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Home Blog The {Farmer} & The Florist Interview: Rachel Siegfried
June 19th 2023

The {Farmer} & The Florist Interview: Rachel Siegfried

Written by
Floret

Today I’m thrilled to share a special new interview with British flower farmer Rachel Siegfried of Green and Gorgeous. I have been following Rachel’s journey for many years now and it has been so much fun to watch her business grow and evolve over time. 

When we visited England four years ago we got to see Rachel’s beautiful farm, and Chris and I both came away so inspired by what she and her partner Ash have created.

I’m excited to welcome Rachel back to the blog (you can read our 2015 interview here), this time to discuss her newest book, all about perennials and shrubs. 

Rachel, I’m so happy to have you back on the blog for a new interview. Can you please tell readers a bit about yourself and your wonderful business? 

Thanks, Erin, I am delighted to be back. The idea of Green and Gorgeous developed in 2002 when I began work in a walled garden on a country estate growing cut flowers for the big house. 

Over 6 years I immersed myself in floriculture and how to arrange in a natural style. I was convinced that these garden-grown beauties needed to be shared with a wider public. So when the opportunity came to rent a 2-acre organic market garden I decided to take a leap of faith. 

My aim was to grow everything I needed to create border-to-vase arrangements guided by the seasons and the growth habit of plants. I wanted my flowers to “leave an indelible memory of their fleeting beauty.” 

Fifteen years on and my garden-led approach is still at the heart of how we grow and sell our flowers. We have grown to 5 acres and now have a team of ten growers and florists producing thousands of stems from March through November for our weddings, shop, and courses.

When you first started Green and Gorgeous, the slow food movement was on the rise and sustainable floristry was still a novel concept. Can you share a little more about the evolution of the local flower movement in the United Kingdom and where you think it’s headed?

The shift has been huge. Local, seasonal flowers did not really exist, and the idea of calling myself a flower farmer would not have even occurred to me. We now have hundreds, if not thousands, of growers out there, and many florists are keen to buy British. 

Hopefully, the future is bright but with climate change, there are many challenges ahead and I think a shift towards growing the more weather-tolerant plant groups—perennials and woody plants—will be necessary.

The Cut Flower Sourcebook is one of the most beautiful and practical books I’ve read in such a long time. It’s precisely what gardeners and farmer-florists have been asking for for ages. Can you share what inspired you to write it? 

I am so pleased you like the book and I think it has come along at the right time. I had been thinking about writing on this subject since around 2018 when I started to make the switch from predominantly annuals to perennials and woody plants. 

They have always been plant groups that I am very comfortable with because of my background in garden design, in fact, they were the first plants I put in when we were setting up the farm in 2007. I think they translate really well to both the hobbyist cutting from their garden, where perennials and shrubs are a natural fit, and to the flower farmer who might find the only way to scale up labour-wise is to go with low-maintenance plants.

Writing a book is no small feat. Can you share a little bit about the experience of creating it? 

As I am sure you know, writing a book is a daunting prospect and initially, I struggled with self-doubt. Thankfully my publisher Anna Mumford of Filbert Press offered a calm and steady hand, guiding me through the process with plenty of positivity and encouragement. 

The part I really enjoyed was the photography. I focused on capturing all the plants in the directory whilst Eva Nemeth worked her magic on the arrangements, garden, and working shots. 

In the introduction, you share “Working in a garden every day, particularly a productive one, makes you appreciate that there are actually more than four seasons. The ancient Japanese were onto something when they developed 72 micro seasons, each just five days long.” I love the idea of celebrating these micro seasons. Do you have a favorite? 

My favourite micro season would have to be April 5 through 9, Tsubame kitaru—Swallows return. We have a pair of swallows that return at this time every spring to nest in our floral studio/shop. It is always a very special moment when they come swooping in. 

Their arrival heralds the beginning of the season. All of our flowery hustle and bustle is accompanied by their chatter as they busy themselves with nest-making and raising their young.

One of the things that stood out to me most while reading The Cut Flower Sourcebook was the images of your arrangements. What do you love the most about arranging flowers and what advice would you give someone who wants to step outside their comfort zone and create something that pushes past what they would normally make?

I tend not to have any preconceived ideas of what my arrangements will look like. I let the garden take the lead, by choosing a peaceful moment to go for a wander and see what captures my imagination. This is usually first thing in the morning when I am accompanied by birdsong and my whippet Jesse, it feels like quite a meditative process. 

I start by searching for the flower that really inspires me at that moment, which always seems to be something different. I then use this to guide me on what else to pick. I am generally drawn to harmonious colours and contrasting forms and textures.  

To ensure my designs are well balanced and to give me some parameters, I try to include plant material from the four elements of an arrangement, which I outline in my book—framework, supporting, focal, and the final accent. 

These building blocks will not only help to create an engaging design but also make it easier to put together.

The Plant Directory section of your book includes 128 of your favorite bulbs, perennials, climbers, grasses, trees, and shrubs. I think it might just be my favorite part and is something that gardeners all over the world will find incredibly useful. How hard was it to narrow down this section and decide what made the cut? 

As a plant addict, it was hard to narrow down the plant selection for the directory. It helped to focus on the tried-and-tested varieties we grow here on the farm. It is by no means a comprehensive list on the subject—my intention is to highlight the attributes readers should look for in a plant that makes it a good candidate for cutting. 

Everyone will have different growing conditions and floristry styles so hopefully, this directory will act as a springboard to finding their own trusty performers with a relaxed attitude and natural style. 

In addition to growing cut flowers, you also have a specialty seed line, teach workshops, and open your farm to the public. Can you share a little more about these offerings?

We are open every Saturday from April through October for our farm gate sales. 

Our workshops range from growing for business and pleasure to arranging with garden flowers. 

I have a couple of new offerings this year which focus on the subject of the book. One is a growing day and the other is about using perennials and woody plants predominantly in arrangements. 

Our seed shop will be reopening in early autumn with fresh stocks and hopefully some new lines that I am trialing this season.

I am working on an online flower farming series with Garden Masterclass, which is being filmed throughout the year.

Thank you so much, Rachel, for taking the time to share about your beautiful new book with Floret readers. It is such a helpful resource for gardeners all over the world. 

To celebrate the release of Rachel’s new book, The Cut Flower Sourcebook: Exceptional Perennials and Woody Plants for Cutting, we’re giving away five copies. For a chance to win, post a comment below telling us about one of your favorite shrubs or perennials. 

This giveaway is open to everyone, regardless of where you live, and winners will be announced on June 27. 

Update: A huge congratulations to our winners Linda, Margaret Donovan, Wendy Dietz, Ioria Morton and Angela Redden.

To learn more about Rachel, be sure to visit her website. You can also follow her on Instagram and Facebook. The Cut Flower Sourcebook is available from Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and Bookshop.org.


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2,087 Comments

  1. Rhonda on

    After two months of back ordering from Amazon, they canceled my order of her book. They said they had no guarantee for its arrival. :(. So disappointed.

    Reply
  2. saptozz on

    I love my lilac bushes! The scent that wafts through the house when I open the windows takes me back to my childhood.

    Reply
  3. Ginny Jorgensen on

    Each year the Echinacea appear wearing a new color or petal shape like they have bought a new summer outfit to “show off” and be noticed as the most stunning in my back yard garden. Visitors ask me “What are those cool looking flower?”

    Reply
  4. Susan Ordel on

    I use all parts of southern magnolia in floral arrangements…from the glossy leaves to the magnificent lemony blooms, then the red red seed pods, and of course the empty seed pods. Divine!

