LEARN ABOUT HEDGES & HEDGEROWS
ATTRACT POLLINATORS TO YOUR GARDEN
Home Blog The {Farmer} & The Florist Interview: Sara Larson Buscaglia
September 18th 2023

The {Farmer} & The Florist Interview: Sara Larson Buscaglia

Written by
Floret

I first discovered Sara Larson Buscaglia of Farm & Folk through a photo of one of her quilts. I was so interested in her quilt-making process, and separately I have always been fascinated by the art of natural dyeing, so I was eager to learn more about how she combines the two to make heirloom-quality pieces of art. 

Sara has just written her first book, Farm & Folk Quilt Alchemy: A High-Country Guide to Natural Dyeing and Making Heirloom Quilts from Scratch, which introduces the processes of natural dyeing and quilting, and with its beautiful photography it is a piece of art in its own right.

On her website, Sara says, “Farm & Folk is a fusion of my work as both an organic farmer and folk artist. The colors in my quilts are born through the alchemical processes of seeds + soil, sunlight, moonlight + water. Through this alchemy, the seeds are transformed to become fibers and dyestuffs, some of which are grown and harvested here on Ancient Future Farm. My fascination and passion for transferring natural color to natural fibers continues to grow stronger as the years roll by.” To me, this is pure magic!

I was delighted when Sara agreed to create a commissioned quilt to help me commemorate filming season 2 of Growing Floret. I was so excited to collaborate with her using the pattern I had felt such a connection to, called the Folk Garden Quilt, and to incorporate flowers and colors from one of my much-loved paintings by Morgan Allender.

Sara’s timeless quilts are made using ethically and responsibly sourced materials, organically grown ingredients, and a slow and intentional process that authentically represents her values and her relationship with nature. She actually grows the flowers she uses to dye, she hand-dyes the fabric, and then every single stitch is made by her hands! There’s such an incredible amount of care in the entire process, and in the end you have a keepsake that will last many generations.

Sara is such a talented artist and an incredible photographer, and following her on Instagram is a must. Farm & Folk Quilt Alchemy will be released on September 26 and is available now for pre-order. I am thrilled to share it with you here today and hope you’ll be as inspired as I am.

Sara, I’m so happy to welcome you to the blog. Please tell our readers a little bit about yourself and the evolution of your business, Farm & Folk.

Thank you, Erin, I’m really grateful to be here! I’m an organic farmer, natural dyer, and folk artist rooted in the Colorado high desert. Farm & Folk began as a vision I had in 2015 to manifest a sustainable way in which I could balance my work as both a farmer and an artist—the two things that feed my soul. In autumn of 2017, I launched my website as a place to sell my naturally dyed, hand-stitched quilts and to share some blog posts about natural dyes and quilt making. I had the folk aspect of my work figured out, but wasn’t yet sure how I could weave in the farm aspect.

I made quilts very slowly in those first years, sometimes only two or three a year, between homeschooling my children and my work as a farmer. I was feeling creatively stifled at that time, like I might burst if I couldn’t find a way to make the art that was inside me. I knew I needed to prioritize quilts, so I began taking the steps that were required to evolve.

I began accepting the opportunities that came my way, including writing a book and taking on custom orders. Then, in winter of 2022, I had an epiphany that I should grow dye flowers as the farm aspect of my offerings. This created a way I could share my passion for transferring homegrown, natural color to fiber. I’m excited to see how this aspect of my work continues to unfurl. 

I am so excited about the release of your first book. This beautiful work pieces together the passions you’ve been pursuing for years: organic farming, natural dyeing, folk art, and quilting. What inspired you to write a book and what was that process like for you?

Thank you so much, Erin! My biggest inspiration for writing this book came from the hundreds of questions I’ve received from folks over the years about natural dyes and quilt making. A lot of people had the same questions, and I couldn’t keep answering them one by one. I started thinking about how I might answer them and it came down to a book. I love books! I’ve learned just about everything I know about farming and natural dyes and quilt making through books, so I wanted to give back in that way. I especially like that books are an accessible form of education.

The process was a definite challenge for me! I put all my other work aside and spent 13 months focusing exclusively on the book. It’s really two books in one. The first half is all about natural dyes, with 20 color formulas specifically for cotton, linen, and hemp fabrics intended for quilt making. I spent 6 months testing my formulas and writing about my natural dye methods and processes.

Then I spent 7 months writing the second half, which is all about making quilts. I put a lot of thought into the patterns and presented them in a skill-building fashion. I designed and made seven quilts in 6 months, which is so much for me, but the experience completely opened my eyes to what I was capable of.

It was a real hustle and a bit of a grind to finish the book in one year, but the irony was that it also completely forced me to stop and form words around not only how I do things, but why. I learned a lot about myself in that process. 

The book’s title is Farm & Folk Quilt Alchemy. Tell our readers why you chose the word alchemy and how it relates not only to the time-honored practices of farming and growing things, but also to the arts of natural dyeing and quilting.

Alchemy means transformation. When I was pondering a title, the word alchemy felt like it was a good fit for all the sections. All the aspects of my work are transformative, from planting seeds that sprout to life from dark soil to transforming fibers with mordant and dyes to the transformation of cutting up dyed fabrics into hundreds of small pieces and sewing them back together again. They’re all such beautiful alchemical processes.

I like that the word alchemy makes folks stop and think, and that’s a big part of my intention for this book: to inspire folks to stop and think about some very basic things that have been a fundamental part of human existence since the beginning, like seeds and fiber and the art of making beautiful things with our hands. 

I have always been fascinated by the art of natural dyeing and growing flowers specifically for this purpose, but knowing where to begin can be intimidating. For someone completely new to this, how would you suggest they get started? 

I have talked today about taking small steps that lead to big ones, but sometimes it’s best to just go ahead and dive in! When I first discovered natural dyes in 2002 at a workshop I attended at my son’s Waldorf preschool, I was enamored by the concept of plants as color! I came home from that workshop and immediately ordered the book Wild Colour by Jenny Dean. The internet wasn’t much of a thing back then, so I learned mostly through experimentation and trial and error.

Then, when I planted my first big dye garden a couple years ago, I had never grown flowers before. I did a little bit of research about which flowers are good for dyes, I ordered the seeds, and when spring came along, I planted them. Once the seeds were planted, I was committed. I began harvesting them, which forced me to figure out how to dry and cure them. Then I began experimenting with them in the dye pots. I totally just figured everything out as I went. 

My best suggestion for someone trying anything completely new is to just go for it. Do some research, read some books, take a class or a workshop if you’re able—but just begin and problem-solve as you go. A lot of questions will come up, but you will find the answers because information is pretty easy to come by in this internet era. You will have some epic failures, but failures are what lead to epic successes. You don’t have to wait for the most perfect and ideal situation—just begin and revel in the experience of being an amateur. Just begin!

Creating natural dyes requires lots of experimentation, trial and error, failure, and trying again, all while knowing that we are working with nature and the end result may be out of our hands! How do you approach the process knowing that your hard work might not produce the outcome you’re hoping for?

Being a farmer sure helps with this! The farm is the ultimate teacher of patience and perseverance. We’ve had crops decimated by hail, 10-year-old fruit trees eaten by goats, frost in the last week of June that takes out a whole crop. With natural dyes there are so many variables that can affect the outcome. It’s nearly impossible to produce the exact same color each and every time. This lack of control is actually appealing to me. It keeps me humble and forces me to let go of expectations and to see things from a different perspective. Besides beautiful, life-enriching colors, the soul medicines that natural dyes provide are acceptance and adaptability. 

How did you fall in love with quilting and what is the inspiration for your designs? Do you plan out each quilt before you begin or do some evolve as you go?

Quilting was something I always knew I would do, but I thought it would happen later in life. I began sewing when my first child was born. A decade later, my sewing scrap basket was overflowing with remnants of the fabrics I used to make clothes for my children over the years. The scraps felt too special to discard, so I made my first patchwork quilt with them. I instantly fell in love with quilt making and the ability it offered to express myself through shapes and pieces, colors and stitches, and I haven’t stopped yet.

Each next quilt still feels like an opportunity to expand off the previous one. My inspiration has always been traditional quilt blocks and designs, but more recently I’ve evolved into what I think of as traditional hybrid quilts. I enjoy adding modern aspects to traditional designs. I’ve also really been enjoying making appliqué-style story quilts as a way to tell the stories of my heart. Some quilts are planned before I begin, especially commissioned pieces, but others I figure out as I go along. Even when I have a plan, I often find that the plan will evolve as the piece comes together. 

In addition to offering one-of-a-kind quilts on your website, you also take on a number of commissioned quilts each year. I was lucky enough to go through this process with you recently and it was so eye-opening. Would you take our readers through how a custom piece like mine comes to life?

Yes! Commission pieces used to kind of freak me out. It’s a different process than just going to the studio and making something. The process is a collaboration of sorts, which is pretty sweet. It begins with an email inquiry. Sometimes folks know exactly what they want as far as colors, fibers, and design, and other times we have to go back and forth a great deal, honing in on the options. It takes about a month, give or take, for me to make a custom quilt, depending on the time of year. During the farming season it can take much longer! I send my clients regular progress updates and ask for feedback to ensure I’m staying on the right track as far as their vision for the piece. It’s always super exciting to make that last hand stitch and send the finished quilt out into the world. 

I know you’re planning to offer a few workshops this autumn and winter. Can you tell us more about those, and is there anything else in the works for you?

Workshops are a completely new offering and experience for me. Last month I traveled to New York to teach my first-ever workshop with my friend Katrina Rodabaugh at her home studio. I was pretty nervous about it, but I had so much fun and it was enriching to connect with Katrina, a fellow author/artist friend, and all the students. I’m teaching a natural dye workshop in Portland, Oregon, for the Portland Modern Quilt Guild in a few days. We will be dyeing a specific autumn-inspired palette and I’m looking forward to seeing how Portland’s alchemy translates the colors.

Then in October I’m teaching a fleece-spinning and natural dye workshop with my friend Stella Maria Baer of Moon Horse Ranch in Santa Fe, New Mexico. I began my adventures in fiber arts by spinning wool from my sheep, so I’m really excited to get back to my roots and share this passion with others. There are still tickets available for that one, so please join us for what is sure to be an auspicious solar eclipse fiber weekend in the October desert!

As far as what’s in the works, I will be offering two dye flower kits in my online shop the first week of October. The first is a beginner dye kit for folks who want to try natural dyeing for the first time. It comes with two organic cotton bandanas from my friends at Maiwa, two of my homegrown organic dye flower varieties, and all the other supplies needed, along with a booklet containing detailed instructions.

The other kit combines natural dyeing and quilting. It comes with one pack of dye flowers and all the other supplies needed to make a plant-dyed quilt block, including needles and thread and a thimble for folks who don’t have a sewing machine. The detailed instructional booklet explains how to make a star block design. The single quilt block can be sewn onto the back of a jacket or shirt, and I’ve created a blog post to explain that. I love putting these kits out into the world and seeing folks get excited to try something new and then to see them feel proud of what they made. It’s so special! 

For a couple years I’ve been contemplating a late-summer workshop on my farm when all the dye plants are in bloom. The vegetable gardens would be in full production as well, so we could eat off the land. Perhaps it’s time to make that vision happen!

I love that you have come to where you are by following your heart and living gently. What advice would you give to others who are trying to shift to a more intentional and regenerative lifestyle?

I was born with a stubborn gene, which has made following my heart rather easy. My husband Tom and I became farmers because we fell in love with the magic that is seeds and soil, but the actual catalyst was that we unequivocally did not want to spend our lives working any semblance of what we thought of as mainstream careers. When we planted our first garden, we had no idea what we were doing. We both grew up in midwestern suburbs, with no exposure to agricultural ways.

Gardening became our passion, which we turned into our livelihood. As the years and decades pass, we have never been afraid to evolve when things feel like they’re weighing us down. The weight of something that isn’t feeding our souls feels a lot heavier to us than taking the risky leaps of faith that are required to evolve.

We basically unintentionally ended up living an intentional regenerative lifestyle. It all unfolded organically and with a lot of grit and hard work as we forged our way to each next step. Everyone’s situation is going to be different, but the best advice I can offer is don’t be afraid to evolve when your heart is telling you it’s time. This will require making a lot of sacrifices.

Set a goal and then begin taking steps, no matter how small they may seem. Small steps over time become big steps. If your goal is something completely new and different to you, remember that every single person who has become great at something began as an amateur. It takes years of focus and dedication, triumphs and defeats, to become skilled at something. 

Prioritizing what makes you happy and letting go of the things that are not serving your soul is revolutionary not only on a personal level, but on a collective level. If we can work toward collectively following our hearts, then the outcome will reshape the world—and the world desperately needs reshaping. 

Sara, thank you so much for sharing your business and your beautiful new book with our readers here today. I know the book is going to be such an inspiration to people who would like to try working with natural dyes or creating handmade heirloom pieces of their own.

To celebrate the release of Sara’s new book, Farm & Folk Quilt Alchemy: A High-Country Guide to Natural Dyeing and Making Heirloom Quilts from Scratch, we’re giving away four copies, plus one lucky reader will win a copy of the book and a handmade wall hanging that matches my own quilt! For a chance to win, simply post a comment below telling us about a cherished heirloom from your own family. Winners will be announced on September 26. 

A huge congratulations to our winners: Juliana, Keren Tsaushu, Lisandre St-Cyr Lamothe, Claudia Casebolt and Damita Becknell.

To learn more and connect with Sara, be sure to visit her website to sign up for her newsletter and follow her on Instagram. Farm & Folk Quilt Alchemy is available from Amazon, Bookshop, Barnes & Noble, and your favorite local bookstore.


Please note: If your comment doesn’t show up right away, sit tight; we have a spam filter that requires us to approve comments before they are published.

Floret only lists companies and products that we love, use, and recommend. All opinions expressed here are our own and Floret does not offer sponsored content or accept money for editorial reviews. If you buy something using the retail links in this post, Floret may receive a small commission. Thank you for your support!

990 Comments

  1. Dynett Llerena on

    When your hands expresses so much intension, a sparkle of love and happiness has sit in this world. Your book it’s pure art. Thanks for have the courage to be so creative.

    Reply
  2. Norma Babineau on

    This is a beautiful article and so interesting how you can bring flowers that we grow to a whole different dimension and purposes. Just love the talent in the quilt making. Beautiful talent and work!

    Reply
  3. Amanda Penecale on

    My family has a small organic farm and we are learning to have more connectivity with the land each season. This year we grew dye plants, but with all of the actual farm work I never got to spend the time using them as originally intended. I did sell many beautiful bouquets at the market! Some of our best heirlooms are the vases passed down through the family. We also have a porcelain Christmas tree from my Aunt Mary we enjoy each holiday as we think of her. I’m feeling inspired to make a quilt now!

    Reply
  4. tanya wilhelm on

    I was recently introduced to natural plants dyes at a local woman’s farm (in southern Colorado, no less) and it feels like no coincidence that you should now be posting this. Simply – well, perhaps the processes are not so simple – beautiful.
    Thank you.

    Reply
  5. Karen Elder on

    I remember buying a plant dye chart long ago but only recently experimented with amarynth and marigold I grew. I bought indigo on line for another color. It’s so exciting! I resonate with your connection to the plants and not knowing the final result ahead of time. A partnership on a journey. I love your layout and pictures to learn from. I mostly want to make wearable art. This book would make a great reference and teaching guide.
    Love of flowers, happy thoughts
    Karen

    Reply
  6. Molly R on

    I have been a natural dyer for years, but it is Sarah’s work with them and quilting that has inspired me to make my first quilt. So excited to read her new book !! Thanks for this peep into her process :)

    Reply
  7. Colleen Pallas on

    Such an amazing interview! I grow lots of flowers and quilt, but never thought about combining the two. I have a quilt from my grandmother that she made and was had quilted. A very cherished memory of her and her talent.

    Reply
  8. Erin E. on

    What a beautiful interview! I loved hearing the passion Sara has for taking the risk, following her (and her husband’s) hearts and growing and creating things organically and with flowers and plants.
    I am blessed to have a few of my family’s heirlooms – when I was married my Grandma made a recipe book with favorite family recipes handed down over the generations. Most recently my cousin gave my a quilt she had beautifully and painstakingly restored that my great grandmother, grandma and she had all worked on,. It too has scraps of beautiful old fabric stitched with love.

    Reply
  9. Marci Minnick-Heard on

    I have been a basket maker for 30 years…which just means I fell in love with all form of “craft”. I dyed my baskets with acorns and walnuts back in the day!! Oooh the maggots from the soaking process. That morphed into felting and dying felt and beads, Yada Yada Yada!! I love this blog and was able to snag seeds from you and am going to go put a look see in at the local library for the Alchemy Book!. I have one Floret book and it has been so helpful…..now someone write about deterring beasts and bugs and oh my beloved birds which need to stop tearing everything up!! Good day to all!

    Reply
  10. Christie on

    Love Sara’s vision!
    My most cherished heirloom was just received this year when my mom presented me with pie pans from my grandmother. Gram and Grampa together were passionate bakers and would batch make handmade pies with skilled finesse. Her pie pans and handwritten recipe cards are my most cherished reminder of all of the lessons they shared.

    Reply
  11. Yukita Washington on

    I have a quilt my grandmother made for my Mom when she was a little girl. Just to have a part of that history and the story each patch has is special. Even where the fabric was sourced was extraordinary. Love it so much.

    Reply
  12. Beth White on

    I have in me my mother’s love of creating. She would paint, sew, and create all kinds of crafts. She passed this on to me, which 59 years later I am still creating. I am not happy unless I am creating a garden, quilt, knitted item, or weaving a basket. I love to dye fiber, reed and wool to use in my craft. I have never attempted natural dying.

    Reply
  13. Michelle Jennings on

    As I was born in Texas, my first fiber arts project included the Star of Texas quilt pattern. I’ve continued to be drawn to star motifs and look forward to future projects possibly including hand dyed fabrics.

    Reply
  14. Nora E. Gonzalez on

    I have a little bag my mom made for me to carry my books to school. It was a version of a back pack. She was ahead of times. She also did quilting. I don’t know what happened to those quilts. They were beautiful and warm for those Michigan winters.

    Reply
  15. Rana on

    I have the family dining table that my Grandfather made. It has almost 100 years of meals, afternoon teas, card games and friend and family get-togethers infused into it’s grain.

    Reply
  16. Laurie Sickles on

    Gorgeous process from getting the seed to growing to drying to making the dyes. Wonderful book and resource.

    Reply
  17. Karen on

    I have my Grandmother’s gardening hand tools and a couple of her kitchen utensils…4-5…painted wooden handles of green, some red. (Perfect). I’m 69 now, I was 4 when she taught me my first gardening lesson…seed saving…then planting seeds, harvesting the crops, preparing them for meals…cooking…canning and freezing…it went on all our lives.

    Her hands held at least one of these tools every day. I cherish them, they are hanging in my studio…I often hold them for a little waltz down memory lane. 😍

    Reply
  18. Lisa Ludwig Smith on

    I have a special pantry cabinet that was brought over from Germany, in the early 1900s, from my great great grandparents. It sits on display, in my farm kitchen. ( I own a beautiful farm house that was built in 1876. My husband and I have put a ton of love and hard work to restore our farm, into something we are proud of. )
    Lisa
    Wandering Creek Acres, a hobby farm in northern IL

    Reply
  19. Julia Bailey on

    I inherited a 200 year old clay teapot from my grandmother. Inside is a list of family members from the originator of the teapot to each person it was passed down to over the years. The list also gives the years that person lived and their relation to the previous owner. The list was started by my great grandmother and my grandmother added her and my name to it. I will add my children’s name to the list as well and pass it on one day to keep its journey alive.

    Reply
  20. Jess on

    I have a 33 year old Jade plant that my brother had originally brought home as a Mother’s Day gift to our mother from preschool. It came home in a little paper cup back then and now it is a well established beauty my mom took care of for all those years. Our mother has since passed and it’s my little reminder to keep taking care of those you love and I love to propagate from it and send it with loved ones to continue spreading her love.

    Reply
  21. Claire Aldersong on

    I have a pewter water pitcher so beautifully etched with flowers from my English great grandmother.

    Reply
  22. Steffanie on

    Thank you Erin and all of the floret team for fueling something inside of me , that I’ve been yearning to find. I am so inspired by your journey and clear intent in everything you do. Such a force and true inspiration. Thank you Sara for also sharing your beautiful story with floret. What a great read and way to feed my soul day first thing in the morning. So my grandmother has been doing vinyl weaving for decades and when my son was born, she made these little Baby shoes as a Christmas ornament. I cherish these so dearly as I don’t have many things from either side of my family. Every year they are near the top of the tree and they put the biggest smile on me and son’s face. I myself have been sewing since I was 8 and have always wanted to learn how to quilt. Sara with her many talents is the extra spark I needed to try something new. So many creative souls in this world and I would love and cherish this hanging piece and book so much if I am one of the winners. It would be a major conversation piece for all my guests. Thank you for the opportunity and looking forward to your continued inspiration. Cheers to my fellow artists! I love and cherish you all!

    Reply
  23. Wendy on

    My great grandmother and grandmother quilted and would have quilting bees at their church. I remember watching them sew when I was very young. I have inherited a few of those quilts from my mom, she was a seamstress but not a quilter. One of the quilts I have was made by my great great grandmother. And one I have was made from my mom’s clothes she wore when she was a kid. So they are all very special to me.

    Reply
  24. Sheila on

    My mom made a quilt out of clothes from when I was a little kid. It has a yellow furry back and many colors and patterns on the front. It has been well worn and used for many decades.

    Reply
  25. Casey on

    A quilt that once covered my mother-in-laws bed. Embroidered pillowcases from my husbands grandmother gifted to my children and my nieces, their great grandmother. A knitted afghan from my great grandmother. Afghans from my sisters. A crouched afghan my mother is currently making will be a treasured piece. They all bring to mind those I love and have loved❤️

    Reply
  26. savannah on

    My mom has some rely pretty China plates that she got at her wedding, i think they used to be her grandma’s. T
    he funny thing is one time when we went thrifting at good will i noticed the exact same plates for sell she ended up getting them so now we have two sets of lovely
    China plates .

    Reply
  27. Margaret Nagi on

    This is an inspiring story. My love of quilting comes through my mom who made many quilts over the years to honor births ,marriages,life achievements. Her quilts are the ones I treasure most . Gardening and her flowers were her other passion in later years . How she would have loved to get into hand dyeing !

    Reply
  28. Laura Doty on

    I have a beautiful antique log cabin quilt that was passed down to me from my paternal grandmother. It was made by her family, possibly my great grandmother. I treasure it and the sense of love, skill, and history it provides

    Reply
  29. Kelly on

    Lovely interview…thank you❣️ I inherited a quilt from a dear aunt, purchased at auction, many years ago. I have it hanging behind my bed. The colors I just love, and it is in beautiful condition!!!

    Reply
  30. Kathy Redman on

    I have a series of embroidery from my Mom who was a talented woman but always so quiet about her passion- they are a window back to my Mama every time I look at them

    Reply
  31. Eleonora on

    That such an inspirational story. I’ve been dabbling with natural dyea for a while and her story is so evocative. I love the alchemy of flowers and fibre ready to creat a masterpiece!

    Reply
  32. Julie Romero on

    I have several beautiful tatted lace pieces made by my grandmother…I cherish them, the are not only beautiful but remind me of a treasured person in my life. I can recall sitting next to her and hearing the soft click of her shuttle as she tatted and the sound of the treat slipping in and out. She created beauty, always…and I hope I have done so as well in my life.

    Reply
  33. Claudia on

    I sooo enjoyed this article! I love quilting but have only just begun experimenting with dying fabrics, so this was a fun read – thank you both!

    We eat dinner every night on a dining table passed down from my husbands family. We love looking at all the scratches and marks and talking about what might have made them.

    Reply
  34. Aubrey Davis on

    What a wonderful read, my heirloom item is a small swan shaped perfume bottle from my great grandmother.

    Reply
  35. Lori B on

    I have a photo of my great grandparents & great aunt sitting under a huge apple tree covered in blooms…both my grandma & great aunt were proposed to under that tree. But the true heirloom is that my great grandpa eventually made furniture from the wood from that very apple tree & I have a small desk in my hallway he made. It also has a sewing spool as a knob.

    Reply
  36. K. Jennings on

    Many years ago my mother tried her hand at quilting. She made only a few and I will always cherish the one she created for my husband and me. It’s way too long for our bed (perhaps why her hobby was short-lived??), but loved nonetheless and we still chuckle together over its supersized gloriousness! 😊
    Mom is now living with moderate dementia and it’s such a comfort to still have these nostalgic touchpoints for our conversations.

    Reply
  37. Sherry Baer 💝 on

    Ohhhh my goodness what a fantastic story!

    I have a quilt that is hand sewn from my great maybe great great grandmother… All hand stitched!

    I also have a quilt my grandma hand quilted…. when life is stormy…. what better thing to wrap myself in… the love of all the hand stitching it too to make The quilt gives me such comfort…. I am so very blessed to have it!

    Reply
  38. Loree Elgie on

    My grandmother loved to set up a quilts in her dining area and have the church ladies over to stitch the pieces together. She would also spend hours on her own working away at it. She made me a beautiful Dresden Plate Quilt all in her own stitches. One year my Mom set up a frame in our home and with Grandmas direction, we quilted a quilt together. My next exposure to quilting and gardening was my mother-in-law who was a seamstress and a wonderful guiltier and had amazing flowers and vegetable gardens. Material was never wasted. She would buy material but she would also use pieces from clothing she had made her children or herself. Some quilts we would look at and her children could pick out the pieces from an old dress etc. I am now able to take time to start quilting! I have completed a few small projects. I am also a native plant gardener and find this intriguing to possibly create my own dyes from my garden. Sound like a really cool adventure and one I look forward to learning about. Thanks for posting this interview!

    Reply
  39. Suzy Hardin on

    I love quilting and creating heirlooms for our family. I’ve made many quilts and have done some fabric dying but not with plants. I’m going to get the book so I can try the dyes.

    Reply
  40. Lauren on

    For our wedding, my husband and I received a family quilt as our heirloom from his grandma. My side of family doesn’t really have heirlooms (other than the stories we tell:)) so, we’d like to be more intentional with what we could share as an heirloom with our kids and grandkids.

    Reply
  41. Sabrina Koebel on

    I have several cherished heirlooms from family members both from way back all the way to present day. Hand made items, long cherished hand me downs etc. My family is full of artists of all mediums. We have a quilted photo created by my Mother in Law who can no longer quilt because of Parkinson’s disease. This is a precious piece. And a reminder that life is precious.

    Reply
  42. Jennifer Gray on

    I took my first quilting class back in 2015 and from that point on I was hooked. I have gifted many quilts to family and friends and in the process of making one for myself. I would love to dive into Sara’s book to learn how to marry my love of quilting with my other love of gardening. Beyond inspirational and look forward to diving in!!

    Reply
  43. Shelley Ricco on

    You are such an inspiration to me with the gardens and the quilting you do. I have a 15 acre farm that we have which keeps us busy. Just had my first dinnerplate dahlia come up. I have about 6 quilts in the making all machine stitched not like yours which are hand done. How you find the time is amazing. Everyday is awesome but its hard to figure out when you love to do so many things…….gardening, reading, cooking, needlepoint and quilting and also 8 grandchildren. We just saved 8 Monarch caterpillars from our butterfly garden and 2 of them just hatched last night. My favorite heirloom treasure is a needlepoint rocking chair my grandmother worked on during WWII raising 3 young boys while my grandfather, a surgeon, served on the frontlines for 2 years.

    Reply
  44. Linda Ross on

    I have quilted for years. Sewing is my passion. It was handed down from the women before me.
    I am also a flower gardner.
    The thought of combining the two, is making my mind run wild. I cant wait to read Sara’s book

    Reply
  45. Nancy Butters on

    The idea of growing certain flowers for dyeing fabric is so interesting to me. I would love to read the book. My most treasured heirloom is a set of journals my grandmother wrote from 1964-1993. Although there is a lot of daily happenings, like weather, I can still hear her voice through the words she wrote.

    Reply
  46. Kathy on

    What a beautiful expression of pure organic thought and talent Sara has shared with us. I would cherish the book and the wall hanging. I love the phrase “Prioritizing what makes you happy and letting go of the things that are not serving your soul is revolutionary.” I have quite a few quilt squares that my mother made but did not complete before she passed. They are really beautiful and I believe in the pattern they call a “fan” quilt. She unknowingly created a handmade heirloom, and your story has inspired me to try and finish up what she started. :) Thank you for sharing.

    Reply
  47. Mary on

    My sister who lives in Alaska is very talented. She paints, sews, and has recently gotten back into Quilting. Years ago she made me a quilt for my 25th Anniversary which graces my bed. She also made me a quilted wall hanging with flower seeds as a colorful center decoration which is proudly displayed in my home. Can’t wait to see Sara’s book as I think it will make a great Christmas gift for my sister.

    Reply
  48. Britt on

    I love Sara’s quilts and can’t wait for her book to come out!

    I have a stack of quilt blocks my great great grandmother made over 120 years ago. I am a beginner quilter, but I would love to improve my skills and make a quilt with them.

    Reply
  49. Patricia Morley on

    Thoroughly enjoyed your interview with Sara. I have always had a love for textiles old & new. Sara does a beautiful job of combining the old designs & techniques with her present day interpretation. Very inspiring. And reminds me of the old quilts my late mother & I collected & enjoyed over the years. Each one a masterpiece of talented hands. Looking forward to her book & perhaps starting a new project of my own. Thank you.

    Reply
  50. Sheri on

    I wish I had a cherished heirloom from my family. I was not lucky enough for that. My husband has his grandfather’s fiddle, which hangs on the wall in our living room. He cherishes that. I love to paint, draw, and photography. I use my painting talents to paint Christmas ornaments for my kids and grandkids so they will have something. I love your work and I am jealous of what you are able to create. I am going to sign up for your newsletter to continue to follow your work. Thank you for sharing.

    Reply
  51. Geralyn Vasile on

    I love that she says we gave to prioritize what makes is happy. My most cherished heirloom is a quilt my mom had made for me after my father died. I wanted to keep his clothes, but she couldn’t bear to keep them. So she had a quilt made from them. Best gift ever.

    Reply
  52. Seraphina Hunter on

    So inspiring! I love hearing about the success of following your heart and doing what moves you instead of conforming or trying to fit the mold. I have been living a duality of conforming and trying to follow my heart. Thank you for reminding me to be gentle with myself, allow for the process, and continue on despite perceived setbacks.

    Reply
  53. Ronda Earenfight on

    Thank you for sharing your inspiring story. I have a cherished family heirloom passed down from my paternal grandmother. I know very little about it other than being from around the 1880’s. A beautiful fan crazy quilt with alternating squares of red and black, each fan is embroidered along each piece and every square has a bird or flower embroidered in the corner. It has always been the cornerstone of my color palette in my home!

    Reply
  54. Sabrena Orr on

    A beautiful story on natural color in fibers! Sara is a talented & amazing artist!

    Reply
  55. Joy C. on

    Very inspiring, and really love her advice to just begin, and that epic failures can lead to epic successes. I’ve always been interested in natural plant dyeing processes, have tried a few in the past, and loved the beautiful natural colors that came forth. I look forward to doing it again. Thank you for the interview!

    Reply
  56. Silvina Pedemonte on

    Thank you for this interview. I can’t wait to see the book. Thanks for sharing .

    Reply
  57. Beth Scott on

    My husband and I had the honor of caring for his 93 year old mother, Ruth, in the last year of her life. Part of her story was the beautiful quilts she made, along with her Aunt Ruth, for whom she is named. After she passed last spring, we received 3 beautiful quilts the two of them made nearly a hundred years ago. What a tribute to them. They hang on a wonderful Trio Quilt Rack my husband crafted for the display.

    Reply
  58. Barbara Chadwick on

    Erin, thank you for introducing us to Sara and her craft. I can’t wait to buy and read her new book!

    Reply
  59. Samantha Lee on

    Quilts are the specific things that are cherished heirlooms in my home. I have the quilts from when I was a child that were made for me by my grandmothers. Some are hand stitched and some machine quilted. The ones inherited from my husband’s family are in pieces except one. He says they’re made from upland cotton and I LOVE that cotton. All of these quilts keep me warm inside and out.

    Reply
  60. Suzy McCormack on

    Thank you for this interview. I have been inspired by the work and intentionality of both of you and I thank you for that too. The heirloom piece that springs to mind is my grandmother’s kitchen table. So many memories of holiday dinners, morning pancakes, and baking extravaganza around that table. I treasure having it in my home.

    Reply
  61. Lisandre St-Cyr Lamothe on

    Wow I love everything about this interview. So inspiring! One heirloom that I have is a house that as always been in my family for 7 generations now. The place is so special to me and there are so many stories there. My first garden was there, when I continued the work of my grandmother’s garden.

    Reply
  62. Janet on

    I’ve worked on many creative art projects myself over the years such as sewing, embroidery, hand quilting, weaving, wool carding, spinning, knitting, yarn dying, block printing (currently immersed in growing dahlias, creating handmade ceramics, sewing my own clothes and knitting a sweater). I absolutely cannot imagine for a minute not having multiple creative art projects going at any given time. My work is by no means perfect, and never will be. But I do put my heart and soul into every piece. I believe in constantly learning, experimenting and challenging myself to try something new. Sometimes successful, sometimes not, thats ok, thats how we grow our brains and feed our souls to hopefully become more well rounded and interesting individuals. I very much appreciate the incredible amount of dedication, focus, time commitment and patience that is required to create any beautiful handmade end product to pass on to others. Sara and her book are an inspiration, her artwork is stunning.

    Reply
  63. Dawn Harris on

    My entire home is filled with heirlooms – one of the benefits of being raised by antique lovers. But, one of the most precious is my grandmothers secretary. She bought it in the early 1960s at a church antique fair with my great-grandparents. The dealer had not unloaded it from his truck as one of the wavy windows was cracked and he thought it might not sell. My grandmother went right in the tuck and said she must have it, It was made in the 1850s/60s and she loved it. She took it home and it just fit in the low ceilinged room. She passed away 4 years ago and I cried the day the secretary came to live with me. I use it every day, it is filled with books that belonged to her and my grandfather and it is precious to me. Thank you for the opportunity to know more about a talented artist!

    Reply
  64. Shirley Grubbs on

    My most precious quilt is one the my Mom made. It’s on my bed because she said I needed to USE it. I had a hard time with that because I wanted it to be beautiful forever. Now 8 years after her death and 2 decades of use, it is soft and beautiful, but wearing a bit. I love it and it will always be my favorite.

    Reply
  65. Nancy on

    Reading the interview was so much fun. I have been think of dyeing fabric but it never occurred to me to start by growing flowers. What a wonderful idea. I love my Floret flower seeds and I am hoping to find some flower seeds to help me start a fabric dyeing project. Currently mending a heirloom quilt that my mother made.

    Reply
  66. Molly Dellaria on

    What an amazing idea! I can’t wait to see the book.

    My mom and I are both quilters and my mom has made a quilt for each of my children when they were born. The quilt she made for my second oldest has patches of dresses I wore when I was a baby and patches of my wedding dress mixed together. It is a quilt I treasure dearly.

    Reply
  67. Christi Clark on

    I love the colors of nature in the QUILTS. Everything about them is lovely!
    Xoxo

    Reply
  68. Susan Smith Ordel on

    My grandmother made amazing quilts and my favorite is a windowpane quilt. We would sit on the bed and Grandma would describe where and or whom each of the colorful insets came from. Kitchen curtains, daughters dresses, old aprons, etc…I just love it so. And she began quilting out of necessity, to keep her family warm. I am grateful a few of her quilts survive and are cherished by family.

    Reply
  69. Fawn Freeborn on

    The one if only heirloom I’ve received Is a quilt. I spent an entire year stitching back up the seams that had started to unravel. I have no knowledge on quilt making so as you can imagine it’s not great. The crooked stitches remind me though, that the things and people we love need mending, our time, and full attention.

    Reply
  70. Sal on

    You know, I don’t think I have a single “heirloom” in the traditional sense. Nothing that’s been passed down through many generations. What I do have is a house full of someday-heirlooms: the chest of drawers from my in-laws, my grandmother’s piano, the many works of art by dear friends that hang on my walls, the antique sofa from a neighbor, the many beautiful handcrafted items that my husband and I have made for our home… I hope that these things live on through future generations, but I suppose only time will tell.

    Regardless, as an avid clothes-dyer and tentative quilter, this book is right up my alley! I’ll definitely be requesting it at my local library.

    Reply
  71. Anu on

    I have some old heirlooms but I also have a new one. I spent two years making a set of traditional clothing from 1850s based on my roots. I learned to weave a linsey woolsey cloth for skirt, made moccasin-like shoes, knitted socks and hand sewed a shift and shirt. I also made my own silver jewelry. I block printed the fabric for an apron and wove a belt. The hundreds of hours of research, learning a craft and actually doing it with a group of women with whom we only met online make it a modern heirloom. It is traditional to wear these clothes for festive occasions – in Estonia you could attend president’s independence day reception in these!

    Reply
  72. Brenda Miller on

    One of my treasured heirlooms is a quilt. A Drunkard’s Path quilt top was pieced on my paternal side, before my grandmother (she didn’t sew) and when she found it in the bottom of a storage chest, my quilter maternal grandmother finished turning the quilt top into a finished quilt. It’s my favorite quilt because it brings both sides of my family together.

    Reply
  73. Rita Ditto on

    My grandmother raised 10 children thru the depression. She sewed all her children’s clothes and saved every little leftover piece. She made a quilt for my youngest brother when he was a baby from all her saved up pieces. I am 73 now. My grandmother and brother have long since passed away, but I have that quilt, and when I hold it, I am reminded that love is eternal.

    Reply
  74. Angela Ciesla on

    I have my father’s fishing creel (basket) that was given to him by his father. It makes a pretty cool vessel for flower arrangements too!

    Reply
  75. Deborah on

    My grandmother made quilts and sold them for a living. She had two quilting frames. One set up in her bedroom and one in the living room. She always had two quilts going at the same time. When she passed away her quilts were sold and they were so expensive I couldn’t afford to purchase one for myself. I’ve dabbled in quilt making but will be retiring soon, so I would like to try making one for myself. My husband’s grandmother also quilted, but she did all of hers by hand. She gifted us with a couple of them. One was a Cathedral Window quilt. So beautiful. We live in the country and I would like to try dying some fabrics with the foliage and wild flowers that are available. Sara’s story has given me inspiration to try my hand and experiment.

    Reply
  76. Cindy Edelbrock on

    I have saved handmade crocheted baby blankets and a cross stitched coverlet decorated with baby animals that were gifted by my Mother-in-law before the birth of my children. Fond memories of when my children were little comes back each time I cover up my soon to be napping granddaughter, who always asks for the ‘baby animal blanket’!

    Reply
  77. Cathy S on

    I have two stuffed bears that were made with remnants of old quilts from my great grandmother. They r pieced together beautifully and sit high on a shelf due to their delicate nature. Have always loved quilts, but never had the time. As a person who loves to grow flower gardens, I would love to combine the art of learning to quilt AND try my hand at natural dying. Anxious to check out Sara’s book.

    Reply
  78. Jackie Peterson on

    I have 2 quilts made by my grandmother. One I remember from when I was a little girl. My other heirloom is my wedding dress my grandmother made for me almost 32 years ago.

    Reply
  79. OnaMai on

    Hi flower-lovers ! One of my cherished heirlooms is a large iron pan that used to belong to my italian grandfather, a great spiritual cook and gardener. I am now a professional cooking teacher and cookbook author and I am using this pan nearly every day to cook with all the seasonal flavors : veggies from my garden, foraged edible goods, and lasts but not least, gorgeous edible flowers that I cultivate as well in my french countryside.

    Reply
  80. Cindy Willson on

    My treasured heirloom is a flower press made by my granddad of old scrap plywood and a potato print of a cedar tree on the front. The cedar was carved into the potato with a simple fruit paring knife while I watched.

    Reply
  81. Georgia on

    The lovely quilts made by my grandmother and her sisters somehow got lost at my parents’ house! I was already a bit heartbroken about it but after reading this post I’m feeling even more bittersweet.
    Outside of the quilts, which I loved as a child, I have a necklace made by my great-aunt, who was a jewelry designer in LA. I wear it all the time! It’s beautiful and I never met her but she was apparently pretty zany.

    Reply
  82. Tammy on

    My grandmother hand quilted beautiful quilts and I am blessed to have many in our home. I have taken up quilting also. Recently I discovered natural dyeing and became instantky fascinated in the process as I am also an organic gardener. Last year I raised Hopi Red Dye Amaranth and dried it wanting to us in dyeing fabric and paper. Your book looks like exactly what I need in my journey. Thank you!

    Reply
  83. Claudia Casebolt on

    Since 1984 our family has used a tablecloth at Christmas that everyone who eats with us signs. Wherever we spend Christmas this tablecloth is with us. Children who cannot write yet have their hand traced on the cloth. Any animal present at Christmas gets (only once in their lifetime) a paw print on the tablecloth. In addition to dogs and cats we have rats and guinea pigs. Every year the names are all embroidered in the same color. When my husband signs he writes the year so that we know who was with us each year by matching the colors. Next year it will be 40 years and now, with so many names, the colors of the signatures make an abstract pattern of their own.

    Reply
  84. KL on

    One of my cherished heirlooms is a baby quilt made by my great grandmother for me when I was born.

    Reply
  85. JOY WETHERALD on

    My mom made a big, beautiful, crocheted bedspread. the thread is fine and the pattern intricate. The grandkids have cable knit sweaters she worked on almost every night.

    Reply
  86. Renee Fisher on

    Oh, this is an easy one! My cherished heirloom is a crib-sized nine patch quilt top that I sewed by hand when I was 9 years old. My granny was making a quilt from flour sack fabric, and I begged her to teach me how to make one of my own. She agreed I was ready! She allowed me to use her big silver scissors to cut the squares from her humble stash, and showed me how to use the fabric colors to make a pleasing pattern, and taught me the importance of making my stitches evenly. I’m 69 now which makes my quilt top 60 years old, and I love that every (perfect) little stitch on it was sweetly guided by my granny!

    Reply
  87. Helen Standen on

    We have an old, framed doll quilt that hangs on the family room wall. The china doll associated with the quilt (which we also have!) belonged to my great grandmother when she was a little girl, so that quilt is quite old!

    Reply
  88. Christina on

    I’m so excited to have learned about Sara, her website and her new book! So inspiring to read about someone who places value on creativity and learning. I’m in a big transitional point in my life and needed to be reminded that small steps become big steps, and encouraged to just get started! The heirlooms that I cherish the most are jewelry that has been passed down to me from my grandmothers. It’s so special to have something tangible that they wore and cherished. My children’s artwork also means the world to me! I love that it represents their thoughts and creativity at different ages and stages. I frame it in beautiful frames and hang it everywhere! I hope that it will be passed down and cherished by future generations!