    Reply
  5. Amy on

    I love baptisia for it’s foliage and it is so easy to grow.

    Reply
  6. Ana Maria on

    I love lilacs and have the TOUGHEST time keeping them in a vase. This year I tried cutting in the morning, and slicing into their stems at the bottom to increase surface area, but by the afternoon they would all be dry. [crying face emoji]! So I also decided to branch out this year and plant two new varieties- I need to go look up what they are but one is a white variety and the other is a pale lilac variety with double petals… which I am excited to see one day. My soil is very poor so I mixed peat with starter fertilizer to help them get started but I think they’re suffering a bit of transplant shock. Hopeful they will establish well this summer as we’ve been getting relentless rain for the past month— but it’s all yet to be seen. Eager for more knowledge and I have absolutely gobbled up your show on HBO. Now doing the summer mini course and consuming as much blog content as possible— next up is books at the library!!! Thank you so much— the intuition that I have had for so many years about the poetry of life to be found in nature and especially flowers— seeing it in all of your staff and on your filmed content and in everything that you do is so so so so grounding and inspiring and fulfilling, I am just so grateful to have found a community of kindred spirits!

    Reply
  7. Barbara Barker on

    Lilacs of course! Wish they lasted for months instead of mere weeks.

    Reply
  8. Bonnie Rae Resor on

    Thank you so much for your beautiful book. I am just getting started with growing flowers and all your information is so helpful. I love the day lilies with their beautiful colors, lavender, peony and Shasta daisy. I always have flowers in the house and they are so refreshing and wonderful to have in view of my kitchen and living room.
    Thanks again for your hard work and dedication.

    Reply
  9. Marguerite on

    Very beautiful ideas. Inspiring ways to use what grows nearby.

    Reply
  10. Anne on

    Lilacs are one of my favorites! My family has four that border our perennial garden. Each is from a relative and feel like natural family heirlooms.

    Reply
  11. Mary Kay Boley on

    It is so hard to pick just a few …I love whatever the hummingbirds, bees, and dragonflies are fluttering around at the moment, and I say that is MY favorite also, and thank you for visiting my garden today.
    To me, a natural garden is peaceful and really a happy garden for peace of mind and little critters.

    Life is a day in the garden, what could be better.

    Reply
  12. Ali on

    Mock orange is one of my favorites, so ephemeral.

    Reply
  13. Frapier Sylvie on

    Si je ne dois choisir qu’une seule plante, ce sera le pois de senteur! Peu de personnes pensent à les introduire dans un bouquet et pourtant ils sont si délicats, sobres et élégants à la fois, le choix de couleur est étendu et leur parfum est un pur bonheur♥♥♥

    Reply
  14. sara w on

    Dusty Miller is a wonderful perennial here in Washington, providing some striking contrast to floral arrangements with their silvery foliage. And they are the gift that keeps giving, all summer long and into the fall!

    Reply
  15. Angela Redden on

    I look forward to Forsythia blooming every year, often before spring. There has been many years in which it has snowed and the branches adorned with the fresh snow makes them magical looking. The arrival of Forsythia signals the soon arrival of everything I’ve been dreaming about all winter.

    Reply
  16. Sally on

    I discovered Estrellita Little Star (Bouvardia x) this year. The hummingbirds love it.

    Reply
  17. Deb Traylor on

    If my life could be a series of gorgeous photos , I’d use all the ones shown in the article . Is it possible to buy prints ?

    Reply
  18. Carey on

    The forsythia is one of my favorite flowering shrubs. It reminds me of my childhood. My grandparents’ home and my own backyard was lined with these cheerful, flowering plants that welcomed the spring season with exuberant blooms of bright yellow. They make gorgeous and striking cut arrangements with their height and graceful lines. And, maybe it’s cliche, but my favorite perennial flower is the peony. My first home as a new mom was filled with gorgeous peony plants, left by the original homeowner when the house was sold to us. He was a master gardener and had designed the most awe-inspiring flowering garden in the backyard. As someone brand new to home ownership and gardening, I think I was more excited about the gorgeous gardens we were inheriting than I was the actual house itself! Although, that was cute, too. Getting to live in that house and be the new steward of the peony gardens was a gift I’ll cherish forever. It sparked my love for gardening and gifted me with the most fragrant and graceful fresh-cut blooms that I can still smell when I close my eyes and think back to those magical times just starting out, over twenty years ago.

    Reply
  19. Lesia Zintchouk on

    Here in the South East bright blue Hydrangea Macrophylla are hard to beat – that color is just not possible on any other plant in such amounts and lasting that long!

    Reply
  20. Jean Frisone on

    I am a huge fan of Baptisia. I have indigo and yellow. Great early blooms whose foliage can be used for filler. For a shrub, I like the color and shape of different varieties of Ninebark.

    Reply
  21. Donna Green on

    Foxglove reaching for the sunlight inside under the tall evergreen shade garden always makes me smile .
    Knowing that shortly following will be more color to brighten my shady lovely oasis of flowers and variety of ferns for my eyes to be enjoyed along with the humming birds starting to come around looking for bright blooms to spread the love about.

    Reply
  22. Kay on

    Carolina Jasmine! We had one on a fence when I grew up in Texas. The scent always takes me back to the little backyard that I explored as a child. A few months ago I decided to dip my toes in gardening. My first purchase was 3 Carolina Jasmine plants. Now my yard is overrun with seedlings and plants

    Reply
  23. Lisa on

    We had spirea from an old farmstead growing in our ditch. I use the blooms in the spring and the foliage in the fall with it’s autumnal colors. Both last forever in the vase!

    Reply
  24. Amy in MN on

    Continus (smoke bush)! Both the golden and purple add a magical, sturdy framework to any arrangement. My fave foliage plant.

    Reply
  25. Beverly Ray on

    One of my favorites is Turks Cap. It can stand the Texas Heat and endures our ice storms of the past several years It is a happy plant that requires little care

    Bev Ray
    Emory Texas

    Reply
  26. Lauren Girard on

    Smoke bush is such a magical shrub that changes colour throughout the season and gives stunning dimension to any arrangement!

    Reply
  27. Nancie Denarde on

    I love Lady’s Mantle. I never planted it in my garden but it has been a welcomed “intruder” and I love how it adds texture and a wisp of color to my flower arrangements.

    Reply
  28. Judy Smith on

    I am thrilled by the early Spring strong growth of the of the Thalictrum aquilegifolium, meadow rue and it’s lilac flower like cotton candy fuzzy balls. The leaves make great fillers in a flower arrangement. And the plant in the shade looks good the rest of the season.

    Reply
  29. Leticia Shifflet on

    Butterfly Bush – I live in Utah, and this Bush is great at attracting pollinators.

    Reply
  30. Kimberl Walburn on

    I love Lavender and Roses, their beauty, texture, color, and smell always brighten my day.

    Reply
  31. Ann G Coon on

    My favorite perennials are asters of any kind!!

    Reply
  32. Caroline on

    Hydrangeas are my favorite perennial! All the colors are beautiful but blue hydrangeas are exceptional in my opinion.

    Reply
  33. Anita on

    Dwarf variegated pittosporum. Their color and mounding growing habit is gorgeous amongst the lavender, golden eonymous, and agapanthus!

    Reply
  34. Jane on

    I love all kinds of daisy shapes but my favorite is ‘Prairie Sun’ rudbeckia.

    Reply
  35. Margaret on

    Last fall, I planted peony rootstocks for the first time. Sadly, I know I will not see any blooms the first year but am excited by the progress and await the blooms!