    Reply
  89. Pamela on

    I look forward to reading more about Sara’s natural dye and quilting. Nothing beats the natural colors of nature.

    Reply
  90. Ida Hale on

    Mine is a beautiful crocheted piece made by my great grandmother for whom I am named—-delicately crocheted after she was over 80 years old. I never met her but I have some of the same hand crafting skills as she had in my DNA.

    Reply
  91. Ada Horne on

    We have a few quilts that were made by my grandparents generation — when I was younger, I really wanted to learn how to quilt but was disappointed in the fabric options available!

    Reply
  92. Janna c on

    Wow! I wonder how long it takes to make one quilt.
    My father found a huge, probably 70-lb piece of petrified wood years ago. I inherited it when he died. I put it in my tiny cut flower garden, which faces a street. Somebody came in and stole it! I was just devastated. But, because of that we go out to different river beds all summer long. My husband, dog and I go on mini adventures all the time looking for another one

    Reply
  93. Lisa L on

    My favorite quilt is the one my mom Darlene gave me last year. Her quilting style is very intricate, she’s quite the master, mainly working with reproduction prints from the 30s 40s and 50s.
    My new quilt has appliqué tea cups, flowers, vines and even a few yo-yos from her original drawings that border the outside of classic traditional quilt blocks.
    In 2018, when the Paradise California fire ravaged her home, a great many works were lost in the blink of an eye.
    She and her husband narrowly escaped down the mountain to my sisters house just outside of Sacramento.
    Feeling completely helpless, the only thing I could think to do was send her a new sewing machine immediately!
    I didn’t know if she would even want to create anything new but she later told me that getting right back to making quilts saved her life. This quilt is one of her new creations that represents not only her talent, but fighting spirit.
    I have another story : )
    The Last Quilt-
    My Grandma Lois passed away in 1996.
    She knew that she only had but a short time as the doctors had foretold.
    What impressed me about her last days was not only that she wanted to see her seven children, but that she wanted to finish one last quilt for her great grand baby.
    Her house was in a Pittsburgh suburb, all my life, this was the house we would visit from clear across the U.S. in California.
    One of the last times I talked to her on the phone she told me about wanting to finish her great grandchild’s baby quilt, and that she did, she just needed a little help at the end.
    It was granted by her daughter, (my mother) Darlene.
    Darlene was at her side for one last memorable week.
    The fact that it was my mom helping her mom finish this last quilt was very special in itself, but there is a twist in the history of quilt making in my family.
    Darlene was the first one to get bit by the quilt bug.
    She later “passed it up” to my Grandmother, then “passed it down” to me.
    …Lois finished her last quilt and lovingly presented it to her newborn great granddaughter who rested peacefully in her arms.
    Her last work being complete, Lois passed on less than a week later.
    Now today the quilt making continues with my daughter.
    No matter the ups and downs, tragedy or triumph, our lives are just a little bit better with a quilt.🙂

    Reply
  94. Debra Bryant on

    Wonderful interview with Sara – so inspiring! My mom taught me how to sew when I was 9 and a member of 4H! I sewed some of my clothes growing up and made my first quilt while a junior in college. I love all kinds of fiber art. My mom is a very talented quilter and made each of her five grandkids a baby quilt – true treasures for them! I have made our first grandson an alphabet quilt with animals and he loves it! I have dyed fabric in the past and am harvesting my marigolds from my garden! How lucky I can order Sara’s book so I can follow her directions to dye some cotton and linen!!! Thank you both!!

    Reply
  95. Diane Barnett on

    Simple is simply elegant. I think my favorite heirloom from my family is my Christmas cactus, I am tending to something that came from my great-great grandparents, there is a connection to my past.

    Reply
  96. LR on

    My MIL recently gifted me a 24k gold pocket watch suspended on a very long gold chain and she had part of the chain made into 4 bracelets for each of my daughters. It’s nearly 100 years old. It had been buried at some point during WWII and then recovered. It was later handed down to her by her great-grandmother. It’s a very treasured heirloom all because of its age, history, beauty, and value. Very special too that my daughters and I ALL have a piece of it.

    Reply
  97. Selene on

    Love this & the process. Inspiring!

    Reply
  98. Carole Austin on

    I feel so inspired by Sara’s quilts. I grew a patch of indigo last year and dyed some fabric. I really enjoyed the process and plan to grow more. Quilting with plant dyed fabrics opens up more possibilities in my mind.
    Thanks for the inspiration!

    Reply
  99. Sarah Menge on

    I have a beefsteak begonia that has been in my family for 150 years! It’s a propagation from the mother plant that my aunt still has! It’s incredible to have this living heirloom!

    Reply
  100. erin on

    I am the current caretaker of the Hoosier cabinet that belonged to my maternal grandparents. It is beautiful and I remember where it lived in La Casita on their ranch. I do all my garden-planning on the counter that pulls out. My seeds and seed catalog are stored in the cupboards.
    I so appreciate how Sara is creating such magical treasures.

    Reply
  101. Kate on

    I have blankets crocheted by my great grandmother when I was a baby. They are precious <3 I have crocheted and quilted blankets for my daughters and nieces, too.

    Reply
  102. Jenise Powell on

    Oh my goodness what an amazing peace of art work you have created. The time spent on this beautiful quilt is priceless. My mother would be in awe if she could see such an elegant pattern and all that you have put into making it.
    Thank you for sharing your beautiful work with us, and teaching how to do it. Simply beautiful!

    Reply
  103. Elizabeth Gerszewski on

    Wow! I had never heard of Sara button I can’t stop browsing her website and adoring her quilts and fabrics! I am so glad you interviewed her andI can’t wait to read her book and follow her art. I just inherited my grandmother’s sewing notions box. She passed away in December 2022 and receiving this box full of buttons, needles, nips, and thread instantly brought me back to learning how to sew quilts with her 30 years ago. Thank you so much for highlighting Sara!

    Reply
  104. Jennifer H on

    Sara’s work is inspirational! I’d love to try some natural dying of fabric – the colors are so subtle and warm.
    My family’s ‘cherished heirloom’ is a simple and classic red & white Double Irish Chain quilt. Given to me by a great aunt, I had it on my bed growing up, but have kept it tucked away, to protect it, for years. That is really not doing it justice! I should get it out and use it. : )

    Reply
  105. Krista Rogerson on

    What a lovely interview! You both have inspired me in many ways over the last several years. My grandmother instilled in me a love for planting flowers and sewing quilts, such a wonderful combination and both I considered to be heirloom quality. Her quilts and the quilts we have made together are things I will forever treasure. Thank you to you both for sharing your passions with the world.

    Reply
  106. Megan S on

    My grandmother recently passed away, and I inherited her Singer featherweight sewing machine. It’s beautiful and I have such fond memories digging through her scrap of fabrics, her teaching me how to stitch in a straight line, and watching my grandmother make her own quilts on the machine.

    Reply
  107. Lorinda on

    Lovely interview! I have some special embroidery pieces from my great grandmother who was a wonderful, vibrant woman. I remember sitting by her side while she would visit with my mom and stitch away. Looking at these pieces as an adult, I see all the time, talent, and love that went into them.

    Reply
  108. Anne on

    My grandmother passed away a little over a year ago. She used to make hollyhock dolls with us at her farm in southern Minnesota. These hollyhocks have grow on her farm for more that 80 years and we were able to share these with her loved ones at her funeral. I cherish those seeds and my hollyhocks from these seeds have bloomed for the first time this summer.

    Reply
  109. Katie Metka on

    I’m excited to create heirlooms that can be passed down to my children and their children. My favorite that I’ve made is a knitted infant baptism dress, that four of my nine girls have worn.

    Reply
  110. Nuala on

    I enjoyed reading this interview of the process you go through to create something beautiful. I have a quilt my mother bought me in 1976. It is a king size and on the back is a embroidered map of Ohio. I think it was made by collection of women. I will treasure it always.

    Reply
  111. Kathleen on

    A memory quilt made of over 4000 pieces that I somewhat naively thought I would totally hand stitch from start to finish while travelling and in off hours. I eventually realized I might never make it to the end. I already had one quilt that 10 years to finish and this one could take longer! The experience added one more memory for me.

    Reply
  112. Melanie on

    I am attempting to hand quilt grandmother’s beautiful hand pieced quilt. The are made of flower sack and are 1” finished square. I love the old fabrics and hope I can find fabric worthy of backing it. Maybe I will hand dye something to border and back it.
    I also cherish my grandmother’s and my mother’s hand written family recipes. I have great memories of learning to cook and sew with both of them.

    Reply
  113. Sheri on

    Fantastic work quilting and dying! Love the saying “simple, sacred slowness”!!

    I am a seamstress (and made a few quilts) which I won awards on my sewing as a child. Then reality hit me after college. I thought I needed to find a good career to pay my bills. My career sent me to apparel factories across the US and the world. I hated seeing the chemicals used in the apparel / fabric industry. I always wanted to do something on my own. Now, much older and wiser, I love this idea of being kind to the earth as you are to yourself. I know there will always be folks that do not want to pay for the ‘slow process’ of hand creating something unique and beautiful. But as long as you do what your heart is telling you AND, you do it well, why not follow your heart (even at an older age)?

    My husband and I have recently moved from a large city to the country. We bought a house in the middle of the US with one acre of land.
    On our acre of land, I am starting to garden and found the show Growing Floret. I had plans for a garden (with bees) since I am a country girl at heart (my Husband is not but we are both embracing this lifestyle). As I learn more about flowers and gardening, I am slowing taking over my husband’s grass with plants (flowers and garden).

    I do appreciate the awareness of protecting our earth and making sure it stays beautiful! Thank you for sharing your story!

    Reply
  114. Kelly Anderson on

    Thank you for the lovely interview! My heirloom is a set of linen napkins on which my great-grandmother added tatting and embroidery details for her wedding trousseau. They have discolored over the years, and I keep them wrapped in tissues, but part of me wants to freshen them up, perhaps with a natural dye, and put them to use again for special dinners. I think she would approve.

    Reply
  115. darien on

    i have a rusty metal tin from my grandpa’s old home scavenged after his passing. it hold precious family photos and inspires me to achrive the family history. I’m a beginning quilter, artist, and flower farmer working with natural dyes. It’s lovely to see another person deeply invested in the importance of the sacred slowness we need in our textiles and the fabrics that adorn our homes!

    Reply
  116. Karen Cannon on

    My oldest family heirloom is a quilt from my great grandmother. It dates back to the early 1900s and is made of old feed sacks. I love seeing the wear and tear on the quilt and love knowing it served a family well for many years.

    Reply
  117. Marebear on

    A double wedding ring quilt my mom made for me years ago!

    Reply
  118. Amy Shearer on

    My favorite handcrafted memory is an inscribed cover of the book Little Women with a note from my mother, explaining that when she was girl growing up with three sisters, this became her favorite book. And when she had me, her fourth daughter, she wanted to give me a name she loved from the book, Amy.

    My mom died unexpectedly shortly after she gave me that present. I loved it so much that the book became shreds, but I saved the cover and have it in a frame in my bedroom. Having four daughters of my own now has brought me even closer to my mom’s memory, and I have read Little Women to them all. (And they all have a quilt on their bed I made for each of them when they were babies – I learned to quilt when I was pregnant with my oldest.) I can’t wait to read the book. Thank you for sharing Sara’s work with me.

    Reply
  119. Mitzi Terry on

    The simple practice of remembering cherished heirlooms is such a gift. Thank you–
    one of many treasured pieces from growing up in a small rural community is my paternal grandmother’s cerulean blue enamelware colander. She was a great home cook and I spent many many hours in the kitchen with her (along with my mother and aunts). It was a special bonding time for me in addition to all that I learned about preparing food and learning to trust and hone my instincts; it is lovely to have such a colorful, albeit simple, daily reminder of the gifts of my heritage. As much as I wish I had also gained my maternal grandmother’s sewing skills, alas, my sister got every last little drop of those. I remain steadfastly inspired, enamored and infinitely intimidated by textile crafts.

    Reply
  120. Leslie Mireille on

    My grandmother kindly taught my older sister how to sew when we were quite young. I got pretty competent in it but didn’t really enjoy it very much. My sister on the other hand, in addition to learning to sew, also learned to knit, crochet and embroider from our grandmother. She went on to learn how to weave and quilt, eventually becoming a fabric artist well loved by those in that community of artists as a teacher and mentor.

    I feel very fortunate to have embroidery pieces from my grandmother and several of my sister’s pieces that she made down through the years including embroidered, crocheted and woven items. I wish I had one of my sister’s quilts to wrap myself in, but that was not to be and she passed right before the pandemic began in 2020. Someday I anticipate learning to quilt myself, guided by her memory.

    Reply
  121. Leslie on

    Seeds are the heirlooms in my life. Flowers, vegetables, medicines. But have been moving into natural dying and starting a community project with dye plants. Can’t wait to read the book!

    Reply
  122. Jo Ann Wright on

    My favorite heirloom from my grandmother is a book with her name written in the front. That pairs nicely with a quilt she also made that covered me all my growing up years. So many comforting hours were spent as a child and into my teen years covered with that quilt reading Grandma’s book. I am a self taught quilter who has done some dying of wool fabric and have always wanted to learn how to make natural dyes. The colors Sara has made are so wonderful and making her quilts have a cozy and inviting look about them.

    Reply
  123. Mindi on

    I am fortunate to come from a long line of talented seamstresses, quilters and artists. I have been a quilter myself for 30 years and I love how Sara transforms flowers into beautiful works of textile art. I am very lucky to still have oil and watercolor paintings created by my mom, my Nana and my uncle hanging in my home in Colorado, as well as some hand pieced quilts and unquilted tops from my paternal Grandma and Great-Grandmother. This grandma also had an amazing rose garden and passed down her love of roses and cut flower gardening to me.

    I wouldn’t dare pick any one piece as my favorite heirloom, they all mean so much to me. i feel the loving embrace of my late-mom every time I look at a painting she created and the scent of the roses that I nurture in my garden bring my Grandma back to me every day.

    Thank you for sharing your beautiful story, Sara and to Erin, for bringing it to her audience.

    Reply
  124. Tamara Grieger on

    I have several treasures! One is a quilt — a sweet yellow nine patch made by my great grandmother. I slept under this quilt when I was a little girl. I have two other items from the 1950’s I treasure that belonged to my grandparents. My grandfather’s made-in-Norway cardigan sweater and my grandmother’s genuine ivory bracelet from the time they lived in Alaska. I have always enjoyed hearing about the lives of my ancestors. I think everyone has an interesting family heritage!

    Reply
  125. Beth Amos on

    I love quilting and memory arts making teddy bears and other items out of family clothing. My Grandmother made a cathedral quilt out if scraps from clothes she made us through the years. Her later years she developed arthritis and wasn’t able to sew and then alzheimers set in and slowly took away her memories. Her quilts and handmade items are truly treasures we have in our family and are sweet reminders of the beautiful woman we called Grandma. ❤️

    Reply
  126. Tracy Goddard on

    Sara is an amazing artist and inspiration as a thoughtful, hard working woman. Her skills and knowledge are endless. Thank you for putting it all into a beautiful book for the rest of us. Love you dearly.

    Reply
  127. Donna Girgen on

    A blue wing- backed chair from my Italian grandmother, It is coveted by all of our children. I may have to take it with me when I cross over! I am 81 years young but I figure I have to live until I am at least 105 to make all of the knitting and quilting I want to make!

    Reply
  128. Elizabeth Stutzman on

    You always pick such interesting authors for these interviews. Thanks for sharing these treasures with us! One family heirloom that I treasure is my grandma’s old quilt. Somehow, I received it when she died, which is a miracle because she has 10 kids and 30 grandkids. The dusty blue and peach colored pieces that make up the quilt give away its creation in the late 80s/early 90s by my aunt who has been sewing since she was little. Everything she sews has perfect lines and is made out of quality material. My grandma had spent her last few years in a retirement home, so there is a little white tag with her name and room number hand-written on it, so it would end up back in the room after laundry day. Some of the edges of the fabric where it was sewn together have started to become brittle, so I have to be extra careful with it.

    Reply
  129. Mary on

    We have a beautiful wooden cradle that was made for my mom by her brother (my uncle) for her dolls when she was a child. That same cradle was passed on to my children when they were young and will be further passed on to their children. It is a great way for them to have something that was special to their grandmother

    Reply
  130. Nancy Pennington on

    I have several flour sack quilt tops that were lovingly handmade by my grandmother and her aunt, during The Great Depression. Seeing those pieces for the first time a child was the beginning of my lifelong love for and appreciation of handmade things. I am looking forward to adding “Farm & Folk Quilt Alchemy” to my library, to get inspiration for quilt designs as well as color palettes. Thank you for sharing your heart with the world.

    Reply
  131. Kadie B on

    Our cherished heriloom is a quilted christmas tree skirt that has the kids handprints quilted on the back from each year.

    Reply
  132. Donna on

    Gardening and Quilting a labor of love.

    Reply
  133. Julie Gillette on

    My cherished heirlooms are my father’s toolbox and his wooden encased radio. I cherish both for all the memories they bring to me of him and of days gone by. Both objects bring to my quilting form, natural colors and feelings I never want to disappear.

    Reply
  134. melissa on

    How lovely and timely this is as I have just started exploring the world of plant dyes and hammering many of the flowers I have grown on my farm onto tea towels. I also did flower hammering at a community festival called Hands on History to show how plant dyes would have been used. Our favorite heirlooms around here are two quilts that my husband’s Aunt Martha made him when he was a child. One is a mix of repurposed jean and corduroy and the other cotton in reds and blues. I have had to repair the cotton one a couple of times as it is around 40 years old, but she was the sweetest lady and it is so wonderful every time the weather changes and we can add a quilt to our bed for extra warmth. Although she passed away in 1997, when I was just 20 years old, I met my husband when I was 14 so I am sure they are just as much my heirlooms as his.

    Reply
  135. Elizabeth A Schraeder on

    I’m very fortunate to have a picture of my great grandparents on their wedding day and a picture of my grandmother and on of my great aunts. Both of these pictures hung in my grandmothers house and every time I visited I remember them and telling my grandmother I would love to have them. When she passed they were given to me. As a quilter I would really love to win a copy of Sara’s book. Thank you for your beautiful flowers and for such a lovely interview with Sara.

    Reply
  136. Jeanne campbell on

    Hello Sara,
    Thank you for sharing your amazing story. I found your journey to be very interesting and can tell you are not afraid of pushing yourself to learn new things. Very impressive.
    I love to garden, that is my passion. I also have dabbled in quilt making and dying wool and enjoy many other hobbies. Thank you for the inspiration to try new things. 😊

    Reply
  137. Kim on

    How wonderful! Your quilts are amazing! My grandmother used to paint still life vignettes on velvet. I don’t know how she got into this hobby but I cherish the pieces that I still have from her. They are very old fashioned and unique!

    Reply
  138. Dianne Connor on

    Born in 1907, my grandmother raised 5 children and cared for her ailing father in a small home lacking indoor plumbing and running water. She stoked the coal furnace in the winter, raised chickens, and tended her garden daily to ensure there was enough food for my mother and her siblings. In the evenings, when she had the time and energy, she sewed a patchwork piece that took more than a year to complete. I was lucky enough to receive this quilt when she passed. I hang it as artwork in my home where it reminds me of her kindness, resilience, and determination in the face of countless challenges.

    Reply
  139. Eileen Johnson on

    My family has always gardened. We pass on seeds to each other, especially flower seeds. I make Mosaic glass garden stones of the flowers, my niece does drawings of the flowers and my mother does paintings of the flowers. We pass this beauty every year!

    Reply
  140. Barbara Davies on

    My mother came from a blacksmithing family, and my father from an early California pear growing community. From them I learned about hard work, creativity, hand-skills & the voices of nature. My mother particularly honored the quilts and other fiber works passed down by each branch of our family tree. Rooted in these fulfilling hereditary occupations, I have let my career in horticulture carry me to landscape & garden design jobs around the world, collecting fabrics everywhere I go. My sewing machines travel with me to each new “home-country”, where I launch my own quilts & clothing into the world, mingling the many cultures’ fabrics I have gathered. I still keep & use my family’s ancestral quilts, along with those I have been inspired to make, to carry on our traditions for my daughter’s generation. Blessed Bee!

    Reply
  141. Brenda on

    My grandparents worked in a silk mill in Eastern PA. My grandmother collected small pieces of silk and turned them into a quilt. Most unusual since silk was not a common fabric back in the ‘30’s. Most quilts were made from cotton feed sacks or used apparel in that time. The quilt is now very fragile but I still cherish this family heirloom.

    Reply
  142. Sarah on

    I loved the interview and am so glad that we have Sara’s book, story and learnings out in the world but I am completely in awe of these comments. Another reminder of why I love the community Erin has built here. Such wonderful heirlooms passed down and traditions created. For myself it’s a porcelain coffee pot and two cups. I used to “sneakily” take it from the living room shelves as a child to play with- I’m sure I never actually did this as craftily as I believed at the time, lol. It reminds me of a time when porcelain coffee pots would be pulled out to share a cup between friends, my childhood and tea/coffee parties with dolls and of course most importantly, my mother.

    Reply
  143. Tracy Kendall on

    I’ve made quilts with my mom for 20+ years. It’s a cherished bonding for life. We have so many and share with friends and she has made them for her surgeons who have given her longevity. Thank you for sharing and continuing the lovely craft.

    Reply
  144. Paige Page on

    My great grandmother made quilts out of old clothing that was worn or had holes and because they needed a blanket, so purely from necessity. Over time she was able to buy fabric and make quilts for fun not just to keep warm. I have her crafty gene and I have been making quilts for about 20 years now and just started to learn about gardening in the last 2 years, my grandmother loved to garden too! This is really exciting to share a book that combines 2 passions and how it works as a business. Just amazing!

    Reply
  145. Esperanza Mena on

    One of my sadness feeling in life is that my family couldn’t pass on any heirloom. I cherish an old flower book ( I bought the beautiful Amy Merrick’s book) and I feel so happy every time I go through it. I bought a book for each of my friends and cousins so that every time I visit them I could read and enjoy at least one page.

    Reply
  146. Camryn on

    I grew up learning the legacy of quilting. When my brother got married two years ago, I used 6 months of my senior year of college to design and piece an heirloom wedding quilt for him and his new wife. I just got married in August of this year, and my quilting mentor and great aunt made me a wedding quilt of my own. I look forward to cherishing my wedding quilt the rest of my life, and passing it down to my children.

    Reply
  147. Karen on

    Lovely work and very much appreciated. Being a beekeeper I do appreciate the awareness and importance of protecting our earth and keeping our ‘carbon’ footprints as limited as possible on our planet we all share. Thank you for sharing your story!

    Reply
  148. Sara on

    I honestly wish I had a precious family heirloom, but unfortunately my family does not hold onto anything that can be passed down. I’ve started a small collection of cast iron skillets in the hopes they can be passed down to my children and grandchildren, as well as my book collection. Here’s to starting new family cycles!

    Reply
  149. Linda on

    Your quilts are a lovely way to honor those we love.

    Reply
  150. Lynn on

    I unfortunately don’t have many heirlooms, although I wish I did! However, I have a whimsical porcelain milk and sugar set in the form of two little Friar monks that cheerfully greet me each morning on my kitchen windowsill! They are very precious to me.
    Thank you so very much for this wonderful opportunity to win a copy of Sara’s new book and a piece of her incredible art! I’ve been following Sara since her blogging days!

    Reply
  151. Karen Goodman on

    Quilts are so special! I have a quilt that my mom made for me when I was 5 that my kids still use now. They also have new quilts that my mom made for them when they were born. I hope they still use them 30+ years from now like I have!

    Reply
  152. Kim on

    This book looks fabulous! My most treasured heirlooms are the plants that I have propagated from my mother and grandmother’s gardens. I love to garden, quilt and crochet and hopefully I am creating heirlooms for my family too!

    Reply
  153. Sarah Naparalla on

    Growing flowers and then using them to dye fabric creates such a comforting feeling in my mind, to see their beauty in the garden and then have it transferred to their warmth around me. My mother was a quilter and my mother-in-law crocheted. It warms my heart to see how protective my children were of the quilts/afghans they received from them as children and still cherish them as adults in their 30’s.

    Reply
  154. Laura Davidson on

    Thank you so much for sharing Sara’s story with us! I am so excited to get my hands on her book. I have been fascinated with natural dying, and quilting, but had not thought of combining the two, not to mention my passion for growing things. I am ecstatic and my brain is bursting with creative ideas.
    I have a treasured crewel embroidery of two birds that my Grandmother made just for me. It hangs above the piano that was my husband’s grandmother’s.

    Reply
  155. Kate on

    My favorite heirloom is my grandmother’s rolling pin. She taught me how to make the best pie crust. I used it when I was working as a baker for good vibes. That pin is least 90 years old and going strong. And believe me it has gotten a lot of use. I plan on passing to one of my children someday

    Reply
  156. Sarah McNanney on

    I have so many family heirlooms, including the travel chest my grandmother used when she immigrated from Scotland in the early 1900’s, so many pieces of crystal from 2-3 generations past and the list goes on and on. What I really treasure is a Christmas cactus plant that my grandmother had and passed along to my mother. My grandmother was born in 1892, so I know the plant is at least 100 years old. My mother had it in her living room for decades and when she moved to a smaller home, I was the fortunate one to get the plant. I have been able to propagate many new plants that I have shared with other family members to continue the tradition. This plant has a special place in my heart.

    Reply
  157. Paula Lopez on

    I am the second of 8 sisters and my mother has always sewn and added color to her fabrics. I grew up with it and until very recently I realized that it was not common to have this knowledge. I recently received an Italian sewing machine from my great-grandmother and we put a motor on it so our daughter could sew. she already has a pencil case business

    Reply
  158. Lora Christian on

    I love this so much! I have a heirloom quilt that is a beautiful Star pattern and is 100 years old passed down! I love the thought of natural dye and quilting! I summer in Maine and look to get started in this beautiful adventure! Thank you thank you for sharing!

    Reply
  159. Nancy Collins on

    I love her story and how she followed her soul. My grandfather took a black and white photo of my father at 10 yrs old and glued it to a 1/2” piece of wood. Then he intricately cut around the outline of my dad. It was mounted on a stand. Neither of them are still with me. My dad would be 89 this year, but I enjoy this symbol of the two of them daily.

    Reply
  160. Brenda Depew on

    My daughter and I have been growing plants for natural dying and flax for linen. My daughter embarked on a year long process of growing, harvesting and creating an outfit from the fruits of the plants. The program is local in NE Ohio called ‘One Year, One Outfit’ supported by the RustBelt Fibershed to bring awareness to the challenges of ‘Fast Fashion’. Take a look at the fabulous work my daughter has created with plant dying and creating linen from growing flax! @emdepew on Instagram I would love to be considered for the drawing to gift to her the book and quilt! Thank you for bringing light to the rewards of plant dying and quilting!

    Reply
  161. Catherine Schuerman on

    This interview was so timely as I have been experimenting with using natural dyes with flowers I have grown this summer. I’m so excited to read her book and learn more about this subject!

    Reply
  162. Alani on

    I have several heirlooms from my mom’s side of the family. I don’t remember my great grandmother, but I have a lot of her jewelry and a lovely tea cart. But my favorite is a crocheted afghan in pink, cream, and brown. It always reminds me of Neapolitan ice cream!

    Reply
  163. Amy on

    My husband’s family has passed around/down a little gold baby ring whenever a new baby is born!

    Reply
  164. Tonya Thornton on

    The idea of dying fabrics from plants that I grow is fascinating to me! I have just become aware of this possibility and can’t stop thinking about it!
    Thank you for a wonderful interview. Erin, you always find the best people!

    Reply
  165. Marcia on

    What a beautiful and fascinating interview! I just received my mothers Singer 221 Featherweight sewing machine that I learned to sew on over 60 years ago! She continued to sew with it and had promised it to me many years ago.

    Reply
  166. Mary on

    When I was very young my Dad had to travel to Chicago for his job. When he returned home he gave me a bracelet that spelled out CHICAGO in individual letters that dangle from the chain. To this day I have this gift from my Dad. ❤️

    Reply
  167. Joan on

    What a beautiful journey. I have my mother’s Elna sewing machine and it works wonders after all of these years. Many pieces of clothing and quilts have been made on this machine. Thank you for sharing your story.

    Reply
  168. Terri Robblee on

    We have a lovely afghan from my grandma & my mom used ribbon embroidery on several beautiful pieces we cherish. It’s inspirational for my family to see the love in their work as we strive to create our own hand made pieces to pass along. This book looks wonderful. I’m so glad you are sharing it with the world

    Reply
  169. Julia on

    Thanks for the oportunity to win a copy of the book! I have my mothers old sewing machine, an Elna in perfect condition, that has brought me so much joy and connection over the years; especially since I left my home country 35 years ago.

    Reply
  170. Virginia Read on

    I store my everyday dishes, cups and glasses in a wooden cabinet passed down from my grandmother (who emigrated from Ireland to Washington Heights as a young woman). We live in an old house and while we were restoring it, our architect kept pushing for a kitchen designer but I knew what worked for us: my grandmother’s cabinet and an enamel-topped table I found at the curb when my son was a baby.

    They’re the soul of our kitchen.

    Reply
  171. Joanne on

    My mother has been quilting for over 40 years. She fell in love with the art after her first quilt class. She’s completed hundreds of wall hangings and over 50 bed sized quilts. She taught quilting classes for 20 years, 10 of them at a community college. She retired from teaching classes when she was 80 years old, after finishing strong! She drove 30 miles one way, 3 days a week for her 10-12 week classes. (15 miles on dirt roads!)
    She gave me her first quilt she completed and made a replica of an antique quilt I was 30 minutes too late to purchase, but had snapped a photo of. This quilt was on our bed for over 30 years and is worn to shreds in many places.
    She wanted to make another quilt for me and let me pick out the patterns, which I selected 12 of my favorite rose sampler blocks. She traveled 10 hours to visit me and we shopped with my dad at 5 quilt shops in the area calling our excursion the Quilt Shop Hop. The color palette is soft pinks and greens, including some hand dyed fabrics and batiks.
    She created a border of flowers and vines spilling out of an antique basket that she let me select and make a template for.
    She handquilted this heirloom in the style I preferred which is quilting around each design three times and cross hatching the rest, which is out of her comfort zone and her first for this tight quilting.
    The result is the most magnificent quilt I could imagine and most beautiful I have lain eyes on. And I have visited quilt shows and poured over quilt books for 45 years.
    Thank you for asking: mother just completed a full size quilt for my sister in law recently, right before her 90th birthday.
    She labels all her quilts with a creative note on the back and each one is a treasure. She gave away 47 quilts at a special family gathering to her grandchildren and a few great grands. We are very blessed to have pieces of her creative work expressed with great love!

    Reply
  172. Sara on

    Quilting has been a big part of my mother’s life and my grandmother’s life. Both have made precious quilts for their children and grandchildren to gift around big events- marriages, babies, and graduations. Countless hours lovingly go into each quilt. They are so treasured!

    Reply
  173. Dawn H on

    I have a number of inherited quilts from my great Aunties and one great grandmother. I cherish them all, and enjoy looking at all the details and fabrics that come from a long forgotten era.

    Reply
  174. Leslie Diserafino on

    My mother was an artist & fashion designer of children’s clothes. I have passed down special pieces of her artwork to each of my three daughters & 3 nieces so they can have a piece of her with them forever. I also have special dresses from her & my grandmother that I cherish….❤️

    Reply
  175. Heidi on

    I love all of Sara’s stuff and the slow process she uses. One my favorite heirlooms I have is a wooden chair that my great grandmother had in her kitchen. I remember always seeing it in the corner, it was an extra chair she kept. The chair has been painted several times and now I can see the peeling paint, and all the layers. I love it and the that I can see the history of it!

    Reply
  176. Chelsea on

    Someday I hope to have my great grandmother’s piano. It’s the one I learned to play on and the one I judge all other pianos by.
    I also have some quilts that I love and cherish.

    Reply
  177. Barbara Rietscha on

    Love Sara’s story. I have a beautiful pink and white heirloom quilt that I cherish.

    Reply
  178. Jan on

    I really don’t have a heirloom from my family. I wish I did but my history is pretty mixed up. But this sounds wonderful to readers

    Reply
  179. Stacey Diehl on

    I have a rocking chair that my great grandfather used to rock me in. Heritage is a beautiful thing.

    Reply
  180. Sherry on

    I have been obsessed with quilts for as long as I can remember. No one in my family knew how to make them. When I was pregnant with my twins I went to every church fair looking for them with no luck. I was shocked! How can no one make them anymore. After months of searching I was able to find a woman who made me them but it was heart breaking. So the next best thing was crocheting. My grandmother and mother both did a ton of it and to this day I sleep with my grandmothers crocheted blanket on my bed every night. It’s my favorite thing from her.

    Reply
  181. Beth Lucius on

    For my 16th birthday, my mom and I found an antique chiffarobe for my bedroom that we painstakingly cleaned and refinished together. My mom passed away 6 years ago (she was almost90), but I still have and treasure that chiffarobe!

    Reply
  182. Marie on

    Thank you for introducing me to Sara and her inspiring work!
    My paternal grandmother hand embroidered two complex table runners, which I have framed and hung in our home. To think that each knot was worked by her hands, which I loved so much, brings a sweetness to every time I pass by them.
    <3

    Reply
  183. Jolene Hitz on

    My most cherished inheritance passed from Grandparents and Parents is a love for making plants grow. Growing up on a farm and seeing crops, gardens, all kinds of animals grow, reproduce and bear food and beauty is a treasure.
    I continue to garden and grow vegetables and so many lovely flowers to be enjoyed by us humans as well as birds, butterflies and bees.

    Reply
  184. Becky Pope on

    I have 2 quilts made by my great grandmother. I never met her but love that I have a piece of her hanging in my home. I also have several antique pieces in my home from family that I will always cherish and hope to pass to my daughters or grandchildren someday.

    Reply
  185. Julie Pauken on

    My most cherished heirlooms are the flowers from my grandfather’s and from my mother’s homes. I have a backdrop fence in front of which I have planted these flowers. I call it my heirloom garden. I have very poor soil, so it has been a challenge to get some things to grow, which makes it even more exciting each spring to see life spring up as flowers have responded to amendments. There are many lost plants and there are those that have taken a few years to spring to life. How exciting to watch a plant get healthy!

    Reply
  186. Rosemary Meehan on

    My most cherished heirloom has to be the letters to my mother found in her china cabinet. They are from 1936 to 1964. They not only capture one family’s resilience from moving to DC as a “Government Girl” and a young couples move to the suburbs, but a nation that endured.

    Reply
  187. Lisa on

    I inherited my grandmother’s sofa. I’ve had this sofa for over 40 years, which is covered in a beautiful blue damask fabric. I have such memories of sitting in the sofa in my grandparents living room, and it always brings a warm smile. I do cherish the memories, and I’m so glad that I can sit in that sofa and have this is a treasured memory.

    Reply
  188. Sadie on

    My Great Grandmother’s quilts are a treasured heirloom in my family.

    Reply
  189. Jan on

    Thank you Erin for this wonderful interview. Sara is an inspiration to those of us who sew , weave and have a passion for growing. I planted a dye garden this season and will begin to dye yarn and fabric this fall. I love books that can further our artistic experience and knowledge!

    Reply
  190. Marissa on

    Beautiful and important work. My favorite family heirloom is my great grandmother’s hand written cookbook. So special

    Reply
  191. Kim “Mimi” Hansen on

    I am popping on again, because I was thinking you meant handmade heirlooms. I wrote about a quilt I made for my grandson, Aiden, granddaughter Lilah, and three sons. I want to add that all of these quilts and so many other things, were made on the Singer Featherlight sewing machine that my grandmother, Florence, bought while working at Singer in Bridgeport, Connecticut. It was passed down to me and is one of my most treasured belongings. I also have her ring, with two small diamonds and sapphires. I was very close to her, and I put the ring on the day she died in 1997, and have worn it ever since. The sapphires remind me of her loving eyes.

    These comments hold such beautiful stories. So many threads of love carried forward. I am struck by how many “Sheila’s” have written comments. That is my mother’s name and I have thought of it as so pretty and unusual. My mom died in June, and I am loving seeing her name here.

    Reply
  192. Kim “Mimi” Hansen on

    What an inspiring interview.🌻 My grandmother, Grace, was an incredible seamstress and crocheter. She made us (four girls) beautiful little wool coats, sweaters and afghans. Unfortunately, my parents did not save these heirlooms, so all I have are the afghan she made me and some lace doilies she made. I learned to sew from her, and in turn, I made baby quilts for my three sons. I also embroidered a baby quilt in high school, inspired by a little towel from a thrift store. It had a scene of a child sitting up in bed, smiling at a puppy in the bedroom window! It is really quite sweet, with the window curtains billowing, the puppy wearing a bow, and the fluffy pillow and quilt on the bed. I actually used watered-down Rit dyes (sorry!) to paint in some areas on the quilt. It was given to my granddaughter, Lilah, when she was born. I guess that I have now become the creator of heirlooms in my family!

    My most treasured quilt, though, is the one I made for my grandson, Aiden. I used 1930’s animal fabrics to make nine-patch blocks, and in between those blocks, are white blocks with embroidered animals on them. I used vintage “days of the week” towel designs as inspiration, but changed them to be fun things rather than chores! For example, there is a cute little duck under a clothesline. Instead of embroidering laundry, I hung block letters that spelled “AIDEN” from the line. There is a kitten on a swing and one playing with yarn. A bear is pushing a wheelbarrow and I filled it with veggies since they have a garden. The quilt wasn’t quite finished when Aiden was born, and unbeknownst to us, he had a serious congenital heart condition. He had his first open heart surgery at one week, and while he was in surgery all day, I was at the hospital embroidering a new square with a little bear with a heart in the middle of his chest…each stitch, a prayer. The quilt took some time to finish, as I was helping care for Aiden, being a pediatric nurse practitioner. But, it did get done, and he loved that quilt so much. He went on to have two more open heart surgeries and many other procedures. He was the most joyful little boy, all smiles, and meeting each day with unbridled happiness. He touched the hearts of everyone he met. Aiden died eleven days after his sixth birthday, following a heart transplant. His quilt is folded at the end of his bed, in his room that holds such memories and treasures. We have each, in turn, laid it on our laps or wrapped it around us, and his little sister loved to cuddle with it for comfort. It will be hers to keep and carry forward. I am writing a little story for her, about how her quilt and Aiden’s came about. As long as our stories are kept alive, a part of us also lives on after we are gone. Aiden’s story, a part of it anyhow, is there in his quilt.💚(his favorite color, green). Thanks for the chance to share.

    Reply
  193. Alena on

    Thank you, it is so inspiring to read about your work. My cherished heirloom is a cross stiched piece of art, showing wild herbs, made by my great-grandmother.

    Reply
  194. Melissa Thornton on

    I have 2 heirloom pieces in my home. I inherited the spinning wheel my Nana had custom made, and I have a beautiful simple sewn by hand quilt by my great grandmother when she was young in the 20s.

    Reply
  195. Nicole on

    My family isn’t that great with holding into things or finding sentiment. I have two kids, most recently a baby girl who is 4m. My mum sent me a pair of baby booties my late nanna knitted for one of us as kids. I was surprised my mum kept them. I’m even more surprised she didn’t send them to me for my son who’s now 5. My mum has knitted each of them a beautifully complicated baby blanket, which I know we’ll treasure for years to come. I’ve promised them I’ll be more organized and take good care of them until they’re old enough to pass them on one day.

    Reply
  196. Kim Bowling on

    My cherished heirloom is also quilts. My grandmother made hand stitched quilts for each of her grandchildren, at various stages in life. I am lucky enough to have 3 of them. My grandma used to quilt with Appalachian Fireside Quilts and once sold a quilt to Betty Ford as she was traveling through KY!

    Reply
  197. Rachel Burgoon on

    What a wonderful interview! I am definitely going to read this book and look into workshops she talked about!
    Surprisingly a cherished heirloom from my family are quilts! I have several on display in my home. Some came from great grandmothers and some my mom bought me. Each has a story and a memory!

    Reply
  198. Lisa King on

    Thank you so much! I thoroughly enjoy reading these articles. They consistently introduce me to intriguing endeavors and make me ponder, ‘Could this be something I’d be interested in?’ 🤔 I’m definitely going to grab the book and explore it further. 😊

    Reply
  199. Britte Gogal on

    I have a beautiful white, violet and green quilt from my great-grandmother. It is very simple with tulips and all hand- stitched. Why is it in our youth we don’t have the foresight to ask more questions of our grandparents? To know and treasure their wisdom. I wish I knew story of this quilt. They all have one. It was made for someone, designed for someone … oh, if I only had the answers to the mystery. We need to not lose the oracle of our heirlooms.

    Reply
  200. Heidi Schmidgall on

    My favorite heirloom is a quilt made by my great grandmother on my moms side. She completed it with sisters and friends and I love the thought of a bunch of women sitting around it sewing it to completion together.

    Reply
  201. A.-C. McGraw on

    Though I don’t have any heirlooms from relatives, I learned how to quilt from my girlfriend when I was nine years old. She spent the summer with her grandmother in West Virginia, and returned with wonderful descriptions of learning to quilt. I was so inspired, I followed her instructions using fabric she gave me and quilted a doll’s blanket. Around the same time, I made my first sewing tool, which is my oldest sewing memento, and is still tucked away in my sewing basket. I called it a “poker” and made it from a popsicle stick. I thought I was being pretty clever to make a tool I could use to invert sewn cloth ties. Of course, nowadays one can buy any sewing gadget under the sun. But my “poker” reminds of the wonder of creativity.

    Reply
  202. Ashley on

    I have dishes that were given to me at my wedding by my grandma. She inherited the dishes from her mother.

    Reply
  203. Anna Gray on

    My mum use to love growing sweetpeas by the garage and it was just part of my growing up having flowers in the garden, after she died, I collected the seeds to continue growing pink sweet peas and this has been my ritual for last 15 years.

    Reply
  204. Krysia on

    My parents were refugees from Poland during world war 2, came to this country with nothing. My cherished heirloom is my mother’s college class ring which she always wore. My parents believed strongly in education, because in war they can take everything, your home, your family, your peace but they cannot take what is in your mind.

    Reply
  205. Emily on

    I have a cowichan vest that my grandmother was knitting for me, during the same period that I was sewing her my first ever quilt. She has many grandchildren, so it was special timing that we were both creating gifts for one another, unbeknownst.

    Reply
  206. Debbie LeGay on

    I some how ended up with my maternal grandmothers vintage silverware from the 1950’s that has about 160 pieces. She used to bring it out for the holiday dinners and I remember thinking how fancy they were. It’s a beautiful set that I will pass on to my daughter.

    Reply
  207. Ingrid Thornton on

    I have saved a fabric for a long time, a particular collection, florals mostly, from beloved skirts I wore as a teenager and young woman. I dreamed I would someday make a quilt from them, an heirloom of sorts, a recollection of my life as a young woman emerging into the world. An heirloom in the making, of a precious and vulnerable time, now long past.

    Reply
  208. Cristina Arcese on

    just start and solve problems as you go, I really liked it. As family heirlooms I have sheets that were woven by hand and have my great-grandmother’s initials, using them makes me happy and makes me appreciate the work of the hands that made them.

    Reply
  209. Ann Richardson on

    My Grandmother taught children in a small one room schoolhouse , when she left her position they created a goodbye quilt for her. Each person created a square and embroidered their name and date on each square. They stitched together with love and kindness and was cherished by my grandmother. I think this would have been during the Depression they where all very poor but gave what they had in a beautiful gesture.

    Reply
  210. Esther on

    My Grandma taught me to knit and I have a baby blanket that she made for my oldest son that we will never give away. She passed recently and all of the granddaughters were given a sweater that she had made and we cherish them.

    Reply
  211. Elisa Allen Arias on

    Before she died, my grandmother gifted me a special casserole-type dish that I always loved. It’s mottled blue and white with a mama pig and babies on the lid. It has some chipped edges and it’s super special to me.

    Reply
  212. Angie on

    I have always wanted to be a “gramma” and to quilt. Today I get to live those dreams. I’m working on my third quilt now and am excited to find out more about traditional quilt making in Sara’s book!

    Reply
  213. Brooke VandeVelde on

    Quilting was something my mother always wanted to do, but never found the time to. She passed too young to ever find that time and so I quilt in her memory. I’ve just embarked on gardening from seed this year and am so looking forward to a cozy fall weekend learning from your book and contemplating the very necessary seed purchases!
    Congratulations to you both on all that you’ve achieved in the pursuit of a life grounded in happiness and joy!!

    Reply
  214. Patty on

    The only items I have are my grandmother’s china cabinet and her wedding band. At holiday dinners the door to china cabinet opens. We always say Grandma is visiting. That is the only time it opens.

    Reply
  215. Cindy Schultz on

    I have a simple blue and while quilt that was passed down to me. I started quilting when I was a young mom and it has been a joy to bless my family and friends with my quilts.

    Reply
  216. Kristina Smith on

    One of my most cherished heirlooms is I inherited one of my great grandmother’s rings and is now my wedding ring and my other cherished heirloom is I inherited my other great grandmother’s fabrics which I have been using to hand quilt my daughter a hexagon quilt.

    Reply
  217. Denise on

    Trial and error. My father created oak grandfather clocks out of bits and piece thrown away from a cabinet shop. I make quilts from bits and pieces that others give to me . Patience and an open mind creates. And then when the quilts are finished they go to charity.

    Reply
  218. Sue on

    How exciting to see her work and read how she started writing her book! Her journey is so relatable! So inspiring!

    Reply
  219. Kimberly Comstock on

    Really beautiful interview. A lovely pairing of two passionate folks investing in the work and life they love.

    I don’t have many objects that connect to my past, but I think of the sewing practices and spaces of my mother and her mother often. They seem very much the seeds for my love of fiber and craft. Grateful to reflect on this with my own kiddos as well. You never know what will bloom in them as they grow.

    Reply
  220. Shirley Gélinas on

    Ma grand’mère maternelle créait des courtepointes pour sa famille, matelassées à la main, et ma mère a hérité de quelques unes. Et à mon tour, j’ ai hérité des courtepointes de ma grand’mère. Elles sont tellement inspirantes!
    J’ ai appris à coudre vers l’âge de neuf ans et j’adore créer des vêtements pour moi et ma famille. Depuis plus d’ une dizaine d’années, je fais pousser mes plantes tinctoriales et je teins durant l’hiver, alors que le jardin repose sous la neige.
    Je connais le travail des semis, des soins, des récoltes et de la conservation des plantes et des graines. Je connais le travail de la création et de la couture des tissus teints avec les plantes que j’ ai cultivé. Et c’ est fantastique! Cette connexion avec le vivant et la nature donne tellement d’énergie!
    J’ admire le travail de Sara et j’ attends avec impatience de recevoir son livre que j’ai précommandé. Elle est tellement généreuse et inspirante!

    Reply
  221. Susan Baxter on

    Before my sisters first child was born our father made a cradle for her. Our kids all spent their first days in it and now another generation have begun their disestablished days in it as well. It’s been a wonderful way to reconnect with and remember a dear Papa.

    Reply
  222. Ellen B on

    Cherished heirlooms are the dresses and a cashmere sweatshirt my maternal grandparents and my mother made for over the years. Both my maternal grandparents were tailors and creatives from the Ukraine who came to this country in the early 1020’s and eventually opened their own tailor shop in my home town on Long Island. Traveling through Paris on the way to America, my grandmother noticed the clothes women were wearing on the street and on the boat coming to NY she created a dress from what she saw. It launched her livelihood and eventually their beloved store where they made clothes to order for people in our town and the surrounding towns.. I cherished the times my grandfather would take me to a department store, ask what I liked and then create something similar with unique fabric we chose together. Creativity was fostered and cherished in our family. Sara, your story is inspirational. Erin, your farm and your teaching videos are extremely helpful.

    Reply
  223. Sheryl Eggleston on

    I love this! I’ve been following her work for awhile. So inspiring.

    Reply
  224. Gail Barth on

    My favourite heirloom is a picture of two cats my Mother embroidered many year ago. It is done on a white background and is about 14 x 16 inches.

    It is a very treasured heirloom, my Mother passed away 33 years ago

    Reply
  225. Tollie Nail on

    My husband’s grandmother made us a quilt as our wedding present in 2005. It has been at the foot of our bed, a place of honor, every cold winter night since! ☺️

    Reply
  226. Nicole D on

    Next month my husband and I will celebrate our 20th wedding anniversary. Our most cherished wedding gift is a quilt my mother-in-law made for us, with the help of friends. She was very sick at the time and died 6 months after we were wed. It is unbelievably meaningful to have that quilt, something we can touch and hold that signifies her love for us.

    Reply
  227. Sharon S on

    We found a partially completed quilt at my Grandma’s after she passed away. We had no idea she was a quilter. The pattern was in a Workbasket, there was a cardboard template cut from an oatmeal box. Flour sacks & a beautiful turquoise chintz carefully pieced. All 2” squares. It was so fun to finish it & think about Grandma along the way.

    Reply
  228. Loren Jones on

    My mother in Canada makes quilts for almost 30 years now on a loom. I have many of her fine work from tea towels to full king blankets that I use in my yoga practice. This quilt has washed, dragged everywhere which I loved. I would love to win this book and send it to my beloved Mother which is 87 and remind her that all her efforts have been appreciated and I feel the love thru her quilts.

    Reply
  229. Jenny on

    My mom made me the most beautiful floral quilt that I just love. It is not an heirloom yet, but I know I will have it for many many years!!

    Reply
  230. Paula Wynn on

    I inherited the grandfather clock that my dad made. Unfortunately it stopped running the day he passed away and during the 38 years I have had it I’ve heard it randomly chime 3 times . The times coincide with times I have struggles in live and I like to believe my dad is telling me he is there with me. My mother had different people try fixing the clock but never was successful. Its ok. I walk by and see my dad where the clock sits and it makes me smile.

    Reply
  231. Lisa Shavlik on

    My father passed away last October from prostate cancer, and I have several things from him. One item is a wooden breadboard in the shape of an elephant that my dad made when he was in high school! The shade of green paint my dad used on the narrow edge of the piece is almost the exact color of my kitchen cabinets, which I had painted years before I inherited this cute little gem.

    Reply
  232. Cheryl Horton on

    My cherish heirloom is very simple. It is my maternal grandmother’s thimble. I enjoy quilting and other need work. Unfortunately, it is too large for my finger. But, stir a treasure.

    Reply
  233. Karen Carroll on

    My dear mother stitched this replica postage stamp years ago of a girl picking daisies from a field full of daisies and had told me she’d finish it “before I die” . She gifted it to me on me and my twin brothers surprise 40th birthday many years ago .my entire family including 7 siblings ,many Aunts, Uncles and cousins attended . I always loved daisies and I love this so much. I have it hanging in my bedroom and it reminds me of her every day.She passed away five months later . Thankyou for sharing this Erin and congratulations Sara on your first book and continued venture in farming , flowers and quilting!

    Reply
  234. Pamela on

    I have a corner cabinet that my grandfather made. He actually made two, one for my sister as well. I have a few pieces he made as a woodworker. After he passed away, I took all of his shirts and made quilts out of them. One for my mother, my sister, my son and myself. I hope they stand the test of time and become heirlooms themselves.

    Reply
  235. Melissa on

    My mother who lived to the age of 102 loved sewing and needle crafts. She inspired and encouraged me and my daughters to sew and do needle crafts. She made many counted cross stitch pieces including birth announcements and nature scenes, after she retired which now hang on the walls in my house. Her legacy lives on in her needlework.

    Reply
  236. Jennifer M on

    When I was pregnant with my second son, I attended a baby shower for my cousin and his wife. I admired a baby blanket that her mother had crocheted for her grandchild. Despite the fact that she had terminal cancer and not much longer to live, she crocheted one for my son. I used it with him and thought of her. I plan to use it with the next generation and hopefully pass it on for future generations.

    Reply
  237. Sarah B. on

    A cherished heirloom in my family is my wedding dress. It was originally made for my Nana by her mother and aunts with beautiful embellishments of lace and beads, lovingly stitched to make her day special. My Nana, mother, and I all wore this wedding dress and I hope to pass it along to my children one day too. I felt honored wearing it as these women have shaped me into the woman I am today and continue to inspire me.

    Reply
  238. Cathy Dunn on

    My sister in law’s Mother in law handmade a raggedy Ann crib quilt for our first adopted daughter. She stitched the Ann and Andy from her childhood memories. It was and is a treasured family heirloom. My daughter is 36 now and my sister in law and her mother in law are gone, but neither forgotten! Thank you for the stories and flowers.

    Reply
  239. Jeni Harris on

    My heirloom is old, but not from generations of ownership. It is my prom dress, worn in 1995. I found it at a thrift store in Houston; it’s from the 1940s. It is the perfect color of golden champagne. I absolutely had to have long gloves to match, so I tried my hand dying with tea. It was successful…enough. I have never felt more glamourous than on that prom night.

    Reply
  240. Lisa Howerton on

    I have a cherished pitcher my grandmother made. She had a kiln in her basement and I would watch her glaze her ceramics. She died when I was 12 and I’ve always wandered what type of gardener she would have been. The pitcher has these beautiful iris around the outside…

    Reply
  241. Juliana on

    Sara’s work and path are so inspiring. My husband makes large wood sculptures from local salvaged wood and stains from plants and seeds. I love to be able to watch his similar slow intuitive process. My family heirloom is from my Italian immigrant grandparents who brought their family here a few at a time as they could afford. They eventually bought a small farm. I have grapes started from the same canes they brought over and nurtured here for more than a half century. Starts from them now grow at my home.

    Reply
  242. Marcia on

    I took an eco-dying class in the spring and it just touched the surface of using natural dyes. I’d love to learn more! And I have taken up quilting in the past year-how special to be able to combine the two

    Reply
  243. Roberta Olson on

    My most precious heirloom is a strand of pearls my father gave my mother when they were young. I was surprised and honored when mother chose to gift them to me as I am -one of ten- children. We were mostly unaware they existed as my father had died in an accident just one month before I was born and mother had them tucked away in a special place.

    Reply
  244. Megan on

    Ah, this is all so wonderful and lovely! My most cherished family heirloom is this small cabinet that used to live in my great-grandparents home, then my grandma’s house and now mine. It’s a lovely dark wood and has tiny white knobs, and is nearly too small to be practical but I remember even as a kid being drawn to it for some reason.

    Reply
  245. Carol Kay on

    I loved your interview!! Intentional living is my goal. As for heirlooms… my grandmother’s handmade quilt is a treasure. It contains one misplaced piece. Intentional quilting! In the 10’s and 20’s, one mistake must be made to prove we are all flawed. Love that.

    Reply
  246. Racheal Johnson on

    When my grandmother passed away I received her antique cast iron chicken fryer pan. I will always think of her every-time I use it.

    Reply
  247. Lisa Applegate on

    My grandmother did tatting and have some beautiful pieces I display on my tables and few woven pieces she did. Just touching them and seeing them brings me closer to her in heaven.

    Reply
  248. sheila on

    Kindly speaking, my childhood was challenging, and I don’t have physical heirlooms from my family. But I do have a quilt story! When I was in my 20s (in the late 80s, mind you), I was driving through Amish country in Ohio and stopped at a quilt store. In a corner shelf, marked down, was a baby quilt in the double wedding ring pattern. I must have walked around that store for the better part of an hour, talking myself into buying it. Even with it’s small size and discounted price, it was the most I’d ever spent on something “impractical.” Eventually it was used by both my children, who put their marks on it with stains and worn patches; which of course makes it all the more precious to me now, 30 years later :)

    Reply
  249. Telly Ryan on

    I still have a lovely puff quilt that my mom made for me when I was in the sixth grade. I will be 50 this year, and it has been used by my 5 children as well. What a treasure it has been and made with many scraps of my old clothes from grade school that my mom had left over from sewing my clothes. It is getting quite tattered and worn now but still such a wonderful memory.

    Reply
  250. Genevieve Brady on

    My grandfather’s spoke shave. He was a saddler, but must also have been a good carpenter. To be taught how to use it by my father, and then to make small pieces with it, connects me to family and history and simplicity.
    Thank you for this lovely interview.

    Reply
  251. Rochelle on

    Adore her work so much and have been inspired to start stitching after following her on Insta. My family doesn’t have a history of passing down heirlooms, (physical ones anyway), Its made me wonder what ever happened to my Grans old silk eiderdown and maybe I can start this tradition xxx

    Reply
  252. Cambry on

    I came across Sara’s work a few years ago and was completely blown away. I had never heard of natural dyes and I didn’t know how to sew but I felt so deeply inspired by her way of connecting to the earth with her art. Over the last two years I’ve been studying and experimenting and learning everything I could about natural dyes and sewing and I’m about to finish my very first naturally dyed (by me!) quilt ever this week!! Reading this interview today feels serendipitous as I do so, because she is the one who inspired me in the first place. Sara has also opened my eyes and led me to research more about fiber growing practices and that has absolutely changed the way I perceive- and purchase- clothing and textiles. All I can say is thank you, thank you, thank you for sharing your gifts and perspective with the world.

    Reply
  253. Julie Lawson on

    I’ve collected quilts from my great great grands and the same in my husbands side. I hang them on an old old worked over ladder that was my Pop’s in my living room. Oh the joy they give me, and keep me close to those I love and have gone on. This article was soul feeding for me!! Thank you.

    Reply
  254. Sherri McHenry on

    I have my mother’s metal music box. I love the patina of the box and the lullaby song it sings. It brings back fond feelings of childhood.

    Reply
  255. Lindsay Halliday on

    What a wonderfully inspiring interview!
    A treasured heirloom I have is a tablecloth hand stitched by my great grandma. It isn’t anything fancy, but knowing her hands made each stitch warms my heart.
    Thank you for this opportunity! I’m sure the book is even more inspiring!

    Reply
  256. Harleen Osburn on

    My mother and father made a large Lone Star quilt when they were courting in the 1930’s. It is still as beautiful and cherished as ever. My father also embroidered a full-sized bedspread for my mother. It is covered with flowers. My father believed that men could do anything and so could his daughters! He taught me to operate heavy equipment, mow the lawns and work in the garden. My mother taught me to sew, embroider and bake.

    Reply
  257. Katie O on

    My grandmother made me my favorite quilt as a child. It is depression green with pink binding. When I had a little girl of my own, she loved it too and sleeps with it every night.

    Reply
  258. Sandy on

    My grandmother introduced me to quilting when I was a teenager. She helped me put together my very first quilt which was a Sun Bonnet Girl applique quilt. She had me trace the pattern from a quilt she had made years earlier. I still have that quilt and over 50 years later I still make quilts. It’s one of my favorite things to do. I’ve been interested in learning more about natural dyeing since my niece told me about it a few months ago. I would love to “make” my own fabric to use in my quilts, and your book would great inspiration.

    Reply
  259. Gwendydd Miller on

    So many lovely things to celebrate in life… & with this said, I absolutely love our hand made black oak dining table. It’s made with wood my father had milled many years ago & after he passed… I was gifted a couple slabs of live edge, black walnut. My husband, mother in law & I got straight to work… hand sanded for days & we played with cutting custom star cutouts of the same wood…for the open center of our unique table. Three black walnut stars from large to small are inlaid in the table for a solid finished surface… making it a one of a kind dining table, that everyone absolutely loves sitting around 💫.

    Reply
  260. Joan Berkompas on

    My gramma hand sewed 2 quilts for her great grandson , first sun bonnet sue and farmer Sam. I still have them, so special. Now quilting is my passion also

    Reply
  261. Sandy Sebald on

    I come from a family of quilters. My grandmother and her sister-in-laws were always making quilts. I am lucky enough to still have some of them and sleep under one every night. I also have the quilt frame that my grandfather built for her and I have used it to hand stitch a quilt as well. It’s rustic design reminds me of simpler times, much the same as those hand quilted quilts of my ancestors.

    Reply
  262. Kimberly Poe on

    When I was young I use to stay at my grandparents house. It was always such a special time to me. My grandmother had a little touch lamp on the night stand that was so neat to me as a young girl. Well my grandma passed away many years ago, and a couple years ago my aunt asked me if I wanted my grandma’s lamp. I cried, of course I do. Now every morning I wake up early to read my Bible next to that lamp it’s so cozy and holds all the memories of being at my grandparents house.

    Reply
  263. Taylor on

    Ah! I love that the two of you came together for an interview. You both inspire me so much.

    I have three quilts that are precious to me. My great grandmother made my sister and I a pair of flannel pajamas every year. Later, she made me a quilt from scraps of each of those quilts.
    I was also given a quilt she made that is full of holes, but it is so soft, so old, and I wont wash it because I love the way it smells. It’s gone on many picnics and been apart of many movie nights. It reminds me of her.
    My third quit that I cherish is one that my grandmother made as a wedding gift- except she gave it to me long before my wedding because “I might not live long enough to see you get married” (my family had little faith in me settling down. She did watch me get married BTW 😂) It’s always at the foot of our bed.

    Reply
  264. Ginny Thomas on

    My mom and grandma made a lone star quilt that was used and loved for all 4 of my brothers and myself. It is an inspiration for my own quilting life. I would like to learn about dyeing fabrics with plants and flowers, so this book would be greatly appreciated and read cover to cover!

    Reply
  265. Sarah Armentrout on

    I have two quilts my grandma made me when I was a child. One has become fragile after years of loving it as a child and it is stored away. The second I still use daily and take with me when I travel. It goes everywhere. It is also showing signs of a well loved life, however, I continue to mend it and continue to love it even more. My grandma was one of my favorite people on this earth and she taught me how to sew, grow and preserve my own food, bake bread and make homemade noodles. I miss her every day. This quilt continues to wrap me in her love and warmth although she is no longer here. I will continue to cherish it and all of the memories have to go with it always.

    Reply
  266. Kay on

    We have a family grandfather clock that has roses painted on the face. It goes to the eldest daughter – is quite beautiful.

    Reply
  267. JudyR on

    I grew up on a farm located on an island just outside Portland Oregon. I have a couple heirlooms from my grandparents who were Swiss. The first and my favorite which I have actually used is an iron for making swiss cookies. It makes four at once and the iron stamps a different picture of something pertaining to Switzerland on each side of the cookies. So eight different scenes. The next is my grandfather’s cheese making pot. He stopped making cheese before I was born but it is something I cherish because when I was little I would sit in it and play with the farm kittens. Plus real swiss cheese is nothing like the cheese in the stores. I am also a quilter and find the idea of dyeing fabric naturally very interesting. Sara’s book will definitely be one to add to my quilting library.

    Reply
  268. Claudia Mendez on

    I would love to learn how to make dyes from my flowers! This is just what I need to make my pillows more beautiful. Thanks for sharing all this.

    Reply
  269. Kirsten on

    I actually have an embroidered needle book of my Nanny’s. It is hand sewn with teeny embroidered flowers circling the words ‘Needle Book’ embroidered in wonky letters on the front. Then page by fabric page it is full of needles of all sorts. I like to imagine us both lost in the creativity of sewing. It’s something I can connect to her, cooking, homemaking, mothering and sewing. That little book will get passed on for sure.

    Reply
  270. Kathy Keiser on

    I am absolutely fascinated. Especially including quilting with it. I have a wonderful butterfly garden. And to have another use for flowers with dye would be magical. The insects work so hard to keep things beautiful for us and never ask for anything. And then they parish as well as the flowers. To keep the colors form the flowers that the insects work on each season what better memory than a handmade quilt with Mother natures colors.

    Reply
  271. Meg Sullivan on

    So fascinating! I have always admired people who quilt. But this is truly magical. Growing the plants, dying the fabric, designing the quilts! Thank you for sharing all of this!

    Reply
  272. Patricia on

    This month my granddaughter Nell slept under the beautiful quilt that her great grandmother had made for her auntie & mother. Putting her to sleep with those hand stitches snuggled around her & feeling the love of my grandmother was such a gift.

    Reply
  273. FranSak on

    I have my mothers wedding band from 1955. I do treasure that. I make heirloom quilts too.

    Reply
  274. Beth Mundell on

    My mom was a true artist and followed her heart in creating heirlooms: I treasure the set of hand painted porcelain she created for me (as well as for my 3 siblings)….including 13 dinner plates, salad plates, cups/saucers, dessert plates. The pattern is exquisite roses, her favorite flowers. Additionally, she made me several quilts, and other pieces of needle art. She nurtured a love of flowers and fiber in me and I have numerous perennial gardens, keep bees, and create rugs and wallhangings from wool and other fibers.

    Reply
  275. Sheryl Nathan on

    I still live on the farm that my dad bought, which only had some wheat on it. That was in 1950. Every thing that is on this 10 acres my dad planted , built and took the best care of the land. My mother worked every step of the way beside him…. I also believe that my mother was the first Martha Stewart.!! we raised all of our food, and of course we had to make homemade soap among all the other things… we were not off the grid!! we lived just outside of Portland Oregon and my parents worked full-time over 40 hours a week at outside jobs! The second home that my dad build on the property is now 55 years old and this is where I live with all of the memories… and, enjoying all of the dye plants that I raise, and all of the seeds that I buy from Erin!!! Your book sounds wonderful and don’t ever give up the wonderful farm life…Sheryl Nathan

    Reply
  276. MD on

    I have inherited 3quilts from my great grandmother. The fabrics used and the stitching putting the designs together are truly amazing. So happy to know so many are gaining the desire to cherish older quilts but also to make their own to hopefully use and pass down.

    Reply
  277. Sharon Gallentine on

    I don’t really have any heirlooms passed down to me. However, I am a crocheter and made my children and my grandchildren each an afghan. I can only hope they will be cherished and passed down to future generations 🧶💚

    Reply
  278. Lisa on

    I have so many beautiful heirlooms left behind by my dear mum – a ceramic serving plate she received as a wedding gift, beautiful textiles she sewed into clothes for me now captured in the many photos she took of her treasured family, all her wedding cards, telegrams and kitchen tea cards, and I am now really inspired to find ways to incorporate these into quilts using home grown dyes – some from my mum’s own garden. What a treasure! It is brilliant there is now a book that teaches not only harvesting dyes but also making quilts – thank you Sara and thanks for sharing Erin.

    Reply
  279. Jamie Sammons on

    My grandmother had the sweetest blue vintage bud vase. She always put lily of the valley in it and I was so mesmerized by it as a child. I often wonder if it lead me to my love for flowers and growing.
    Last Christmas I was gifted that treasured bud vase. She’s been gone a few years now and I must say, it was the best gift ever! I will cherish it always!

    I am very excited about this book. I have been dabbling with eco dyes and I’m trying to learn everything I can about mordanting and plant dyes. It’s amazing!

    Reply
  280. L Kelly on

    Thank you for this beautiful and inspiring interview with Sara! My maternal grandmother was the most incredible seamstress I have ever met. I LONGED to sew like her and she did give me some simple lessons when I was an adolescent. After she had a stroke, my Mom and I found a little suitcase filled with crazy quilt squares. There are more than 150 of them and they are hand stitched. They were never pieced into a quilt. We do not know exactly who put them together and for me they represent the beauty and mystery of creating something even when you don’t know what the outcome will be. Quilts and storytelling really go together in my heart and mind. Thank you for reminding us of the connection between creation and color!

    Reply
  281. Elissa Arnold on

    My grandmother made a lovely quilt for my mother when she was a little girl. The quilt is a collection of pieces of fabrics that once were dresses my mother wore. The quilt was passed on to me and is a treasured possession.

    Reply
  282. Megan Bakken on

    I have a beautiful wooden collapsible plant stand, that my father used in his house in Maine. I remember seeing the overflowing plants in that stand during the cold winters. I have used it for starting my own garden seed, and love the remembrance of my dear father.

    Reply
  283. Kaylin on

    This is so inspirational, I can’t wait to see the full book. 🥰 I’m lucky to have several heirlooms from my grandmother- most of them pieces of her cookware, but my favorite thing of hers is my simple gold wedding band.

    Reply
  284. Leslie Word on

    Oh my, my heart is jumping with joy! I am so excited as a flower grower who’s passion is quilting, I can so relate to Sara’s struggle between garden and studio. My favorite family heirloom is my Grandmother’s quilting frame. As a child growing up I can remember it hanging from her living room ceiling, showing up with excitement for her to drop it down and let us make a few stitches in the quilting. It will hang in my quilt room when our new home is built but for now it is standing in the corner of my bedroom awaiting its new home.

    Reply
  285. Sarah on

    My great grandmother was a wonderful knitter and I have some adorable knitted dolls that she made for me and my sisters. They are little scarecrow people with baskets and hats and umbrellas and bees and ladybugs on them. I have fond memories of childhood games with my sisters and now my kids are enjoying them, too.

    Reply
  286. Kim Castle on

    I have a couple of what I would call heirlooms from my grandmother. She was the epitome of glitz and glamour to me. Her name was Marguerite but people called her Meg. For some reason, I started calling her Boc as a baby, and the name just stuck. I have a set of ’60s cocktail glasses and a martini pitcher with pineapples on them in gold leaf. I treasure them so much that I would dare use them, except maybe once a year. I also have two light wool jacket skirt ensembles that she had made custom for her. Sometimes I’ll take them out of the closet and hug them.

    Reply
  287. Marianne on

    My mom and I have quilted for years and I have been able to spend more time now that I’m retired. This process of dying the fabric organically reminds me of my mom who dyed her own wool, spun it on a spinning wheel, then knitted us all hats and scarfs! Wonderful memories since she is not with us any longer. Would love to try this process for quilting! Inspirational!

    Reply
  288. Keren Tsaushu on

    My Grandmother ring:
    My grandma survived the holocaust at 20 years old, as she worked to reform her life and find her family. In the meantime work in a little kiosk at the train station in Vilnius.
    A train of German war captives pulled in and they were allowed to buy food in the little kiosk.
    A soldier approached my grandma and asked for a Herring sandwich but had no money – he offered her to pay with a ring he had. The ring had a red stone and a star of David. an unknown family heirloom that has been taken from a different family. my grandma had that ring until she passed away, now in my aunt save keeping it until she passes it down to me

    Reply
  289. Mary Dragich on

    I have the pillow my grandmother made when my oldest sister was born. It was the first pillow used by each of the six siblings who followed. It’s a simple, feather-stuffed pillow. I love the green and white ticking, which now is faded and stained. Every once in a while, a feather escapes.

    Reply
  290. Becky scheller on

    I have a double wedding ring quilt made by an aunt and grandmother from about 1930. It is not is good shape but I love it very much and have it in my bedroom on a rack. I am also a quilter and appreciate all the work and love that goes into them

    Reply
  291. Jeanne on

    I have a beautiful simple wood bench that was made by my great great uncle. The wood is silky from years of use and one of a long line of handmade objects in my family tree.

    Reply
  292. Kathy Stamets on

    I have a hand stitched quilt from my grandmother. It’s kind of a shadow box with all kind of fabric from clothes my mother made so it is a beautiful memory. Like a time capsule from the 70’s. I sew and dye linen and over run with scraps so I ordered Sara’s book to help me in my dye practice and make my fist quilt!

    Reply
  293. Monica Brown on

    My mother in law gave me the scissors she used for 30 years. She has altered some of my clothes, and I was inspired by the way she carefully hand sewed pieces of clothes to make them fit better. I have teied hand stitching to mend and never end up with the beautiful rows I have seen her accomplish. I am designing my own fabric collections this next year and hope to incorporate those fabrics into a hand or machine sewn quilt (using the beloved scissors of course)

    Reply
  294. Toni on

    I have an appliqué quilt and an embroidered pillow, both of which I made for my mom nearly 40 years ago. After she passed away, they reverted back to me and I keep them and display them in her memory.

    Reply
  295. Havaleh Gagne on

    For my family, our cherished heirlooms are the simple tools of everyday life. My grandfather’s candy canister. My grandmothers glass leaf dishes we used to eat ice cream with maple syrup on. The memories embedded in the objects are what make them so meaningful.

    Reply
  296. Marisol on

    My mom was an incredible seamstress. I don’t have any clothing she made but I do have a couple of quilts she made me. I use them but also treasure them like museum pieces.

    Reply
  297. Darlene Martin on

    My Mom passed away a month before I was married in 1979. We were close and it was quite a shock as she was still quite young. My Grandmother (actually my fathers mother) became my surrogate Mom. Every week we would get together and share a meal, just the two of us, across her oak drop leaf table. That table became a symbol of our close and loving relationship over many years, until her passing. Since then, I have moved that tired, but beautiful table to each house where I have lived, until currently it sits in my forever home on a lake in northern Michigan. Now my children and Grandchildren see it whenever they visit, an heirloom from Grandma Margaret, and know she is always watching over us.

    Reply
  298. Grace on

    My grandmother has been so intentional and generous with giving her grandchildren heirlooms. I have lockets from both of my great-grandmothers now, how special is that. I love that they have photos and memories stored in them from a hundred years ago!

    Reply
  299. Karen Jackson on

    I inherited 2quilts from a precious mother mentor who passed away 2 years ago at the age of 91! She loved history and filled her home with historical things and things “of life” that meant something to her. She was a wonderful, wise woman.

    Reply
  300. Stacie Clark on

    Wow! What an inspiration for me to go out and harvest many of the flowers I grew from the Forest library (Cupcake, Terra Cotta, Queen Lime—ohh, I hope I can create a Rose color). This speaks to my heart. Many have gone to seed but I will plant again next year.
    We at Medicine Horse Ranch use recycled horse water and compost to fertilize and amend our high desert soul. This year Erin’s seeds transformed our property-we have over 10 varieties of red poppies we’ve collected from huge 6’ tall Danish Cross, to and understory ov short Red Corn poppies to a massive variety from the Himalayas that has a seed pod as big as your hand! The red poppy collection has been in the making for 20 years. I can hardly wait as red and turquoise are a favorite combo for me as a watercolorist. I am excited to try and paint with the dyes I am going to try and produce. Cotton fiber paper and flower dyes-my hat off to you for inspiring me to take a dive🤩🤩. Thank you both!

    Reply
  301. Barbara Cain on

    I was moved reading about Sara and her creations! Her process and the results are very inspiring. I look forward to stitching a quilt with a talented friend.

    Reply
  302. Shell ~ on

    ~ A favorite Handwork embroidery was made by my Nana Gertrude. It is sewn with thread and tiny beads.
    The writing says: “Welcome Guest ~ Here You Find ~ Friendship and Comfort” I treasure Nana’s collection of tiny beads in glass bottles and tubes with cork tops. I haven’t yet decided how to use them in a fiber art design, but it will be inspired from the Maine ocean coast that I love. I feel like all the additional vintage embroidered pieces that I rescue from yard sales & thrift shops then become my heirlooms, continuing to hold sacred the beauty created by special hands.
    Sara’s book is gorgeous!

    Reply
  303. Bellamy on

    My grandfather was a woodworker in his retirement. I am lucky enough to have several things he made for me as a child. Babydoll bunk beds are the most prized of these! Thanks for the opportunity to share!

    Reply
  304. Patricia Backer on

    Thank you both for coming together and being a source of inspiration. I recently became a beekeeper and have always loved gardening but my older sister Tracy is truly the green thumb of our family. I met my husband on the job when he was an irrigation specialist and I was a landscaper so that was about 25 years ago and I’m not yet 50. Deciding to follow your dreams takes immense courage and you ladies and your families have just that. My mother and father were both artists and the only talent I managed to get was an eye for color so consider yourselves born with a gift. My mom crocheted and I have so many blankets and doilies she hand made for me that she can’t do any longer because her eye site just isn’t what it used to be, but those items I will use for my lifetime and I cherish them so very much. I do paint my beehives with whimsical little bee patterns and it’s so relaxing and fun. I think I know those girls just adore flying back home to their bedazzled hives and it makes me smile and giggle a bit just thinking of that possibility. Cheers to you both and your journeys, keep up the work you do which reminds me of how important living close to the earth truly is. XXOO

    Reply
  305. Julie K. on

    Thank you for sharing your beautiful creations and how much you have worked to be where you are. I recently watched a short video given by a photographer discussing FLOW and the study of happiness by Mihály Csíkszentmihályi. The way you live and create totally seems like an example of that. Brings joy to my heart!! I don’t have any family heirlooms, but as a ‘wannabe’ photographer, I cherish old and new photographs that capture moments in time that we can preserve for future generations.

    Reply
  306. Amy Kaufman on

    A close friend made a quilt for our son when he was born. It remains a cherished possession that we will pass along to his children one day. Quilts have that special quality.

    Reply
  307. Megan on

    I have a patchwork quilt that I made with my grandmother when I was very young. The various patches all remind me of her and of the outfits we both wore then.

    Reply
  308. Maria Colletti on

    I was given a quilt when I married in 1984 from a cherished new sister-in- law who has become my life-long sister. We have been through so much together and counted on one another for so much. I can’t live without her. The quilt reminds me of this.

    Reply
  309. Kristen on

    “the best advice I can offer is don’t be afraid to evolve when your heart is telling you it’s time. This will require making a lot of sacrifices.“ l needed to read this today. I’m at a shift in seasons and I’m completely open to what I’m called to next. In the waiting, I keep tending my garden, knitting, quilting, painting, photographing, until I see the next steps clearly.

    I deeply cherish connections to my past. I have a hand crocheted tablecloth my great grandmother made. I used it for my daughter’s 18th Birthday. I have some pink depression glass that belonged my great grandmother (the other side). I adore handmade. It carries a piece of the maker’s heart. Probably my most cherished item is the wood cutting board my dad and I made together. He left us too soon and the memories I have are extra special.

    Reply
  310. Tami on

    My Great Grandma made all her grandchildren hand made quilts. Mine is the Suebonnet girls made from baby dresses that were worn. It is a beautiful heirloom treasure to have.

    Reply
  311. Jannah on

    Sara’s book sounds like an incredible reference and so beautifully put together! I love timeless creations that can be passed down and hold so much meaning! We have several special dishes and table linens that remind us of dear memories of my mom and grandmas when we use them

    Reply
  312. Karen Packard on

    Though there are several cherished family heirlooms, one that is very special is the embroidered piece of felt cut to fit a clock face that has survived for 144 years. It was created by my great grandmother who was born in 1869. She wrote a note years later explaining when she made it: “My first attempt at fancy work when 10 yrs old the opening for the face of a clock.” The embroidery is pictures of rabbits, lily of the valley clusters and owls. This precious piece, a button, her little thimble, and a wooden darning stick for gloves is kept in an intricate wooden box made by my great-great grandfather.

    Reply
  313. Michele Hoffmann on

    I am currently in the process of making a quilt for my niece’s 16th birthday present. It has brought me so much joy to learn step by step through books, blogs and youtube videos! I am so excited that this may be our family’s very first heirloom quilt! We have had fancy dishes passed down from generation to generation, but never a quilt.
    I also work in a greenhouse that produces beautiful annuals every year for the area garden centers. Flowers, again, bring me and those around me so much joy that I do my best each year to create a small cutting garden in my small yard to share the joy!
    When I opened this email this morning and read about someone who has figured out a way to marry the beauty of flowers with the creativity of quilting my heart swelled!! More joy in the world, what a blessing!!

    Reply
  314. Jeannie Starks on

    I have a quilt that my mother had on her bed as a child–it was tattered when I inherited it, and so I’ve mended it by adding my own hand quilted patches of vintage fabrics that I have collected. I’m also adding patches from clothing that are sentimental to me and turning the quilt into more of a memorial item, something that tells a story.

    Reply
  315. Brooke Sayre on

    I follow both of you because you both fill my world with beauty so I love that you are each fans of the other. When my husbands remaining grandparent on his mother’s side died, the family was torn apart over the inheritance. When my grandmother died, my dad called me and said, “do you want a quilt or the salt and pepper shakers?” I loved that my grandparents had spent their money when they were living and there was nothing left for the family to fight over after they passed and of course I chose the quilt! It is in great condition so I expect another two generations to receive this legacy as well.

    Reply
  316. mary on

    I have my grandmother’s linen tablecloth. perhaps it is time to dye it.

    Reply
  317. Carol Sammons on

    “Prioritizing what makes you happy and letting go of the things that are not serving your soul…” is so inspiring. Your book looks beautiful and I can wait to learn how to dye fabric from the flowers I grow in my garden.

    Reply
  318. Mary M Zeilinger on

    Ahhh an antique mustashe/shaving mug that had belonged to my great grandparents. Its new life is a reed diffuser in the loo. When I was a child ( being raised by grandparents) I used an antique crazy quilt on my bed. It wasn’t pretty by little girl standards. The fabrics appeared to be made from mens suits, greys, blacks, navy with a bit of burgandy velvet. It was heavy and warm. It was most likely made by my great grandmother around the turn of the century. My grandfather the last of four boys was born May 8, 1900 with a 10 year gap between his next brother. It made sense these would be the fabrics she used.

    Reply
  319. Kathleen on

    In all honesty, because I come from a broken family, I don’t really have any family heirlooms to share with my family. But for my own little family, I have tried to work on creating things that I hope will become heirlooms for their future. And if I were to really think about it, what I would claim as my heirloom is the desire to do so…the one thing passed on, even through all the hard stuff, was that there was value in creating. So that is what I do, and that is what I have tried to show my family, with all hopes for healing going forward.

    Reply
  320. Janie Hansen on

    There were 13 kids in my family. I was lucky enough to receive a quilt made by my mom. It was made on a machine and the quality was not very good. But I treasured that quilt until as an adult it finally fell apart. Most of my belongings and clothes were hand-me downs. So having my own quilt made me feel special.

    Reply
  321. SusieKH on

    I’ve been part of a small group of quilters who supply the U of Washington and Seattle Harborview Trauma Center with Comfort Quilts. Having some natural dyed fabric for the quilts would make them even more special. I can’t wait to buy the book. The colors of the fabrics shown in the interview are wonderful. Thank you for undertaking the research and providing us with a wonderful reference.

    Reply
  322. Heather on

    When I was in high school my mum became gravely ill – she was ready to give up but, also having a stubborn streak, I insisted she make me a quilt that she had always promised to.

    It took her over 2 years to do – I cut everything – she pieced it – it’s quite pedestrian but it gave her inspiration not to go… she lived another 30 plus years after competing.

    It’s been to college, lived in several homes, and still on my bed to this day

    Reply
  323. keiko leonard on

    My mother made my daughter’s Christening gown, she learned to smock as soon as she heard I was having my first and so she created a wonderful smocked gown & bonnet. Then she learned to quilt. I only have a lap quilt she made but it’s still my favorite snuggle! While not technically heirlooms per se, everything my mother made during her lifetime are my most treasured items.

    Reply
  324. Haley M. on

    Recently, I received a spinning wheel that my uncle’s dad and his dad, had made. My uncle’s mother was an extraordinary weaver and fiber artist in the Pacific Northwest. She foraged and dyed her own fibers that she then spun. Once off the wheel, she weaved her threads into amazing works. Regrettably, I never got to learn from her as she had passed away by the time I woke up to this craft. I now hold this sense of empowerment to carry on her legacy with this spinning wheel her husband and father in law built all those years ago.

    Reply
  325. Joanne Dubrow on

    My two great passions in life have been growing flowers and fiber arts. I was first introduced to natural dying in a weaving & spinning class I took in my late 20’s. This has evolved over the years to quilt making and felting, sewing of all kinds and just being in enamored with fiber in all it’s forms. Your book looks beautiful and I’m excited to read it and generate some ideas how to incorporate the garden into my fiber projects. Thank you for a lovely interview.

    Reply
  326. Adrienn on

    Nagyon inspiráló, amit olvastam. Remélem egyszer az én álmaim is valósággá válnak. 😊

    Reply
  327. Renee Zarate on

    I’m fascinated by this interview! I do have a few cherished heirlooms, one is a quilt my grandmother made for me in 1969 that has pieces of dresses that all of my relatives wore in the 1950’s and 1960’s. It brings back so many memories. I’ve made a few quilts in my life but that one from my grandmother is a real keeper.

    Reply
  328. mary deLaittre on

    My grandmother was an accomplished quilter and hooked rug maker. Both were made from clothing and linen scraps she would collect and store in overflowing boxes in her attic ‘studio’. I have a number of her rugs both on the floor and hanging on the walls. My mother has the beautiful quilts on her beds and I look forward to inheriting them one day. Both the rugs and quilts are true works of art but not precious as they are used – and enjoyed – every day.

    Reply
  329. Laurie McLane-Higginson on

    I have a lovely piece of furniture that belonged to my great Aunt Minnie. It is a very tall, wooden, elaborately carved, breakfront of sorts that also has a small desk that folds out. It takes up so much space in our house but it is comforting because of all of the memories it holds and are created in it’s presence. I save things in it to reuse in my daily life and creative endeavors.

    Reply
  330. Maryn on

    In the 40s my Grandmother made one of those colorful crocheted granny square afghans with black borders that seem ubiquitous these days. It was part of my childhood until my teens when my mom lent it as a prop in a play that we were both in, “He Done Her Wrong”. The afghan was never recovered. To this day whenever mom sees the living set of Rosanne on tv, she recounts the story of the afghan.