    Reply
  36. Andrea on

    Hydrangea, different varieties of echinacea and of course peonies.

    Reply
  37. Robyn on

    Artemisia Silver King! I use it for cuts from May-November in New England.

    Reply
  38. Dee on

    Wow, how do you pick a favorite perrenial? Each one so unique…I like Black Adder Anise, adds a special touch each year to garden. Thanks for interview, book looks interesting!

    Reply
  39. Sue Sullivan on

    I have several clematis plants, including one that is 60 years old and still blooms deep purple. They are my favorite perennials.

    Reply
  40. Jess on

    Ruscus! I love it in my flower arrangements.

    Reply
  41. Gordon Richard Bowman on

    Perennials sometimes are great, sometimes they make you cry and sometimes when all is good, they make you smile. That’s why I love to garden, it’s Boffo !

    Reply
  42. Kenna Schaub on

    I love my yellow yarrow that survives the harsh Colorado winters!

    Reply
  43. Brooke James on

    One of my very favorite perennials is snowball viburnum – usually ready here in the PNW to include in Mother’s Day bouquets!

    Reply
  44. Sue Whitehead on

    I starting focusing on flower farming after living on this property for 10 years. We were drawn to the place for many reasons but for me it was the perennials.
    Once I started following Floret and other farmers, I took a REAL look around. I have an raspberries, an old nine bark and a snowball bush. The branching for me now is everything.

    Reply
  45. Trudi Hurst on

    My favorite shrub is, Blue Mist Caryopteris

    Reply
  46. Lexie on

    My favorite woody cuts I’m currently growing at Quince, buckthorn and lilac! But I am so anxious to get my hands on more perennials! Perennial plants are what got me into flower farming and they are definitely the heart of my farm! Can’t wait to read this book!

    Reply
  47. Nancy B. on

    Iris in all colors and a sweet bunch of wood violets. When they bloom I know spring is here.

    Reply
  48. Thea Snyder on

    Hydrangeas, hydrangeas, hydrangeas!!! I love how I can change their color. I love the length of of their life, lasting all year once I learned how to dry them. I also leave dead blooms for garden insects to hibernate in over the winter.💚

    Reply
  49. Kc on

    This book sounds amazing! I have been thinking of adding more woodies to my property to use in arrangements! Thank You!

    Reply
  50. Susan Antall on

    Your variety and thoroughness of information, and dedicated energy toward gardening is amazingly inspiring to me! How many lives you have touched with those you teach, and to whom they then share!!! What a gift giver you are!!
    Thank you to you, and those you host, for the time and for sharing your special talent.
    Choosing a favorite perennial is so tricky as I feel it is forever changing. Presently the hellebore is special to me. They are so delicate and beautiful, dainty and sort of reserved in the way they hide amongst their big green foliage.

    Reply
  51. Sandra Peterle on

    Erin,Thank you so much for the inspirational interview with Rachel from Green and Gorgeous. Her flowers and arrangements are absolutely beautiful. It also reminds me of how badly I need to get to the UK to see these gardens first hand. Thank you

    Reply
  52. Janna Dubberke on

    Rachel’s book sounds inspirational! I am eager to share it with my flower garden-loving friends!

    Reply
  53. Autumn G. on

    Cuphea is one of my favorite plants.

    Reply
  54. Patty on

    My favorite perennial is yarrow…all the colors and leaves of this plant fit nicely in a bouquet.

    Reply
  55. Ashley L. on

    I’m super new to the gardening scene (although I have loads of dreams for it!), but one shrub I’ve been eying here in North Texas is Texas Sage. It’s hearty and has a wispy whimsical look to it when the small flowers start blooming, adding just a little pop of color. I’m so inspired by this interview and can’t wait to see the new book!

    Reply
  56. Anne Phernetton on

    The book looks very intriguing. I already have a fairly large perennial bed with some shrubs, and many other shrubs in our medium sized yard. I’m very interested in learning more about how to arrange these stems to enjoy their beauty even more.

    My favorite perennial is Butterfly Blue Delphinium. The strikingly true blue stems are so gorgeous and really stand out in the garden. Unfortunately, my plants did not survive our last Minnesota Winter, so I will need to try and find that variety again to replenish.

    Thanks for sharing about this new book!

    Anne

    Reply
  57. Camille on

    My favorite is juniper, especially when it is covered in the little blue berries. I’m especially fond of it because Juniper is the name of my daughter that we lost in a miscarriage and so I’m reminded of her precious life every time I use it.

    Reply
  58. Olga Kent on

    Up here in Canada, my husband and I have been focusing on how to grow a perennial garden that the bees, butterflies, etc. will enjoy. We love exploring plants and coming up with something that suits our lifestyle. If I had to boil it down to just one perennial, I would say foxglove!

    Reply
  59. Lois on

    Oh my gosh…so hard to choose, but love my many lilacs in the spring even though they don’t last too long in the vase! Peony season is really amazing here too, and even though I give buckets and buckets of flowers away all summer from my wee flower stand, I have a hard time parting with my peonies! Then there are the dahlias and chrysanthemums….!!! :)

    Reply
  60. Julie Hawley on

    A favorite year round is Hydrangea arborescens , Smooth Hydrangea ‘Annabelle’, native here in Virginia. It flowers white from June thru the summer months, then dries slowly in fall to a chartreuse green and ghostly pale thru the winter. A great cut flower and so beneficial for the pollinators. A “keeper” for all gardeners/landscape designers.

    Reply
  61. Joyce on

    I am just a hobby gardener giving my flowers to others. For perennials I love penstemon and the snow ball bush, although the blooms don’t last long. . I think it is a viburnum. I also use the blooms from heuchera.

    Reply
  62. Margie French on

    It’s not really a shrub but I love to pick the flowers off our white cedar trees. On the tree they are not overly noticeable, beautiful tiny little star shaped flowers that are the faintest mauve colour you almost think they’re white, very understated! I pick them and put them in small bottles and vases throughout the house and the perfume that fills the house is so lovely.

    Reply
  63. Antoinette Reutimann on

    One of my favorites perennials is asparagus foliage. The femaile plants have berries, which looks awesome in a bouquet. But the green and airy foliage without berries looks great too. And the vase life is incredible, they last for weeks.

    Reply
  64. Heather on

    Too many favorites to list! Lavender is really great and I just love using fragrant perennial herbs in bouquets in general.

    Reply
  65. Dory on

    I have been, for decades, an edible landscape gardener. That has meant fruit trees, berries, fruiting groundcovers, herbs, and vegetables.

    I planted 20 years ago a single Eternal Fragrance Daphne, a Morovia cultivar. It was my one “indulgence.” Its tiny white fragrant flowers bloom constantly here in the Pacific Northwest as I pass them daily on my way to my front door.

    Floret Farm’ Cut Flower Garden changed my life. I planted a bed of cut flowers, some started as seedlings inside. I am now allowing myself purely indulgent beauty!

    The Cut Flower Sourcebook may free me even further. I can create beautiful fragrant structure in my garden with woody plants and perennials. My fruit trees and bushes will be happy for the company!

    Reply
  66. Jamie on

    My husband and I purchased 5 acres of land about 5 years ago. We love hydrangeas – all kinds – and have been coloring the property with all sorts of varieties. It is the most special time of the year when I can display (and share!) the blooms. We have also been devouring all of your episodes and I just purchased a couple of your books so we can get started preparing a flower garden. We agree with the idea of giving back to the land and the flowers will be pollinators, art and gifts to the community.
    Thank you for sharing your passion and thoughts on “balance” in the second season of your show. We, too, love to sit/lay/jump around in all the natural glory of our prairie as well.
    Here’s to all of us that you have inspired to go out there and “bloom” with all the education and excitement that you have shared with us.