    Reply
  331. Cherylflaitz on

    My mom wanted to make a quilt for each one of her 8 children. We started in January years ago. We got 6 done. We didn’t do mine or my brother that lives in Texas. They all loved them. I made on for my daughter for graduation and she washed it so much it fell apart and she threw it away. Once you start it is like reading a good book you don’t want to put in down.

    Reply
  332. Ruby on

    My mom and dad moved around a lot when I was a child, and nothing was kept if it didn’t serve a purpose so we had no heirlooms passed down to us. However when I got older my great Aunt gave me the hand-sewn christening gown she was christened in as a child and it’s such a treasure. So delicately ctreated.

    Reply
  333. Dee Dee Gran on

    So beautiful and inspirational! I unfortunately do not have any family heirlooms. But there is hope! My grand children are old enough now to understand the importance of passing on and creating new heirlooms. And together we are beginning some new traditions and beautiful creations that we can pass on to our generations.

    Reply
  334. Vanessa Moss on

    Some of my earliest memories were of watching sunlight pour through the jewel-toned squares of my parents’ wedding quilt as I hid beneath it. It felt like a private palace—royal blues and deep magentas imprinted in my mind. It was made for them by my great grandmother Odie, a woman of meager means and great talent who raised my father. After my parents’ divorce and years of neglect, the quilt is in rough shape and I’ve now inherited it since my mother’s passing. Areas of it are salvageable, so I’m having it commissioned into a jacket by an artist in Chattanooga, to keep it in my life and transmute it once again into a precious item of great love.

    Reply
  335. Beth Ann Case on

    I do not really have a family airloom to speak about. But I do remember loving the heavy quilts that my parents used when they took us camping and fishing when we were children. I have always loved quilts and took a class 10 years ago to learn how to make a special one for my great niece. It was very rewarding. Since then, after retirement, I became a flower farmer to help my niece on her flower farm. This has been the most rewarding thing I have done in my life. Learning so much about myself and my creative side ( which I did not know I even had a creative side) has been incredible and very fullfilling. I admire what Sara is accomplishing.

    Reply
  336. Mary Rossow on

    My Grandmother gave me her very old beautiful black china teapot . I only take it out on very special occasions or when good friends are visiting. Monetary I could never part with it because of the memories it still brings to me….

    Reply
  337. Ashley Beeson on

    One of my most treasured items is a quilt that was passed down to me from my great grandma. I’ve been so intrigued with quilting and learning so I can pass one down that I’ve made to my kids one day 💞

    Reply
  338. Heather Minix on

    I have a few of my Grandmother’s quilts that I treasure so much now that she is no longer with us. I have since learned to make quilts and share in that fun with my mom. I hope to pass down my knowledge to the younger folks in the family. This art seems to be dying out her where I live , so glad you are keeping these traditions alive. Love your style of quilts and would love to learn more about the process. Thank you.

    Reply
  339. Mindy Brennan on

    What an amazing way to create an heirloom for family to remember past generations. I love to do hand work and unfortunately have developed tennis elbow. Hand work, quilting and sewing in general has become a lost art. Our society is so intrigued by technology instead of what someone can create with their crafting ability. I was so interested in your interview and it gave me hope that one day I may be able to return to what I love to do. I would love to have the opportunity to read your new book.

    Reply
  340. Liz on

    What a beautiful story and journey shared through this interview! We have just begun living more intentionally and seeking to pass on to our children what was not given to us. Our desire is to live organically through growing and raising our food. Teaching our children to know and appreciate where nourishment really comes from. Off to a good start over the past year we are excited to see what specific part of holistic living becomes our passion . No heirloom to pass on yet but hopeful that a life lived with purpose will become our legacy.

    Reply
  341. Kathy on

    I love the process of piecing and quilting. It’s very therapeutic for me. My sister and I have several family quilts we treasure but the most interesting is a baby quilt made in the early 1900’s by our mother’s Uncle Todd. It’s beautiful and his hand stitching is the neatest, tightest per square inch I’ve ever seen!

    Reply
  342. Anna on

    I have a handstitched quilt from my husband’s family, passed down to the eldest son. It had obviously been well used, as the binding is frayed. A stylised tulip pattern, with tiny handstitching. Just finishing a quilt I started when I was expecting my 6th child 26 years ago. She is now expecting her 1st child, and I thought it was time to finish it and pass it to my granddaughter! Would love to receive a copy of Sara’s book! My daughter & I are followers of your beautiful farm, and seed/ book customers!

    Reply
  343. Bonnie LeBlanc on

    What an inspiring interview! There is truly nothing better than handcrafted products.

    One of my favorite heirlooms is a white dotted Swiss dress and slip handmade for me by my dear grandmother. I wore it for my 1-year portrait (I’m now 68); my daughter wore it as a toddler; and her daughter wore it as well. This almost 70-year-old baby dress survives and is being worn by a doll of my granddaughter! It is in excellent condition which attests to the strength and stability of things made by agile hands!

    Reply
  344. Kirsty on

    My Nan, who died at 99, was a keen gardener and stitcher. She lived at the bottom of the South Island in New Zealand and travelled the world on garden tours … a huge feat from tiny NZ. She visited Switzerland on a tour and bought a hand stitched Swiss girls dress which has been passed around the granddaughters, great granddaughters and even great great granddaughters. Nan inspired my love of stitching and she has done some stitching for me on a 35yr wip sampler I started when visiting her with my first son and was browsing through her collection of stitching books. That sampler takes me back down memory lane to visit to Nan who always had some stitch work project on the go

    Reply
  345. Meg King on

    A year ago we moved my Mom into assisted living. I received my Grandmother’s beautiful champagne saucer’s since my Mom had to downsize. We never got to use these so I now use them all the time. What are we saving things for? Everyday should be excuse enough to use “the good stuff!”

    Reply
  346. Tracy marino on

    My cherished heirlooms are quilts made by my mother and sister who are avid quilters. I love them dearly and am so touched they took the time and effort to hand make something for me.

    Reply
  347. Jane Anne Gibbs on

    A cherished “heirloom” I have is my grandmother’s tomato juicer/sieve. I’ve used it many times to juice tomatoes as well as to sieve juices I’ve made from cooked foods when living overseas. Just this summer in returning to live stateside and tilling the area where my father gardened, I’ve grown a couple dozen tomato plants to have plenty to share with family and friends. I’ve put the juicer to good work making tomato juice that I then use to make tomato soup. Campbell’s soup company will have to count me out this winter to buy their condensed tomato soup.

    Reply
  348. Michelle James on

    This book comes out on my birthday! I’m so interested in growing, drying, and next will be the dying. Thanks for a great interview

    Reply
  349. Janice Arone on

    One of my greatest joys, and also influences have been the quilts of Gees Bend. These iconic quilts helped to support and change our history. I remember during a class at Art School in Virginia…all going on an expedition to collect poke berries for a dye class, as well as cherry tree large branches to be made into tools for glass blowers to form the molten glass. Let’s hear it for hand-made. Janice Arone

    Reply
  350. June on

    One of my favorite heirloom pieces is the cross stitch Santa’s my Mother made for me one Christmas.. I have it hanging on the wall in my bedroom.

    Reply
  351. Lisa on

    What a beautiful way to Garden! I planted madder root a few years ago intending to make some natural dyes and inks/paints. Hasn’t happened yet, but I imagine your book would be a huge inspiration!
    I teach book making workshops so fabric is a huge part as we cover the boards with beautiful textiles. My course A Storytellers Compendium is all about creating an heirloom book to keep memories, pictures, recipes, thoughts…. All those things you don’t want to be lost. Totally excited about this book! Thanks for the opportunity to win one ♥️🙏

    Reply
  352. Karel Klinger on

    I come from a long line of Mennonite quilters in Lancaster County PA and I have made a living selling quilts for 25 years now. This whole concept of growing flowers and dyeing my own fabric is fascinating to think about and could be my next adventure in quilt making. I would love to win a book.
    Thank you!

    Reply
  353. Susan Venn on

    My Mum (91 years old) & living in Australia, where I was born & raised, saved lace made by her Grandmother. A creative friend has used sections of this lace in Australian themed quilts for 3 of my grandchildren – Virginia, Violet and Bodie. I consider these quilts to be cultural heirlooms over 5 generations!!!

    Reply
  354. Margo on

    Erin, thank you for posting this wonderful interview! Your encouragement, education and exposure for young women
    trying to find their way is really heart felt … and so impressive. You inspire so many to do what they love and how to
    make it a success…Follow Your Dreams 101! 👍🏻

    Reply
  355. Carly J. on

    I loved this interview, the photos, and learning more about Sara. I am so so excited for her book. <3

    A cherished family heirloom I have is a tradition of quilting, and some sewing odds and ends from my grandmother. Things like cheap, snappy scissors, and a dozen spools of purple Rick rack. I’m not sure I’ll ever use that Rick rack, but it’s still special because it’s surely part of a project that never came to fruition. The cherished things I’ll protect for my own use are a portable singer 185 from and molnlycke goliath thread. They’re special because they were hers, but also commercially irreplaceable. They represent a moment in her time as a living person.

    Reply
  356. Leslie on

    I have a writing desk from my grandpa, that belonged to his father. If only heirlooms could share their stories…

    Reply
  357. Jennifer on

    My Grandmother’s crocheted doilies and tablecloths ❤️

    Reply
  358. Emily on

    I’m hoping to start collecting and making heirlooms to pass down to my children. I don’t have too many passed through my family. One thing I do have is a crocheted cardigan my late aunt made for me and now it fits my daughter.

    Reply
  359. Kendra on

    We have red china plates that have been passed down to the girls in my family. Red was my great-grandmother’s favorite color and it is so special to have a visual reminder of her.

    Reply
  360. Vanessa on

    I have some teaspoons my grandma used to collect. I love them because they remind me of her.

    Reply
  361. Damita Becknell on

    Family heirlooms are so special to me. I have one very old family quilt from 1908. I quilted among many other needle work projects and only recently dawned on me that my own works might become family heirlooms. What a wonderful talent and how much determination it must take to start from dying fiber to result in usable art! How inspiring she is to me.

    Reply
  362. audrey wagner on

    We have a family tradition of assembling Omi’s (Grandma German equivalent) village, which lives in a small, old trunk and is taken out for special holiday celebrations. She was born in 1906. and it was her toy.
    This happens on our dining room table. Its always fun to see it reappear, replete with houses, churches, tradesmen, people, animals, etc.

    Reply
  363. Julie Cooper on

    A cherished heirloom in my family is my grandmother’s turquoise jewelry collection. I made my first quilt 24 years ago and that quilt has been passed around in our family, even been used on military deployment in Iraq and Afghanistan. Quilts can comfort and bring good memories.

    Reply
  364. Liz on

    So inspiring, both of you! I’m so lucky to have many heirlooms of my family, some being flowers and most notably, the 80+ year old red dahlias that were my great grandmother’s that are now mine to carry on❤️

    Reply
  365. Rinda on

    Looking at your quilts reminds me of our “first quilt,” one that was brought by my great grandmother from North Carolina to Oregon in the very early 1900s. The color palette is very much the same, and until now I hadn’t realized that the colored pieces were likely hand dyed. The quilt has been handed down from oldest daughter to oldest daughter—and I’m not that, so my sister has it—for generations. But it is treasures and in good hands. And it spawned generations of quilters and fiber creators.

    Reply
  366. Nikki Ambrosius on

    An heirloom in my family is a hand embroidered tablecloth that has been passed down for 3 or 4 generations now. Love hearing about all the different heirlooms!

    Reply
  367. Karen Lenore Davidson on

    I will be moving my 102 year old mother to my home and hope to encourage her resuming quilting. Natural dyeing would be great !

    Reply
  368. Ashley on

    I love quilts. I treasure a quilt passed down from my Grandmother that was sewn using her clothing and her sister’s clothing over the years. I also treasure the quilts I have made for my children. I love that they sleep under them every night.

    Reply
  369. Linda Rauch on

    In my craft room, hanging on the wall, is a beautiful watercolor quilt my mother created. She loved to quilt and sew for family. I cherish this reminder of my mother and her heart.

    Reply
  370. Elizabeth Saucier on

    What an inspiration! Thank you! I’ve been dying fabric from nature and making very small heirloom quilts with little instruction. I want and need to learn more! Can’t wait to read this book!

    Reply
  371. Janis Cross on

    When we visited our grandparents there were always a garden growing with vegetables and flowers. We would take naps on the old feather bed which had their quilts that were made from their old clothes. Today I keep those quilts stitched up and clean with all their memories of the family.

    Reply
  372. Anna Reynolds on

    One of my favorite heirlooms is a picnic basket that my mother’s family used when she was little. I now keep all my embroidery and sewing projects in it. It’s my favorite winter pastime and it feels nice sitting next to a reminder of my heritage.

    Reply
  373. Carrie Adams on

    Most of my home is decorated and furnished by something that once belonged to a relative. I love the history, the stories, that come with each piece. I even love the stories I don’t know. :) I have quilts from great grandmothers and a bed and side table from a great grandfather. I had my grandmother write with a sharpie on the furniture who it belonged to and when, as well as anything she recalled about the piece. I had another grandmother write a story on a ceramic hen about when her mother purchased the hen. Memories are priceless. Especially the ones I get to be a part of only because they are shared by loved ones.

    Reply
  374. Christa Callanan on

    My mom is a quilter and she makes quilts for our daughters for special occasions – their births, their 13 birthdays and when they go to college. They will treasure these forever.

    Reply
  375. Phuong Truong on

    Sara is a true pioneer, a soul I am grateful to you Erin for bringing her art in the light . I feel the love she expresses in her quilt . I’m am so excited to read her book. My family and I immigrated to America on a boat, so my mom was saddened that she couldn’t take any family heirlooms . What little treasures she could bring was stolen by pirates. However, I treat her stories as heirlooms I can past on to my girls . Grandma stories are reminders to them that bravery and love conquers all . Thank you Erin and Sara .

    Reply
  376. Debbie Dowling on

    My grandmother made quilts from old clothes and had them on every bed in her home. When she passed in the early 1960’s my sister and I inherited one of the treasured quilts. One of them became too thread bare to use daily so my sister cut the salvageable squares and framed them. Each one of my grandmother’s six granddaughters received one of these precious gifts. The framed piece of quilt reminded us of the legacy of quilting that was left to us. One sister, Virginia (Ginny), my grandmother’s name sake has continued the quilting tradition and is a wonderful quilting artist. She gifts her beautiful quilts to friends and family to treasure. I have a quilt on every bed in my home because of the love of quilts instilled by my grandmother and sister. I have is a photo of the legacy quilt square but could not get it to post here. I would love to share it with you.

    Reply
  377. Evie Opp on

    My grandmother is an avid hand quilter — she made the sweetest yellow rose quilt for my wedding that will keep forever. You can see in the details all of the hours poured in to such a special piece. <3

    Reply
  378. Sandra Martensen on

    Hello: A crazy quilt made by my great-grandmother is a treasured possession. It is a challenge to keep in good repair but my work on it continues the tradition.

    Reply
  379. Terri Robertson on

    I have a quilt of my great grandmothers that was actually purchased for me at auction by my sweet mother-in-law.

    Reply
  380. Julie on

    I feel lucky to have a couple of hand-pieced quilts and several tatted treasures from my dad’s mom and remember clearing out our dining room to set up for the bee when it was time to quilt her latest work. I learned to tat from her more than 50 years ago; her shuttle and one of her thimbles are among my prized possessions. Thank you for the opportunity to win one of Sara’s books.

    Reply
  381. Rebecca on

    My Grammie was always cooking. They had a huge vegetable garden and my she would send me out to pick what she wanted to prepare for dinner. I loved the time I spent with her in the kitchen and better yet the delicious food. It was one of the inspirations for me to attend culinary school. I not only inherited her entire collection of cook books but I was also given the cookbook she compiled with all the family recipes.

    Reply
  382. Myranda on

    My sister and I purchased a pair of earrings for our grandmother as a Christmas gift. She loved dressing up and I recall her wearing them on several occasions. The earrings returned to me following her passing. I find myself wearing them in life’s most cherished and difficult moments when I wish she could be here most.

    Reply
  383. Ann Marie on

    For each of my three children I hand sewed a quilt while pregnant and this was the blanket I brought them home in. With everything I do, it is never perfect….and never a straight line 🤦‍♀️ it is in this imperfection I thrive.
    I would love to know more about the natural dyes and if I could use them for watercoloring.
    Thank you for introducing us to this artist. -Ann Marie

    Reply
  384. Marija Vujcic on

    I just LOVE this so much!! Enjoyed reading this interview and getting to know more about Sara – so inspirational!! My cherished heirlooms are somewhat different but actually similar – they are hand woven kilims my mother in law made herself when she was a young wife and mother on a farm, all the way in Serbia, in a very small village. She also spun and died all the wool for them herself, so that is where similarity comes from.
    But as an immigrant to US, I took quilting as creative language of my soul and home to leave many quilts as family heirlooms for my kinds and grandkids.

    Reply
  385. Lori R on

    There is nothing better than ‘handed down’. It can be a quilt or a doily crocheted by my gramma out of the finest strand of thread. It can be the way my grampa raised chickens, raspberries and bees. In reading this blog I realized the alchemy is present as I didn’t realize as a child how these simple gifts from my grandparents would literally transform my future. What a blessing.

    Reply
  386. Jo on

    I have never tackled piecing s real quilt but have several the are passed down from grandmothers. Rather than stuffing them in a chest they are on beds in my home. If they survived years of use a long time ago – they should survive a few grandkids.
    Love gardening and the idea of flower dyes.

    Reply
  387. Shannon on

    These beautiful quilts remind me of stars, and I can not even imagine how much love is woven into these beauties. My shining star was my maternal grandmother; I think about her and talk to her spirit every day. I have a clock she was gifted at retirement. Not only do I get to think of her/see her when I look at the clock, but it also reminds me of her tenacity. Raised on a farm in New England she went to help during the efforts of WWII, then as a single mother worked and had a solid career for over 30 years. She was always positive, strong, resilient, and always stayed active (gardening, cooking, cleaning, working, making friends, etc.). One of my favorite memories was her laugh which I wish I had been able to record. She was then and still is my lodestar. <3

    Reply
  388. Beckie Dorothy on

    I have been a quilter for many years and love the process from designing to sewing to the actual hand quilting. I love making quilts for people and am currently making one for my niece. I love the thought of hand dying fabric. Sara’s book will be a “must have” for me! Thank you for bringing her to my attention. Blessings

    Reply
  389. Lara on

    My grandma crocheted what looks like fairy webs into a coat for her first grand baby. It is a treasure.🥲

    Reply
  390. Lana Bush on

    My great grandmother’s old dining room table. To hear the stories it could tell…

    Reply
  391. Gregg Lowery on

    My grandmother was a quilter, and she taught me to garden starting at age three. My greatest treasures are the quilts she made to keep me warm for my entire life. Their cool comfort on long-ago Iowa summer nights, their stories from family and childhood reveal the love that is sewn into a quilt. Today I am a gardener and a caretaker to roses whose stories, like quilts connect us to the past.

    Reply
  392. Kassy on

    My mother, who was born and raised in Japan, passed down her haori she would wear around the house in the winter. The fabric is a worn indigo colored linen with patches of green, orange, and patterned squares. Every time I put it on I’m reminded of the deep connection I have with a culture across the world. It is so humbling and beautiful!

    Reply
  393. Brenda on

    I have a handmade teddy bear gifted to me when I was ten years old, Mr.Teddy.
    He caught a lot of my tears through the years, but still looks good. My daughter had him growing up, and now he is packed away, for when he is gifted to her own daughter one day. My precious grandbaby is 2 years old. I’m crocheting a blanket for her this Christmas, and making a quilt for her 3rd birthday.

    Reply
  394. Mary M on

    Sara is so inspiring! Wonderful article! Me and my siblings received a quilt made from our fathers shirts after he had passed away. Such a beautiful, personal heirloom I can pass on to my children. Over the years I’ve collected materials from their old pjs in the hopes of making each one of my children a quilt. I love the memories it will provide for them.

    Reply
  395. Linda Sabo on

    My grandmother made me a little stuffed clown about 58 years ago. She had used leftover fabric from a dress my mom had made for me for first grade. I treasure it and amazed I still have it through all my moves.

    Reply
  396. Ignatius Vigé on

    Being a Louisiana Cajun born and bred, crawfish boils were always a fun experience of family time for me while growing up. My dad used a giant solid copper boiling pot for all of his many boils, fashioned by his own hand from an old-style water heater tank. I was fortunate enough to be the one of his seven children who inherited that pot. Now retired from its former duty, it’s become a treasured keepsake, not only for the amazing memories it holds but also for its esthetic beauty. I have it prominently featured in my garden landscape, home to a thriving peachy-pink water lily. Thanks for asking, telling about it has me appreciating it all over again!

    Reply
  397. Jo lewis on

    Oh my gosh! I have followed both of you over the last few years . To see both of you come together in collaboration gave me goose flesh. You two speak to my heart in bringing the love of earth and art thru quilting and flowers and dyeing of fabric to come full circle . Thank you both!!!
    My treasure that is near and dear is an old quilt cover found in my grandmothers old chest after her passing not sure who made it.
    Thank you ladies for making my day and giving me hope to be just a titch of what you both are.

    Reply
  398. Mariann Brown on

    Quilts and afghans made by grandmothers on both sides of the family are so special to remember them by!

    Reply
  399. Kathi on

    My grandmother’s patchwork blanket that she made out of squares of wool from the clothes that my mom had sewn for me. The squares were crocheted together to make a beautiful blanket full of memories to this day!

    Reply
  400. Carmen Carter on

    I have a hardanger table cloth and piece of crocheted lace made by my maternal grandmother who was from Mexico. She was a wife and mother in the early 1920’s and 30’s and had little to no, modern conveniences. I am always amazed that she found the time to make beautiful items that filler her home and her soul.

    Reply
  401. Summer on

    A set of Depression-era glassware from my grandmother was passed on to me when I got married. I never got to meet my grandmother, so it feels extra special to have something that belonged to her.

    Reply
  402. Emily McAuley on

    I have hand embroidered table cloths passed on to me from my maternal grandmother who received them from her grandmother. We use them all the time and they have held up well!

    Reply
  403. Laura Coke on

    I’m working on my third quilt for my third granddaughter! I’ve been using scraps that I’ve kept from all the clothes I made for my children growing up. I won’t let myself buy any new fabric until it’s mostly gone! They are not as good as yours, but I will get better at it with time! You are so inspiring, and have been following you on ig for years. Hope to get your book sometime soon!🫶

    Reply
  404. Barbara A Roemer on

    In 1920, for the birth of her granddaughter, my great grandmother gathered scraps of shirts and dresses for a pinwheel quilt. Each block has four mostly blue or lavender triangles, with the other four figured. I slept under this quilt all of my childhood, the patterns etched into my dream life. My son slept under it, too, and when he was an adult, my mother retrieved the nearly threadbare treasure, rebinding it. She embroidered her grandmother’s name and date, and her own. Now my grandsons snug under those stitches, fingering the worn fabrics, five generations and a hundred years distant from their dreaming great great great grandmother. Needles and thread march tidily through our family. A new house, three kids, and lean times in the ’50’s? My mother block printed exuberant paisleys on linen for living room drapes. She appliquéd circus animals with floppy manes and tails onto muslin bedspreads for my brothers. For me, a pinafore -style apron with ruffled half sleeves and red buttons marching down the back, a stenciled Little BMiss Muffet on the front, framed by three luxurious rows of deep red soutache. Today my grandsons harvest fruit from our hundred year old trees, pull beets and carrots from the earth, and we cook them up together, me wiping my hands on the batiked apron my mother made for me in the 70’s. No wonder a love of textiles abides: some of my life’s most satisfying work has been in quilting and teaching costume history, design and construction. This year I will pass on the Miss Muffet apron to my grandniece, and with it so many stories, so many lives threaded together.

    Reply
  405. Sara Coppler on

    So beautiful… and how important it is to cherish beautiful craftsmanship, nature, and artistic expression. To me, fiber arts are a form of storytelling and knowledge source. I worked in various parts of North America and around the world for most of my career. Fabric arts: dying, quilting, felting, weaving, etc., would be a common denominator among all cultures. I learned much from the people efforts in textiles. Example: I helped build housing with remote communities in Afghanistan , where making of rugs was their primary income source, in knowing how they weaved the rugs, prepared the dyes, etc. — we could understand how their homes needed to be designed — the length of the main room to accommodate their rug looms, and open areas within their compounds where the women could dye and dry. It was also the first time I tried natural dyes myself and loved going to the street markets where various natural color dyes would be powdered in baskets for purchase by the kilo.

    Anyhoo, I loved to get a copy of the book. For me, my collection of textiles represents my life, like a diary, A few come from my family, but more come from my travel, whether its a table cloth, wall hanging, quilt, rug, napkins, scarf, etc. A component of textiles is that they can pack relatively easy for travel. If you were to tour my home, I would be able to share many stories — I’d be able share pieces of the world and its humanity.

    I’m a recent fan of Floret. And since I’ve settled back in Kentucky two years ago, gardening and flowers are my new passion. Thank you for all you do and for wonderful joyous content you offer.

    Reply
  406. Janice on

    Thanks for sharing Sara’s truly inspirational journey. The natural dye colors are so lovely. The whole process of growing and dyeing and sewing feels so grounded and satisfying. Brava ladies for your efforts and beauty! Fabric is just that…..the fabric of our lives that clothes and warms us. Such worthwhile endeavors; growing flowers and creating fabric art.

    Reply
  407. Megan on

    Love this! An heirloom is my grandfathers super8mm film. I work in film and I didn’t know my grandpa had a film camera until I was grown. I inherited it and I’m so grateful for this connection to my family history!

    Reply
  408. Celeste Moriarty on

    Best memory from my mothers quilting was one made of wool squares. It was tied on top. One of my best friends took on the project of repairing it for me! I love having to use once more. Your book looks amazing, and I hope to win one for my dear friend.

    Reply
  409. Debbie Eliasen on

    I have several quilts made by my grandmothers, one especially worn one that brings back cozy memories every time I look at it. I still remember hunting for specific little squares with puppies or kittens on them. I am a quilter/maker myself and recently recreated a quilt from an old photo of me as an infant laying on a pink and white lone star quilt. The original quilt is sadly long gone, but my new version still stirs memories. Perhaps my most cherished item is my great grandmother’s spinning wheel that she brought from Norway. I feel so fortunate to have it!

    Reply
  410. Charlene Lee on

    I’ve been enjoying my grandmothers recipes and books full of stories about life. So grateful someone took the time to preserve them.
    Thank you for sharing!

    Reply
  411. Pamela Q on

    What a lovely, inspiring lifestyle. I came to gardening and creative endeavors (knitting, embroidery, a smattering of making simple clothes, etc.) later in life after a career in engineering. I always hashtag my IG gardening posts with #ishouldabeenafarmer. Over the past 20 years I transformed my wee urban lot in Denver to a nearly 100% edible landscape (including wildflowers and fruit bushes for the birds and pollinators). Last year, I tried to grow indigo in a small patch. My plants withered while I was away and I also realized I really didn’t have the quantity needed to dye anything. But, yes, lessons learned. While I’ve grown vegetables for most of my adult life, I jumped into cut flower gardening this year with very limited success. I hope that I can harvest seeds and tubers for better results next summer. Low success, but a great amount of learning. I guess I say all of this because the ‘heirloom’ that guided me all my life is my mother’s tenacity, grit and determination. She raised a family allowing (requiring?) all her kids to attend college without us going into debt, so that we would have a better life. Mom dropped out of school at 14 to work to help support her widowed mother. Nothing defeated her. I can only keep trying to make her proud.

    Reply
  412. Gail H on

    One of my favorite heirlooms is actually a set of pillowcases that I made for my grandmother when I was in high school. I gave them to her and later after she died my favorite aunt on my mother’s side of the family inherited them . One day when I was at her house she showed them to me on her beautifully made bed. She said her mother Laura had made them. I went to her linen closet and pulled out some embroidered pillow cases that grandmother Laura had done and compared the two with her. Everything grandmother made was always very tight. These weren’t. After my aunt died I inherited the pillow cases that I had originally made for my sweet grandmother .

    Reply
  413. Mary on

    I have been a quilter for 40 years and as far as I know I was the first quilter in my family in recent memory. There are no surviving heirloom quilts made by those who came before me. As a young woman I created a quilt for my husband’s parents for their 50th wedding anniversary. I collected handprints from their entire family (six kids, spouses and grandchildren) and appliquéd them along with symbols of their life and a map of the USA that showed where we all lived. It was a snapshot in time and a family portrait of sorts. This quilt now belongs to my daughter, who was the youngest family member represented by the smallest handprint on the quilt. She treasures the quilt and hopefully will share its story with her children and they with theirs.

    Reply
  414. Megan on

    Many years ago, before my father died, we made a table together. He was a general contractor and was very skilled. He used scraps from previous projects, like beautifully carved balusters, for the legs. This is an item that will definitely be passed down through generations.

    Reply
  415. Alyx on

    My favorite quilt is one my great grandmother made. It’s so colorful and heavy and unique. It’s one that brings me immediate comfort when I wrap myself in it and one that I cherish for the memories it brings me of the person who so lovingly made it.

    Reply
  416. Emanuela on

    Beautiful and inspiring!
    It is custom in my family to receive a blanket stuffed with wool as a wedding gift. I still have that from my grandmother.

    Reply
  417. Linda on

    My grandmother’s quilts, my sisiters and I just went through a process of getting them all washed and repaired and now we are enjoying them all over, we remember them from being on our beds as kids.

    Reply
  418. Lisa Mittleman on

    One of my most cherished items is a teddy bear made out of my Dad’s handmade baby quilt. The quilt had some rips and stains. But I didn’t want to dispose of it. So I found a woman who makes teddy bears out of pieces of clothing and she made the teddy bear for me. It’s beautiful!

    Reply
  419. Holly Paul on

    My Grandmother made a quilt from dresses she had sewn for me when I was a child. That quilt is a treasure that brings back memories of her love and care for me even though I was too young to understand the depth of her love for her grandchildren.

    Reply
  420. Betsy Funk on

    As a micro flower farm and a quilter this speaks directly to my heart. I have worked to incorporate my floral designs into my appliqué work. Finding inspiration all around me. Thanks fo all you do to continue this tradition.

    Reply
  421. Cheryl Mandler on

    I cherish a doll quilt my Mom made in 1939. The doll’s dresses were made from scraps of my Mom’s and Grandmother’s dresses.

    Reply
  422. Corrie on

    Amazing things can happen when you deeply listen to your soul and follow your heart! Love what you BOTH have created by doing so ❤️

    Reply
  423. Ashley E on

    I revel in Sara’s story and her processes. Looking forward to checking out her book! A cherished heirloom I keep is a white and pink open-knitted apron, with not a stitch pulled out of place. This is so incredible to me because my great grandmother who made this would not have had time to make wearable things just to be pretty, but must have used them all throughout the days and years. In all that time the apron was cared for meticulously, and not a stain or a yanked thread shows.

    Reply
  424. Tisa Brookhyser on

    This book and interview speaks to my heart. Thank you. My love of quilting is ongoing. My need for gardening is essential. It grounds me in the moment and seasons. Now you’ve inspired me to combine the two with dyeing fabric. As a retired Preschool teacher we dyed eggs with natural ingredients. So why not move it into the present. Again, Thank you.

    Reply
  425. Amy DeCastro on

    What a lovely conversation! I’m so glad that you are highlighting this work, and grateful to Sarah for all of the energy poured into sharing her knowledge. Natural dying is on the rise, and I’m hoping it brings awareness to the hazards of industrial scale chemical dying processes…

    My favorite heirloom is my grandpa’s hand drill. I grew up in a farming family with conventional gender expectations. After sharing my interest in woodworking, my dad gifted me the hand drill a couple years ago and continues to collect and send me bits for it. It is a testament to my dad’s evolution in letting go of gender roles. Plus, it makes a satisfying, gentle crunching sound when you use it.

    Reply
  426. Donna on

    I have handmade doilies that my grandmother crocheted. She passed away in 1969 when I was still young. I love the vintage style of placing doilies around the house under vases of flowers. This is particularly symbolic because one of the things I remember most about her were the beautiful flowers she grew. Seeing them and remembering her makes me feel connected to my heritage and the women that came before me.

    Reply
  427. Melissa Schmidt on

    I was inspired to read this interview and about all of Sara’s interests she has combined in her process of creating. I had a dream in my younger of doing something similar with raising sheep and spinning and dying the wool to knit. Alas, life took me a different direction and we left our farm. However, the inspiration of quilting has been passed down from my maternal grandmother who presented each of her seven grandchildren with quilts she had made. My mother continued the tradition by making me a quilt as I left the nest, and I have made baby quilts for all of my ten (to date) grandchildren. All of the quilts represent a labor of love!

    Reply
  428. Nadia F. on

    Wow! Didn’t know she existed! I too garden and sew but I am learning how to do quilts which is a different ball game from garment sewing. So cool. Beautiful work!

    Reply
  429. Connie Howard on

    I have a crocheted throw that was passed down from my grandmother to me I use it every fall. It reminds me so of her warm enduring love.

    Reply
  430. april wilson on

    My husband was gifted an old writing desk from his great great grandmother. It is a beautiful piece which has gone thru many generations and transformations. From being painted, stained and then put back to its original natural state. There are indentations of letters, numbers and symbols all over it. Many generations have sat at the table, writing love letters, sympathy cards and sharing so much emotion. It is tattered and torn, but oh so beautiful. A piece which cannot be replaced or have a monetary value placed upon it.

    Reply
  431. Katrina S on

    So hard to think of a cherished heirloom from my own family, as there didn’t seem to be many tangible things passed on through the generations. However my husband’s Wisconsin Grandmother was a wonderful quilter and had many beautiful creations that passed down to her children and grandchildren upon her death.

    Reply
  432. Cindy Oliver on

    We have some 100 year old cloth toys from family that my sister and I restored. One is a bunny! My sister knits and has started to experiment with dyeing her yarn.

    Reply
  433. Jeannie Evans on

    Our family heirloom that immediately comes to mind is our summer cottage on a little off the grid island where we spent our summers as children . My Dad bought our heirloom cabin in 1955 . There were 7 cabins in a row …we drifted from cabin to cabin as kids and still do . This island gave me a healing place to explore my creativity and belong in a gentle slow way . No electricity …cooking on a wood stove …magic 🙏 I became an artist 🥰 . I believe heirlooms connect us spiritually and create a touchstone to past generations where we feel a deep sense of belonging and a warmth in our hearts .
    Thank you for your sense of beauty and grace you share so openly with your farm and lifestyle . 🙏🥰🌻

    Reply
  434. Rebecca on

    So beautiful! I don’t really have any heirlooms from my family, but as a quilter I hope the pieces I make become the heirlooms I can pass down. Thank you for the inspiration!

    Reply
  435. amy on

    My grandma was a quilter, knitter, a rug-maker, and seamstress. She used damaged antique quilts to make pillows and stuffed animals for us grandchildren, in which I still have some today. But my favorite heirloom, is a red calico prairie dress and apron she made for me when I was 5yrs old (41 years ago). My three daughters have all worn it and it’s still in amazing condition and will surely be worn by my granddaughters some day! I’m grateful to be carrying on the handmade traditional as I, myself, approach grandmotherhood this winter!

    Sara’s work is always inspiring in so many ways! Looking forward viewing her new book!

    Reply
  436. Sherie Siverling on

    I cherish a wood box my grandfather made for my grandmother. When she passed it was given to me and full of memories. She had photos, obituaries, buttons she had saved, quilt patterns (she was an avid hand quilter), post cards from loved ones from the early 1900s and so much more!!

    Reply
  437. Tantris Hernandez on

    Years ago one of my Mother’s cousins sent her a box filled with embroidered tea towels and pillow cases. In that box was a very old quilt top made up of simple squares with flowers embroidered on them. The quality of the embroidery was varied from square to square and my Mom told that her Grandmother had given each of her daughters (3) and her daughter-in-law (my grandmother) squares to work on so they could learn to embroider. It made my Mother laugh looking at the different squares because she could tell which of her Aunts or Mom did each square. It’s lovely connection back to the women in my family.

    Reply
  438. Meegan Davis on

    This book looks stunning and interesting! I have always said that I am going to teach myself to quilt one of these days and the natural dying process seems to be sparking the creative in me!
    I have 2 cherished heirlooms. I have a beautiful brown velvet dress (that I will never fit into) that my grandmother made back in the 1930’s. The cut of it is stunning!
    My second cherished heirloom would be a Japanese Kimono my Uncle brought back for my grandmother when he was overseas in the war. It is hand embroidered in such a way that the huge dragon on it is raised off the silk….it’s amazing! One of these days I’m going to get it framed so I can see it every day :)

    Reply
  439. Amy Spence on

    Great interview.
    I have a handmade quilt from my great grandmother called the “Flower garden”. I love and cherish it !
    I think I’m feeling the urge to get back into sewing/quilting.
    Keep up the great work, spreading the love of gardening and now quilting !

    Reply
  440. Sarah on

    I wish I had cherished heirlooms but I don’t…I am trying to start this tradition by creating special gifts to give my children. I am so inspired by the art of quilt making and plant dying fabric. I would so love to learn more…

    Reply
  441. Valerie on

    My Great Grand Mother silver cutlery set that i use every day to nourrish my self & loved one 🤍

    Reply
  442. Dania Ellingson on

    There is a specific comb in my mother’s family that is probably more beloved than any other item. It doesn’t look like much, just a standard little rat tail comb, but it’s what my grandma used to do all five girls’ hair every day throughout their growing up years. It’s become a physical embodiment of the love shared and the care given, somehow all of that emotionality was transferred to a physical object through repeated use of it. That’s what I love about heirlooms—they hold on to the feeling of memories and keep them safe, so we can revisit them long after life has taken us elsewhere.

    Reply
  443. Chris Bentley on

    Sadly, I have only a small piece of a crazy quilt made of old wool suiting, silk ties, dresses, from the days when people made quilts only of leftover or re-used scraps. The idea of buying fabric for a quilt was anathema to this class of immigrants. Some pieces may have been worn on the boat to the US. Now I have a natural dyeing and eco printing practice, and am looking for enough sit-down time to make a quilt myself.

    Reply
  444. Melanie on

    Difficult to name just one cherished heirloom, but my husband’s paternal grandmother was a prolific crafts person. She left behind a number of embroidered flower samplers and I have been able to incorporate them into gifts for family members (throw pillows, tote bags and worked into quilts). They have all been cherished and are constant reminders of a wonderful woman. Thanks for sharing this interesting and inspiring interview. Be well and take care.

    Reply
  445. Jacqui on

    Without a doubt, my most cherished heirloom is a quilt my sister made for my sixtieth birthday at the start of the pandemic. On my actual birthday, my sister’s family dropped by unannounced to surprise me (all the big party plans had been cast aside). My brother’s family joined by phone. It was a socially distanced and masked gathering in my late October backyard. It was there I unwrapped this gorgeous quilt that my sister had made from material she had on hand. I have never seen such a beautiful quilt. It now lives at the foot of the bed. To this day (three years later) it continues to bring me an untold amount of joy.

    Reply
  446. Juanita Young on

    These are beautiful quilts. I especially like the colors. Wish I had a family heirloom quilt. No one in my family sewed. I have been quilting off and on for years. I always machine quilted, but have fallen in love with hand quilting…it is so zen.

    Reply
  447. Nena Williams on

    What a talented, gifted artist!! I have so many cherished heirlooms passed down to me from both my mother’s side and my father’s side…my Aunt Dimitra crocheted baby clothes, stuffed animals like Paddington Bear, and literally hundreds of gorgeous afghans …of which I have 3 or 4…my dad’s letters back home to his Mom and Dad while he was a Marine in WWII…my mother’s hand-needepointed roses in an oval frame…the list goes on and on… I will only part with all of these treasures when I pass …and my daughter will inherit them. I also would love to explore the hand dying process. It sounds wonderfully dangerous for a person like me who tends to go overboard into any newfound interest!…

    Reply
  448. Megan on

    My great grandmother used to quilt and we still have those in use. But I fondly remember helping my sister quilt when we were little. A good friend taught her and then my sister then taught me how to help but she is the quilter in the family. Each quilt has its own story which is the beauty of this art form!

    Reply
  449. sandy rader on

    I have some lovely antique quilts that I treasure but, the thought of hand made quilts with hand dyed fabrics is sublime! Very gorgeous on so many levels!
    I can hardly wait to dive into this new book!

    Reply
  450. Donna on

    I have a “postage stamp quilt” that was made by my gran mother and great grandmother. It has every fabric under the sun and is worn and tattered in some place but I love it!! I have been quilting myself for 40 years. Even tho I was not taught by either of them it is in my blood!! Love this collaboration of yours Erin and Sara!!

    Reply
  451. Sheila Walter on

    Sadly, I have no cherished heirlooms to speak of at all! My mother was a World War II British war bride who immigrated to the US with one suitcase. My father’s side of the family had no material wealth, or interest in textile arts. By owning this book, perhaps I could create a “new” heirloom for my family.

    Reply
  452. Chere Tournet on

    Erin, thank you for, once again, shedding light on yet another life opportunity. Whether it be dyeing fabric from home-grown plants or sewing together pieces of fabric to make a quilt, the process of self-actualization is taking place. I particularly love the term “intentional” when used as an adjective – as in an intentional lifestyle. During our “Mother Earth News” days we intentionally grew most of our food and exposed our sons to a lifestyle of resourcefulness and hard work. Now, at age 73, I am devoting my intentionality toward floral design and growing all varieties of flowers…many from Floret!

    Reply
  453. Pam Farmer on

    So enjoyed this information about flowers & dying material. I was born & raised on a dairy farm ion southern Wisconsin, however, now live north of Chicago. I have space for a flower garden & needed the encouragment to use them not only for bouquets but as a dye for fabric.

    Reply
  454. Erin Brooke on

    My maternal grandmother made my mother’s wedding dress. The two of them had a very contentious relationship, and the wedding dress (to my mind) served as a way to stitch together some kind of apology for years of childhood trauma. They collaborated on the design and my grandmother’s skilled hands stitched the dress. It is a thing of beauty; made from candlelight satin, floor length, long sleeves, and unadorned. The first of my sisters to marry, had the dress altered slightly. She took the large satin rose on the veil and had it attached to the lower back of the dress. Strings of pearls were sewn to the shoulders. It’s is being stored away for one of the next generation of our children to marry, and to modernize, if they choose.
    I’m inspired to create something of my own to pass down. Thank you for the lovely article.

    Reply
  455. Taylor on

    Sara’s quilts are so gorgeous! I live in New Mexico and would looooove to afford the upcoming workshop in Santa Fe. I do not have cherished family heirlooms like this in my family but intend to pass my handmade goods onto my children.