    Reply
  67. Brenda Avery on

    I love Hellebores in the spring. The are the perfect flower for cutting as they come in so many colors and styles, plus they often last for 2-3 weeks as a cut flower!!

    Reply
  68. Robin Erly on

    I have always wanted a ninebark. This year I finally purchased Amber Jubilee Ninebark. It is growing beyond my expectations. The colors glow in the sunlight. I can’t wait to use the stems in my dahlia bouquets later this month.

    Reply
  69. Sarah Ondracek on

    I love forsythia; the way the yellow flowers come before the green leaves is so unique and special.

    Reply
  70. Sarah Brunner (Brunner Family Farm) on

    I started my cut flower farm about 10 years ago and I fall in love with perennials and shrubs more and more every year. They take time and patience to get going, but once they take hold, the ease and hardy nature of these plants are so rewarding and long lasting. I have only dabbled in planting perennials, as my garden space allows, so I have so much to learn and explore in this category of plants (which is why I would love this book!), but if I had to pick a favorite right now it would probably be hypericum. I love how easy it is to maintain and that I can hack it back every fall without abandon. It’s just not finicky like so many other crops and you can use the flowers, berries, and foliage!

    Reply
  71. Susan Dempsey on

    My favorite shrubs are peonies and lavender “Grosso;” my fav bulb perennials are calla lilies. The flowers have the wow factor. They thrive on neglect, enlarge without being invasive, and except for the lavender, withstood an unusual extended spring temperature drop (5 degrees F). I too have been moving towards replacing annuals with perennials. Mostly because annual seedlings and mass plantings are too much work!

    Reply
  72. Lynn on

    I love lilacs and how they scent the air all around the garden. Since moving to VA I also enjoy the Miss Huffs lantana which gets huge and full of multicolored flowers all summer!

    Reply
  73. Rose Smith on

    Erin, your book A Year in Flowers transformed my entire household. You showed me how to (finally) stop just plunking supermarket flowers in a vase and start really arranging them for maximum beauty and enjoyment. That led me to grow my own flowers; two years ago I had zero cutting flower beds, and now I have three! Like everyone else has said, it’s hard to pick just one favorite, but right now I’m appreciating a humble shrub rose with simple five-petaled pink blooms. Its branching habit looks lovely in a rustic pitcher, and just three cuttings (once the thorns are stripped) are practically a whole arrangement.

    Reply
  74. Jenny Sterling on

    I love all hydrangeas with an antique appearance and also oak leaf hydrangeas, they’re all too gorgeous for me to narrow it down to just one favorite!

    Reply
  75. Mary Pennington on

    Oh my, how can I just pick one? Hydrangea is at the top, always beautiful and seems to grow with the punches my Iowa weather hands out.

    Reply
  76. Trish on

    One of my favorites is Hypericum which is a newer discovery for me.

    Reply
  77. Rebecca on

    At the moment, I think it’s a tossup for me between sedum and baptisia for favorite perennials (zone 5a). I’d love to learn more about perennials and shrubs, particularly this year and my annuals struggle in the drought-like conditions.

    Reply
  78. Rosanne Palombi on

    I’m in love with mountain laurel. It’s incorporated into a privacy planting we first planted two seasons ago. Sometimes I worry the shrubs are not going to survive although we just added several more to a planting bed along the front of our house and fingers at crossed. I’ve taken to having brief encouraging chats with them on occasion hoping they’ll feel the love. Arrangements of woody plants is so intriguing. I’ve always added branches here and there to any cut flowers I arrange. Now you’ve caused me to imagine the blossoms of laurel in an arrangement…if I can bring myself to cut them!!!

    Reply
  79. Maddy on

    My favourite perennials are proteas! I live in Australia and although they are not technically native to Australia they are often grouped in with our natives. I love their different varieties and the fact they are so easy to grow.

    Reply
  80. Lyndsay on

    As a designer and grower of gardens the elements of design and nurturing nature is a beautiful outcome. Blooming woody shrubs have grown to be a favorite on the farm, for both garden design and floral design. Viburnum has grown to be not only useful but purposeful and a hint of luxury in its texture.

    Reply
  81. Katie Oskin on

    One of my favorites a echinacea. They come in such a huge variety of colors and self seed and get bigger and fuller every year. They are truly a treasure.

    Reply
  82. Robin N on

    One of my favorite shrubs is hypericum (St John’s wort) they are great for flower arrangements andthe bees love them too. They come in a few different colors and have nice foliage, then flowers and berries. Always enjoy learning new things from Floret.

    Reply
  83. Rachel on

    I enjoyed this interview and blog! I cannot wait to get the book!
    I cant say for certain my favorite perennial has been found yet! I did learn the growing importance of perennials and plan to plant more!

    Reply
  84. Jacque Barker on

    One of the favorites of mine are the shasta daisies that bloom in an abundance. They are so pretty with the stark white petals and yellow centers on stocks of green leafy stems. They add a touch of happy whimsy to our garden beds!

    Reply
  85. Karyn Teed on

    Looking forward to reading this beautiful book! I have a vibrant red Geum that comes back every year along the edge of my house. I also have volunteer snapdragons that pop up all over. I love seeing where they find a home!

    Reply
  86. Christine H on

    I love the native arrowwood viburnum from Minnesota Viburnum rafinesquianum Beautiful flowers unique leaves. and I am going to submit a small tree I love…ironwood or hop hornbeam Ostrya virginiana. Delicate branching, interesting hop like flowers and they hold their brown leaves in winter. Both are not as well known as they should be.

    Thanks for sharing great books! I will add it to my winter reading!

    Reply
  87. Evelyn Rosa on

    I love dahlias; even as challenging as they can be in Zone 9b. I still get excited when I get a bouquet of them for my home. I also love lavender and gladiolus. Thank you

    Reply
  88. Lacey R. on

    I have been loving yarrow and lavender lately! Next up on my grow list is feverfew.

    Reply
  89. Kaci Dunn on

    Blanket Flowers are one of my all time favorites. Late bloomers with beautiful colors reminding me of fall sunsets.

    Reply
  90. Sonja on

    Right now gaura and a delicate apricot coloured geum!

    Reply
  91. Betty Longworth on

    I love all the varieties of paninculata hydrangea and ninebark.

    Reply
  92. loria L morton on

    This year I have taken on several trial gardens for cut flowers to determine if I could manage a little business of my own. I have invested in annuals, but have quickly realized my heart is actually with perennials and wild flowers, of which I have harvested and now growing my favorite, the majestic Bride’s Feathers. This plant grows on a river trail near my home, here in West Virginia. The plumage against the masses of Maidenhair Ferns is mesmerizing to me, I always feel as though I’m in an enchanted forest! As the flowers fade, the seeds form and dry, creating arched strings of pearls … most appropriate for the bride to leave behind: “treasures for winter”! Rachel’s book sounds like a must for me!!!

    Reply
  93. AJ Linke on

    Definitely Leucojum aestivum! I’m always so excited as the colder temps roll in to know these little bulbs are starting to send up shoots. When I spot my first ones of the season it always brings such a smile, they’re cute little white hats and dainty green dots. It’s where the fairies must play!

    Reply
  94. Erin Ardoin on

    My go-to is always ninebark. Diablo is my absolute favorite. Just can’t find that color and structure in an annual that I’ve found.