    Reply
  456. Madelyn Stroud on

    My parents had a double wedding ring quilt with scalloped edges on their bed for as long as I can remember. That quilt held me when I was sick, or heartbroken, or scared. It held the scent of my family home and the warmth of the love inside. It was safety and a promise of better times to come and a optimistic look forward. That quilt inspired me to start my own quilting journey. I’ve just finished my first quilt top and am so happy with its wonky seams and crooked lines because it reminds me of that feeling of home.

    Reply
  457. JoAn Choi on

    Many years ago I made a small wall hanging for my parents, which contained 5 section, each respresenting something connected to their life: i.e. music, garden, grandchildren etc. When their house was emptied after both had passed on, I was able to retrieve the hanging which now hangs in my bedroom.

    Reply
  458. Jan Shefferly on

    Your work is stunning and so thoughtfully crafted. My mother was a knitter. It has been such a joy to share her wares with my grandsons knowing that the sweaters and blankets were made with such love and attention. It brings a smile to see the little blanket that she made for my son draped over the foot of my grandson’s crib.

    Reply
  459. Deb on

    My granma -my dad’s mom- made hand sewn quilts of which I still have mine. They were made from clothing we wore daily. Oftentimes I was in one of those worn shirts or pants out helping my grandpa plant our large gardeñ, or ride the sweet cow ( a beautiful carmel color with the biggest brown eyes..) in to be milked, or some other fun chore (they were fun). When I see that quilt and all the scraps, I see chapters and visuals of those days. I love to sew. I love to craft. My very good friend would let me “play in the dirt” at her farm – as a long time ER Nurse – it was a balm. I have my own large garden now and have been saving seeds, flower heads to see what I can create from them and sew, craft into some memories for family, others.

    Reply
  460. Kristen Barry on

    From my childhood I remember a handmade quilt that we used as a blanket as the weather got cold. I remember thinking it wasn’t beautiful; the colors weren’t lively and the patterns weren’t my favorite. But it was the warmest and most cherished piece in our house. I remember fighting over who got to use it. Even though perhaps the colors wouldn’t “go” with my home’s color scheme today, I still wish I had that blanket since it evokes such a sense of warmth and calm in its memory.

    Reply
  461. Deborah Durany on

    My great-grandmother passed a crazy quilt top to my mom and now it is mine to complete. It is double bed size perfect for my bed. It will take awhile to finish but I look forward to the process. My best friend is a very practiced quilter so I hope she will help me do justice to my beloved great- gran’s masterpiece!

    Reply
  462. Aimée van Drimmelen on

    My cherished heirloom are a small collection of Ukrainian pysanky eggs that I inherited from my grandma. When I first studied the designs years ago it was like a lightbulb turned on inside me and it changed the course of my creative practice. Still today when I feel a creative lull I just pick one up and turn it around in my hands and am re-inspired. That’s the true power of art!

    Reply
  463. Gina Ebbeling on

    I have several of my grandmothers quits that she made by hand and even a quilt that her mother made- they are so special to me!

    Reply
  464. Susan May on

    Love her way of inspiring by example, just living her life, and allowing herself to see where it leads!

    I have a few small paintings that were done by my great uncle. He had Scarlett Fever as a child and it affected his heart. He was too weak to work a traditional job, but spent his time painting landscapes and seascapes in our small town in New England. They never brought in much money, but I occasionally see one of his paintings at a local yard sale or shop, and buy them if I can!

    Reply
  465. Jeri Bates on

    My mother spent the last 20 years of her life hand quilting with an embroidery hoop. When others were trying to persuade her to launch into machine quilting for quicker results, she stayed the course with her embroidery hoops. The work she did was a personal testimony to her life that sadly ending during Covid when she was just 89 years old. Her quilts were lost in transit when her effects to shipped to me after her passing.
    Thank you for bringing back memories of what my mother so meticulously labored with. I am glad to see the artform has not gone away with the speed of our days.

    Reply
  466. Debbie on

    I’ve quilted for quite a few years. I also love to garden. I think I will try next year to plant some of the plants to turn into dyes. My daughter in law works in a quilt shop.
    I think she will enjoy this book for Christmas. Thanks for sharing.

    Reply
  467. Dawnita on

    My great-grandmother, Amanda, hand-stitched a ‘coat of many colors’ for my grandmother as she headed off to college in Oregon. It was made from repurposed clothing from her childhood. It is truly a treasure in our family that we wanted to share. It is on loan to a quilting museum to inspire others. 🌻

    Reply
  468. Kayla McDougall on

    It is always so encouraging to come across kindred spirits. Erin has become a resource for my flower gardening and now this amazing alchemist. I understand the urge/drive to create. I’m a 72 year old who usually describes myself as a frustrated artist. Quilting was my grandmother’s passion and she was my flower gardening instructor. I do feel this is something we need to pass along to others. Thanks for sharing this great find.

    Reply
  469. Maya on

    I have an old oak dining room table that was payment to to my great-grandfather for his service as a doctor. As a child my family ate our meals on this table, and my children grew up eating in it as well.

    Reply
  470. Kendra on

    I’m already a follower on Instagram! I love the beautiful colors from the plant dyes. My favorite heirloom is from my grandmother, who was part Cherokee. I received a beautiful silver bracelet with a large blue-green turquoise stone. It has symbols along the bracelet. It’s lovely.

    Reply
  471. Christine Voorhees on

    My favorite heirloom is a quilt my mother made which hangs on my wall. It’s made with shades of purples and blues and represents so much to me! I can see my mother’s hands cutting the fabric and stitching it together, watch her eyes as she laid out the pattern deciding where each piece of fabric would go, and feel wrapped in her love as she gave it to me.

    Reply
  472. Sandi on

    I have a twin double wedding ring quilt that my great aunt gave me for my HS graduation in 1975, I have no idea when she quilted it, by hand, but I’ve treasured it for almost 50 years. It’s put away in my cedar chest. I sent it to a quilt show, just as an exhibit, but the show judges raved about the size, the workmanship and the main color, it’s an pale orange sherbet. The interview was a great read and I would love to have a copy of Sara’s book. I’m retiring in a few months and I’ve always been interested in dying and weaving, growing up on a ranch in Central Texas, maybe now is the time to just do it! Thanks again Erin for bringing Sara to us.

    Reply
  473. Michelle on

    I made a quilt from all my Pake’s (Pake[Pack-ah]=Friesan for Grandpa) plaid shirts after he passed on at the age of 94. He was a farmer plain and simple. The quilt is treasured by each and every one in my family.
    I follow both of you on instagram and am always inspired by each of you and how you live large and share with us all, THANK-YOU. 🪡🌸

    Reply
  474. Nancy Batchelder on

    When I first took a quilting class (50 years ago) I asked my mom to sew me a jacket with the blocks I was going to make. It was Christmas morning and all my mom said was that I would be happy with my gift. When I opened it I was so shocked that she had made me a jacket with pieces from a quilt that my great grandmother had made that was starting to fall apart from frequent use. Since then I have gotten many antique textiles from my family. I have done some indigo shibori dyeing (I love blue) but have just started studying how to do other natural dyes. Would love to have this book as it includes my favs-plants, dyeing, and quilts.

    Reply
  475. Cathy Bell on

    We have a push pedal organ that came to Colorado on a covered wagon and my great grandfather had it restored. I played on it as a child. I taught myself Greensleeves.

    Reply
  476. Julie Witt on

    My most cherish heirloom is a quilt that my maternal grandmother made from scraps — including from her house dresses and some of the clothes my family wore as kids. It has a wool core; so it is very warm. It is a log cabin design with classic red squares. The outside edge is hand stitched. i truly treasures this gift.

    Reply
  477. Jackie on

    I have my dear mother in laws duck decoy. The head of the decoy comes off and when my kids were little she didn’t care if they played with the duck. My grandkids all played with this duck that now lives at my home.

    Reply
  478. starlene walker on

    My favorite quilt .my grandma made me when I was a young child. It is a doll quilt.my grandma made the squares
    ,and my great grandma embroidered on every square. It has flowers, birds,flower baskets.I love all the hand work and love that went into it. The family would all work together on the quilts. quilting frame always up. so many happy memories.

    Reply
  479. Susan T on

    I have my grandmother’s Singer treadle sewing machine. She made my mother’s and aunt’s clothes with it as they grew up on a farm in South Georgia. She also made two of their wedding dresses. My grand father had a motor installed on it to make it easier for her after many years.
    My husband removed the old motor for me and it’s displayed in my sewing room. I will always cherish it and treasure the thoughts of all she made for her family.

    Reply
  480. Marlene on

    Wow. Sara’s work is so beautiful on so many dimensions especially the process. Now I want to dye my own fabric to make a quilt with flowers grown in the garden. What an heirloom that would be to pass on.

    My favorite family heirloom is my Mama Yola’s metate (it’s a long millstone with something that looks like a rolling pin to grind corn to make tortillas). It’s the same one that she used to make tortillas to provide for her family all of her life. It’s a beautiful reminder of her and all the work her hands did to provide for her kids as a single mom and her sacrifice of such a laborious way to take her of her family influences me today especially in this country and as a mother.

    Reply
  481. MaryLu McFadyen on

    You are following a beautiful path. The natural dyes are beautiful.

    Reply
  482. Crystal on

    A cherished heirloom of ours is a wool jumper that has been passed down 2 generations. It’s so warm!

    Reply
  483. Cathy Heffner on

    I have several cherished heirlooms from my paternal grandmother. I have a quilt she made, in a bow-tie pattern, from the 50s that winters on my bed. I also have the quilting frame she used to make it, made by my great-grandfather. I’ve recently shared her crocheted doilies with my cousins at the family reunion. I’m the only grandchild who sews and crochets, but one of my second cousins is crafty, and I’m gifting her the quilting frame.

    Reply
  484. Ter on

    My most cherished heirloom is from my grandmother. She gave me her wedding band just before I got married and I have worn it as my own wedding band as a daily reminder of the enduring example of life-long love and commitment between my grandparents.

    Reply
  485. Kelli Nichols on

    I have my grandmother’s wedding band quilt, made by her mother, if family lore is true. All from bits left over from sewing the family’s clothes—yet with a harmonious palette and feel. It shows the wear from daily use throughout the decades, which only makes it more beautiful.
    Making natural dyes from my garden flowers has been on my ever-expanding “ garden-adjacent projects” list since visiting the Ardalanish weavers on the Ross of Mull in 2019. I’ll look forward to reading Sara’s book!

    Reply
  486. Kimberly C on

    I have my grandfather’s recipe book. He owned a bakery at one point in his life, long before I was born, and his recipes are all written down in there where my mother shared them with me, and I will get to share them with my son.

    Reply
  487. Holly Haynes on

    My most cherished heirloom is the quilt and knitted poncho my great-aunt made. She sewed and knitted many things for my mom, her own family, and her many great nieces and great nephews. I love covering up with it in the evenings and always have to look at all the many scraps she used to make the quilt. Since I have already named two cherished heirlooms, I would add a third – the bowl my mom used to make all of our childhood cakes.

    Reply
  488. Nancy Lamontagne on

    My mother knitted three granny square afghans for each of us kids. They’re about 50 years old! Still pull mine out in the winter.
    You must have ton of patience to deal with everything that can go wrong as a farmer, creator and artist. I hear you on the goat damage!
    The book looks like it’s filled with a lot of useful, detailed instructions, inspiration and great photography.

    Reply
  489. Halina K. on

    I have two pieces of crochet table runners, one from my grandmother and one made by my mother long ago in what is now Bielorussia. Both priceless and magical as they have miraculously survived the II WW and a “total loss” house fire in Vancouver, Canada. Lucky to have them still…

    Reply
  490. Denise on

    Great interview & so excited for the book! And my little flower farm is in ⛰Colorado⛰ too.

    Reply
  491. Cerelda de Heus on

    I am lucky enough to have several family heirloom quilts that I display and treasure. A stitch to the past, connections to family members who have passed but they live on sharing their creations daily.

    Reply
  492. Ashley on

    My most cherished family heirloom is a small metal sign that says “Galley”. My grandfather was a chef in the navy, and this sign is from one of his boats. I have it in my kitchen and it always brings me closer to his memory whenever I cook.

    Reply
  493. Lena on

    My most cherished heirloom is from my Ukrainian grandmother who was a war prisoner in Italy after WW2. She met my grandfather in the prison camp where they fell in love and married. During the year and a half they spent there, my grandfather purchased a small wooden frame from another Ukrainian prisoner. It was intricately carved with traditional Ukrainian patterns and painted blue and yellow. In the picture frame sits a painting of a woman holding an infant, both of them wrapped in an azure blanket. On the back of this frame, my grandfather’s message to my grandmother is simple but profound considering the situation. “To my dearest Olga, an eternal reminder.” My mother was born several months after this. They eventually came to America where I was born and she gave me this picture before she died. The words on the back are still visible almost 80 years after it was written. I cherish this gift.

    Reply
  494. Jackie on

    My favorite heirloom is my grandmother’s green hand stitched quilt covered in her favorite white dogwood blossoms. Unfortunately, I lovingly used it so much it has become tattered so it is tucked away in a plastic keeper in my cupboard. I have a garden filled with lovely colors of varying strengths and textures. Intentionally and natively planted for my pleasure and personal use, bit I often think they would make wonderful dyes. I would truly enjoy reading Sara’s book not only for the plant dye and quilting wealth of information and guidance, but for her foundational ethos of sustainability and recognition of one’s passion, similar to yours Erin. You are both such inspirational women for our times. Thank you for this interview and introduction to new lost arts.

    Reply
  495. Julie on

    A cherished heirloom is two hand embroidered Holly Hobby pictures my aunt stitched for my sister and I. Unbeknownst to her, my mom, was stitching the exact same ones for her daughters, my cousins, at the same time. They are framed and hung in my craft space so I can admire and gain inspiration from them.

    Reply
  496. Arlene Moseley on

    Before my dad passed away he requested my Grandma Grace to quilt me something special. He passed 1974. He wanted bright colors. I thank God she was able to make this memory happen and only wish that I could have quilted with her. Her log cabin had a quilt loom/frame hanging from the ceiling. Sadly, don’t know if it was taken or burned in the cabin fire.

    Reply
  497. Dinelle Hunsberger on

    My Mom was always trying new things. She was a great seamstress and made many of my clothes. She did wood craving, wheat weaving & we grew the wheat on on farm. She has a curious mind and tried many things. My husbands Grandmother sewed and made quilts. I have a lot of blocks that she made, which I need to get put into a quilt. I have hopes that I can make our Grandchildren a quilt for their High School Graduation. I love hearing about the natural dies with flowers.

    Thank you for sharing! I will be retiring in this coming May, hoping to have time now to do the things I love. I sew and do other things but love flowers and need to try the dyeing process.

    Reply
  498. lynn nicholas on

    my grandma maxine’s hand tatted tablecloth is on our breakfast table on the front porch where we break our fast, take in the morning aire and talk about our plans for the day and our future. with fresh brewed coffee and tea fruit nuts cheese and egs from our hens, we are there every morning from early spring til fall, as weather allows. it is the sweetest moment!

    Reply
  499. Cindy Cook on

    I just ordered your beautiful book. As I approach 70, I’m accepting that there are too many things I still want to do with the rest of my life. It’s hard to tell yourself “No, you won’t be able to this, not and do that too”. What I can and will do though, is immerse myself in the wonder of what you do. I’ll sit quietly with my 95 year old mother, with dementia, and lovingly look at the quilts. She was a quilter. With any luck we can connect over your creations. Thank you for sharing this glorious process.

    Reply
  500. Mariah Oster on

    I have only started to quilt myself this year and have one baby quilt under my belt. I am currently working on a huge extra large kind size quilt right now. It is tough to fit the time in when you work 45 hours a week in a corporation 😅. I already follow farm and folk on Instagram and just gush over her quilts and the alternative lifestyle she lives and it’s definitely a goal for myself to get closer to that.
    One item that I have passed onto me is my mother’s ring. It was originally yellow gold with an emerald (my birthstone) in the middle and regular diamonds surrounding it. Sadly the emerald was cracked down the middle but My husband replaced it with an Asher cut diamond (similar to an emerald cut, to pay homage) and proposed with it. It’s probably my most prized possession. Everyday I look down at my wedding rings and think of my mom (even though she’s a quick call away). It makes me feel so special.

    Reply
  501. Audrey on

    My first paid job when I was 15 was working in a small fabric store specializing in quilting. I was able to sit in on classes, learning the basics. Looking at the colors of Sarah’s seed dyed fabrics brings such calmness to her quilts. Natural beauty.

    Reply
  502. Dani Hainds on

    Not sure if it’s the traditional definition of heirloom but for years my aunt, who is 88, has written on the back of every birthday card, letter, or Christmas card the words “You are special”. I started tearing off the flap of envelope with her words and putting it in a large glass jar – my jar of love. I can think of nothing more personal than someone’s hand written words.

    Reply
  503. Beth Austin on

    I have a crocheted bedspread that my grandmother made during WWII . Crochet thread was impossible to get so she used tobacco twine . It’s absolutely beautiful but so fragile now . She also gifted me 3 quilts and several quilt tops she never quilted .These treasures are so special to me and I hope to pass these down to my granddaughters one day .

    Reply
  504. Jodena on

    I have a quilt my Mom made shortly before her death from cancer. I never even knew she had made the top until my aunt gave it to me 35 years after her death. I did the quilting on it and cherish it. She always liked handwork and so do I.

    Reply
  505. Catherine Morgan on

    Thank you, Sara. Erin, this is beautiful. My Grandmother’s baking tools are my most cherished heirloom. With them come memories of her hands. When I was little the held me and today they hold my hands whenever we’re together. I always felt her warmth, strength and love. When I was a child she taught me her alchemy in the kitchen. We made all kinds of things together but most memorable is bread. I have many cherished memories of Grammy’s hands working with dough. She’d say, in time your hands will know the way; there is a feeling, a knowing that will come to you. Today, at 104 years of age, she continues to teach my nieces her art. She is such a gift to me.

    Reply
  506. Beth on

    Wow following Sara now. Can’t wait to get her book. I’m an avid quilter, gardener and primitive rug hooker. I love to dye my own wool

    Reply
  507. Sharon Jauck on

    My mom’s sister loved to quilt. When Aunt Freda passed away, her daughters, who were moms’s flower girls in 1950, gave mom one of her sisters quilts she had always loved. My dear mom passed away last Oct, at a wonderful age of 94. Now, I am enjoying this treasured quilt.

    Reply
  508. Nanc6 on

    My Grandmother has made dolls from fabric and embroidered faces on them for my girls. A beautiful keepsake from their Great-Grandma. My Mom found time to show her crafty side while working 2 jobs and raising a family. She painted and crafted wooden items with her sisters and sold items at craft fairs. I grew up learning to sew my own clothes, garden, cook and survive on limited income. We have many keepsakes from our talented, resourceful women and men in our family, during an era when this is how most country families lived.

    Reply
  509. Anna-Marie Larson on

    Also, I’m a Denverite, and a Colorado workshop for spinning and/or dyeing sounds like something I could wrap my heart around.

    Reply
  510. leah on

    wow, i love how slow and intentional this work is. it is so beautiful that you are following your heart, and taking those steps to reach big goals.

    i think one of my favorite family heirlooms is a wool blanket from seymour woolen mills. my family owned and operated the mill in indiana and it’s so special to me to have a piece of that family history.

    Reply
  511. Anne Belanger on

    I learned to quilt from my sister, I am not nearly the quilter that she has aspired to be but I continue to love the soothing process of choosing fabric and designing and making it come to fruition. I will forever be in gratitude to my sister for her patience and guidance in showing me that I can make something that will bring joy to the receiver.

    Reply
  512. Joanne Lee on

    My grandmother made the most glorious dresses for me when I was a toddler. She always included a matching dress for my doll. The quality and colors.. the fabrics, they’ll be cherished forever and hopefully I’ll see them again being worn once I have a granddaughter. 💞

    Reply
  513. Anna-Marie Larson on

    What a beautiful and magical calling. Plus, some inspiring words that were perfect for me this morning.
    I’m fortunate to have numerous family heirlooms, so I’d like to mention two. I have a cherished granny square afghan crocheted for me by my paternal grandmother some fifty years ago, and the colors are still so very perfect for me. And, I have a lovely portrait of my maternal grandmother’s mother. She died giving birth to my grandma in 1904, so she’s a bit of a mystery, but I adore her.

    Reply
  514. Anne McGilvray on

    My most cherished heirloom would be a large tablecloth crocheted by my granny. Whenever we would visit, she always had a project on the go. I never learned the craft from her but I am in awe of the intricate beauty she could create.

    Reply
  515. Heidi on

    I have a set of beautiful china made in France from my great, great aunt. She brought the set on a boat from France made in the early 1900’s and they have graced 3 generations of family dinner tables. I feel very connected to them , especially because they have beautiful hand painted roses on them.

    Reply
  516. Brooke A on

    My wedding band was my great great grandmother’s engagement ring. It’s very simple, but I love the shared history that this family heirloom represents.

    Reply
  517. Sarah on

    I love piecing fabric together but never manage to go all the way to a fully quilted bed covering. Last year I found a hand stitched quilt top at the thrift shop pieced in the 40’s. The fabrics are of little flowers, polka dots, small patterns and tiny people running with hoop and stick. There are even funny little elephants. It’s a traditional wedding ring design, just large enough for a queen bed. It embodies beauty, resourcefulness, humor and perfection. I could feel the labor and love in this piece and was inspired to complete it. Heirlooms have a beginning, and I hope that someday it will be an heirloom on my granddaughter’s bed, as it brings her great delight to look at it.

    Reply
  518. Nancy McPherson on

    When I was in high school, my mom made a patchwork quilt for me out of fabrics that she had used to make clothes for me and my sister when we were young. The backing was a sheet that was my bedspread when I was very young. That backing lasted for 35 years before we redid it about 3 years ago and retied the quilt. My kids all want to claim the quilt as their own. It is already an heirloom.

    Reply
  519. Robin L. on

    I have many of my grandmother and great grandmother’s quilts. I cherish them all. Thank you!

    Reply
  520. Jenna on

    What a beautiful interview, incredibly inspiring!

    Reply
  521. Carol Bernthal on

    My mother made me a quilt out of dresses both of us wore from childhood into adulthood. It’s one of my most cherished possessions and I feel her love every time I sleep under it. I love your work and look forward to trying natural dyeing.

    Reply
  522. Maria Babcock on

    I really enjoyed reading this interview. I can hardly wait to check Sarah’s book out of the library.
    I recently started to weave. I’ve been a knitter for many years. Also my friend and I collected gallons of marigold flowers that are waiting in the freezer to be used for dying yarn.
    My heirloom piece is a very old linen sheet woven by my Mother or Grandmother. They both had the same initials so it’s unknown.

    Reply
  523. Gail Friend on

    This sounds like a beautiful book. I’m so interested in learning about dying fabrics for the handmade flowers I make for my bridal/fashion designs. I love the word Alchemy too. I use “the Alchemist Spell”. To me alchemy is taking something ordinary and creating extraordinary, often without being able to explain how.

    Reply
  524. Cynthia Boyd on

    Incredibly amazed, inspired, and touched by this gentle and gifted lady. I have a number of heirlooms haunting walls, desk drawers, and tiny nooks and crannies of my home in St. John’s, Newfoundland Canada. But one of my favorites is a pair of decorative hair combs that my great, great grandmother wore in a bun at the back of her head (and I believe my great- grandmother and grandmother donned in their own buns as well). These were rescued from a house fire so they are slightly battered, but they have a rich and layered history, coming down through myriad generations of my mother’s family from Dubuque, Iowa. All the women who used or admired these hair combs worked with their hands, gardening, preserving, and loving plants both wild and cultivated. Though I have been too nervous to use these combs as they are so fragile, I, too, am a gardener and sometimes I dye a few things for the fun of it. I obviously come from a long line of ladies who take pleasure in similar things. After reading Sara’s story and her journey working with plants to create stunning creations for others, I started thinking about heirlooms and the hair combs came to mind. Sara’s life and work are balm to the soul. Thanks Erin and the Floret Team for sharing this with your readers and viewers.

    Reply
  525. Melissa Wilson on

    My name is Melissa and I spent many years learning textile crafts such as rug hooking with recycled 100% wool (as is and over dyed), cross stitch, tapestry weaving and then knitting. All crafts I could do while visiting with people, watching tv or listening to books on tape or pod casts. As I’ve grown older arthritis in my fingers is keeping me from doing some of those things so I’m trying to relearn sewing. I follow Sarah on IS and just ordered one of her kits—my winter project when I can’t be in my native garden.

    Reply
  526. Elizabeyta on

    I would have to say I really do not have a cherished physical heirloom from my family. I cherish the skills my family has taught me and I try to pass on to my boys. The biggest learning is that we can really make anything we wish to.

    Reply
  527. Wendy on

    I have an appliqued quilt made by my mom when I was a baby 70 years ago. I love to piece tops for quilts and have also tried to dye fabrics with plants. I was happy to read through the interview with Sara as it pertained to my favorite things, quilting and flower gardening. Thank you!

    Reply
  528. Martina Freeman on

    My mom was big into fine pewter pieces. One year my sisters and I pooled our money and gave her a beautiful pewter coffee/tea serving set for Christmas. It made her cry happy tears. Today I am the proud owner of that set.

    Reply
  529. Deb Boes on

    Very interesting and inspiring read. My sister is a quilter, my ancestors were florists. I still have my late grandmothers wedding ring quilt. It is a bit tattered but I’ve always loved it and will cherish it. She’s been gone almost 50 years.

    Reply
  530. Shauna Rawlins on

    My mom makes all things rig hooked and has spent years dyeing her own wool. I can’t wait to get a copy of this book as a gift for my mom. She will love it!!!!

    Reply
  531. Sarah L on

    I have a few of my grandma’s dresses that I cherish. The fabric is old and stained in some places, so I’m considering making an heirloom quilt with them. The same goes for a number of old chicken feed bags that her and my grandpa used on the farm they once had. They used scraps of fabric with fun prints that are now vintage, so I’ve been stashing them away for a special project.

    Reply
  532. Tracey Lamb on

    I have a hand sewn quilt passed down from my Great Grandmother to my Grandmother to my Mother and now to me. I use it and it brings me so much joy and comfort-knowing the hands that so patiently and lovingly created it and with the thought of passing it down for generations to enjoy for years to come. I love being a part of my “fabrics” past and knowing that my children will be well versed on its origins and can be comforted in it for years to come as well. Meaningful intentions official purpose -shared and inherited and moved forward= Success for past, present and now future 🥰❤️🙏

    Reply
  533. Kim Fuller on

    Congrats on the book and I LOVE the quilt. My grandmother was an artist and seamstress. She immigrated at the age of 21 from Germany with her sister. She was a seamstress by trade only because her father told her as an artist she would never be able to make a living. Well, she ended up becoming both and made a great life for herself. She sewed for the Dodge (yes the cars) family while living in Detroit, Mi and did exceptional work. I have many heirlooms from her but two of the most precious ones are a water color painting of roses and irises that is stunning. She never had any formal training in art, just a natural talent. The other is my wedding gown. I showed my Gram a picture of THE dress in a magazine and she made it just like the picture. She made the pattern and covered the tiny buttons that went all the way down the front. It is beautiful and I still treasure it, but the time I spent with her while she made it was a bigger treasure. She was such an inspiration to me and was a blessing to all who knew her.

    Reply
  534. Katie English on

    My cherished heirlooms are my grandmothers teacups passed down to me. But in the world of quilts, my auntie started a tradition of making quilts for all of our children, it is a beautiful tradition and the quilts can be passed down for years to come. Thank for the inspiring and beautiful work!

    Reply
  535. Heidi Klammer on

    How inspiring! I feel like I am on the edge of jumping into a new endeavor and I found Sara’s story and advice very compelling. Thank you Sara and Erin. Making things from plants you have grown is something I would love to do. And I have long been interested in quilting. Though I have a sewing machine, I find the process of hand sewing so much more able to become part of my life, so much more portable and meditative. Thank you for sharing your art and process with us.

    Reply
  536. Andrea on

    My grandmother and my mother crocheted beautiful fine gauge items like tablecloths and doilies. I cherish them all

    Reply
  537. Cessie on

    Sara’s story is beautiful, and I remember her from blogging days, like several others have commented. :)
    My mother gave me my great grandmother’s handmade quilt from the late 1880’s…so special. I’ve been wanting to learn to quilt forever (and also to grow a dye garden and experiment with dyes) so this book is timely.

    Reply
  538. Jacquie on

    I love her story of alchemy! Im in that place of needing to transform my art. Thank you for the inspiration!

    Reply
  539. Kayla on

    I have my Grandma’s cooling rack for baked goods. She had MS and died before I could get to know her, but I like to think about the years of lovingly made treats it has held!

    Reply
  540. Kristina Olsen on

    My grandmother was making a quilt for my father when he was born, but she died before she could finish it, so I’ve been finishing it myself. It’s an alphabet quilt, and she had all the blocks penciled out and most of the fabrics cut. It feels so beautiful to continue some thing that she started, and to work with those vintage fabrics.

    Reply
  541. Aretha on

    Perhaps one of the most grounding item we have is from my great-grandmother. It is a smallish home made wash board. A piece of flat board with metal wires driven in horizontally to make the ridges. I was told she made it herself. If so, that too tells a story as does this humble tool that shows the evidence of hard use.

    Reply
  542. Felicity on

    How lovely! There really is magic in seeds & soil and turning them into heirloom quilts is so special. Can’t wait to read the book!

    Reply
  543. Rebekah Kristovich on

    My cherished memory is my childhood of growing up out in our garden with my sisters. We built a tunnel under the blackberries- we climbed trees daily- we picked endless amounts of apples and pears for canning- and my mom grew so many flowers! My 2 sisters are master seamstresses and quilters! My other sister and I followed education and became teachers. We spend hours sharing plant ideas and out in the garden. Now all retired – I am back to my childhood foundation of becoming a flower farmer – built on my foundation. This book is beautiful!!

    Reply
  544. Sue on

    PS. Loved all the photos included showing us Sara’s process and the results. The range of colors of fabric she has been able to create is so impressive.

    Reply
  545. Laura K. From Mount Vernon, WA on

    My mother in law hooked rugs as wall hangings from long strips of wool she sewed together. Her wool was sourced from scouring many thrift stores and garage sales. She made her own artistic folk art inspired designs with farm scenes and animals. I have several of them and cherish them all.

    Reply
  546. Lori Wolford on

    My cherished heirloom is a ladies gold pocket watch & chain. My grandfather in Nebraska, whom I barely knew, sent it to me in the mail when I was about 12 years old, living in WA state. I am the only female born to the family in 60 years and the gold watch belonged to my 60 year old aunt, the only female in the family at the time (born in 1890s). She was a school teacher and bought herself a watch. It is engraved with flowers, ribbon and her name, Lotta.

    Reply
  547. Nancy Tate on

    I am honored to have a beautiful hand sewn heirloom quilt from my grandmother in-law. She had a collection she shared for keepsakes (to the family members she felt had interest in owning one). Felt honored then to choose one and to this day cherish it, and the time that was spent with her admiring the work of her quilts. I’ve always had an infatuation and love for the time and beauty of handmade quilts. 💙💜🪡🧵🤍

    Reply
  548. Kacey on

    My favorite is tatted lace dresser scarf from my great grandmother. It’s quite old fashioned these days but spoke to my seamstress heart since I was a small girl. I had it specially framed museum style to preserve it for my grand daughters.

    Reply
  549. Lea on

    Love love LOVE Sara’s Instagram page! She’s one of the first people I ever followed.
    As far as heirlooms, I don’t have anything from family, but the closest thing would be the vintage dresses I used to collect. The attention to detail, the fabrics, the uniqueness, and imagining who once owned and wore them had me hooked.

    Reply
  550. Giselle Young on

    Thank you Sara. Your words about prioritizing and letting go are deeply intuitive. Our quilts are gifts marking milestones in our four children’s lives; each a celebrated memory, a marked heartache, a passing, a goal, a gift with an intent to share love and hard work.
    Thank you for igniting courage to create.

    Reply
  551. Mickey on

    I guess I’m the one creating family heirlooms. I have been a quilter for 36 years and have made many quilts for family including a large hand appliqued quilt when my daughter was married 22 years ago. I was told the only person in my family who quilted was my grandfather, who was an engineer on the railroad here in Washington state. I love Sara’s work and have followed her on Instagram for a long time.

    Reply
  552. Sue on

    I’ve enjoyed reading through the Comments of the many family treasures cherished by others. I wish I had a few family quilts to enjoy!
    My grandparents and their predecessors seemed to be more focused on baking than stitching. I have enjoyed recreating many of their favorites over the years. I was intrigued by the many labelled “Walt’s Favorite _____”. Turns out my Dad’s mom wanted to make sure my mom would be able to make her only son’s favorite recipes after they married and moved from the area.
    I have a lovely collection of varied teacups my mom’s mom collected as she tried out various patterns when deciding on which china pattern to select.

    Reply
  553. Amanda on

    I love the intention and thought that Sara conveys in this interview. I started quilting after my first child was born, and I cherish the time that I get to spend wrapped up in it with my family.

    Reply
  554. Tricia on

    My great-great-grandmother’s bedside lamp is now in my house. I never met her. She died long before I was born. But the thought that she touched it, maybe read a book under it at night, bring me great joy. She spoke only Czech and was from Czechoslovakia (present day Czech Republic).
    This book intrigues me, but I especially would like to gift it to a friend of mine. She’s a mother of 5 small children and has hand-dyed fabrics and is currently using her fabrics to finish a machine-pieces, hand-quilted quilt for her oldest child, a 12-year-old boy. I have no doubt she is making an heirloom for him and will likely make even more, as time goes on.

    Reply
  555. jennifer on

    I have a beautiful quilt made for my parents back in the sixties. Unfortunately I don’t have any information about it… who made it, the story of the fabric selected etc.

    Reply
  556. Suzanne Meyers on

    This is so special! Erin, thank you for introducing us to Sara. As for my heirloom, it was a recent gift after I did a post on Think Pink. A friend of a friend in France saw it, and was excited to use up the bits of pink calico she’d been saving. Then she made a separate quilt for my goddaughter, whom she’d also seen on my social media. New heirlooms and traditions are a beautiful thing too! P.s. my birthday is 9/ 26. :)

    Reply
  557. Karen on

    As a gardener and someone who dabbles in quilting, I look forward to reading Sara’s book. My favorite keepsakes are quilts I had commissioned for my daughters as young children. Both girls were adopted internationally through orphanages. So I don’t have the typical newborn photos and keepsakes. I saved my oldest daughter’s clothes from age one to three and had them made into a lovely snowball design. The quilter worked the decorative buttons, pockets, and decals into the quilt. For my youngest daughter’s arrival, I had everyone give me two squares of fabric; one for a patchwork quilt and the other saved with a note from the participant.

    Reply
  558. Jeanne Mare Werle on

    I worked as a fabric dyer for a small woman run dress company when I was in my 20’s in NYC. Later in life I started a company doing color consultations for paint & interior / exterior surfaces. I worked on my boyfriends organic farm for many years along the way. Then one day I was seized by the flower fairies & have begun to come home to all these elements as one. I literally wept when I started to order seeds this year from Floret. My Dad passed on young & my Mom drifted away so not much made it’s way to my brothers & I. But I have this one embroidered piece my Mom did of an Apple Tree hanging in its original falling apart black frame. I see it as her reaching out for something she couldn’t name, something that was buried in her soul. I see her in that piece in ways I never saw her in her dailiness.

    Reply
  559. Dee on

    One of my most treasured heirlooms is a set of glass Christmas ornaments that belonged to my grandmother. They’re still nestled in their original boxes which are marked Poland and you can faintly read a price of 10 cents. I have very few items from my grandmother so these ornaments are extra precious to me.

    Reply
  560. Ciara on

    Hand knit sweaters from my grandmother who grew up in a thatched cottage in Ireland and began knitting as a child to stay warm. She taught me to knit and I have been exploring more challenging projects lately!

    Reply
  561. ellen mccarthy on

    I have a beautiful antique tea cart that was my mother’s aunt. Very unique and special to me.

    Reply
  562. Monica on

    My cherished heirloom is my Dads bible. He was a pastor and passed away when I was little. Although I have chosen a different path for myself as far as religion goes there’s something special about the Bible’s soft pages with his writing in the margins.

    Reply
  563. Megan S on

    A cherished heirloom in my family comes actually from a friend that is another talented fiber artist, Meg Callahan. A beautiful quilt made for my first baby, Tulsi. Dyed with indigo 💙🩵 there is nothing like receiving a gift made by hand with love.

    Reply
  564. Jessica Jidas on

    I have always loved quilts and the stories they tell. We do not have a family quilt, but we have many objects that remind me of my grandparents and always bring up the memories and stories behind them when people ask about them. We have an apple press that was my Grannys, and several of her cows from her ceramic cow collection. The memories and stories the objects hold are what make them so wonderful and special.

    Reply
  565. Gail M on

    Sara is an inspiration! I have been following her for years….since her blog days. Congratulations to Sara on her beautiful new book!

    Reply
  566. Terri on

    Quilting is definitely a sacred art. Her work is beautiful and her story is truly inspiring. Thanks Erin for bringing her to us!

    Reply
  567. Char patane on

    I have my mothers measuring cups. After she passed away I had to have them because of all the times she helped me while I was learning to bake and cook.

    Reply
  568. Dawn on

    I have three siblings, and when we were young my granny crocheted each of us our own quilt. Not an itty-bitty quilt, but a full-size quilt. She made four of them! I can’t imagine making one. I’m 53 now and still have it and use it every day. She taught me to never treat things handmade with love, precious, and put them away, but to use them.

    Reply
  569. TJ on

    For me, my most cherished family heirloom is my son’s name, which he inherited from our Fathers.

    Reply
  570. Ingrid Harrison on

    I have a beautiful chest from my grandmother in Holland. It datess back to 1930’s. I love to store my special things in there.It brings back memories of my grandparents and tge times i spent with them.

    Reply
  571. Anne Kelly on

    I coordinated 5 crafty women to help me make a pink floral quilt made from my daughter’s baby dresses. At some point I realized that all I ever dressed her in was some form of pink floral so I had a dozen or more dresses to work with. The quilt is just a basic 9-square pattern, I cut up the dresses and salvaged as many squares as I could from each dress then I purchased a coordinated solid or small dot print fabric to go with each. Each dress formed one of the diagonal lines, the row where I used it was determined by how many squares I was able to get from each dress. I saved all the embellishments; collars, side ties, ruffle linings and used those to embellish 9 different teddy bears and two ruffle trimmed pillows. Nothing cuter than a bear with two arm ruffles for a dress and a matching side tie for a hair bow. One crafter helped me plan and sew the quilt, one crafter quilted it on her big quilting machine, one crafter machine embroidered my daughter’s 4 names on a square for each corner, and one more crafter hand embroidered little flowers on each name square. I am a more garden and food focused crafter and an all around “planner” but not a seamstress. I was so lucky to find four amazing women that would work with me to bring my little girls childhood back to life in a quilt that will be cherished.

    Reply
  572. Brenda Kerton on

    How exciting. We already grow a number of flowers that can feed used for dye making and learning more will help us expand our offerings and try some new things!

    Reply
  573. Lauryn on

    Sadly I have never had a cherished family heirloom. I’d seen and heard stories from people who have a special piece that had been passed through the generations. Knowing this I decided that I was going to pass something on to my family, and through exploration, I realized that I was finding many things I wanted to pass on to my family. My hope is that they are cherished for years to come. It’s all gotta start somewhere

    Reply
  574. Leslie on

    “The weight of something that isn’t feeding our souls feels a lot heavier to us than taking the risky leaps of faith that are required to evolve.” I’m crying. This line reverberated deep into my soul as someone who has been afraid to take that risky leap. I turn to my prized collection of tulip oil paintings that my mother passed on to me to ground me back into my self, to safety, to connectedness. It’s a verdant triptych with pops of orange and yellow. The colors vibrate with love and memories, and it’s my favorite heirloom ever.

    Reply
  575. Tracy B. on

    I have and cherish a quilt my grandmother made with her mother when she was a child. She is always with me even though she passed 13 years ago. She was born in 1915.

    Reply
  576. s on

    My favorite heirlooms are the quilts. None is artsy. Each one embodies the immediate necessity of staying warm.
    We are so blessed to have the luxury of time and other resources to make our necessities beautiful.

    Reply
  577. Susan Rodgers on

    I have made several quilts in my lifetime and thoroughly enjoyed the process but I had never thought about died fabrics and then bringing flowers that’s been grown into the garden to life in a quilt. What an amazing transformation. That is a wonderful thought process. I love hearing the story of how you got started it’s so inspiring and encourages me to follow my heart more instead of my head.

    Reply
  578. Jennifer Smith on

    My favorite family heirloom is a quilt crocheted by my grandmother. I love this story and inspiration It has provided.

    Reply
  579. Cindy Kettlehone on

    This interview was wonderful and so inspiring! Our family has a baby quilt made by a relative for my daughter before she was born. I’d love to make heirloom quilts myself for all of my children.

    Reply
  580. Linda Hancock on

    My grandmother, Emma, made quilts for all of her grand-daughters and the grandsons who married while she was still alive. I cherish the one she made for me. I appreciate her example of working hard to achieve goals. She was an amazing woman.

    Reply
  581. Amy F on

    My most cherished heirlooms are a box of cards and letters I have from my grandmothers when I would go to camp. They would both write and send me pictures and fun things and it’s just a wonderful reminder of who they were to me.

    Reply
  582. Erin on

    My mom crocheted my daughter a beautiful baby blanket that she loves to be tucked in tight with every night, and won’t sleep with anything else. I hope she uses it for her own children someday.

    Reply
  583. Alex Schultz on

    My sourdough starter has been around for 225 years! I purchased it from a elderly woman off Etsy who uses the meager sums generated from her dehydrated starter sales to help relieve financial burdens in retirement. Though this starter isn’t an heirloom from my family, and though the yeast varieties have certainly changed over the centuries, the art of sourdough making is certainly an heirloom venture if ever there was one! It’s humbling to think of the many mothers and grandmothers and aunts, daughters and sisters who have participated in the great and simple art of wild yeast bread making from this very starter I have in a jar on my counter. I intend to maintain this starter and to pass it on to my children. I will ensure that they are very well acquainted with it when that time comes. As my children dust their little, chubby hands with flour and squeeze the dough through their fingers, as they form oddly shaped bagels and roll out uneven tortillas, and as they rejoice with giggles and squeals as the boule comes out of the oven, my heart is full, knowing that these are the makings of precious home memories that will carry these beloved babies through the rest of their lives.

    Reply
  584. Krista on

    I have old dish and silver wear from my great grandmother from England. Such beautiful items in their simplicity and wear from use over the years. And that simple everyday items were made so beautifully, ceramic bowls the perfect shape and covered in tiny looking cracks, a simple serving spoon made of silver with the most comfortable shape for holding and function. Compared to fast made products these days these items are art forms themselves with personal meaning. 🤍

    Reply
  585. Etta on

    My Mother’s Bible, with all her lovely cursive notations and thoughts, each time I find a new note it feels like she’s here with me again.

    Reply
  586. Chelsie on

    A hand quilted quilt from my Great Aunt ❤️.

    Reply
  587. Mandy on

    I have an heirloom quilt my grandmother passed down to me when I went off to college. (She ran a tobacco farm for years.) To this day it sits in my kitchen, resting on a chair. It has warmed me, my girls and my husband. It would be the first material item I would grab in a fire.

    Reply
  588. John Kemp on

    I love hand dyed fabrics and this book looks amazing. I can’t wait to pick up a copy (or two). We cherish a handful of hand-quilted throws that my wife’s great-grandmother made. They hold a prominent place in our home–both decoratively and in regular use. Thank you for such a great blog post. As always, so thoughtful and inspiring.

    Reply
  589. Kristine on

    I have a kids ride on John Deere tractor that my great-grandfather received when he was a JD dealer. It’s been lovingly restored and used by many children since!

    Reply
  590. Annie on

    Thank you for sharing this amazing artist with us! Without a doubt, this book will inspire many to embark on a beautiful journey of creating.
    I recently attended a wedding with extended family and surprised my family by wearing a vintage dress my grandmother made and wore many years ago. Costume jewelry was included! It was a fun way to connect with my mom’s generation at the gathering.

    Reply
  591. Toni Chumbley on

    Oh this is such an exciting story,, my husband’s family had been in the textile business for fifty years and I ve often thought about doing quilting of something beyond grandchildren blankets.
    Also I’ve started gardening with flower’s for the happiness they bring.. I live in the PNW and last year started using floret seeds and this summer produced many flowers that I saved .. for next years crops I’m excited to read your book.. maybe I will have new quilts in the nearer future..

    Reply
  592. Fay Aubuchon on

    I love the idea of ethically sourced fabrics! I have two quilts made by my aunt and my grandmother. They are my most treasured keepsakes. They are not as pretty or fancy as what is made now, but I can still remember my grandmoher running her hand over one and pointing out dresses she and her sister wore, then made into the quilt when the dress was too worn to wear.

    Reply
  593. Marla Yetto on

    I fell in love with quilting as a young girl. Throughout the years, it has given me inner peace and immense joy. It has also nurtured me through intense grief. I am truly grateful for it all. Many of my works of art live on in the hands of others to whom I’ve given them. That feeds my soul the most, knowing those I love so deeply love the quilts I made specially for them.

    Reply
  594. Shasta Brander on

    I would like to make an heirloom quilt for my grandchildren since we don’t yet have one.
    Using natural dyes would be a new adventure.

    Reply
  595. Nicole on

    I keep a tiny compass my grandfather used during war to guide him. He passed almost 10 years ago, I had the honor of being with him in his final moments. I miss him.

    Reply
  596. lorraine cotter on

    My gran mother-in-law made a lovely little wooden stool. I guess originally it was made for milking cows. However, now we don’t have cows but it was passed down to my husband(an only child), and I love this dark brown little stool. My own children used it for fun, playing etc. and now my little grandchildren have it.

    Reply
  597. Kathie Lewis on

    What a lovely life connecting with nature and expressing that beauty through her craft. I remember my grandmother teaching me to hand sew clothes for my Barbie doll. Being the oldest of eight, I don’t have them, but she taught me a love for creating things. Among my many crafts, I made clothes for my infant daughter that she now treasures as an adult.

    Reply
  598. Jetta on

    A handsewn wedding ring quilt from my paternal grandmother and a worn to bits handsewn quilt from my maternal grandmother are two of my very most treasured possessions. I hope to recreate the worn to bits quilt someday. Thank you for the opportunity to win a book!

    Reply
  599. Lee S on

    An old rocking chair…all the babies in our family have been rocked in it for several generations.

    Reply
  600. Miwako on

    I don’t really have anything called heirloom, but had a dream about giving something to our kids. I made a quilt of some kind to each kid hoping they would love them. They did and those quilts are mostly tattered and nowhere close to be handed down. 😅 This kind of rekindled that dream. I’d better make a step. Too many things I want to do and time is short. I enjoyed this interview very much. Thank you. 😊

    Reply
  601. Leah McIntosh on

    Love Sara’s work! One cherished family heirloom is a baby quilt made for me by my grandmother.

    Reply
  602. Stacy Hollingsworth-Barnett on

    I cherish the Grandfather clock my dad restored 40 years ago. The ticking reminds me that each second is priceless. The chiming of each quarter hour refreshes his memory in my heart. I too continue the knowledge of restoring clocks that he taught me and share with others the wonder of vintage timepieces. If only clocks could talk, the stories would be magnificent.

    Reply
  603. Ariel on

    We have a number of beloved quilts made by family members including a beautiful hand knotted circular flower quilt made by my great grandmother ❤️

    Reply
  604. Margaret on

    My dad loved wearing cotton t-shirts that commemorated events in his life: best grandpa, my daughter is a paratrooper, where in heaven is Zim, etc. After he had a stroke, he could no longer pull shirts over his head. My mom gave the shirts to a friend who made them into a quilt. My dad is now in heaven and when I visit my mom, I crawl under that quilt and feel a hug from my dad.

    Reply
  605. Molly on

    What a beautiful process! Thank you for sharing all of this. My favorite heirloom is a wall quilt my grandmother sewed of some desert flora and fauna. My father said this was the only thing she ever sewed. I feel the desert in my bones and am so glad it accompanies me through my whole life!

    Reply
  606. Kathryn Flom on

    I have a pillow cover from my Mother, that is linen, in tangerine, squash, cream, and sky blue. And the figure is an Art Deco girl and then it is hand embroidered. It is my treasure. It must be over 100 years old!
    Kathryn Flom

    Reply
  607. Krystal Thorne on

    One of my fondest childhood memories is of the handmade quilt from my Nana. It was pastel multicolored with the profile of little girls in white bonnets all around the edge. Oh how I adore that meaningful piece of warmth and labor of love from my treasured Nana. She is coming to live with us next year and one of my hopes for our time together is that she will teach me how to create quilts for my own children.

    Reply
  608. Zanné de Villiers on

    My granddad painted me a blue pillow case, with a colorful wild daisy on it, in 2001. It can still see him sitting at the table, concentrating to paint it perfect for his granddaughter. In the right hand corner he wrote ‘Oupa’ (Afrikaans for granddad) with a big, red heart next to it and then my name.

    Reply
  609. Libby on

    We have many cherishes heirlooms in our family but my favorite is my great grandmothers spinning wheel. I come by my love for fiber naturally I guess!

    Reply
  610. Monique LeBrun on

    I am a quilter and a gardener! Reading about how Sara was able to combine the two creative arts got me very excited about how I could incorporate the two in my creative endeavors.
    A family heirloom that I love is a wall hanging of a rooster that hung in my room as a child. It brings back great memories of my Dutch heritage as it came from the Netherlands

    Reply
  611. Star on

    My mother-in-law gifted me her mother’s wedding band (so my husband’s grandmother’s ring) before we got married. It’s a simple little thing, but it feels very precious to me. Another favorite heirloom of mine is a painting by one of my husband’s grandmothers. It’s a beautiful floral piece – she was very talented.

    Unfortunately I never really had any heirlooms from my family’s side.

    Reply
  612. Gaby on

    I love that the author allowed her soul to guide her decisions in life and that that led to her accomplishments. In my family we have fabrics that are are not exactly family heirlooms passed on through generations but that my mother began gathering and collecting and that will be passed on to me and my siblings. These are woven blankets and shawls from South America, where my mother is from and they embody a rich and ancient tradition that shapes part of my Mom’s history. I love quilts for the way they do the same.

    Reply
  613. Janet Shope on

    My Grandmother (MawMaw) as we called her, was probably the biggest inspiration in my life for all things simple and soul fulfilling. She crocheted an entire queen size bed topper by hand, along with multiple quilts, such as a fan quilt and a wedding ring quilt. She did all of this while tending to cooking, cleaning and watching all of us crazy grandkids. She did all of this until she was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. I was really young when she was at her best, and never got the chance to learn how she did all of the things she did, and for that it’s definitely my loss. She was amazing, and I would aspire to be half the person she was.

    Reply
  614. Jenn Abbott on

    My mother passed down to me a a shell-shaped jewelry holder that my father bought her when she told him
    she was pregnant with me. She gave it to me when I found out I was going to have my son. I absolutely treasure it!

    Reply
  615. Pippin Christiansen on

    My grandmother had six children and loved sewing. She made clothes for her children and quilts. The first 20 grandchildren all received a denim quilt made from recycled jeans. I’m the only quilter in the family. When my grandma passed my aunts asked if I would like to finish some quilts that she had stashed away. I received some of her characteristic denim quilt tops and a number of tops that were clearly very old. One of her sisters recognized the fabric from dresses they wore as girls in the 40’s. This particular quilt was a pattern of H blocks. Her mother’s name was Hanna Helene, my sister is named Hanna after this great grandmother and they grew up in Hurricane, Utah. I don’t know what the H stood for, but it was the prettiest of the quilts. I finished it and gave it to my sister.

    Reply
  616. Stacy Martin on

    I have a piece of embroidered fabric framed that my grandmother did. It’s got a Bible verse and oodles if flowers all over it. It hung in her house when I was little. It brings back childhood memories everything I look at it

    Reply
  617. Rudy Crownhart on

    I didn’t grow up with heirlooms but I have created them for my own children as the years have passed. Most involve fabric. Creating special quilts and snuggling under them has gifted my children and myself with happy memories for years to come.

    Reply
  618. Erika Stephens on

    My Grandmother, Astrid, was my first portal into the world of quilting. During Summer break, I would ride the train to spend a couple of weeks with her and my Grandfather. She would take me thrift store hunting. She loved to find silk ties which she repourposed into incredible story book like quilts. She would hand embroider animals and insects, hearts and stars and the names of our family members. Each of her sons and their children received many of Astrid’s beloved quilts. My Grandmother’s quilts are some of my most beloved treasures.

    Reply
  619. Valarie on

    My grandmother quilted and before making any quilt, she pieced a sample square. After her death I was given all of her quilting stuff. I took all the sample squares and created a one of the kind quilt top. The finished quilt is now on our bed making me so happy.

    Reply
  620. Kathleen Witt Ryan on

    Fascinating, inspiring interview! My heirloom is my wooden rocking chair with beautiful engraved detailing on the back rest. My grandmother painstakingly refinished this chair when I was born, and it’s lovely. I used it as a child, though it’s not necessarily a child’s chair, nor is it suitable for a large adult. “Just right” for me…

    Reply
  621. Heather Shea on

    Originally from the UK and heirloom quilts weren’t very common. I’m starting to create my own quilts now to start that tradition as it’s such a gift of love.

    Reply
  622. Martha Anderson on

    We have quilts made by both grandmothers – I love them as they are thick and pieced with fabric from old suits and flannels- so cozy! I absolutely love your beautiful creations and thank you for sharing

    Martha Anderson

    Reply
  623. Bonnie Olesko on

    I am thrilled to see the emergence of more artists living and sharing creative and sustainable knowledge. I am from a pioneer background but also raised in the city. I returned to my ‘heart roots,’ living on the land, farming, creating expressions of gratitude from nature through art. Quilting has been on my ‘someday’ list and at 73 years old I am ready to start! Thanks for sharing this information from Sarah! Bonnie

    Reply
  624. Jocelyne on

    One of my dreams on our farm is this kind of work. I appreciate that she doesn’t mind being the amateur naturally in the start. Wonderful interview.
    A family heirloom I’ll mention is also a quilt.

    Reply
  625. Ashlee Crook on

    Without a doubt, my cherished heirlooms include a set of cherry wood night stands my grandpa made. After WW2, he lived in Washington state and made the wooden welcome signs at National parks. He made these tables during that time and I can’t believe they found their way to me!

    Reply
  626. Emily on

    This book sounds lovely! My partner and I are following the farm dream and it’s finally becoming a reality. I’ve wanted to leave my mainstream job to pursue this full time and this feels like yet another push in that direction.

    My great uncle created a family tree and researched our ancestry back to the 1800s which for descendants of the enslaved is pretty amazing. He bound copies and mailed them across the country to all the families and it is a treasured piece of our family history.

    I also have heirloom pieces of jewelry from my grandmothers that are irreplaceable.

    Reply
  627. Lucy LaFayette on

    My cherished heirloom is my father’s wooden skates. He and his family immigrated to America from Holland in 1950 after the war. The skates are one of the few belongings he was able to bring with him to start a new life.

    Reply
  628. Sarah on

    My grandpa carved the most amazing ducks out of wood. He made me one when I was just a year old. It is my most treasured heirloom.

    Reply
  629. Alli on

    My family is a bunch of ranchers and horse breeders, my grandma made me a quilt when I was a young girl of palominos and other patterns of my favorite horses and so many other quilts over the years that I will hopefully get to pass on to my children and theirs. A book like this is absolutely what my family has been about living and resourcing from the earth to make beautiful things. So excited for this book!! Thank you!

    Reply
  630. Mercedes on

    Very inspiring interview!
    My most cherished heirlooms are the baby clothes me and my brother wore when our family left Cuba in the mid-60’s. Families were not allowed to take anything out of the country, only the clothes on their backs. These baby outfits are simple, handmade works of art, and a reminder that even in the most trying times, there’s always room for beauty.

    Reply
  631. Sandra Andersen on

    Since my mom made it, it is not very old yet…maybe 50 years old, but the quilt she made me is becoming an heirloom to pass on to our son, who thankfully values meaningful family possessions. She and dad had four daughters and my mom sewed ALL of our clothes, except for slips and coats we got for school each fall. From her scraps she made us each a quilt, using the scraps from each daughter’s collections. I look at my quilt now and can remember very vividly which skirt, dress, etc., was made from that piece of material, all the way back to kindergarten- I’m 73 now!

    Reply
  632. Lorrraine on

    Love the connections of botanicals with fabric arts. I had a neighbor who taught me some about natural dyes with the botanicals on our land. She was a weaver and gave me a beautiful set of placemats I still have.

    Reply
  633. Lezlie Lawson on

    My grandmother, Granny, was a quilter and her quilts were on all the beds in my family home. Like the rag rugs she also made, they weren’t intended to be works of art but they certainly were. Sadly, they were “used up”and fell to pieces over the many years they kept us all cozy. But now they still provide very warm memories.

    Reply
  634. Katie Mendelsohn on

    I am not sure that a plant can be a cherished heirloom but I am so grateful to have several of my grandmother’s old peonies now growing in various corners of my garden. They make me think of her and her love for growing flowers and the joy she taught me to find in the garden.

    Reply
  635. gail champagne on

    My heirloom piece is a bit of crazy quilt from my grandparents house It inspired me to take up needle arts as a young woman. Love Sara’s approach to quilt for the “ground up”

    Reply
  636. Deborah Batson on

    My Aunt Jeans hand knit Aran cardigan made with traditional Irish cream wool, dense, rich with lanolin, twisted cables, leather buttons, the warmest garment I own.

    Reply
  637. Shelley on

    I am not sure if this would be considered a family heirloom that is passed down…there is a very large black walnut tree that was planted by my great aunt and great grandmother in our backyard. It provides shade, endless black walnuts, gorgeous winter branches that create dark lines every which way out our window, and so much more (lovely dyes too).

    Reply
  638. Donna on

    Lovely interview. I love things handed down generation by generation. I have a quilt my Aunt made a very long time ago. It was my Mom’s and I inherited it and treasure it. I remember going to my Aunt’s house in a very small, rural Tennessee town. She had a farm and I remember looking up and seeing a big frame tied high to the ceiling. It was my Aunt’s quilting rack that she could lower to work on her quilts. I was fascinated by her and her quilting and of course her delicious food! I am also a gardener. I have been on 3 different garden tours and I have a small greenhouse that I designed to look like an English cottage. I follow Floret and I buy Floret seeds for my cutting garden. The seeds are wonderful and I always get beautiful blooms from them. More so than any other seeds I have used in the past. My garden is perennials. I love flowers! I am thinking about making a medicinal garden at some point!

    Reply
  639. Dejia on

    My two favorite artists/makers collaborating?! What a dream!!

    I’ve been a quilter for most of my life, which I inherited from the women in my family. I started sewing when I was about 5 years old making dresses for my Barbies. I started making quilts in my late teens and grew to love quilt making! Now that I’m in my 30’s I started making heirloom quilts for my friends who get married, have babies or buy a house. This year I got married and I’m got my very own heirloom quilt!

    I’m such a huge fan of both Sara and Erin so seeing these two collaborate is so awesome! I hope to see more!

    Reply
  640. Eileen McCarthy Mendonca on

    Growing flowers and always wanting to start quilting, I am so excited about this book! I believe it will give me the motivation especially adding the next level of dying the material with things I have grown!
    Thank you for sharing and being inspirational.
    Eileen

    Reply
  641. Britany on

    I don’t come from a family of heirlooms, so I’ve started learning how to make them myself. I started with a sourdough starter that I can pass on, then started sewing little dolls for my daughter. This year I started the process of learning to quilt and, after getting a feel for the process with my first three made on my sewing machine, I just started hand quilting a beautiful oversized take on a carpenter’s star quilt. I have always felt as though natural dyeing is the next step in my journey, so I can’t wait to see Sara’s book.

    Reply
  642. Patty Ward on

    My mom is a quilter and both of grandmothers were. But there is one special quilt that I have from my father’s mother. I have the last wedding quilt she made for her grandkids. It was our wedding present and I cherish it because she made it for me and was not able to keep making quilts. I’m also a big gardener and grow flowers to brighten my life and others. I love the homesteading way of living and wow, how cool is it that Sara dies her own fabric. Love this!!! So fun to read this interview. Hugs!

    Reply
  643. Patricia on

    I enjoyed your interview with Sara. Fabric, colors, flowers and dyes all in this beautiful setting fills me with joy. I treasure a very small quilt my daughter made for me when she was a teenager. I look forward to reading Sara’s book. Thank you for sharing.

    Reply
  644. Diane on

    I remember that my granny always had a project that she was working on, either an afghan, making dolls or quilts. She made many quilts and I have several of them. My favorite is a dutch doll quilt that she made me when I was little. All of her quilts were quilted by hand. I can remember sitting with her at the quilting frame and trying my had a quilting. I have not made my first quilt yet but I love to sew and hope to start making quilts. The most difficult part for me is deciding what colors I want to use.

    Reply
  645. Jeannine on

    What an amazing interview! I was touched by all the comments shared by others about their cherished family heirlooms. My favorite heirloom is from my grandfather who was born in Philly in 1914. His family was poor and he worked in stables around the city. When he was 12 years old he won a pewter gravy boat for a horse show he was in while representing one of the stables owned by a wealthy family. The gravy boat is my favorite thing to use at Thanksgiving and I am so grateful that kid from Philly grew up and thrived.

    Reply
  646. Rachelle on

    Beautiful work, Sara!
    Quilts have been an important heirloom in our family. My grandmother made each of her 30 some grandchildren a quilt!

    Reply
  647. Tim on

    My mother was a quilter, and for her eulogy I drew twelve pictures (a 3×4 quilt like she made for all her grandchildren) that told the story of my mom’s life in a quilt from my perspective. My cousin is a quilter and she took those 12 pictures and made the quilt of my story with my mom, including the “text” of the eulogy I had written out and a copy of the program from the day sewn into the back side of the quilt. It’s priceless and will be passed down for generations to come. The day after the funeral, as we were going through “stuff”, Mom’s last quilt was there which was made from a hodgepodge of leftover fabric from decades of sewing. My sister asked the siblings “After that eulogy yesterday, is anyone even going to fight for Mom’s last quilt, or do we just hand it to Tim?” lol My daughter slept with that quilt every night until she left for college.

    Reply
  648. Terry B on

    I am still trying to locate two quilts my grandmother made that have been lost through time. One is a traditional pieced quilt and the other is covered in lace she tatted. I have managed to save some of my mother’s favorite handkerchiefs and am trying to find ways to save them for her great granddaughter. A quilt may be the answer.

    Reply
  649. Ronna Husby on

    My husband’s grandmother’s sturdy rocking chair. She was born in the late 1800’s in Minnesota, the daughter of Norwegian immigrants. We have a cherished photo of her holding our newborn daughter while in the chair. Now I rock her child, my grandson, in that same chair.

    Reply
  650. Joanne Burke-Vernon on

    Quilts have had an ancestry presence in my life. Passed down quilts had a daily presence on many beds. I have also made many quilts, mainly to give away. A devastating house fire took them all away. The rebuilding of the house has been healing. We returned to the house 18 months after the fire. Serendipitously a neighbor presented us with a handmade quilt upon our return. She had no knowledge of the quilts that I lost. Her generosity has allowed me to open my heart once again to the presence of quilts in my life. I live in gratitude 🙏

    Reply
  651. Allison on

    Such a lovely interview! My family heirloom is a very old, intricately carved, silver bread basket. It has been handed down through the generations in my husbands family. I bring it out at every special occasion and is a reminder of parents, grandparents and great grandparents that have gone before.

    Reply
  652. Bonnie Sue Boyd on

    I loved reading about Sarah’s journey and about how she uses flowers for her dyes. It seems like a fascinating process. Makes me wonder if I can try this from my garden. When I was born a work friend of my grandfather’s made a beautiful butterfly quilt for me. It has such special meaning to me as the moment I was born a beautiful yellow butterfly landed in my grandmothers kitchen and she knew I was born. Being her first grand baby, this was our special bond.

    Reply
  653. Suzanne W on

    Thank you for the interview and inspirational story.
    When my children were young I used to sew their clothes. I wish I would have known about
    using plants for coloring cloth years ago. It sounds so interesting. Today I have a vegetable and flower garden. My brain is busy thinking about other natural ways I can use the flowers.
    I feel inspired to try something new.

    Reply
  654. Kate Mrozowski Lim on

    When my Mom died in June, my aunt and I were tasked with giving away her quilting fabric and quilts. I had no idea that in a 10 year span she had made dozens of beautiful quilts. She was so humble about them, didn’t show them off, but she should have. They were stunning. Now I am labeling them with her name and guessing at what year she made them. My favorite heirloom is one of her quilts with a pinwheel style. It’s an incredible way to remember her.

    Reply
  655. Linda Dunning on

    I can’t wait to buy the book! I have a large crazy quilt wall hanging that my mum made to “use up” fabric that she had. She had never made a quilt before. There is not one block or embroidery stitch that is repeated. When my husband designed & built our house he moved a door so there would be room to hang it. He has always thought of it as his quilt because he loves it so much.

    Reply
  656. Maria Doss on

    Treasured possessions is a cliche but so appropriately applied to the quilts and quilt tops I’ve inherited from my female ancestors. My grandmother’s wedding quilt is a “white quilt” made of muslin. Each square is embroidered in deep red over the signature of a family member and the date, 1923. The quilt is hand quilted but never bound. I’ve been keeping it in my grandmother’s cedar chest for the past 38 years, since her death. She kept it there since 1940, when her husband passed away at an early age. Maybe that is why it was never finished and used. It is a dear possession. Thank you for your beautiful work.

    Reply
  657. Marilyn on

    My dearest aunt passed in early April. How precious it was to cuddle under the baby quilt she sewed for me 63 years ago and tell her how much her love, generosity and creativity inspires my life.

    Reply
  658. Katherine Hogan on

    One of my sisters recently passed along a family heirloom as a gift to celebrate the completion of my kitchen remodel. It’s a ceramic pitcher decorated with painted blooms. They look like peonies. The surface has taken on a fine crackle throughout the glaze. It’s probably 100 years old or more. It belonged to my mother’s mother who was a lifelong farmer in Alabama. I have fond memories of visiting her farm when I was a child although I never got to know her because we lived so far away. The pitcher doesn’t hold water so I keep it filled with dried hydrangeas from my urban flower gardens. It sits on a shelf in my renovated kitchen and seems to resonate with a connection to the energy of farming.

    Reply
  659. JoS on

    This looks like a beautiful book. Combining dyeing and quilting with all natural material is a gift.
    Thank you.

    Reply
  660. Debra on

    My favorite heirloom is a gold pocket watch that my grandfather fixed and gave to me when I was young. He was paralyzed from the waist down when my father was 3 months old and spent many years in the hospital. He taught himself watchmaking from a mail order course and I was always completely fascinated to watch him work.

    Reply
  661. Shelley Winship on

    My great-aunt Emma was an avid quilter, and I still have the sweet quilt she made for me when I was a child. She asked me to pick out the colors and even some of the fabrics, which gave me early confidence in my love of color and pattern.

    Reply
  662. Maria CW on

    Gardening and quilting, two of my passions! I love the idea of dyeing the fabric, such a connection to the two. Would treasure the book. Erin these blogs are such inspirations. I am in wonder how you do it all, but treasure reading the blogs and seeing such beauty!

    Reply
  663. Shelah on

    My nana was the youngest of three girls who grew up on the iron range in Minnesota. Their mother, my great grandmother, opened and ran a resort on a lake with cabins and a diner – for all the miners. My nana would have to clean out the cabins, sweep the diner, serve miners, and make beds. She often would grab a jar of olives and a book- and hop in the canoe near the cabins, to float away from the chores. (Only to be found out quit easily by my great granny.)
    Nana had a beautiful old chest of drawers on tiny wheels that squeak when moved. Her older sister had the top two drawers, the middle sister got the middle drawer, and nana got the lower drawer so she could reach.
    I had this set of drawers in my room as a little girl – given to me with the story. Every time I pulled one of the soft drawers for my own clothes, I thought of the cold winters, hard-working summers, and legacy of our family. We all have a story.
    Thank you.

    Reply
  664. Virginia on

    Both of my grandmothers are quilters. My maternal grandmother made me a beautiful patchwork quilt when I turned 11 which I still use and cherish to this day. My paternal grandmother made a quilt for each grandchild as a gift when they graduated high school, so I also have a cherished quilt from her.

    Reply
  665. Eliza on

    Our kitchen table! Simple wide wood planks that show the hour and years of pancakes on Saturday mornings, holiday dinner prep, and late night conversations.

    Reply
  666. Amy on

    I have done a small amount of fabric dying with plants grown in my garden and am excited to do more. I am also a sewer and knitter, so this book speaks to me in many ways.

    Reply
  667. Chris G. on

    My beloved family heirloom is a quilt make by my 80 year old grandmother and her arthritic fingers. It Tyler was a labor of love!

    Reply
  668. Sarah hill on

    My dads pocket knife and my moms dining room set are my favorite heirlooms. While the knife takes up a tiny spot in my bedside table drawer, the dining set is something I have to continue to advocate to keep with my minimalist husband!

    Reply
  669. Cheryl on

    My cherished heirloom is starting with me. When my mom was diagnosed with stage 4 cancer I started hand stitching a quilt for her called “Sunny Days”. It is a bright cheery quilt that was to help her through rough chemo treatments, unfortunately she was never able to use it. Every time I hold it, it reminds me of her. My hope is that it is enjoyed for generations to come!

    Reply
  670. Sarah Gundersen on

    I married my high school sweetheart 40 years ago on September 10, 1983. My beloved grandmother, Dorothy, gave us a treasured burled maple bedroom set she no longer needed and the following Christmas, my mother made me the most beautiful quilt to rest on top. All of our babies were birthed and nursed on that pineapple four poster bed and under that quilt. Both heirlooms traveled with us through three moves until their fateful day in December of 1998 when while the Christmas cookies were still cooling on the kitchen counters, our treasured heirlooms were lost in a house fire. I have three remaining mirrors from the dressing table, all hung in my home today, however, I sadly did not think to save a square of that special quilt from my mother. Today I make quilts for all my children, knowing there will be stories to tell with each one.

    Reply
  671. Jane Henery on

    Quilts have been a part of me since the age of 5.. I am now 70😊 I used to help at my Grandmother’s quilting bees. Her quilts were left to me when she passed, so I always have that part of her with me. I loved the work and the company at the bees. Hand sown work is an art and so much a part of the spirit in the quilt.

    Reply
  672. Katie Deverson on

    I inherited my skills in sewing and quilting from my grandmothers on both sides. I am so grateful to have learned from them and because of them. I proudly own two vintage Singers (my grandmother’s and my great grandmother’s). I have made many beautiful pieces (heirloom dresses, quilts, doll quilts, birthday outfits and dress up clothes) for my own kids. I just set up a little sewing machine for them in my studio and I can’t wait to teach them too! I really admire Sara’s passion and thoughtfulness in her creative process. Happy to see this book in the world to bring these cherished skills to the eyes of more people!

    Reply
  673. Emily Stainback on

    I cherish the handmade quilt that my father gave me that my great grandmother made. I love when he tells me the story of how my great grandmother taught my grandmother how to quilt. I can’t wait to pass both the quilt and the stories to my daughters one day.

    Reply
  674. Emily Baerg on

    I have a pillow case that my great-great grandma began to embroider, but was left unfinished for decades. Eventually it came to me, as one of the artists in the family, to finish it. That project got me hooked and I have completed many embroidery pieces since then. This blog and book also caught my attention since I just dove in to my first natural dyeing experiment this past week!

    Reply
  675. Hannah Spaetgens on

    Thank you, Sara and Erin, for sharing all your passion and experiences with us!
    I love knitting and painting/drawing, so just some days ago I thought about making ink from blueberries for drawing.
    I love natural colours and growing circles and as a organic vegetable and flowerfarmer I am lucky to be sourrounded by nature every day.
    One of my special heirlooms is a silkscarf I got from my grandma which she dyed herself.
    She loved sewing and used to dye silk for a period in her lifetime.
    Just had to think of her while reading your interview.
    Thank you!

    Reply
  676. Kathy Tolmie on

    I have an old quilt all hand stitched with each block a different hand embroidered flower. The quilt top sat for many years in my grandmothers chest and I was able to have my mom put the backing and edging on it that matched perfectly. The quilt will always be a work of art, and passed down to my daughters. My Moms best guess is it was completed in the 1930’s.

    Reply
  677. Lynne A. Crosett Flynn on

    Thank you for this wonderful interview. I am so impressed with Sara’s dedication to her art and to it all being naturally derived. Her work reminds me of an artisan I met it Italy, when I lived there. She makes baskets with designs colored with natural dyes. Her Husband grows and harvests the reeds she uses. Sara’s work is so beautiful.

    Reply
  678. Ruth Hill on

    Loved your article I enjoy making quilt tops I have made quilt tops for my brothers and sisters and my mother hand quilted them They are all cherished now because my mother has passed So I would love your books that is something that I enjoy

    Reply
  679. Nicole on

    We have a hand made wood carved sculpture the my grandfather used when he worked in the mines in Europe. The idea was he would hang it metal number tag on the sculpture and when he would go down into the mines he would take his number with him. It was a way of tracking the workers if anything ever happened. My mom holds on to this now, lovely aged wood.

    Reply
  680. Shelby on

    I’ve loved Farm & Folk for years, and her process had greatly influenced mine as I’m a seamstress & farmer. My family heirloom is Grandma’s ruby necklace.

    Reply
  681. Gwen Garcia on

    What a testament to creativity – quilts and dying and gardens! You are quite the inspiration!

    Reply
  682. Susan on

    Wow, this is over the top wonderful! I’m a long-time organic gardener, lifelong sewist and knitter and 2 years ago I began quilting — I made 5 quilts in the first year! And, when I was a high schooler in the 70s I experimented without any guidance, with natural dyeing fabrics with teas, etc, using it for a wall quilt of California for CA history class! I’ve also knit with wonderful naturally dyed yarns dyed and spun by Swans Island, ME; a gal on Bainbridge; and also A Verb for Keeping Warm in Oakland — the owner, Christine Vejar, wrote a book: The Modern Natural Dyer, and she is a friend to whom I’ve given organic homegrown marigolds for dyeing. So….needless to say, I am fascinated by what Sara is doing and would LOVE to have a copy of her new ground-breaking book! Thank you Erin for bringing her and her amazing skills to our attention, and your commissioned wall quilt is STUNNING!

    Reply
  683. Amy Georgopoulos on

    I have a quilt my great grandmother made from clothes my mom wore when she was a little girl. Now my little girls use the same quilt. ❤️

    Reply
  684. Mary Shurmantine on

    This interview was SO inspirational! Our family faced the daunting task of helping mom decide what to take to assisted living, and then going through decades of “stuff”. Through it all I discovered old textiles and worn quilts are what move me, and anchor me to my grandmothers on both sides of the family. As a quilter myself, finding these heirlooms buried under things was truly a gift. They spoke to me. The feed sack used, the old blankets used as batting, the hand stitching…I’m moved. This interview added a new dimension of tying my love of gardening to my love of quilting. I always thought of them as separate ways to feed my soul. But they can be combined! Thank you!

    Reply
  685. Katie on

    When my grandpa died in 2020 at a age of 93 I took some of his flannel shirt home with me. I was determined to teach myself how to quit. I’m very happy to say that I have gotten the patch work top done but I’m too nervous to try to bind it all together. When I do finish it, it will go to my nephew that was named after him just before he died.

    Reply
  686. Jo on

    Wow, that’s beautiful. For my wedding I received a beautiful handcrafted quilt rack that my late grandfather built and it is such a precious gift. I hope to fill it up with homemade quilts over the years to pass down to future generations.

    Reply
  687. Liz Helms on

    When each of our three children were born my mother made each child a stuffed elephant including clothes. For some reason the ears which were stitched on separately by hand kept coming off and I was constantly stitching them back on. They have been passed on now to great grandchildren and looking very loved to say the least!

    Reply
  688. Fran on

    I treasure the crochet bedspreads my maternal grandmother made. I am the keeper of three of the seven she made – one for each of her children.

    Reply
  689. Pam Garrison on

    My heirloom is not a thing but a person, my grandmother Anna. I spent many summers on her farm in Wisconsin. She instilled in me a love of vegetable and flower gardening. Our lunches quite often consisted of a glass of Kool Aide and a napkin. We would walk out to the garden and sit in the shade looking out to the garden. Whatever vegetable caught your eye you would pick and eat. My favorites were tomatoes, green peppers, green beans and squash. When I came inside for the night she would have a fresh bouquet of flowers and we would discuss what they were and their growing habits. Fifty years later I am a Master Gardener teaching others to love these same things.

    Reply
  690. Sheila on

    Thank you for sharing about this beautiful artisan. Sara leads a different life than many of us, yet we all aspire to work from a restful place. My Dad was an amateur painter, but all of his paintings were sold when I was a child. I never saw him paint, but would have enjoyed it immensely! We do have some of his drawings that I hope to inherit someday.

    Reply
  691. Sheilah Lansky on

    Just like Sara, my great grandmother made a quilt for me out of scraps from my grandmother’s clothes. It was always my favorite blanket growing up. Now my quilt is my entire family’s favorite and we often quibble over who gets to use it! Like my great grandmother, I saved scraps from the clothes I made for my daughter and made her a quilt when she left for college. It was my first quilt and since then I’ve been making one for each member of my family and for their friends. Like Sara, it is a labor of love for me and I, too, make them totally by hand. Recently I began to wonder how I could make my own unique fabrics and designs. I’m excited that this may be a method of expression for me.

    Reply
  692. Shannon A. on

    Such a great interview. I really resonated with the idea of “Prioritizing what makes you happy and letting go of the things that are not serving your soul”. My family heirloom is an antique cuckoo clock that my grandparents got in Germany while my Grandfather was serving in the military. As a child, I remember spending lots of time at their home and the ticking and chiming of the clock was always present (even at 2am). It’s now in my home and I love the simple act of having to pull the weights to wind the clock every day. It’s a comforting sound and reminder of them.

    Reply
  693. Norma Cook on

    This is an incredible story. Love her passion. She’s very inspiring. Thank you for sharing her love of quilts.

    Reply
  694. Annie Collacchi on

    My cherished quilt is the one my mom gave us for our wedding. She contacted family and friends and sent them a square with design dimensions and instructions. She then put together a hand stitched quilt with all the squares- the center one was hers- a bride and groom dressed from material from my dress and my husband’s tux (she snuck it from their hems)
    A scrapbook came with it with each page dedicated to a square with the letter from the person and usually the history of the design choice. Even my husbands friends found a way !

    Reply
  695. Cynthia on

    I made my first quilt last year for my granddaughter’s first birthday. I’m now making a quilt for my grandson. It is a labor of love and hope for their wonderful futures. It’s very nice to think that these quilts could be passed on to my great grandchildren.

    Reply
  696. Rebecca Galat on

    My sister has been making heirloom quilts for as long as I can remember. Whether the occasion was for a new baby, a wedding, or to just send someone her love in quilt form.
    My quilt was for a log cabin I lived in in Montana. The log cabin pattern was used, along with a bunch of native wildlife. I’ve had it for over 20 years and to this day appreciate every stitch that went into her work.

    Reply
  697. Lori Farmer on

    I loved this interview! I am lucky to have a handmade quilt from each of my grandmothers. One is a beautiful full size quilt and the other is what my grandma called a “sick quilt”…it is just big enough to cover up with on the couch. Such a blessing to have these to pass on to my children someday. Thank you!

    Reply
  698. Joshua McAllister on

    My great-great-grandfather built a dining table and matching buffet table. All my life it has been at my grandmother’s house. I have a mind book of memories of eating at that table and exploring the buffet table with its old fashioned latches, lights, and doors. When my grandmother passed away some years ago, the tables were taken by my parents, who live just up the street with my grandfather, the grandson of my great-great-grandfather. I have the immense joy of knowing that my daughters will get to grow up making those same memories that I did, eating and joining around this table that has seen generations of families. As a woodworker, it inspires me to make lasting furniture. Not just to fulfill a need or want if one person or family, but to fill the needs of many.

    Reply
  699. Dale on

    My favorite heirloom is a hand-braided rug made by my grandmother from wool scraps. The colors are both rich and soft with beautiful gradations. She was a watercolorist who understood color. Now that I’m retired I’d love to learn how to braid rugs with fabric that I dye myself. Living in the south, wool is not a fabric of our lives, so I was hoping to make a lighter version with cotton or hemp dyed with natural elements that is more in keeping with how we live on our little organic farm. Now that we no longer grow for market we need less space and intersperse our flowers with vegetables and herbs. This interview and this book are so inspiring – the ideas are bouncing around. I can even see my first quilt formulating as I write this comment. Thanks again Floret for more inspiration and learning!

    Reply
  700. Laurie Youngquist on

    I inherited an old quilt from a relative that was in bad shape. I cut it apart and made adorable little teddy bears for members of my family with Aunt Flora’s hand made quilt.

    Reply
  701. Maria on

    A friend made a small quilt for my daughter to celebrate her birth. I’m passionate about handcrafted things so this is a treasured gift that I hope will inspire my daughter to make beautiful things with her hands.

    Reply
  702. Sarah on

    I have followed Sara’s instagram for some time now. Her work is truly amazing. I come from a long linage of quilters in my family as I am sure many of us do! To survive in the wild west you needed quilts for warmth. Anyways my mom is an avid quilter and my sister owns a small quilting business where she does long arm quilting for many people. My favorite quilt I own I made at my grandmothers house when I was just a kid. I laid it out on her floor to piece it together and she helped me with the process. In college that same quilt was chewed up by my dog but alas I just trimmed it a bit and put some new binding on it and viola! Loved more then ever my kids now use it to snuggle in front on the TV to watch shows. Great interview!

    Reply
  703. Violeta on

    I have a pair of socks that my great grandmother knit from wool spun from my great grandfather sheep.

    Reply
  704. Elaine Qualter on

    My maternal grandmother was a Japanese fish peddler and farmer who worked the rice fields. She lived a very simple, humble life and never wasted anything. I have a quilted vest that she hand sewed using scraps of fabric. She would wear this to keep her upper body warm while she sat at the Kotatsu heated table in her unheated house. I love that vest so much because of how it embodies her values; I can’t imagine ever parting with it.

    Reply
  705. Sandra Abalos on

    What an inspiration, thank you for sharing your passion, Sara. I will now try my hand at growing a few dye plants in my spring garden.

    Reply
  706. Starr Linden on

    Hi, This was very inspiring and beautiful. and I feel like I am involved in this right now. Playing in the garden and creating art is always the goal. I was recently contacted by a textile company in LA. They said a few of their customers knew about our small flower business in Watsonville, CA near Santa Cruz and that we grew a large quantity of Marigolds. They were looking for 4000 or more dried Marigolds and they said they would like to support a small farm. Turns out they are making DIY kits for dying bandannas for the holidays. I love when activities are in the air, when everyone starts to do them because all of a sudden the collective sees the fun and value in an activity. I will get this book regardless of winning it here (which would be very nice) because it would be fun to grow other flowers or plants that could be used to create art. Thanks for finding her and sharing.

    Reply
  707. Tammy Walker on

    Intriguing Story! I love the simplicity of her passion for creating what has been forgotten. My sweet heirloom is my grandmother’s recipe box with her own handwritten recipe cards. Every time I pull a card out of the box it places me right beside her in her kitchen.

    Reply
  708. Cheryl Salger on

    My mom loved to piece together quilts. My most cherished one is one my grandmother made. I love the idea of dying your own material!

    Reply
  709. Claire on

    What a lovely interview! I love Sara’s grit and determination and willingness to change and evolve! I love family history and collecting heirlooms from my family. I come from a family of people who work hard a non-artistic jobs and still find time to create. My maternal grandfather dabbled in stained glass, my paternal grandparents were rock hounds and jewelry makers, my aunt made pottery, and my mother paints. I have a beautiful quilt from my great great grandmother and an exquisite inlaid wooden darning egg from my great great grandfather (he was a cabinet maker). I also have been quilting for over 20 years and am looking to start dying fabric to get custom colors. I love Sara’s earthy palette!

    Reply
  710. Deb on

    We have a cherished quilt that my husband’s grandmother made him when he was a baby. He spent many years living on the family farm with her when he was very young and cherishes those memories. The quilt always reminds him of the special bond they had.

    Reply
  711. Merrilee Anderson on

    I’ve been collecting oak galls all summer to try my hand at making ink. Now I’m inspired to collect for fabric dyeing! My treasured heirloom is a Halloween wall hanging my mom hand embroidered and then machine pieced for me. Every year I marvel at her creativity, while she used a pattern to get started, she added her own small touches, like sparkly thread for a spider web. This book looks wonderful!