    Reply
  95. Jenny on

    My favorite in my high elevation garden is the Boulder raspberry. When we first moved up here, I noticed there weren’t many flowers. When the weather warmed up, a bush that looked had raspberry-like leaves bloomed some beautiful white flowers. They are a joy every season now

    Reply
  96. Val Boergesson on

    This looks like such a beautiful book. It’s impossible to pick a favorite, but my mom and grandmother always had peonies, they sparked my love for gardening and my oldest perennials are peonies I planted over 20 years ago. When they all bloom the end of May, they are so dreamy and beautiful, I am obsessed with taking photos and making bouquets to bring to friends.

    Reply
  97. Sarah G on

    One of my favorite perennials this year is the Siberian iris. Some of them have a scent like fresh baked lemon cookies. This year a couple of them made pods after flowering. So cool!

    Reply
  98. Katie Kelbel on

    I love purple coneflowers echinacea. We have a group of goldfinches who hang around when they go to seed. My kids love watching them from a window

    Reply
  99. Terry England on

    Hello, I have to say one of my favorite shrubs are viburnum so many different variations … I just love them and fell they are under represented.. thank you.

    Reply
  100. Laine on

    Astilbe. Textural filler, makes everything look elevated and unique.

    Reply
  101. Megan Clinch on

    Oak leaf hydrangeas are a fav neighbor of the flowering tobacco for evening smells & sights!

    Reply
  102. Linda Robertson on

    I love delphiniums. For me they represent the best of the English cottage garden, remind me of my great grandmother and make me forever grateful that I’m able to grow them in my my zone 3 garden in northern British Columbia. I’m on the lookout for more perennials that will thrive here and Rachel’s book looks like a fantastic inspiration and resource (plus she grows incredible Delphs!)

    Reply
  103. Jennifer Crist on

    My favorite is my Limelight Hydrangea. I love how the flowers change from cream to green to rose over the season and then I can cut them and keep them inside for months on end as they dry so beautifully.

    Reply
  104. Dawn Griggs Mullenax on

    I love arranging with my blue hydrangea, orange lilies and white gardenia. I create “Gussie mussie”style arrangements and take them to my “hostess” friends!

    Reply
  105. Veronica T. on

    I absolutely fell in love with hellebores (lenten rose) when I found them in the woodlands of my mother’s 4 acres several years ago! I saw several photos of these within this blog and it always make me think of all my mother taught me about gardening!! I am looking forward to dividing and planting some of them on our own property, as well as incorporating more perennials to use in arrangements. Thank you for sharing this new book.

    Reply
  106. Sharon Phelps on

    I am a beginner gardener, but I love the gladiolus I planted years ago that come up year after year even though that isn’t the norm. Not many people in my area grow them. I want to learn and grow so much more, particularly natives that are great for pollinators.

    Reply
  107. Kate on

    I picked up some honeysuckle and fern on my dog walk the other day. There is something about unruly honeysuckle and a symmetrical fern that worked so nicely together. My hallway smelled like flowers for a week! Now I have to figure out how to grow them both in my yard:)

    Reply
  108. Amanda Wikstrand on

    I love oakleaf hydrangea and peonies. Can’t go wrong with those around.

    Reply
  109. Dana Goodson on

    I love Iris and Roses, but want to learn more about woody perennials for my gardens thet I could use for cutting!

    Reply
  110. Veronica Straub on

    Peonies are my favorite, but there are so many other supporting players.

    I’m excited to read this lovely book!

    Reply
  111. Florian Reid on

    My favorite perennial is our native Cali coastal sage, Artemisia Californica. On early morning hikes in San Diego, the sea salt and sage on the wind feels like I’ve stepped into another reality. The tiny blooms are fierce and the trail feels surreal when you’re surrounded by sage you can’t see through while hearing the water birds chattering away nearby. When I get a whiff of sage in the city it takes me back in an instant!

    Reply
  112. Stephanie A. on

    I love all perinnials how can I choose! But the things that narrow it down for me the most are all perennials thatt atract pollinators of all kinds…butterflys, bees, and hummingbirds! So in that respect I think my butterfly bushes are some of the most exciting perennials that I have because when they are blooming it brings all the beautiful pollinators out and together to drink and share its nectar!

    Reply
  113. Judy Greiter on

    Favorite Perennial-
    Me- “This is hands down my favorite perennial!”
    Me a week later- “Now this is my favorite perennial!”
    Truly, it isn’t a favorite perennial – it’s a favorite FEEL that it gives me and the calm and serenity that it brings.
    Thank you for the interview- it was special.

    Reply
  114. Judith Vasquez on

    Roses, Peonies, Azaleas, and Hydrangeas are some of my favorite perennial shrubs. I am still learning about growing and maintaining a perennial garden, but every year I fall in love with a different perennial to add to my garden. Erin, you have inspired me to learn more and more about gardening. I am so glad I started following your path and have you as a mentor.

    Reply
  115. Karen Lay on

    Delphiniums for their beautiful blue. But who can resist the variety of dahlias???

    Reply
  116. Edie on

    One favorite shrub or perennials? There are so many!
    One favorite shrub on my top 5 is for the bees in the fall, but I love the pop of color when everything is dying back for fall.
    It’s the New England Aster ‘Purple Dome.’
    I love it for it easy care, natural mounding habit, the purple flower with yellow center and lastly, the food source it provides to the pollinators towards the end of the season.
    I live in Pleasant Prairie Wisconsin and this plant never disappoints year after year.

    Reply
  117. Hunter S on

    Wow ! Thank you, Rachel !! I love the variety of perennials and the thrill of seeing them come back year after year !

    Reply
  118. Kim Callaghan on

    Right now my favourites are probably delphiniums and peonies. Along with irises, lilacs, oregano for filler, ninebark…. okay, it’s very hard to pick a favourite!

    Reply
  119. Tricia Lazarus on

    So hard to narrow down…my favorites include native azaleas, heirloom and English roses (Valdosta, Georgia, USA, zone 8b)

    Reply
  120. EDWARD BROWN on

    My Favorite Tree is the Sandy Cherry Tree. It has tiny white scented flowers in the spring. Green Burgundy leaves when they first come out, then an all Burgundy leaf when they mature. The bark can change from Brown to Burgundy as it grows. I love to take 3 small trees to braid the trunk and for a smaller tree and 5 years later, it still performs beautifully.

    Reply
  121. Johanna on

    Daffodils are my fave and they take me back to lots of different moments throughout my childhood. Plus they are usually the first things to bloom every spring.

    Reply
  122. Jann on

    I love ‘Black Lace’ elderberry and Solomon’s Seal (polygonatum variegatum) in arrangements, but for long lasting foliage Aucuba japonica is hard to beat. It lasts so long in a vase it usually roots! The only downside to aucuba is that the stems aren’t very long so they’re only suitable for smaller arrangements.

    Reply
  123. Louise Thompson on

    Peonies are my favourite and I’m testing new ways to store them as buds
    I’m very interested in the perennial and woody idea as I age with my garden.
    Less planting each year!

    Reply
  124. Laura Ellison on

    Russian sage and verbena Bonariensis are so beautiful ❤️

    Reply
  125. Jeann on

    Hellebores are currently my fancy and would like to start a little collection. 😊

    Reply
  126. Shannon Chapman on

    I’ve undertaken dahlias this year. I have my sons wedding in august and I’ve always LOVED dahlias, but was intimidated. I did a workshop last fall about them and bought your dahlia book! I would love a copy of this book!

    Reply
  127. Denise on

    Currently growing Dahlias from tubers I overwintered in my zone 5b basement! Really enjoying the process of learning about these beauties.

    Reply
  128. Lori L on

    I love being introduced to new people from the blog. Thank you. My current obsession is with peonies, specifically ITOHs. Right now it’s the Garden Treasure. I love the lemon-y scent! We have a local peony grower who is retiring and selling off 3000 peonies with over 200 varieties. There will. Be more.
    Thanks for the preview of the book. It’s so helpful and the photos are gorgeous. .

    Reply
  129. Mary Silkowski on

    I love to use blackberry in arrangements, especially in the fall. The arrangement of leaves on the branches, and their length, add movement and lightness, and maybe a little bit of wildness, to an arrangement. Definitely a favorite of mine!

    Reply
  130. Jane on

    One of my favorite perennials would have to be the springtime peonies for their scent as well as their large blossoms. Festiva Maxima is a must in my garden.

    Reply
  131. Chelsea Reasor on

    Gardenias have long been a favorite perennial of mine not only because they’re beautiful, but also because their lovely fragrance evokes joyful childhood memories of learning about plants and gardening from my mother.

    Reply
  132. Corrina on

    Thank you for the giveaway. This book sounds like a wonderful book to have and read. I have to say there are so many different plants to choose from. I love the pussy willow, it has always been one of my favorites since I was a child.

    Reply
  133. Kari P on

    My fellow flower farmer friend Zhanna gifted me Silene seeds a few years ago and they quickly became a favorite perennial.

    Reply
  134. Sarah Fink on

    I’m in zone 7b, and dahlias are my favorites!

    Reply
  135. Sharon D on

    A favorite perennial of mine is lilacs. Don’t see them very often but enjoy the flower, their scent and shape of their leaves.

    Reply
  136. Kellie Lander on

    I’m in zone 8a and I’ve always been so jealous of folks that can grow Ninebark. I’m learning that I actually really like crepe myrtles, vitex and hydrangeas that bloom in the Texas heat.

    I’m excited to grab a copy of Rachel’s book and explore other perennials to add to my little cutting garden.

    Reply
  137. suzanne anderson on

    Peonies have become my most favorite perennial that I have in my yard. And I can’t wait for my Oklahoma Red Bud tree to get big enough for me to cut some of the branches off when the purple pink blooms are on.

    Reply
  138. Priscilla on

    Well … that’s a tough one … so much to choose from ☺️ I think one shrub that we’re definitely still missing in our garden is honeysuckle. I clearly remember the sweet scent next to all the roses my Dad had in our large garden in England and it’s something I’d love to have here in our garden in north Germany as well ☀️

    Reply
  139. Kim Struck on

    Rich burgundy wine to nebulously plum leaves create depth and frames blooms in the garden making ninebark my most admired foliage.

    Our family has been working hard to clear poison ivy, poison sumac, thorny autumn olive, and blackberries to reveal hidden oak and maple trees. After a few days of battling the prickly brush, my farm store had a 90% off sale and I was able to scoop up a whole truck load of neglected shrubs and two trees for $28! I am just beginning to experiment with perennials and shrubs. I would love to learn more and find inspiration from “The Cut Flower Sourcebook”! I will also be on the lookout for the Master Gardener class online. Thank you for sharing!

    Reply
  140. Ivana Souckova on

    Thank you for the interview! Perennials and shrubs definitely have a big place in flower arrangements. I didn’t think about it from the climate change perspective, but it’s really something to consider. My favourite shrub is Pyracantha, it has decorative flowers in spring and beautiful fruits in winter. Be aware of the thorns though! ;)

    Reply
  141. Stacy on

    Delphiniums and Hydrangeas are two of my favorites.

    Reply
  142. Lisa on

    One of my favorite fillers is babtisia. It outlasts several flower arrangements and has an amazing vase life. So interested in finding more fillers to add to my garden.

    Reply
  143. Brenda Hanrahan Waterman on

    I adore Astrantia. They are not fussy, but look so sophisticated in a garden or as a cut flower. Astrantia is easy to grow once established, features attractive foliage, is virtually disease-and-pest-free and tolerates the wet soil Washington offers in the early spring. The bees love them as much as I do, which is an added benefit. To me it is a must-grow flower. It adds a little whimsy and charm. Everyone wants to know what that unusual flower is when I tuck it into a bouquet.

    Reply
  144. Terri Basso on

    My grandmother grew Hollyhocks across the front of her garage. The varied heights and colors captured my attention even as a very small child. I grow them today and enjoy hearing my neighbors reflect on their beauty. They make me weep when I stand among them as the sun fades.

    Reply
  145. Cindy Krepky on

    Today is the summer solstice and my garden in southern Oregon is absolutely vibrant with color and full of life from bees to hummingbirds. My favorite shrub is the smoke bush. It is a great filler with a beautiful color and texture for flower arrangements for most of the season. I coppice it every year for a maximum of useful branches. So excited for this book and congrats!

    Reply
  146. Lisa Pilz on

    I would love to add even more woodies to my flower farm and learn even more about them. I have lilacs, dogwood, hydrangea, quince and forsythia at this time.

    Reply
  147. Linda Winslow on

    My favorite is my white coneflowers. They seem to be pointing to the sun and happy to be in the garden and cut to bring in the home.

    Reply
  148. Gwen Garcia on

    One of my favorites is my lilac bush. When those tiny buds start to appear, I know that spring is on its way. Another reason is that its fragrance reminds me of Mystery at Lilac Inn, a Nancy Drew book. It takes me back to such sweet memories !

    Reply
  149. Amy on

    I love peonies, hydrangeas and now getting into Dahlias thanks to you!!

    Reply
  150. Adrienne Wolff on

    Living in northern Michigan, nothing signals spring more than the flash of yellow forsythia flowers. Such a welcome sign after months of snow.

    Reply
  151. Susan McDaniel on

    I love the bottlebrush buckeye. Each flower has so much depth of color, even though they seem at first to just be white.

    Reply
  152. Karen Sella on

    Thank you for the ongoing inspiration. One of my favorite shrubs is Edgeworthia–the Dr. Suessian growth habit and cheery yellow blooms at a rather dreary time of year–and the fragrance! Heavenly.

    Reply
  153. Kari Ward on

    One of my favorite perennial plants is the heuchera. There are so many colors of gorgeous leaves with detailed veins and a surprise of delicate long stems of petite flowers. The plants look neat and tidy all season long. The leaves and the flower stems are pretty in any floral arrangement.

    Reply
  154. Anne on

    I have a fallen Corkscrew Willow tree that I am sourcing vase length branches from very easily, they are growing vertical from the now laying horizontal trunk.
    I love the variation and texture in woody plants, trees, and perennials for floral arranging and also so great for creating natural environment too.

    Reply
  155. Lynda on

    Camellia’s! I love that they are one of the first to blossom while we’re transitioning from winter to spring. They feel like a sign of hope of what’s to come. I live in California, about an hour from our state building where there’s a beautiful garden and the grounds have a lot of Camellias that look like they’ve been there for many years. It’s always a pick-me-up to walk amongst the Camellia’s.

    Reply
  156. april wilson on

    My favorite by far is the Hydrangea! Oodles of colors and varieties. They can grow in most zones, coast to coast. An old fashioned romantic shrub.

    Reply
  157. Deb O'Neal on

    Hellebores are one of my favorite perennials! Anticipating the hellebore buds and blooms is delightful when there’s not a lot of other growing happening here in the Northeast!

    Reply
  158. Susan Gay on

    I love astilbes. They show up neat and tidy with beautiful feathery blooms. As the flowers fade, they still have interesting structure for the garden. I love the white astilbe and the creeping Japanese one with the smaller tufts.