    Reply
  712. Karen on

    My Grammy was one of 11 and had 7 sisters . They were raised on a farm in Arkansas. They used the fabric from worn out clothes, blankets etc to make quilts. Grammy gave me the one and possibly the only quilt she ever made. The pattern is small green and purple triangles. She had her sister Ethyl add the back and finish the quilt. Grammy decided she didn’t like to quilt. In her retirement years, she took up crocheting, making afghans for her 23 grand kids, and all her great grand kids. She created unique patterns and made over 100 afghans. She also made baby blankets that my children loved. My daughter took hers with her to college. I still have my quilt tucked away. And one day will pass it down to someone in my family who will appreciate it .

    Reply
  713. Barbara Evoy on

    Beautiful work. Our family is a family of engineers so while no one has an artistic touch, we think of others by the sound of clocks.

    Reply
  714. Dorie Knott on

    This is so interesting! I have made some quilts, my mom drew her own patterns and made a quilt, I grow marigolds, sunflowers, calendula and much more!
    This book would be a great read I’m sure!

    Reply
  715. Tanya Ridgedale on

    Very excited to see this book and read through it. I have always loved quilting and observing quilts in stores. My goal is to make more as I have only made a few. My family heirloom is not a quilt but an old cross stitch that my great Grandma made.

    Reply
  716. Janet Vallar-Gillette on

    I am a retired art teacher and did some dying with my students when teaching a unit on andinkra cloth. The results were amazing to all and I and the students learned a lot. A friend also used to make and dye baskets from natural dyes. Thank you for this quick tutorial. My grandmothers also had quilts going in the house growing up. Such a wondeful and collegial art.
    Jan

    Reply
  717. Heidi Marshall on

    My father just passed away at 74 young. He was a master craftsman for 50 years. My mom, brother, and I went through his tools and of course, learned more about him through the items left behind — I held his tools and felt his hands. I am now appreciating all the little and big things that he has built, on all planes. I will never toss out his old wooden hammer for a new one.

    Reply
  718. Sandra on

    I don’t have too many heirlooms, but I have 2 afghans my grandmother made that I’ll keep forever. I also have a handmade changeable wall calendar that hung on her wall for as long as I can remember! Now my kids love it!

    Reply
  719. Jen NyBlom on

    Eek, there’s some proof reading needed to be done in my story 🤦‍♀️😅
    ( much loved, not lived & stretched, not wretched)
    Autocorrect 🙄😆

    Reply
  720. Kaethe on

    When my mother was a child in the 1920’s, her mother made Flopsy, Mopsy, Cottontail and Peter rabbits out of muslin. Their design is based on primitive line drawings my mother made, so the rabbits are upright and their bodies are square-ish. They have multiple repairs, are threadbare…and are wonderful.

    Reply
  721. Liz on

    I’ve always thought I would make a quilt. This interview has inspired me to get on with it. I’m excited to read the book

    Reply
  722. Julia on

    I was so. inspired by Sara’s interview that I forgot to post my cherished heirloom in my other comment. 😊Thank you for that wonderful interview! My favorite family heirloom is a tattered old quilt that my husband’s stepmother’s mother made. I handwashed the quilt one day and a tear developed. When I went to mend the tear, I saw a bit of fabric inside the quilt instead of batting. I peeked inside and saw another quilt! Since the outside quilt was only tacked on, I removed the tacked stitches and opened up a side seam. Then I turned the quilt inside out to expose the beautiful soft, tattered quilt inside.

    Reply
  723. Susan Rich on

    What a great interview, such inquisitive questions too! You both fall under my wanderlust dreams in life. My heirlooms have been passed on from my grandmother! She made my mom and uncle Christmas stockings, then she made one for my dad and aunt, then her creativity expanded as she made the grand kids each their own stockings. We all still have ours! Then when I got married over 38 years ago I made one for my husband, then one for my son, and one for my daughter. Hers actually took me several years because life…now I have 2 grand kids to make stockings for. Guess I better get busy on those ❤️

    Reply
  724. Jen NyBlom on

    Across the back of the couch, lies a worn, much-lived afghan that my great Grammy Reed crocheted in the very early 1960s for my parents when my family moved back to New England from California.
    One of my early memories is of this afghan wretched across my parents bed, and I a little girl with a wild imagination ( now I’m a big girl with a wild imagination, still!) tracing my finger along the black crocheted border around each brightly colorful “granny square”…pretending the borders were the roads, the squares the houses.
    Grammy passed away while I was in my teens, my mother 10 years ago, and my father just this Summer… but last year, he gave me the afghan, and it will always have a home on the back of the couch, where I can trace my fingers along the black borders, look at the colorful squares, and remember my family.
    I don’t crochet, but I do quilt and hand stitch every day.
    I never did revive my indigo pot this Summer, but the goldenrod is beginning to bloom; time to dye some cloth!!
    Thank you for letting me share this story. 💚
    ( btw, your zinnia seeds did amazing this year and the blooms are making the entire neighborhood HAPPY!! 🤩)

    Reply
  725. Tabitha Grace Alterman on

    When I was 17 years old, my dad and I hiked a 30-mile stretch of the Appalachian Trail at the Tennessee-North Carolina border. We didn’t have sleeping bags, so we packed two of my mom’s twin quilts. When she found out after, she was horrified! But then when I graduated from Hendrix College in Conway, Arkansas, she gave me those quilts as a gift. She packaged them up with a huge bunch of wildflowers she picked along the drive from Memphis to Conway. I will always treasure these quilts. And I am a garden writer and flower farmer in Lawrence, KS now! (Moon On The Meadow certified organic farm)

    I have another quilt memory with my parents, as well. I was a coffee farmer in Hawai’i for a while. When my parents visited, I took them to the Kona Hawaiian Quilt Museum (https://www.konahqm.org). We all loved the quilts depicting all the volcanoes on the Big Island—where we had just been hiking all week.

    While on that trip, my mom fell in love with many of the flowers there. When she turned 50, I took her to get her first tattoo: a Hawaiian hibiscus.

    Also, my favorite short story is Everyday Use by Alice Walker, which every quilter must must must read!!!! Walker explores the distinction of enjoying heirlooms versus using them in your daily life. I’ve always fallen on the side of everyday use for the treasures I adore.

    It occurs to me that flowers, nature, farming, hiking, reading, writing—and QUILTS!—have always been intertwined in my life. I can’t wait to read this book. :)

    I loved this post, Erin. If I don’t win the book, I’ll be getting a copy for myself and my mom, and a quilting friend. Thank you!

    Reply
  726. Liz on

    I am so excited to get a copy of this lovely book. I have been growing calendula since I first learned about this medicinal plant in high school. Now my kids and I collect the seeds each year and have expanded our crop almost every spring.

    Reply
  727. Kayla B on

    Beautiful work! My family doesn’t come from much, migrant farm hands, and our heirloom comes in the form of old fashioned manners and hard work ethic. I’m working fervently on creating more handheld heirlooms for the next generation.

    Reply
  728. Karen Furnanz on

    I loved the interview. Thank you for sharing. It is wonderful to hear how many of these “lost” arts are resurfacing with this next generation. My grandmother, mother, and aunts were all sewists and we grew up with some of their quilts on our beds. Unfortunately, over the years these quilts were lost! Now I am a quilter as well and treasure a handmade quilt my aunt (now deceased) gave to me in more recent years. Currently, I am working on quilts that I will pass on to my own children and grandchildren.

    Reply
  729. Annie on

    I just recently got into quilting over the summer. I love the earthy tones of these quilts! I don’t think my family has a family heirloom, but my great grandmother made lots of quilts for us, all of which we treasure!

    Reply
  730. Rebecca Hammond on

    My most precious quilt was hand sewn by my Great Grandmother Eliza Griffith. She died when I was less than 1 yo so I do not have any of my own memories of her. This quilt was passed to me from my Grandmother Gertrude Cole who also passed along many memories of her loved Mother Eliza. My Gran was also a quilter and taught me how to quilt and sew. This quilt is not a fancy quilt but was obviously well used and needed. The next owner will be Eliza Griffith’s great great great granddaughter!

    Reply
  731. Lauralee Harding on

    Becca, what a beautiful story! Your grandmother sounds like an amazing woman, just like my own, who is still quilting while blind at the age of 96! She also has made a handmade (completely by hand, no machine stitching) quilt for her five children and then the first born of each of her great grandchildren, not to mention the dozens of other quilts she has given to various family members. She has passed on this skill to me, and I am still working on a quilt that is over 20 years in the process, in the midst of college, marriage, and now raising a family. But it is all about the journey to me, not the destination. Thank you so much for sharing!

    Reply
  732. Emily M on

    I hit send before mentioning my own cherished heirloom. I have an old metal candle snuffer with a curly-cue handle that belonged to my great grandmother. I wish I could post a photo of it. I’d also like to post the only photo I have of my great-grandmother, my grandmother and my mother, with two-year-old me on my mother’s lap. I grew up in a male dominated family and I like to think of the strength and backbone these women brought to our family over generations. They gave us love and light, and when the day was done, they snuffed the candles and tucked us in so we could rest up for a new day.

    Reply
  733. Michelle Enns on

    What an amazing story and beautiful way to share a passion! It’s so special to see just how far the love of flowers can go and what can be done with love and persistence. Beautiful quilts are something that speaks to so many of us and to have them be made with handmade processes is becoming a lost art. Tha chance to win one of these beautiful creations is a gift indeed.

    Reply
  734. Mary Curran on

    What an inspiration! Years ago I put together quilt pieces and used them as wall hangings and gifts. I’m ready to turn my garden over to flowers for the purpose of dyes. I have acquired a framed icon that hung in my grandparents home. I love it-the frame is chipped and shows its age. I can only imagine what it has been through coming to the US from Eastern Europe.

    Reply
  735. Susan Schenkenberg on

    My daughter, who has an interest in slow fashion, worked on an alpaca farm this past summer (Old Homestead Alpacas in Walla Walla, WA), helping to care for the land, animals and dye gardens. Through that experience she learned about the natural dyeing process that the farmer uses to dye her alpaca fiber. That opened my eyes to the possibility of dyeing fabric (with home grown flowers) to use for quilting, which I recently took up learning. This book will help fill the (multiple) gaps in my knowledge. The timing couldn’t be more perfect! Thank you for sharing your journey and knowledge with us.

    Reply
  736. Susan on

    My grandmother was an avid quilter who created mostly appliqué quilts for heirloom treasures for family members and friends. I have never tried it but have always wanted to. She inspires me, as does this interview! I’d love to give it a go, now that I’m retired and have a bit more time to pursue my interests. Thank you for sharing this interview, and I am looking forward to reading your book.

    Reply
  737. Lauren on

    My great grandmother hand embroidered pillow cases and I have a few that I cherish. This interview was so inspiring!

    Reply
  738. Yvonne on

    What a wonderful interview!
    Everything that we make with our hands feeds the soul.

    Reply
  739. Allison on

    I moved into my current home last September. Right away I knew it was going to be home for my family heirlooms I have gathered over the years. I am the sentimental one in my family and can’t bear letting things go that I know meant so much to family members. This home is off of a road named Gracewood… my Great Grandmother’s name is Grace. It felt fitting to display her photo in my dinning room, bring her furniture from Ireland into my living room and drape her crochet quilts on my sofa. I have knitted blankets from my Nana, collected sea shells from my Cackie, and wall hangings from great Aunts I’ve never met, but feel in spirit. I can’t choose a favorite heirloom because I love them all so much and feel so grateful to each and everyone. I feel as if I get to keep that line of communication open every time I look at or use a family heirloom. It’s special.

    I loved this interview so much! Thank you for sharing <3

    Reply
  740. Mimi Parr on

    Thank you for this wonderful interview! Inspirational!!!
    I am a very lucky gal who inherited several amazing handmade quilts 100 – 200 years old. But more recently, upon the birth of our first daughter, her great Auntie made for her a handsewn carriage quilt, which has become now a much cherished wall piece.
    Can’t wait to read Sara’s book!

    Reply
  741. Lori on

    I fell in love with quilting through the pandemic and have fallen in love with it. Thanks for sharing Sara’s book.

    Reply
  742. Kristen Costello on

    I love this article. I relate to Sara’s various interests and how to merge them together to combine farm life and quilting. Interestingly the house I have moved into belonged to an extremely talented woman who made quilts. she even wrote books and judged quilts. So happy I read this article. I draw so much inspiration from others finding their calling through artistic pursuits.

    Reply
  743. Julia on

    Thank you for this interest interview! Sara’s story has inspired me to get out some unfinished quilting and see how I can change hhings to more truly reflect my style. As for gardening, I planted a lot of seeds in the spring that never grew flowers. Instead of counting it a failure, perhaps I could use the greens as I learn the dying process. Maybe my quilting is simply lacking a bit of alchemy too. 😊 Thank you! I am looking forward to reading Sara’s book.

    Reply
  744. Sharon Roberts on

    I love your infectious joy of cultivating beauty and sharing the inspiring stories of other like-minded souls. Since I’m by far the most sentimental one in our family, I’ve ended up with many of the family heirlooms. My Grandma Jessie always shared what little she had and never wasted a scrap; from her I treasure a yoyo quilt and several brightly colored crocheted afghans and toys. My Grandma Louise passed when my dad was only 9 (he’s currently 95), and I cherish the vintage candy box full of precious little cards she frequently wrote to him from the time he was a baby, all signed “your loving mama.”

    Reply
  745. Heidi Kawamoto on

    I grew up in Hawai’i, and one of our neighbors would collect pieces of scrap material and would sew them together and make beautiful, Aloha print quilts. She gifted one of her quilts to me when I was 10 yrs old and it became my favorite blanket. It’s over 50 yrs old and still in tact. I plan to pass it on to my daughter.

    Reply
  746. Felicia Blair on

    I love natural fabrics and dyes from flowers are just Magickal. I plan to gift this book to a friend that is into all of this. I found an old gorgeous ring quilt in a goodwill years ago and she saved it for my by repair and restoration. It is imbued with her special energy and it will be a heirloom for me to pass down. Best of luck with the book!
    Peace, love and flowers!

    Reply
  747. Joan F. on

    What an inspiring interview!! Thank you!!! I don’t have any family heirlooms, sadly. Hoping to create some to pass down to my children and start a new tradition. Maybe quilts!!

    Reply
  748. Lori on

    My grandfather went to a community harvesting day when he was 23 in the 1930s. A pretty girl was serving food to the harvesting crew. He didn’t want to lose the chance of not seeing her again, so he impulsively asked if she’d like to go for a ride with him sometime. She looked over at a beat-up truck that she thought was his and said “no, thank you.” It took another community harvesting day for her to realize he had a nicer vehicle and that time she said “yes.” They didn’t take long to become engaged. That’s when she hand-quilted the quilt in my possession. It is a hand-sewn and hand-pieced quilt with a basket design, with flowers in the baskets. She finished it before their 1939 wedding, and it was always folded at the foot of their bed. They were married 63 years when my grandfather passed away.

    Reply
  749. Mary Hill on

    Lovely interview. Favorite heirloom: a mantle clock my grandfather gave to my grandmother on one of their first anniversaries.

    Reply
  750. Debby on

    What a beautiful interview!
    One of my most treasured heirlooms is a tea towel that was made by my great grandmother in Germany. It is accompanied by a note, written by my great aunt, which says, ” … grew the flax herself, wove it into material, and made this towel along with the crochet edging”. In order to preserve it, I have framed the towel and the note and it hangs humbly in my little library, next to a picture of my great grandmother and her family. It warms my heart every time I look at it.
    Thank you, Erin, for all you do to expose and encourage beauty in this world.

    Reply
  751. Carol Hambridge on

    I made a baby quilt when I was in college for the first grandchild in our family, my nephew. All of the grandchildren were baptized with it and it hung on nursery walls over the years. It is now lost. I recently made my second quilt for my first grandson. So much has changed in the quilting world over the years!!! I have time to quilt now and I am in love with the process. Thank you for this book❤️

    Reply
  752. Emily M on

    How beautiful and inspiring!! I love seeing how Sara connects her love of her land and garden to her art. And the colors!!

    Reply
  753. Karla Santoro on

    This book is tugging at my heart. I’ve been quilting since 1996, and expanded my flower gardens since retirement. I save lots of seeds, and dry calendula for soap and salve. Dyeing fabric could be a next step. I don’t think it’ll take much of a nudge. Thank you for this interview. I’d love to be picked for a copy.

    Reply
  754. Lauralee Harding on

    I have been making handmade quilts for over 30 years, having been taught by my grandmother when I was a child. She is still alive, making quilts while blind at the age of 96! My most precious heirloom is a Baltimore Album Applique quilt that she made many years ago, every single stitch by hand. Every block is completely original, from her wedding block, made from fabric from her own wedding dress, to her patriotic block, representing her love and honor for her country, to her cornucopia, brimming full of fall’s abundant harvest. This quilt represents years of labor and love and is a treasure I will pass down for generations to come.

    Reply
  755. Carrie Bunch on

    I love all the natural beauty. It seems when we work with nature and our hands time slows down and there is peace.
    Thank you for sharing.

    Reply
  756. Janice on

    A treasured heirloom is a hand quilted Christmas table runner my aunt gave to me. She recently passed at 104, proof that quilting keeps you young! I now think of her when I sit down to make my own quilts. Natural dyeing is on my list to learn next so the book will be a wonderful resource to have.

    Reply
  757. Linda on

    Beautiful interview thanks for sharing! my favourite heirloom is a hand crafted chest my father made and from my husbands father who was a danish craftsman wonderful wooden chairs he made from hand with beautiful craved details.

    Reply
  758. Joanne Halter on

    Wonderful interview. We have many heirloom quilts created by our family members.

    Reply
  759. Becca Pritchett on

    Grandmaw, my maternal grandmother, was born in 1913, had 6 children and 18 grandchildren. Grandmaw and Poppy grew a wonderful garden, had a small orchard with 6 HUGE apple trees, a pear tree and milked a cow for milk, butter and buttermilk. Grandmaw was great at doing all things but her passion was quilting! In the winter when all the gardening was finished, she sat downstairs beside her woodstove, let the quilting frame down and hand stitched her amazing quilts.
    We lost Poppy in 1972 and Grandmaw soldiered on, continuing to milk the cow, garden and then taking on the mowing of her yard, with a push mower that she continued doing even when she was 92!
    Grandmaw created a lovingly handmade, beautiful full size quilt for each and every one of her children and grandchildren then began making wall hangings for each and every great-grandchild! What treasures these beauties are to each of us, her precious family!

    Reply
  760. Eilis on

    What an incredible interview. I loved it! A special family heirloom for me is an old rocking chair from Norway from my moms side of the family.

    Reply
  761. Katie Tolson on

    Thank you for sharing this! My grandmother Ginny started what she called my ‘college quilt’ in the 1980s but fell ill to heart failure and passed away during the fall of my freshman year. It’s still in pieces waiting to be finished and I’ve been dreaming about how to complete it for years. This beautiful post was so inspiring. How amazing would it be to finish it with squares dyed from my own little farm! I can’t wait to read this book!!

    Reply
  762. Teresa on

    We have a few cherished quilts in our family. Treasures made of love and passed through the ages. Thanks for sharing this interview with Sara and giving me an introduction to her beautiful work. ❤️

    Reply
  763. Margaret Ullman-Hess on

    My mother has been slowly making quilts over the years by hand for all of us–and the latest was a sweet little one for our daughter’s favorite teddy bear, with our daughter getting to pick out all the fabrics from her Oma’s sewing box. So special!

    Reply
  764. Cassy on

    Wow, so inspiring! You can feel her gentle slow down pace in this interview, something I really love. Can’t wait to learn more about this.

    Reply
  765. Becky Stewart/ BirdSong Farm on

    I love this so much! As an avid quilter and farmer I understand the passion that drives Sara’s creative spirit. Her work with flowers/plant dyes is truly inspiring and is a perfect way of intersecting her love of plants and fabric. Thank you for introducing us to an amazing artist!

    Reply
  766. Maggie Morgan on

    Quilts have always played a part in my life. One I own was made by my great grandmother, Bertha Chambers, who died long before I was born. I was photographed as a baby on it and I try to get all my grandchildren photographed on it. It’s one of the treasures I hope I could grab if there was ever a fire or natural disaster! Sara, you are a rock star! Bravo!

    Reply
  767. Susie on

    My grandfather was a traveling pickle salesman, but so much more. Someone told him that you couldn’t sew a quilt on a sewing machine…and off he went. First to learn how to sew on a machine and then learn patterns. I am fortunate to have been given three of his quilts which I’ve passed down to my three granddaughters. A gift of art and life lesson…you can do anything if you believe you can.

    Reply
  768. Sabina K on

    Very lovely to learn about Sara and her craft. My mother spent a year creating a cross-stitch piece for me. She brought it to me when I last saw her and it will become an heirloom in our family.

    Reply
  769. Tracy May on

    I am a quilter and have started a journey of dyeing my own muslin. I am interested in natural dyes, but started our using the Procion products as this was an easier route. I just moved to a rural community and will be retiring soon. I am in the middle of planting and planning for my future garden . I have read everything from Erin’s website, but haven’t committed to planting. This book will make me consider planting flowers for dyeing too.
    Thank you both for this information. I am a gatherer of much before I act.

    Reply
  770. Ingrid on

    Thank you for an interview that made sense and reminded me to slow down and start creating my art. . Well written.

    Reply
  771. Cheryl Nelson on

    I have the baby quilt my mom hand stitched for our oldest child. It is all white. The beauty comes from the stitching. My mom, who has been gone for 25 years, was meticulous and made very tiny stitches. I recently passed it on to my oldest daughter who just had her first child 2 months ago. Just this week I was thrilled to receive pictures of our granddaughter on it, wearing the smocked outfit and embroidered booties that my husband bought to bring our daughter home 39 years ago.

    Reply
  772. Crystal on

    This interview just takes my breath away! Such intention and devotion is wove into the very fabric of both of your lives, Erin and Sara! A family heirloom of mine is a wooden cutting board in the shape of a pig. It is of medium size and brings such joy to my heart when I see it. I have memories of my Mom cutting watermelon in the hot summers. My Grandma would dice potatoes, onion, and array of herbs for delicious meals when she would visit. That cutting board was used by friends and families for decades and was the source for many stories. To this day ‘The Pig’ still brings laughter and joy to my heart in the absence of both my Mom and Grandma.

    Reply
  773. Melissa Turnblom on

    I loved this interview and am so excited to read this book! I have a pair of brass candlesticks from my great-great-grandmother that have a special place on my bookshelf. I also have a mantle clock from my husband’s grandparents that we love. It doesn’t work, but it tells the correct time twice a day!

    Reply
  774. Lisa Huber on

    I inherited my Grandmother’s small cross made from celluloid that sat on her bedroom shelf. It reminds me that above all, she loved Jesus. It was her greatest legacy to us all.

    Reply
  775. Sheila Hlubucek on

    I’m a quilter and a flower farmer designer. I ordered a bunch of fat quarters one winter to play with, so I could become more instinctive about using color in my floral design. Then I had the urge to cut and sew. Quilting has become my off season sport.

    Reply
  776. Maureen A. Conner on

    I actually have several of my late mother-in-laws hand pieced and quilted quilts that I treasure, and I just recently have taken up the quilting arts myself. As an avid gardener and quilter, I would love to learn to dye my own fabrics. How intriguing!!

    Reply
  777. Lindsay Wadel on

    I own my great grandmother’s sewing basket. In it is sewing supplies that she used to hand-mend her family’s clothing.

    Reply
  778. Deanna Cole on

    This book looks super! – I’ve just started planning and prepping for my first dye garden and I can’t wait to start dying my own fabrics!

    Reply
  779. Minda Johnson on

    Thank you Erin and Sarah… I’m so grateful there are gals like you who treasure the earth, florals and textile art and hope you inspire a new generation to do the same. As I age (63 now), I’m curious to see what heirlooms will survive my generation. My sister and I have squirrelled away furniture, linens, war mementos, recipes in Norwegian, even plant cuttings from childhood gardens. The most treasured? Hmm… for me it’s the photos, the faces of those who gathered these items.

    Reply
  780. Susie on

    My grandfather was a pickle salesman, but so much more. Someone told him you couldn’t make a quilt on a sewing machine…..off he went, first to learn to sew, then study patterns. I am lucky to have been given three of his quilts which I have passed on to my three granddaughters. A gift of art and life lesson.

    Reply
  781. Carol Hammontree on

    Two of my prized possessions are both quilts. One is a beautiful quilt made by my paternal grandma and the other is a quilt in which the blocks were pieced by my maternal grandfather’s mom (Nanny) from his shirts and pajamas. He died when my mom was three and my grandson is named after him. My mom later sewed the blocks together and hand quilted it. At 92 she is still piecing baby quilts for her many greats and future greats. Quilting is a tangible link to the past of labor, love, and beauty.

    Reply
  782. Kris on

    I have been experimenting with natural dyes and am looking forward to diving into this book! I made my first quilt for my husband for our “cotton” anniversary a few years ago.
    One heirloom I am so impressed by is an afghan my grandmother created. It inspired me to learn how to knit and since then I have enjoyed sourcing hand spin and naturally dyed yarn. I am very interested in future workshops!

    Reply
  783. Pat S Clilfford on

    Beautiful interview ! How wonderful to have found your creative calling in this way. I admire your grit and determination and look forward to your first book.

    Reply
  784. Julie on

    I live in MN, I have scraps of fabric, and I love to garden. The season is short here. This interview has just revealed to me how I can transform gardening into a winter activity!! Thank you!!

    Reply
  785. Susan Rode on

    Such a wonderful interview ….I can experience the creative process and force that gives Sara the energy and vision to immerse herself deeply in this artistic process…such beauty she is creating…
    I have a table cloth that has been hand made in lace patterns from generations ago…it is the work of many many hours of love…like. Sara s work

    Reply
  786. Stephanie on

    Both my mother and father came from a kind of turmoil that didn’t lend itself to keeping many things. So there weren’t really things at the ready to become heirlooms in my family to be passed down, except for recipes and stories.
    My grandmother’s recipes bring her back to me. Every time I start a paprikash I can feel her guiding me (which is helpful because what she wrote down was so sparse: no measurements, a lack of instruction “make the chicken”!).

    Reply
  787. Missy on

    Thank you for the interview and beautiful story. I received a few quilts after my Mom passed this March that her grandmas made. I have always wanted to learn to quilt and pass the same to my grandchildren 🌺🧡. And I LOVE growing zinnias!!

    Reply
  788. Beth Becker on

    This is such a fresh way of living in the rare and intentional past! From the desired choices of soil, seeds, and fibers, to the very thoughtful and laborious end result of a natural piece of art!
    Two of my great grandmother’s quilts are treasured pieces that I have the great honor of caring for and and enjoying, and have only dreamt of carrying on her art and skills! I am so excited to learn how this book can give me direction and hope to bring beautiful pieces of art to a reality from the soil of my own farm here in Texas! Thank you for your insight, intent, and education! What a blessing this book is!

    Reply
  789. Nancy Brennand on

    My only grandchild came to visit when she was eighteen months old.
    I pulled out my grandmothers wooden darning spool, worn smooth by years of use.
    As I handed it to her questions bubbled up from family members.
    How could I easily share a cherished family heirloom knowing it might be tossed to the ground in a childs hands?
    Passing it on if only for a moment, that was the ultimate memory.

    Reply
  790. Lisa H on

    I have my grandmother’s pillow that she slept with. I don’t use it to sleep but keep it on my bed anyway. It just reminds me of her so can’t get rid of it.

    Thanks for the story.

    Reply
  791. Chanda S on

    I’m lucky enough to have a lot of family heirlooms. My favorite is probably my family’s china hutch they built from the covered wagon they used to cross the US in the pioneer days

    Reply
  792. Peggy on

    What an inspiring interview!

    Reply
  793. Kate H on

    My dad gave me an old wooden floor lamp. The lamp is simple but the story is what makes it special. My grandpa didn’t have a car at one point in time but he knew my grandma wanted this lamp so he rode a bus for an hour to the store and rode the whole way back with this lamp awkwardly between his knees sticking up in order to surprise her with it.

    Reply
  794. Deni Van der Voort on

    Our beautiful family quilt was discovered in Grandma’s attic after her passing at age 99 and that was 20 years ago. It is a crazy quilt with fun embroidery. It was wrapped in brown paper from the cleaner and the colors are beautiful still. We wish we had the origin story!

    Reply
  795. Kathryn on

    I have a beautiful mariner’s compass wall-hanging that my Mother made – it hangs at the base of my stairs so I see it everyday and think of her.

    Reply
  796. Ashley M on

    What a lovely interview! My grandmother was a quilter and made me and my husband a beautiful quilt for my bridal shower. It’s been used and loved so much that it’s all but threadbare. She also knitted and crocheted, so we have no shortage of blankets. I treasure every single one!

    Reply
  797. Mylène on

    What a beautiful interview and fascinating creative process! My grandmother had 16 children and made all their clothing by hand. When the grandchildren came along (my cousins and I), she would make pyjamas, dolls and quilts for all of us. Where she found the time and the energy is beyond me, but she’s one of my greatest inspirations and I will always hold these family heirlooms dear to my heart.

    Reply
  798. Leigh Zika on

    My most cherished heirlooms are also quilts…or quilted items…made by my Mom. She was a skilled gardener as well as a quilter. She loved growing many different types of flowers, which may or may not have made beautiful dyes had she chosen to explore that avenue, but her quilts and quilted projects are like a beautiful garden of flowers and memories for me.

    Reply
  799. Aviva Pilgrim on

    Great interview! I would love to read this book. I have a hand appliquéd and tatted banner that my great grandmother made. It says merry Christmas but the last S is backwards which makes it especially endearing.

    Reply
  800. Betsy Edwards on

    I have a beautiful handmade quilt from my husband’s great-grandmother. The main color is bright yellow. Reading this article reminded me why I like the quilt so much. Every time I look at it I’m reminded of dandelions. Even if it’s winter – this quilt brings flowers into our house year round.

    Reply
  801. Beth on

    My treasures my grandmother crocheted are in each of my 4 children’s homes. Small pieces to our last name crocheted and table clothes. Needle work by my other grandmother. My mother in law continues to bless each new great grand child with her hand made knitted blankets. I look forward to reading you r new book.

    Reply
  802. Lauren Bush on

    I love this!
    One of my cherished heirlooms is a ring that was passed down from my grandmother to me. It was actually my great grandmother’s anniversary ring but I remember admiring it when my grandmother was wearing it and after she passed, she left it to me. ❤️

    Reply
  803. Amber on

    Quilts and clothing my grandmother sewed!

    Reply
  804. Chris on

    My mom made several quilts during her life. She passed away this May at 99 years old. I cherish the quilt she made for me as it is one of many fond memories I have of her.

    Reply
  805. Marianne on

    This makes me want to get back into quilting. I started back in college and haven’t done it in forever. I have one from my grandmother that she made using leftovers from shirts and clothes back in the 40’s and I love it

    Reply
  806. Susan on

    My great grandmother was an excellent student but instead of going to college as her parents had hoped (my family has long supported educating females), she married the high school football star, moved to his farm and had four daughters in rapid succession. She then took to her bed for three years with an undiagnosed illness. One day she finally got up and announced she was going to Chicago. When she came home three months later, she allegedly had attended classes at the Chicago Art Institute. Who knows, but when she got home, she got a small apartment in town and started painting “china”. No white plate or t-cup was safe around her! She also painted beautiful large watercolors of vases filled with tulips, irises, or black-eyed susans. And, once she returned from her sojourn, she was a dynamo, driving her green Chevrolet around Lincoln, Nebraska into her 90’s. She not only passed along an enough painted tea-cups and plates that all her great grandchildren could have place-settings for every book club they hosted, she passed along an indomitable spirit. Maybe her story of finding her way is why so much of what Farm and Folk is doing resonates with me. Thanks for a great introduction to another indomitable spirit!

    Reply
  807. Dawn Davis on

    My cherished heirloom lives in the cabinet – my grandmothers glass luncheon plates with tea cups. I get them out and share them with others when we host garden tea parties here at Bloom Junction. They conjure memories for the sweet ladies that attend our gatherings.

    Reply
  808. Patty Eisenhaur on

    My family heirloom is a grandfather clock. Inside the clock is a newspaper clipping from the late 1930’s of my father standing next to it with his grandfather declaring the clock was 200 years old. Fast forward another 75 years, and I have a photo of my son with his grandfather in front of the clock. The clock still runs and is a cherished keepsake.

    Reply
  809. Audrey on

    I have a quilt hand pieced and stitched by my great grandma of scraps left over from her dressmaking that I treasure. A more unusual heirloom was left by my dad. He hired a man to build a short but long wall across the front of his yard. Every morning he’d go out with his coffee and watch. When the wall was done, my dad picked up his shovel, excavated a trench next to the foundation of his house, and poured footings of concrete that he mixed up a wheelbarrow full at a time. He bought a truckload of mountain stone. Then, one 12-foot or so course a day, he started laying rock. It took about a year but he rocked the whole house. He had spent so much time watching that his hands knew exactly what to do.

    Reply
  810. Lisa Olivetti on

    My grandfather made furniture. We have several pieces throughout our home. When he died, my husband was the only person in the family interested in inheriting all of Grandpa’s tools. And today my husband is making furniture that will hopefully be handed down through generations.

    Reply
  811. Flora Reed on

    Thank you for the beautiful interview! I have a vibrant Hoya plant from a cutting that goes back 3 generations and consider it a true heirloom. 🧡

    Reply
  812. Heather on

    This is fantastic, it combines 2 of my hobbies and is intriguing!

    Reply
  813. Lisa Worsham on

    I’m totally intrigued by this concept of using flowers to dye fabrics for your quilts. My grandmother has long since passed, but as a small child, I can remember how she and her friends would gather in the basement around the quilting rack that hung from the ceiling, quilting and gossiping for hours. I seemed to be the only one in the family who truly appreciated her works. I have several of my Grandma’s quilts. One of my favorites is an Elvis themed appliqué quilt, complete with a guitar and hound dog! Thank you for reminding me of childhood loves.

    Reply
  814. Ginny on

    This is a delightful interview, well done!
    I have 3 undated oil paintings created by my great grandmother. I’m 77, so I’m guessing they were painted in the late 1800s. A vase of roses, a fruit still life, and a basket of cherries with orchard in the bg. They are beautifully done and are such treasures!

    Reply
  815. Emily White on

    In our family, we have my great grandfather’s tobacco pipe that he carried with him during WWI. The pipe is hand carved with the dates and locations in Europe that he fought.

    Reply
  816. Beverly Landis on

    Enjoyed the interview. I have a lone star quilt that a great Aunt made. It is beautiful. Lots of small quilting stitches.

    Reply
  817. Tina on

    My grandmother made me an ancestor quilt with the names of my ancestors stenciled on it. It is a treasure that I will pass down to my daughter and she can pass down to hers. I took and interest in quilting about 2 years ago and have been fascinated with learning how to dye my own material with flowers and plants. I would love to win one of her books and learn more about this.

    Reply
  818. Shauna Cameron on

    I have a handmade quilt from my great-great-grandmother with the comment “Forget Me Not” embroidered in one corner. Although I never met her, I treasure the work of her hands and promise to never forget my link to her.

    Reply
  819. Amy on

    Love this. Reminds me of my grandmother and her love for flowers and quilting.

    Reply
  820. Mellonie on

    I have some very special pillow cases made by my grandmother. I lived with her for a large part of my childhood and watched how she would carefully make quilts, and do special embroidery on pillow cases for gifts each year for all the different members of our large extended family. My favorite is my pillow case she embroidered with a special night time prayer for me. I find this type of fabric dyeing fascinating, but anything to do with flowers and creating is. Thank you for the interview, so very interesting.

    Reply
  821. Sheila on

    Wow! As I was reading this it brought to mind several people and cherished heirlooms. First the heirlooms are a quilt from each of my grandmothers. Each so different from the other and beautiful. Then very dear to my now adult children and me are baby quilts for each that were hand stitched by my mother. They were made with love and loved to pieces (literally) by each of my children.
    Sara, your story brings to mind friends who quilt. I am struck by how you all talk about the thought and intention that goes into each piece and at the same time letting the piece transform into its own. (Alchemy)
    Thank you for sharing. -Sheila

    Reply
  822. Sammy jo on

    My mom made me a lovely earth toned pink and burgundy quilt when I was a baby. I have it now hanging over the rocker in my little girl’s nursery. I love quilting and she has several quilts that live in her little room.

    Reply
  823. Teresa Morabito on

    My mother-in-law made loaves of Easter Bread every year to share with family and friends. When my husband and I started our own family we wanted to carry on her bread tradition. We found her recipe box and were so happy to find her Easter Bread recipe written out in my mother-in-law’s beautiful handwriting with tips in the margins and well wishes at the bottom :)
    I carry-on the Easter Bread tradition and this year I had the image of the recipe printed on kitchen towels and gifted the towels to my three sons.

    Reply
  824. Emily on

    My dear friend made a quilt for me using embroidery blocks from my kids art. It hangs up as a reminder of collaboration between generations. And it has flowers on it too:).

    Reply
  825. Bobbie Van Eck on

    I have two cherished heirlooms. First are two paintings done by my grandmother. I grew up on the east coast, so they are of boats and ocean. Even tho my daughter never met her, she has heard the stories and, I believe, will also cherish these beautiful paintings. The second is a small handcarved wooden chickadee that I found in my other grandmother’s house after she passed. The chickadee was her favorite bird, and I can remember watching them in her amazing yard. She had a huge, beautiful flower garden, and a yard full of trees. I think of her everytime I see this adorable carving… and the chickadees at my feeders.

    Reply
  826. Greta on

    Amazing and inspiring! Thank you for sharing this with us and introducing us to Sara!

    Reply
  827. Emily on

    I have a pair of pinking shears in their original box from my mom-mom (great grandmother). She used them throughout her life as a seamstress and gifted them to me years ago when I went to college to study apparel design. Somehow the box still smells like her and everytime I pick them up and feel them in my hand I am instantly connected to her.

    Reply
  828. Stephanie Lemay on

    I loved this interview. Sara is so inspiring! My great grandfather made a beautiful redwork quilt when he was eight years old which I now have and treasure. It has dozens of tiny images of farm life and flowers.

    Reply
  829. Kristen H on

    My most cherished heirlooms from my family are the pieces of jewelry I’ve inherited from both my mom and my grandma. I love that I can wear them daily, they’re little reminders as I see them and wear them, and it makes me a feel a closeness to them even though they’re no longer living. Family heirlooms hold precious memories and help in the grieving process.

    Reply
  830. Christal Lane on

    I love that Timmy made an appearance on the quilt!! 🥰 In my family, my grandmother had been building quite a collection of jewelry pieces – most notably, rings. Each of the grandchildren received several rings from this collection that she had specially collected for them. It was very special and not expected… None of us knew she had been collecting them!

    Reply
  831. Teresa McFarland on

    The amount of heirlooms I have inherited recently make it difficult to choose my favorite. Right now it’s a melamine bowl of my grandmas that I love to make my pie dough in and pick garden vegetables in.

    Reply
  832. Judy HOlland on

    This interview had such a good feeling, just an overall cozy sense of well-being. I love the fact that you do all this yourself, how inspiring. I would love to learn the art of dying fabrics, I have a fabric fetish. If anything is to excite me, it will be fabric. Thank you so much for the inspiration.

    Reply
  833. Lisa on

    My grandmother also enjoyed quilting and needlework. I am fortunate to have the quilt she cross-stitched and quilted 50 years ago! She made it for my sister and I for the bed we shared growing up. I remember when she gave it to us and I remember how good I felt sleeping under it. But my grandmother didn’t do much patchwork – I am fortunate to have the time and interest to pursue that art. Just love the natural colors Sara uses in her quilts.

    Reply
  834. Tricia Monfrey on

    My parents have been gone from this earth more than 20 years and I myself am now 67, but one of my prized positions is a scrap of my own baby quilt. I came to my parents as a foster child at 18 months old and was later adopted by my foster parents. That scrap reminds me how they wrapped me in love and helped me thrive.

    Reply
  835. Jenny on

    What a beautiful interview! Thank you for sharing. My grandfather owned a feed mill and I have a quilt my grandmother made out of the feedsacks from the mill. It is treasured.

    Reply
  836. Kristy Wessel on

    Thank you for the wonderful interview and for introducing us to Sara! I’m a big quilter and dying fabric is something I’ve never considered before but now I’m hooked. I have a feeling I’m going to be planting a LOT of flowers for dying next year a I can’t wait!

    My favorite heirloom quilt was handmade by my great, great grandmother. She raised a family of 10 children on a farm in South Dakota where winters were frozen and very difficult. She hand pieced quilts for each of her children to keep them warm through the cold nights. She didn’t have much money so she used whatever was available like old clothing and flower sacks, which were surprisingly pretty back then. They were put together in a somewhat haphazard manner with more focus on efficiency than symmetry. Those kids needed a warm blanket as soon as possible! But the unique designs are what make them beautiful. I was very lucky to be gifted one of those quilts and every time I snuggle up under it, I feel her love and strength.

    Reply
  837. Carole Caplan-Sosin on

    It’s hard for me to be working the farm and not be inspired to create! I have fabric from my grandmother that has been in the family for years…waiting to become a quilt? Both my grandmothers escaped pogroms in Russia-one by sewing trinkets into the lining of their clothes to barter with-textiles certainly have stories to tell! Lovely inspiring article!

    Reply
  838. Michelle Gooding on

    This interview spoke to my soul. I agree with you that we can change this world one small and mindful step at a time by using the earths resources in sustainable and gentle ways. The photography is breathtaking. Like Erin’s books your book looks to be a work of art and patience and the love of what you do can ooze out and infect the reader in positive ways. What a gift. You’ve inspired me soul sisters.

    Reply
  839. Eliza on

    When I was a girl, our family would visit my grandparents who had emigrated from Italy every summer to can the tomatoes from their garden. I think of them every year when I use my grandmother’s canning jars and my grandfather’s enormous pot.

    Reply
  840. Larissa Davis on

    Beautiful magic indeed….

    Following a passion and sharing your beautiful art for the world to enjoy is a true gift.

    Reply
  841. Misha Hutchison on

    Sara is inspiring! I love her passion for hand dyed materials from plants——- and her quilting skills.
    I have 2 matching log-cabin, twin quilts made loving by my great grandmother. They are a priceless family heirloom!

    Reply
  842. Heather G on

    The passion and skill well-honed certainly shine through. Simply beautiful. My grandfather built wooden benches and stools for fun when he was alive. There’s nothing particularly fancy about them, but this was his way of showing love for his family and I think of him every time I sit on the patio or need to grab something from a high cupboard.

    Reply
  843. Shelley on

    My grandmother and mother have made quilts for every child and grandchild in our family. I still have mine and I am amazed at every stich. They were created with love and I am bathed with that love. Thank you grandma and mom!

    Thank you for sharing Sara’s story and the textiles she creates.

    Reply
  844. Karen Lyman on

    Your work is so inspiring! I’m continuing to learn of ways to use, share and enjoy the flowers I grow. My grandmother was the maker in our family. She owned a fabric and yarn store, and taught many, many women to knit, crochet and quilt. One year for Christmas, she made log cabin quilts for everyone in our family – 5! Plus 2 twin size for herself! The precious item passed on to me is a wooden candy bowl with a music box in it which plays “Blue Danube”. All those times we had together when we played the music box together, I never imagined actually boating down that river, yet I have. I hope her spirit, determination and creativity are somewhere in my own genetic makeup – that is truly the most precious gift!

    Reply
  845. Susan Sims on

    My grandmother divided her “crystal” between me and a much loved cousin. We each received seven glasses. Since then I have accumulated many more at antique stores and estate sales! Quilts have also been special finds too. Looking forward to Sara’s new book.

    Reply
  846. Danielle on

    Quilting is a huge part of our family history. I’m so excited to see this book!! My Great Grandmother taught me how to sew around the time I was five years old. We would do all kinds of things together. When I was a teenager I made my first feed sack quilt and a handful since then. I would have to say that one of my most cherished heirlooms is my mother’s baby quilt. It was an indigo star, one of my favorite old blocks-and it happened to be my daughter’s name too! Beautiful images and a beautiful interview, you should be so proud!

    Reply
  847. Dawn Gentry on

    When I was growing up, my mother gave me and my sister a hope chest and a homemade quilt to go in int. Mine was white with pink and blue dolls which I later figured out was the Suebonnet Sue quilt pattern. I have used that quilt over the years on my beds so it’s getting a little worn. While my mother did not make it, she gave it from her heart. Losing my mother in my mid-20’s, this is a cherished heirloom I hold dear to my heart. She was one of a kind and so it my precious quilt.

    Reply
  848. Lindsey Graff on

    My sister in law is a new quilter and made two of the most beautiful quilts for my new baby. One depicts a sunset and hangs above his crib. We share a love of textiles in general . I have a feeling that dying fabric may be the next frontier :)

    Reply
  849. Patty Grove on

    How inspiring! Love hearing how you understood what wouldn’t work for you as a lifestyle & choosing one that allowed for Alchemy. I own a 70 year old quilt made from scraps of dresses in 1940s fabric & gifted to me on my wedding. Cherished!

    Reply
  850. Julieta Sherk on

    Thank you both for the inspiring and uplifting interview. Three quotes resonated most with me: 1 -” I might burst if I couldn’t find a way to make the art that was inside me”. 2 – “The weight of something that isn’t feeding our souls feels a lot heavier to us than taking the risky leaps of faith that are required to evolve”. 3- “don’t be afraid to evolve when your heart is telling you it’s time”.

    Reply
  851. Heather Brunelle on

    I am very excited about the book. I take care of a flock of sheep and would love to learn more about natural plant dyes for their wool.
    I have an old family quilt, possibly from Depression era, made of fabric scraps. I love seeing the care and intention of the work to make the quilt. It is an heirloom that was used and worn and carries much energy of those who made and used it.

    Reply
  852. Heather Martzke on

    My mom died almost two years ago. She loved to embroider, crochet, bead, and sew in general. But needle work was her passion and she created so many projects! My cherished piece from her, which I hope will become an heirloom when my children pass it down to their children, is a framed geometrical pattern of needlepoint, all in purple of course (her favorite color!).

    Reply
  853. Katie Wyatt on

    What a beautiful soul you have! I’m a quilter who loves flowers and can appreciate all the steps in your process. Currently, I’m making children’s quilts for a group called The Hole in the Wall Gang. This is a camp that hosts terminally ill kids and each kid at camp receives a quilt and a pillowcase to take home. It’s a project that touches my heart to the core and the camp near me will open in 2024!

    I can’t wait to see your book and also can’t wait until the next one. Happy creating, happing sowing and happy sewing!

    Reply
  854. Ted Warren on

    My great grandmother loved to quilt & needlestitch. When I was a child, I’d happily spend time watching her patiently creating her works of art. She made a flower pot with flowers. It’s quite fragile so I had it framed to hang on the wall.

    Reply
  855. Erin Walker on

    I love this! I have recently experimented with hammering flowers onto tea towels which has given me a glimpse into the dye that flowers make and I’m hooked! I love this concept of natural dyes and quilting. My grandmother is an avid quilter and so our family heirlooms are quilts made by her hands. She hasn’t done any natural dyeing of fabrics though so maybe I’ll get her this book for Chirstmas and we can learn together!

    Reply
  856. Leslie Freitas on

    My great grandmother, my gramma and mother are all quite the seamstresses. I can remember feeling so beautiful playing dress up in old prom dresses and wedding dresses that they had made for their daughters. My mother made a lot of her clothing when she was in college but the piece that is loved most is a cream blouse hand embroidered with her favorite flowers. It passed down all of my sisters and is now in my possession. I wear it every summer.

    Reply
  857. Rana Boland on

    Cuttings from my grandmother’s garden. Some of these plants I’ve had to leave behind as I’ve moved through life. A peony with beautiful cut leaf foliage lives on in a Brooklyn community garden. A recently acquired flowering quince offshoot (a cutting of a cutting) that will hold space in our new home garden. A jade plant taken as a leaf from my childhood home that now sits in our sunny living room. Small pieces of plants tended to and shared living on and keeping their memories close.

    Reply
  858. Jill on

    My husband’s grandfather made us a chess table for our wedding 42 years ago. He inlaid the top with a chess board made of stone. All the chess pieces reside in a drawer he created. So much love and time went into this piece and will be cherished for generations to come.

    Reply
  859. Lisa Migliore on

    I treasure my three quilts that my great grandmothers made. All are hand stitched and between 70 to 100 years old. Still in excellent condition!

    Reply
  860. Deitra on

    How inspiring! I can’t wait to get this book! I’ve wanted to try quilting and I’m going to start with the kit described in this interview. So excited to give it a try.

    Reply
  861. Corina Moser on

    I grew up watching my mother set up the formal dinning room table for the upcoming holidays. She used a tablecloth where each block was hand stitched and embroidered with scenes of Japanese people, mountains, and small boats. As a two year old and throughout my growing up years I simply loved this tablecloth. It is now in my home…my younger sister saved it after our mother died a few years back. I’m the only sister that creates hand made things, quilts, dolls, and paintings. And it is ever so special to me because my aunt Mina my father’s sister made it some 74 years ago.

    Reply
  862. Karen Vachon-Thaner on

    Your story Sarah is so inspiring! I am a quilter, photographer and urban gardener. I have been saving the petals, flower pressing with a little success and would love to give natural dyeing a try. I would definitely be interested, should you decide to have that workshop on your farm. Thank you so much for sharing your process and evolution as an artist!
    Karen
    *Thanks also go to floret for sharing your experiences and the people you meet along the way. Much appreciated!

    Reply
  863. Pamela Higgins-Brown on

    Your quilts are breathtaking. I love the natural colors that you apply to your fabrics. I signed up for your news letter and I look forward to reading your new book. 😘💜✌

    Reply
  864. Janet Kronenberger on

    What a great story, I love that in her own way Sara is preserving the art of fabric dying. I am a quilter, something I learned from my Grandmother, then later my Mother. I love fabric and designing a creating quilts. Maybe some day I’ll give hand dying fabrics a try, they are so amazing. My most cherished memory is time spend with Grandma sewing my first quilt. Then later in life working with my Mom quilting and sewing. I still have this beautiful quilt hand quilted with my Grandma.

    Reply
  865. Anna Jennings on

    My grandma hand pieced and hand stitched quilts. I have two that she made me and use them with my own children now. I got into flower farming the year after she died, and I have thought a million times how much she would have loved it. She knew every flower in existence (it seemed) and would be so proud of me. I miss her and am grateful to wrap up in the quilts she made me and enjoy a shadow of a hug from her.

    Reply
  866. Lisa Philipps on

    What a wonderful venture! The natural dyed fabrics make up a beautiful palette. This inspires me to get back into quilting using flowers and plants for coloring fabrics. My grandmother used to make bed quilts out of old fabrics from clothing, etc. They were gorgeous. I have very few family heirlooms as one side of the family lost everything in the Great Depression, but I have an old pitcher that I treasure. The other side of the family were immigrants who traveled from the Ukraine during WWII with just a suitcase, and I have an old broach with a piece of a (blue morpho?) butterfly wing, which was turned into a necklace and shimmers with iridescent blues. They are priceless.

    Reply
  867. Stacy on

    I waited patiently to receive my grandmother’s custom crochet blanket for my wedding. Everyone receives one but the special occasion can be different. She has now past and I hold dear to that blanket and so many other handcrafted pieces created by her. She was a gardener too, so I cherish my time with her spirit in my garden. Xo

    Reply
  868. Megan on

    My Aunt had made each of my kids a mini quilt they we still use as they age. My husband has a quilt that his grandmother made and uses it every night. When I think of heirlooms I usually think of special items tucked away in boxes but with quilts they are in our family room and invite snuggles and warmth with often use. Such a tangible piece of love! I’m looking forward to learning the craft so I can make this kind of usable art my the ones I love also!

    Reply
  869. Kellene Marsan on

    My uncle lives for two things: fishing and the flea market. As long as I can remember, he’s worn this old dive watch on his wrist that he found one Sunday sifting through treasure. It was perfect, he could wear it all day out on the river and I could sit on his lap and twist the outer dial to listen for the pleasant clicking. As the older generation loves to say “things just aren’t made like they used to be” and this watch lasted well through my childhood and I clicked that outer ring around and around every time I saw him. Every holiday, every fishing expedition, I made sure to play with his watch. Then in college, I landed a job as a suction harvester. I donned diving gear and swam around pulling aquatic invasives for two summers to get myself through college. After I graduated, I started my own “Land and Sea Gardener” business and sure enough, on Christmas Day, he pulls me aside and tells me he has a gift he would like my Aunt to also watch me open. And I knew what it was before I opened that box but I still couldn’t believe my eyes when I pulled aside the tissue paper. Safe to say my tears made my aunt cry as well. That dive watch from the Elephant’s Trunk a zillion years ago is my most prized possession.

    Reply
  870. MarySue Cromwell on

    Very inspirational! I’ve always been interested in natural dying, but just never tried. I’ve recently interested in making rope bowls. I think I’ll try dying the rope.

    Reply
  871. Lynne Thomas on

    I have been sewing and quilting for years. I too love the slow process and creating something that will be around for a long time. My great grandma was a quilter with her sister. I have my baby quilt that they hand stitched. I love what Sara is doing. Now off to follow her on insta!

    Reply
  872. Danielle Schami on

    I love all that Sara does, such a delightful combination of skills and passions. A cherished heirloom from my own family is an orange and brown afghan my maternal grandmother knitted in the 1970s or 1980s. It is comforting to wrap myself in it, and feel her loving embrace.

    Reply
  873. Catherine on

    Sara this is so amazing. I have a half made quilt given to me by my mother-in-law that her mother started before she died. She knows I love to sew so she thought I might enjoy finishing it. I have been so scared to mess it up that it still sits up with all my fabric untouched. As the weather cools and the farm chores slow, this has given me the inspiration to pull it out and try to finish the quilt. Thank you.

    Reply
  874. Sarah Puma on

    I have a vase of dried wheat that traveled all the way to Ellis island by my great, great, great grandparents who were farmers coming from Sweden! They somehow have remained intact after all this time, and sit on my mantle as inspiration to preserve the beauty and integrity of nature and my work.

    Reply
  875. Diane Buker on

    How inspiring you both are Erin and Sara. I am a reader. One of the main reasons I like to read is because I get to meet people I would never know through their life experiences or through their imagination writing fiction. I hope to retire in a few years and I am thinking about what things I want to add to my life. I have a small bungalow and a garden, so enjoy working on my home. I have cats I have rescued that have a good home with me. I have been fortunate to have grown up with good parents and grandparents. I have thought of them often but even more so now that I am getting older myself. My Dad was so kind and good to us all. I use many ideas of his, like, if you can’t figure it out, walk away for a bit. It always works. I have my Grandpa’s old metal wheel barrow that he used to give my sister and I rides in as kids. My Mom and Grandmas were always cooking something warm and delicious. I wish you both well in your future endeavors and thank you for touching all our lives in such wonderful ways.

    Reply
  876. Erica on

    I missed the part about a cherished family heirloom. I think it would be the brightly colored tuffets that go to the chairs for my grandmothers dining table that has passed down to me. They are not fancy but always take me back to having fried meatballs and bagels on Sunday mornings with her and the rest of my extended family.

    Reply
  877. Barbora Vigier on

    Our treasured family heirloom are old baskets that my aunt treasures at her cabin in the mountains… <3

    Reply
  878. Gia on

    This interview was inspiring—thank you Erin and the Floret team.
    Our family heirloom is a long, wide mahogany dining table, inherited from my husband’s grandparents. We love thinking about what conversations were held around this table—his grandfather was involved in the civil rights movement—and what conversation will happen around this table in future generations. We use it as our everyday kitchen table, and it’s the heart of our home.

    Reply
  879. Stephanie on

    I have two of my grandmother’s handspun, handwoven linen tablecloths and they’re so precious to me. The village where her family lived had a communal loom (or possibly someone who made a living by doing the weaving for the area), so everyone would spin their thread at home and bring it to this person to create the fabric.

    Reply
  880. Evelyn on

    Such a fascinating blog post! I greatly enjoyed reading it. I was gifted a patchwork quilt many years ago when I was in college. It had belonged to the late daughter of my great aunt. I am sure it was difficult for her to part with the quilt but she insisted that I needed a proper covering for my dormitory bed! It was made using the Dresden sunflower pattern and I cherish it to this day. The quilt is nearly 100 years old now and is still in beautiful condition. I think of my aunt and her unselfish kindness whenever I plant sunflowers on my small flower farm.

    Reply
  881. Megan on

    Your use of natural dyes is fascinating, I can’t wait to learn more!

    Reply
  882. Kim on

    Wonderful to read about Sara! In my family my best friend and cousin was taught by my favorite Aunt , her mother, how to make linen bonnets from a handkerchief that is then set aside until the child gets married . On this day the bonnet becomes a handkerchief again and is carried down the aisle by the bride or is placed in the breast pocket of the groom.
    (For the first time I planted indigo. Beautiful green leafed plant that was used in ancient Japan as a blue color fast dye.I am looking forward to experimenting!!)

    Reply
  883. Maggy Watkins on

    My family heirloom is my grandfather’s oak table and chairs I can remember tap dancing on the table whilst everyone else watched the Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II and it had to be french polished to remove the scratches. It has been used for family celebrations and especially at Christmas it brings back memories of my parents, my own family growing up and now grandchildren

    Reply
  884. Lisa Whitaker on

    I’m the crafter of the family (though not always an avid one), and the one heirloom that comes to mind is a green velvet cloak I made for my younger sister to wear on her wedding day. It poured that day, but somehow the cloak made it through just fine. When my niece (her daughter) recently wed, she was looking for something to wear to combat the chilly April weather and the cloak was the perfect fit – and yes, it rained on her wedding day too! And the cloak is still in excellent shape, waiting for the next generation, should they want it.

    Reply
  885. Erica on

    Wow! What inspiring and beautiful work! I love it so much!

    Reply
  886. Diane Guthrie on

    I am taking a natural dye class at the University of Kansas with MaryAnn Jordon. I think you would love her quilts.

    Reply
  887. Deborah Hunter on

    Family heirlooms have always been centered around art and the love of gardening. From my great grandparents down to grandnieces, each individual and a love of combining art with digging in the dirt. Even creative cooking with garden flowers, herbs and veggies. Passing down the knowledge we each carry and know will be carried on.

    Reply
  888. Lynn on

    I love these heirlooms and what makes it even sweeter is how this life passion also led to personal exploration and growth. Truly inspiring! I have a beautiful Japanese baby doll that Japanese ancestors gave to Americans as a welcome gift. The doll has an amazing kimono that is embroidered and quilted. I am intrigued by quilting and this organic process and am definitely going to check out the classes and website. Thank you for sharing this story Floret!

    Reply
  889. Emily on

    My grandmother restored antique furniture. My favorite heirloom pieces are a red desk, chair and dresser my mom used as a teenager.

    What gorgeous art!

    Reply
  890. Suzanne on

    I only recently discovered my great grandmother was quite an artisan, and I am lucky enough to have her wood-burned wall art that reads “All’s well that ends well”, a Shakespearean phrase. Admiring it brings amazement in its intricacy—as a kid, I was never told it was a handmade piece, much less by a relative, so I was struck when finding out much later in my adult life its generation. To have it is a gift.

    Reply
  891. Dolores Sinram on

    What spoke to me was Sara’s advice: Prioritizing what makes you happy and letting go of the things that are not serving your sole. This is such good advice, I need to take to heart.

    Reply
  892. Patricia Ovington on

    My mother-in-law is a beautiful quilter! She has made each of my children wedding quilts and each of my grandchildren a baby quilt . My favorite is a quilt that she made out of my father in law’s ties after he died, such a special memory! She is 99 now and stopped quilting a couple years ago. She has passed her quilting things on to me so I have a lot to live up to!

    Reply
  893. Isabelle on

    Beautiful work! My family heirloom is a small wood rocking chair for children! My grandmother used it a a child: my mother, me and now my two girls are still using it! We carved all the women’s name who plays with the chair for memories.

    Reply
  894. Cindy Nyberg on

    Sara you’re story is very interesting and thank you for writing the book to keep your passion alive. I have 2 quilts that a very good friend made for our daughters. In addition, my mom made us a knitted afghan for our wedding. It’s cream with cables. I love it and will keep it forever. Now I’m going to use the same pattern to knit an afghan for my daughter and son in law to set a tradition and remember my mom!

    Reply
  895. Jane Warner on

    My cherished heirloom revolves around my German heritage. My great Aunt gave me 4 hand embroidered banners to adorn my linen closet shelves. The German quote translates to:
    Blossomed in summer wind and bleached on green meadows,
    Placed still as now in a closet for the happiness of the German frau.
    Every time I go to my linen closet and see this I think of her and her handiwork.

    Reply
  896. Amy Manson on

    I love the softness of the colors

    Reply
  897. Martha Duffy on

    I actually make the heirlooms in my family to hand down. Every year I make something new for my two grown children for Christmas. A lot of time and love goes into every creation.

    Reply
  898. Shirlee Wolf on

    Such an interesting & talented lady! Her love for everything she does certainly shines through! In the ‘80s I learned to needlepoint & do counted cross stitch both which allowed me to make things for my son & gifts along the way. My eyesight is not as sharp now but I will always appreciate handmade anything. I recognize the time & love that goes into each piece! Your book looks amazing!

    Reply
  899. Adrianne on

    We have several family heirlooms, but I think my very favorites are the three glass flower frogs that were my husband’s grandma’s. I’m not positive if the heritage goes beyond that – I should find out!

    Reply
  900. Meg Owens on

    My grandmothers floral sketches.

    Reply
  901. Claudette Ryan on

    I grew up visiting my grandmother, who handmade quilts. She held quilting bees with her friends in her living room, and made sure I had a needle and thread to use to quilt (I’m sure those big stitches were removed later). She sold quilts to supplement their income. But, thankfully, she gave quilts to all her children and grandchildren, which are still used and treasured today. I can still remember dresses my mother made for my sister and I when I look at her “flower garden” quilt. These quilts will be lovingly passed down to great- grandchildren.

    Reply
  902. Jessica W on

    Both my, and my husband’s, grandmothers have been purposeful in handing down treasured jewelry pieces to their granddaughters. It has been precious to wear a special broach that my husband’s grandmother gave me.

    Reply
  903. Callie Shepherd on

    My Granny’s white enamel wash basin with a red rim – I use it all the time for serving watermelon in the summer, green salads for a crowd, or just soaking fruit before it’s washed. I think Granny would be pleased that I remember her throughout the year with her humble basin. :)

    Reply
  904. Katie Timm on

    A woman at church made my husband and I a quilt for our wedding, and included Scripture in the actual quilting lines on it. It’s precious to me.

    Reply
  905. Terri on

    I don’t have an heirloom like this in my family. How wonderful that Sara is creating this heirlooms and treasures. She followed her heart and has created an incredible business. Very inspiring.

    Reply
  906. Elisse Birch on

    Some my most treasured heirlooms is a set of simple tin cookie cutters; an Angel, bell, and several Christmas trees. My grandmother used them for Christmas cookies with her children and grandchildren and I enjoy using them with my children now, even if the Angel has been so loved (aka bent) it must be explained each year what it is supposed to be. When I roll out my sugar cookie dough, I can still hear my grandmother giving tips to me.

    Reply
  907. SarahCrossman.com on

    Beautiful work and inspiring interview!

    My most cherished family heirloom is a framed piece of my paternal grandfather’s calligraphy. It was a transcribed poem gifted to my grandmother for her birthday in 1965. From my grandfather, four uncles and father. Such a simple gift, lovingly made.

    Reply
  908. Julie Rouse on

    I love all things color and fabric. What a wonderful thing to use nature to create such memories. Look forward to reading your book.

    Reply
  909. Rose Chovan on

    I have several heirlooms from my mothers side of the family. When my grandmother passed away she had several antique quilts that we all got to share. She also had enough sets of China that each granddaughter was able to have one. But my most prized and special heirloom is an end table that my great uncle made. It’s not very fancy and has been repaired over the years but it’s one of the only things we have to remind us of him. He was in his late teens/early twenties and serving in the Army (think WWII era). He went out for a swim in the middle of the night with a buddy of his (no one knows why) and ended up drowning. It was devastating for my grandmother because they were very close and she was in the hospital because she had TB. To this day we don’t really know what happened to him and don’t have hardly anything that belonged to him. Which makes the little end table I have so precious.

    Reply
  910. Kathi Graves on

    I love your personal vision and I love that it includes stitching. Sewing, in any form, is sadly becoming a lost tradition. My mother taught me to sew when I was 10 years old so I could make my own clothes (she hated to sew!). One time when I was a little girl growing up in Kansas City, we visited my aunt in Texas and she spent a whole day with me, making a sock doll and a hand sewn dress. I’m almost 65 now and I still have her. We named her Charlotte, which turned out to be a foreshadowing of a far off place I have now called home for 34 years….Charlotte, NC.

    I haven’t thought about that doll in years and, before today, I had never made that connection. So thank you for the prompt!

    Reply
  911. Cindy Lammon on

    I have 2 sets of quilt blocks and some crewel pieces done by my maternal grandmother. We were very close and she taught me how to sew. I also share a love of growing flowers from my paternal grandmother.

    Reply
  912. Laura B on

    Fascinating and amazing work and transformations! We were gifted a 4 piece mission dining room set that I remember eating at my grandparents home when I was a young girl. So many rich memories of time spent sharing the bounty of their garden together with them.

    Reply
  913. Taroh Alexandra Strong on

    Our family heirlooms are more intangible, although my spry 98 year old grandmother may have some things to pass along to me. Kindness, connection to face, and hard work plus perseverance is what my family passed on to me. There wasn’t much time for collectibles or hobbies… That side, I hope that some of my creative endeavors may become heirlooms!

    Reply
  914. Lisa Galan on

    I really enjoyed heating about your intentional lifestyle and art. I have always been fascinated by quilting. My mother used material from flour sacks when I was a child to quilt blankets. My grandmother was a crochet artist and my most beloved possessions is the bedspread she crocheted for me.

    Reply
  915. Erica van Emmerik on

    My mom was a quilter and I inherited all of her heirloom quilts, I think I have about 30! I have always wanted to carry on the tradition but haven’t been able to find the time but maybe it is time that I did❤️

    Reply
  916. Norene on

    I’ve always loved crafting things by hand, years ago when my girls were young I made them rag dolls for Christmas. They were made from muslin and yarn , embroidered faces and yarn hair.I had this one book that I loved it was Making Christmas Gifts, I learned how to embroider and sew, I was very proud of myself ! This same book showed you how to make wooden spoon dolls which were fun to make ! Later I moved on to Mop dolls, I used tea bags to stain the mops and muslin and crafted beautiful American Indian dolls .

    Reply
  917. Lisa on

    Sara- Thank you for sharing your process of leaping as you love what you experience in your life. A cherished heirloom?
    The ocean and all that it shares with my family. As i swim, snorkel, listen and wander on and in the ocean with my family and friends the love of the body of the ocean softly speaks to us all. I know my legacy will be this love.

    Reply
  918. Marla Wexler on

    My sister in law Helene creates beautiful crocheted quilts. She made me a special quilt that incorporated the colors of my new summer home which I cherish. This quilt will eventually become a family heirloom especially since it was made with love.

    Reply
  919. Kelley on

    I have a few of my great grandmother’s quilts, many of which were totally sewn by hand. I think of her every time I curl up under one!

    Reply
  920. Janelle Rickermann on

    Both my grandmothers were seamstresses, and quite accomplished. Both made quilts as well as rugs, from scraps of everything from flour sacks to velvet. My paternal grandma was also a weaver. I remember the rhythmic sound of the shuttle. My mother’s mother had an old treadle sewing machine. With it, she made wedding gowns, men’s suits and ties and once made an entirely reversible dress, vest and purse for my little sister out of black corduroy and polished cotton with a pattern of cherries. Their profession was one of the few money-making opportunities available to women, and allowed them to raise large families. I, unfortunately did not get the “gene”.

    Reply
  921. Emily K on

    I love this way of combining flowers and fiber! Such an inspiration! I am blessed to live on part of the land that has been in my family since the 1700s. We have many things passed down through my family, but one of my favorites is a large wooden drying rack. It came from my great-grandmothers house but I know it was used for many generations before that. I use it for drying flowers now, but have used it for holding quilts in the past!

    Reply
  922. Andrea on

    My grandmother and great aunts hand stitched beautiful quilts up until their mid-80s. I am blessed to have the last quilt that my Great Aunt Toots worked on, a wedding ring quilt, that was gifted to me when I married. Such an honor to have such a beautiful family heirloom.

    Reply
  923. Kelley Quinn on

    One wonder-filled Christmas, when I was 8-years-old, my mom knitted an entire wardrobe for my Barbie as a special gift. Teeny-tiny treasures knitted with her love from teeny-tiny needles that I’ve kept pristine to this day (over 50 years later), and even let my daughters play with the items with their dolls. Even then I was amazed that she found the time to create something so sweet for me and my beloved Barbie, as she worked a busy, full-time job then came home to be the best mom to my brothers and me. Mom now has very advanced dementia, and she’s lost many of her past memories, but I recently found the original book for knitting doll clothes and the magical tiny knitting needles in an old cedar chest at her house. When I showed them to her, her face lit up as I told her about the excitement I felt opening that gift, made of love from her so many years ago.

    Reply
  924. Andrea Steele on

    This looks like a lovely, informative book. I cherish a tablecloth my great grandmother made. It has scalloped linen squares attached together with tatting. She came to the US from Syria and have children. My great grandfather died when my grandfather was a year old. She never remarried, raised the children and owned a dry goods business when it was rare for women to own a business, she was one tough cookie.

    Reply
  925. Martha King on

    How inspiring. There are so many ways to live a fulfilling life. I’m looking forward to studying the book and learning more.

    Reply
  926. Karolina on

    I still have my grandparents linen wall hanging from their wedding, it’s such a special piece of fabric art. Sara’s quilts and willingness to share knowledge are incredible!

    Reply
  927. Eve Douglas on

    My dear mother was a quilter and I have a few of her hand sewn quilts made decades ago that I cherish. I’ve wanted to use my garden flowers and foliage for natural, organic fabric dying for quite sometime. It would be wonderful to utilise Sara’s expertise in her new book to guide me through this creative process. Erin, thankyou so much for sharing!

    Reply
  928. Martha on

    I have some items of clothing from my family that are very precious to me, including a dress that my aunt had made in thr Middle East from the most stunning silk she purchased there at a market. It comes out for weddings and I would rescue it in a fire!

    Reply
  929. Sarah on

    My mom made my sister and I quilts and clothes when we were younger; I hope one day that I can do the same (or if I decide not to have children, then I’ll make my own)! Either way I’d love to start a cut flower, dye, and textile garden and experiment, fail, and learn from the process. What a beautiful way to live!

    Reply
  930. Michelle on

    I think her slow process is an inspiration we often rush through our lives. I have my grandmothers sewing machine. I still remember watching her create magic on and am so honored that I can give it a home.

    Reply
  931. Lou Ann on

    Looks like a beautiful book. My mother and aunt are quilters, I am a quilter and my daughters are beginning to quilt. I cherish the quilts my mom has made for each of my children – treasures!

    Reply
  932. Marilyn Brinkley on

    I have some old cookbooks handed down in my family that are special to me.

    Reply
  933. Karen Mary on

    Oh, Sara, your work is just wonderful! You are such an inspiration.
    My favorite heirloom is a quilt made by the mother of an old friend who died many years ago. This friend taught me to quilt and garden and preserve food when I was in my 20s. (I’m almost 70 now, and I still think of her every day.) I have a granddaughter, Ona, named after her. The quilt was likely made around 1915, and I appreciate that it’s been passed down to me. I love handmade quilts and linens; I love thinking about the women who made these treasures from the past and present.

    Reply
  934. Patti Moree on

    I have been making quilts for many years. My first quilt was an heirloom quilt made by me and my 4 siblings for our parents in 1975. I have never been what I would call a traditional quilter. I’m always looking for something new to try. Sara’s approach to quilting and flower gardening is very appealing to me. Looking forward to her new book.
    Thanks for sharing.

    Reply
  935. Holly Doe on

    We have a wedding ring quilt that my aunt made for us when we married. It is beautiful and for years we had it hanging in our living room. We’ve just moved to a new house and I think it’s time to get it out again to enjoy.

    Reply
  936. Maribeth on

    My Grandmother inspired me to love flowers and quilting from the many quilts she made during her lifetime. I look forward to making new inspirations that will be treasured by many for years to come.

    Reply
  937. Helen Baldwin on

    I have a family bible, from my mothers side and I have a crocheted blanket which was a baby present when I was born. Both are falling apart, now that I think of it! The blanket has a mistake in the pattern – where one color is left out in the repeat of colors – and I love it even more because of that!

    Reply
  938. Krista on

    A rocking chair that first belonged to my great grandmother and has served as a sturdy vessel for comforting several generations of babies and a sacred place for mornings devotions and prayer.

    Reply
  939. Katie on

    I loved reading this interview! Natural dyeing AND quilting are two things on my “someday list.” I’m very inspired by Sara’s “just start now” mentality! A family heirloom that I cherish and use is the teakwood dining table that my grandfather made.

    Reply
  940. Sue Schlenner on

    I wish my family had been the type to have a treasured heirloom, but they were not. I do have an antique coffee grinder that we received after my mother-in-law passed away. I have it displayed in my kitchen and it keeps her memory close. I have a necklace from my Mom that I love to wear and that makes me feel good when I wear it because it is literally close to my heart. I have a garden that keeps me busy and happy. I mostly grow flowers and flowering plants. This year I added three beds raised beds to grow dahlias in. I am learning and improving how to garden best, but we are at the mercy of the elements like all farmers and gardeners – I live in Michigan :) where we can get a freeze in October or April or May. My friend and I just tried flower pounding with various flowers we grow in our yard. We pounded on tea towels and I will give them away for Christmas. I learned that if you use soda ash to treat the tea towels, it changes the color of the flowers as the dye transfers to the material. It’s good to know that depending on what you want your end result to be. Thanks for a great interview. I will follow Sara on Instagram.

    Reply
  941. Samantha Jackson on

    My first quilt hangs on the wall in our living room. It’s basic, brightly colored (where everything else in our decor is neutral), large, and unevenly blocked. It will probably always be there because each of the rows was sown by special women in my family, two of whom are home in heaven. Almost every other quilt I have made was given as a gift- lots of precious baby quilts and a few to wrap my favorite grown ups in. Thank you for sharing your gifts with the world ladies!

    Reply
  942. Patricia Mayer on

    I so appreciate ALL of you sharing your talents and your wisdom. Thank you.

    Reply
  943. Tamara on

    Such a beautiful article- enjoyed immensely!!
    So wonderful to see someone following their dreams !
    Though not a quilt , I treasure a floral embroidered handkerchief from my nana . I carry it in my purse wherever I go . It’s beautiful but it’s the genuine feeling that she / herself gave it to me that makes it truly special!
    Thank you for the wonderful article and to both of you for sharing your gifts with all of us.

    Reply
  944. Paula on

    I still treasure the the double wedding ring quilt that was on my bed as a child. Sara’s quilts are extraordinary. Congratulations on your first book!

    Reply
  945. Sanj on

    My Nana’s gold wedding band with 9/1917 inscribed on the inside

    Reply
  946. Karin Husty on

    Beautiful Beautiful! The artist processes is always magical and inspiring! Hand dyed fabric has a special story and always makes the most rich quilts! Thank you for a lovely interview!!!!

    Reply
  947. Stephanie P. on

    My two favorite things: textiles and flowers! My heirloom is a collection of pottery that I received as a wedding gift. The pieces were handed down through a dear family friend that they gave to me instead of their family. I consider them family so this was an honor!

    Reply
  948. Valerie Phaneuf on

    When my mother was pregnant with me, her mother knitted a baby blanket. Now that I am becoming a grandmother, I will be passing on my baby blanket to my son and his pregnant wife!

    Reply
  949. Evelyn J. Gonzalez on

    I have 3 of my grandmother’s quilts that she made by hand in very rural southwest Texas. They date to the time of the Civil War. Though they’re a bit worn, they’re very precious to me and have a revered place in my home.

    Reply
  950. Melanie Walker-Malone on

    My three year old grandson sleeps each night under a quilt made by my grandmother’s friend. Each time I tuck him in I am reminded of all the truest things about family and the treasure of the handmade.

    I am inspired by this interview!

    Reply
  951. Kim on

    My grandmothers sewed, crocheted, & knitted. I have many cherished pieces from works they created as far back as their own childhoods. I love knowing they are part of the “fabric” of our family and look forward to passing them down to my children and grandchildren.

    Reply
  952. Maurlo on

    I am inspired by the slow, quiet work of years that both of you lived out so that such beauty could be shared with the rest of us. My grandmother always sent us twelve gifts to open the days before Christmas. One year, we opened her last gift…delicate tatted lace stars she had starched stiff to hang on the tree, then learned she had quietly passed away that very morning. I still look at them and think about her quiet hours given in love to make those gifts.

    Reply
  953. Jennifer Henson on

    My grandfather made us a roll top bread box. He made one for all of my cousins when we got married. It has been on my kitchen counters for 29 years now!

    Reply
  954. Beth Stansell on

    When I was helping my mom downsize, I came upon a quilt that was made of velvet pieces. One side was a tea stained floral, the other side was dark maroon. On the dark side were names stitched in tea stained thread. Mom said the names were of my great grandfather’s family. His mother had made this and it was akin to a family tree. I’m so happy i found it and learned more about my family history.

    Reply
  955. Karen Randall on

    I unfortunately don’t have any family heirloom quilts. Maybe my quilts will one day be family heirlooms. I have a shaving mirror from my great grandfather that we cherish. The story is, it was the only thing he would not let his children touch. He kept it high up on a shelf in the kitchen and took it down every morning to shave.

    Reply
  956. Elisa on

    amazing work, can’t wait to read the book!
    Our family heirloom are linen sheets with the family’s initials and floral embroidery that my ancestors had embroidered, they are so light and timeless that they make us imagine glimpses of past lives! 🤍

    Reply
  957. Allison on

    What a beautiful interview (and commissioned quilt)! I love the handmade quilts I have been gifted in life.

    Reply
  958. Jean Sloan on

    I have been sewing since high school, and have always loved fabric. So I collected fabric an always wanted to learn to quilt. We moved to Ohio 20 years ago and my new neighbor invited me to her quilt quilt and I have been quilting for my family and friends since. I always love to learn new ways to use fabric and wool to incorporate in my quilts. This method of dying fabric with natural method would be fascinating for me as I make many baby quilts for my grandchildren, 10 of them and for the young families at church. Thank you for sharing this book with all of us who follow your work! ♥️

    Reply
  959. Joanie on

    I am so inspired by this story. Dye from flowers assures the preservation of nature’s beautiful bounty. I would love to venture into this process.

    Reply
  960. Tia on

    Our family has no history in quilt making but my sister and I treasure our grandmothers handmade crocheted blankets and other items she brought back with her after the war from Germany. She was especially talented in decorating wooden picture frames with cut wheat. She would create the most intricate flowers and designs traditionally to her Ukrainian heritage.

    Reply
  961. Patricia B. Reed on

    Years ago I sewed my first Christmas- themed wall hanging and love the feeling of pride it brings upon taking it out of my cedar chest each year.
    Thank you your very emotive interview.💜

    PBR

    Reply
  962. Jennifer on

    Loved learning more about Sara—such a talented gem they are! One of my treasures is a hand crocheted baby blanket made by a great aunt who recently left the earth.

    Reply
  963. Chris Roddy on

    QUILTS! One of my favorite handmade treasures. I am the delighted keeper of quilts from my great-grandmother and my grandmother. Stitched together in solitude but quilted over a frame with other farming women. When I was 9 and visiting the farm I was mesmerized by my great-grandmother Anna sewing 1 inch squares together and not looking at the piece. I asked my Dad why didn’t she watch her stitches and he told me because she was blind. She had made so many quilts in her lifetime that her fingers knew what to do.

    Reply
  964. Mary-Jane Lopa on

    A rocking chair that was my great aunts and is now my daughter’s. Been in the family for 4 generations. Many years of rocking our babies in this chair and It also survived a fire. <3

    Reply
  965. Margaret Tokar on

    I have a beautiful Yo-Yo quilt made by my grandmother about 100 years ago. I’m fascinated by the tiny, tiny stitches in it and the herculean amount of patience obviously required to make such thing. For over 40 years, I’ve thought ‘someday’ I’d like to make something like it. I love your advice to start taking those small steps toward a goal. 2024 is the year of learning quilt making for me!

    Reply
  966. Louise Cramer on

    My grandmother raised silkworms on mulberry leaves in Hungary. She spun her own silk and wove useful linens and beautiful cloths. Furthermore, she had exquisite embroidery and crochet skills. I have a few of these amazing pieces. But the real treasure is I have her creative urge to make everything with my hands and have continued her legacy…and that of so may women…in the art of needle craft and textiles.

    Reply
  967. Carol McKey on

    Personally, I make hand hooked rugs in the traditional manner using dyed wools cut into strips. I love that Sara is using some of the sane fyi g techniques in her work.
    One of my most cherished possessions are the rugs I have created.

    Reply
  968. Erin W. on

    Sara truly is a quilt alchemist! I’ve been amazed and inspired by her work for years. Love this collaboration or minds! 💛

    My favorite heirloom is a painting that hung in my grandparents’ home and now hangs in mine. Truthfully, I’m sure it was just a factory produced piece back in the 40s, but the memory of it in their living room is so comforting and I’m really thankful to have received it when they passed. That’s the thing about heirlooms! Even a humble object becomes a family memory when the people attached to it are so dear.

    Reply
  969. Carol on

    I have a beautiful handmade quilt made for my grandmother by the family that took her in as a teenager.

    Reply
  970. Jane Martone on

    Thank you Erin and Sarah. So much of this interview speaks to my heart. Your words: The weight of something that isn’t feeding our souls feels a lot heavier to us than taking the risky leaps of faith that are required to evolve. Speaks volumes to me. Very excited for a workshop/eating off the land.

    Reply
  971. Carol McKey on

    Your interview with Sara was fascinating. Her dedication to hard work and pursuing a vision through. that work and her beautiful quilts is a testimony to her and the earth.

    Reply
  972. Samantha Sansook on

    I have a wooden dough bowl that belonged to my great grandmother that I treasure. Well over a hundred years old. I keep it out and proudly displayed so everyone can see it.

    Reply
  973. Patti Combs on

    My sister is also an incredible quilting artist. She made me a treasured heirloom quilt with the colors of fall soft greens, golds, oranges and bronzes. She titled the quilt. “My Sister’s eyes” truly a treasured heirloom.

    Reply
  974. Nancy Dohrn on

    My cherished heirloom is actually a pant. My mom had a beautiful red rose in her garden that never stopped blooming. I was able to propagate it for my own garden, my sister’s garden and several friends. My mom may be gone but her beautiful rose lives on. 💗

    Reply
  975. Joy Kuhar on

    I have never been talented in the sewing area. I almost flunked home economics class in high school, but I have a huge appreciation. One of my most treasured items is my quilted baby blanket. It is in rough shape but still useable and my 8month old grandson LOVES it. Maybe it is the softness of the fabric. The cotten back then was so soft. Not like today. Anyway, thank you for introducing this talented artist.

    Reply
  976. Michelle on

    My grandmother made a quilt for my husband and I for our wedding, it has the names and birthdays of all of our family members which she painstakingly sewed, by hand, around the edge of the quilt. It took her so long to do, surely a labor of love. One that will be passed down to our girls for generations to come. ❤️

    Reply
  977. Amy Korn on

    I’m a quilter also and treasure my handmade quilts especially those with a connection to the past through antique fabrics or historical patterns.

    Reply
  978. stephanie on

    I made a quilt for my college boyfriend with some of his old tee shirts and any fabric I could find that told a story about him at that time and he still has it 15 years later. Quilts are like photo albums you can hug.

    Reply
  979. Deb on

    I treasure some of the quilts that have been passed to me by my grandmother. I’ve made some quilts, but not for many years. Sara’s story inspires me. I am a long-time flower farmer who has a passion for fabrics and quilt making, but not the time to make it happen. Time to reprioritize!

    Reply
  980. Annie M on

    My grandfather built a cabin in the Adirondack Mountains of upstate New York in the 1950’s, and today it holds cherished memories of my childhood and serves as a gathering space for extended family. It may be an unconventional’heirloom’, but the photos and decorations on the walls tell a thousand stories.

    Reply
  981. Judith Sudduth on

    Inspiration from nature always pleases this creative heart❤️.Thanks for sharing .

    Reply
  982. Mara on

    A bronze sculpture I made in Giverny while studying abroad many moons ago, cast at the same foundry as Rodin

    Reply
  983. Brooke Rodgers on

    Always interesting to hear artistic experiences if others.

    Reply
  984. Pilar on

    Very inspiring.

    Reply

Leave a Comment

Floret Farm's Small Plot: Big Impact

Small Plot: Big Impact

Inspiring stories, profiles & advice from 45 flower growers from around the world

Stay in the loop with our updates

Close

Join Us

Join the Floret newsletter and stay in the loop on all the exciting happenings here on the farm

Close