    I was always too impatient to try my hand at flower arranging. The airy free forms of the new floral designers and their abstract designs give me the courage to make beautiful bouquets.

    Reply
  159. Jo Lynn on

    Sitting on my front porch swing looking at the little cottage garden my husband I created in the last two years I find it hard to pick just one plant. I think it’s the overall planting I like. The whole garden gives me a sense of calm.
    But I would have to say I do like the purple wispiness of the nepeta. And it draws in bees & hummers! And the hummers are always fun to watch.

    Thank you for the opportunity to read Rachels new book.

    Reply
  160. Jodi Miri on

    I am in zone 4/5 and baptisia grows well here. I love using baptisia foliage in arrangements, especially when I’m going for a delicate and romantic feel.

    Reply
  161. Sarah Beaves Lewis on

    I am going to say peonies! This is my second year after planting my first peony tubers ever. I am proud to say as a beginner all but 1 bloomed beautifully this year. (the one that was weed-whacked down by one of my boys last year :)

    Reply
  162. Cathy Challinor on

    Eek! Forgot to tell of my favourite flower / shrub. Jude the Obscure roses and Smoke Bush.

    Reply
  163. Cathy Challinor on

    Having been born in England, I have a special love for the English country garden. I would love to read about the shrubs Rachel recommends as they add such interest to a bouquet. I have found myself of late wandering around my garden and thinking “Oh that would look beautiful in an arrangement.” Thanks to Floret and people like Rachel, I am now looking at flowers, shrubs and trees in a different way and I love it! Thank you for introducing us to this new book. I hope I am one of the lucky ones!!

    Reply
  164. Vanessa on

    PEONIES!! Of all kinds… herbaceous, itoh, tree. Love them all! 💕

    Reply
  165. Ruth Garry on

    I can’t wait to read this book! Thank you for the sharing and doing the interview, Rachel and your farm are wonderful resources and inspirations.

    Favorite perinneals, shrubs and small trees:
    Luculia pinceane
    Hydrangea paniculata
    Viburnum opulus
    Viburnum tinus
    Syringa var.
    Persimmon
    Azalea var.
    Smoke bush var. And canariansis
    Eriostemon
    Copper glow tea tree
    Camellia scensis
    Rasberry canes
    Thryptomene
    Wax flower
    Bronia
    Scented pearl michaellea (magnolia)

    Reply
  166. Jennifer Soto on

    I am new to Gardening and truly inspired. We just purchased a home w/ 2.6 acres. Mostly open field, In Ohio. Perennial’s seems to be the best way to go w/ such a short growing season. I look forward to learning more about flower farming. By accident I discovered sage, now has flowers in it’s 3rd year after starting from seed. Large shrub w/ flowers that taste lovely.

    Reply
  167. Martha on

    I was so excited about the focus of this book that I forgot to mention my favorite perennial in my first comment. I am finding that so far my favorite perennial is sedum right now. The range of colors and textures has been so useful at so many different stages. It’s so easy to propagate and grow. I must have 6 different kinds and the longevity of the plant is remarkable. I take full advantage of it as greenery and later on when it blooms. Thanks again for sharing a glimpse into this new book. I can’t wait!

    Reply
  168. Kristi Hein on

    Oh, it’s impossible to choose just one — but long before I began raising flowers for arrangements, we planted northwest native plants for a backyard wildlife habitat, and it’s a joy to forage among our mature hedgerows and such for bouquet material. Some favorites include Pacific ninebark foliage and seedheads (the flowers are lovely but short-lived), mock orange, highbush cranberry, evergreen huckleberry, salal, the drooping flower heads of slough sedge, and various ferns. Big, bright-colored flowers really shine when nestled among or above abundant greenery and intriguing pods and berries.

    Reply
  169. Kathryn O'Brien on

    True English Delphiniums, no other flower can come close to their majesty in both color and form. Growing them from seed is a lesson in both patience and gratitude. Planted in mass, their splendor never fails to delight!

    Reply
  170. Martha on

    I’m two years into flower farming and I had already decided to largely focus on perennials and woddys. This takes some patience because both need to become established to take cuttings from. I have found a couple of ladies on YouTube that talk about perennials and shrubs as a basis of their arrangements and they are from England too. This book is just what I have been waiting for. Thank you for sharing this with all of us I can’t wait to dive in. Truly excited! It’s as if someone was reading my mind.

    Reply
  171. Ashley Wood on

    I wish I could say with confidence I have a favorite shrub or perennial. Since discovering Floret I have learned so much but theirs so much more to learn. Plants and flowers bring me such joy. They have gotten me thru so many tough times in life. I’m finally at the stage in my life where I can focus on my greatest passions and Floret has opened that door for me in a way that I will be for ever grateful for!

    Reply
  172. Rye Daves on

    My favorite perennials has to be the hydrangeas. My grandma has them surrounded her pink farm house and the contrast of the blue and pink always made me smile. I had blue hydrangeas from her garden as my wedding bouquet. I have been struggling for years and years to get mine to grow with hardly any luck but every year I keep planting new ones in different areas of the garden hoping they will find a home they enjoy longer than just one season. Wish me luck!

    Reply
  173. Wendy Deitz on

    The simple coneflower. Raised in the country where the purple coneflower lined the roads in the heat of summer. Now, after many years, I’m back in the country, and I find myself drawn over and over again to the coneflower. It comes in so many colors, and shapes, but the sight of those sturdy, hardy purple coneflowers, growing wild, filling the ditches, fills me with memories and peace. Definitely the coneflower.

    Reply
  174. Liza Swenn Martin on

    Greetings from Southern Vermont. Forsythia is a favorite shrub of mine. It signals Spring’s arrival and it makes wonderful fences. I’m also wild about Peonies. And when I was young we had a mixed shrub that my landscaper Father constructed between our yard and the neighbor’s driveway. Mom transplanted in a bush from her family home. It had woody, burgandy “flowers” and Mom referred to it as a Clove Bush. I’m so thrilled to learn of this book and the fact that others are using woody/flowering stems in their arrangements. I’ve been doing for years along with using and cultivating wild flowers, plants and wild rambling roses. The dried stems from the garden and fields also make beautiful winter arrangements. Cheers.

    Reply
  175. Kristin on

    I just adore Baptista … the beautiful spring spires and the foliage looks great the rest of the summer. So excited to see this book!!

    Reply
  176. Christine Lennon on

    My Mum grew hydrangea’s and now that she is no longer in this world I keep growing them in remembrance of my Mum .

    Reply
  177. Nicole Mathys Derella on

    Carolina Allspice is my all time favorite. The burgundy blossoms last a long time and are so beautiful.

    Reply
  178. Ida Hale on

    I love Forsythia. My mother gave me starts when we married and had our first home—left them behind when we moved. I am looking for a miniature variety for our new place.

    Reply
  179. Joan Fossum on

    I’ve always loved dahlias. Such color, such variety!

    Reply
  180. Jacki Baschmann on

    Lilacs will always be my favorite but roses given them a run for their money.

    Reply
  181. Wari on

    I really love everything but one of my many favorites is delphinium! They are so pretty in all colors and forms. I will always have them in my garden.

    Reply
  182. Joanne Starr on

    Some of my personal favorites are Flowering Quince, Wild Red Flowering Currant (ribes sanguineum), Indian Plum and Common Chicory. All are so beautiful!

    Reply
  183. Elizabeth on

    This sounds wonderful. Thanks. I arrange flowers/foliage from my tiny garden here that is just 2 years old. Would love some additional ideas for planting shrubs. Sounds like this book is just the ticket.

    Reply
  184. Deirdre on

    Peonies without a doubt are tops on my list.

    Reply
  185. M on

    Great interview! I love this subject, great write up!

    My favorites are ome oldies but goodies:

    Forsythia, Lynwood Gold, for flowers and foliage

    Spirea, bridal veil, blossoms and form

    Hydrangea, annabelle (love dried also!) For soft volume

    Egyptian mint, fuzzier, less rugose and more pointed leaves than apple mint. Haven’t found the proper Latin name. Wonderful strong stems and soft texture!

    Heuchera, so many! Leaves mostly, but airy blossoms are so delicate.

    And Forsythia, Kumson, beautiful foliage (F. viridissima var. koreana)

    Reply
  186. Sally on

    What an inspiring interview, I’m off to seek out Rachel on Instagram. I’m about to expand my garden to include a picking patch, and the first plant I’ll plant in the spring are hydrangeas as I know they’ll grown in the shady situation !

    Reply
  187. Steff Branscombe on

    Its got to be Eremurus Robustus when the sun shines on them they are absolutely magical

    Reply
  188. Irina Rogozanska on

    Thank you, Erin, for introducing Rachel’s book. Feels like what I am currently looking out for. Peonies have just faded away in my garden and I am seriously thinking of planting a new variety this fall.

    Reply
  189. Dottie D on

    Resisting the urge to highlight all the amazing hellebores, hydrangeas and peonies that light up my life all season. My two favorites are my single DAPHNE ODORA and my mass planting of PHENOMENAL LAVENDAR — all requiring intention to protect them in our Northeast winters to ensure they shine in the summer:)

    Reply
  190. Kara Tharpe on

    I’m a peony lover. When I was little I convinced my mom to plant them in our garden. She planted an entire patch just for me and now that I have my own gardens, I add a peony every year to my collection. I’ve recently become a member of the American Peony Society and am going to try my hand at growing them from seed!

    Reply
  191. Lisa on

    I love Johnny Wheeler honeysuckle, it attracts so many hummingbirds and it blooms all summer!

    Reply
  192. Holly Stetson on

    Erin, thank you for offering a book giveaway. You are full of kindness and so much knowledge. Just love to read and view the gorgeous flowers. What fun it would be to visit Rachel’s garden and your garden too. My blessing of flowers are surrounding me, so many favorites. Today the favorites are the big, bold clematis and the intricate foxglove. So appreciate your sharing!

    Reply
  193. Taylor Christman on

    I think Iris’s are the most underrated flower. They are gorgeous and such a beautiful sign of spring!!

    Reply
  194. Mary Mills on

    Hi Erin My favourite perennial in flower now is amazing and admired by all our visitors, Giant scabious such a lovely subtle shade of lemon , good in a vase with gardener’s garters and ammi major and superb in the garden when it goes to seed against the sunset!

    Reply
  195. Carol Taylor on

    Too many favorites – lilies, peonies, lilacs, mock orange, amsonia – but 2 workhorses for dry shade (once established) & deer resistant, love Geranium maculatum & Japanese painted fern. They are hard to beat!

    Reply
  196. Lia Turk on

    I’m currently enjoying the beautiful poppy Papaver hybridum ‘Cupcake,’ which started blooming almost six weeks later than last year due to our cooler temps in northern California. One plant has reseeded each year and produced even more gorgeous blooms that the bees gorge on!

    Reply
  197. Melissa Brent on

    I have so many favorites but my favorite this year is variegated Solomon’s Seal. So versatile, long lasting in vases and available throughout the growing season. I’ve had just the fresh cut foliage in a large vase since the beginning of May, refreshing every 10-14 days! So intricate. 🍃💕

    Reply
  198. Tiffany Devens on

    I’m a hydrangea girl. I’ve just fallen love with Hydrangea paniculata the last few years. I love how they look throughout the year through all their phases.

    Reply
  199. Danielle on

    In previous years I would’ve said hydrangeas. But now after a few years of waiting I enjoyed my first peony blooms this year! I’m torn between the two.

    Reply
  200. Alexandra on

    I adore my coneflowers! They’re super tough and I’ve got them in a bunch of colors.

    Reply
  201. Lorri on

    My favorite perennial is iris & favorite shrub is lilac. Both of these were in my grandmother’s tiny backyard garden. She used to bury her vegetable peelings & coffee grounds. I use to wonder “why in the world is she doing this?” I know now, what a smart grandma she was-💕

    Reply
  202. Kéri-Kovács Adrienn on

    I really like lilac and hydrangea. I like to use Euonymus Japonicus in flower bouquets. This is a great filler plant and evergreen!

    Reply
  203. ann on

    thank you so much for introducing us to rachel siegfried and her green and gorgeous garden! the pictures are amazing! i love her philosphy of letting a bouquet build itself as you wander the garden. i like using leucahendron stalks for structure as well as using the bracts for focus. i can’t wait to read about other interesting green and woody options for bouquets!

    Reply
  204. Kéri-Kovács Adrienn on

    I really like lilac and hydrangea. I like to use Japanese goat’s milk in flower bouquets. This is a great filler plant and evergreen!

    Reply
  205. Laura on

    I adore Philadelphus (mock orange)

    Reply
  206. Sarah Z on

    One of my favorite shrubs in the garden is my Flowering Red Currant bushes, which is a native plant here in the PNW. Actually, to clarify, I ended up with a white flowering currant bush in my clutch of bare root stems that I purchased 5 years ago and that one is my absolute favorite. It signals the beginning of Spring, is impressive in size, and I’ve never seen a white flowering currant anywhere else! Also, all the early pollinators and hummingbirds are in absolute heaven when she starts to bloom.

    Reply
  207. Glenna on

    I really love crocosmia. The bright red flowers are beautiful, and it seems to bloom quite a while. Although it is not quite hardy in eastern Washington, the plants will reappear if planted in a pot and overwintered in the garage. They also produce a lot of seed that can be started in spring.

    Reply
  208. Abbe on

    I am very fond of our native bee balm (monarda). They are such vigorous and joyful plants and as the name implies the bees do love them so. Delicious tea from the blossoms as well.

    Reply
  209. Joanna Glud on

    So many beautiful things, hard to pick a favorite!! I would love to do what both you and Rachel do, if I was 30 years younger. I so enjoy all the great information that is passed along!

    Reply
  210. Cheryl S. on

    I can’t wait to read Rachel’s new book, sounds like it is exactly what I have been looking for. As I was reading through the interview I kept thinking about all of the native California buckwheat on my property that are all lit up with creamy white clouds of flowers, the perfect additions to a summer floral arrangement. I hope someday I can call myself a flower farmer and natives will play a huge role in that progression.

    Reply
  211. Jaine Westing on

    The Peonies are my favorite of all . Can’t wait to see the book 😊

    Reply
  212. PAMELA RICHARDSON on

    How to have a favorite when there are so many to choose from, I plant perennials because they do come back each year so my favorite, I think it is the one blooming at the moment.

    Reply
  213. Susan Corrieri on

    Can’t wait to get my hands on this lovely book! SO excited! Thank you.

    Reply
  214. Sarah on

    I love Peonies, of course, and delphinium and lilacs!

    Reply
  215. Sara on

    I’m a sucker for lilacs!!

    Reply
  216. Nicole on

    My favorite perennial, that I’ve yet to successfully grow are Delphiniums.

    Reply
  217. Morgan N on

    Yarrow has to be my favorite perennial!

    Reply
  218. Lisa Moss on

    It’s hard to choose but some favorites would be tree peonies, lilacs and roses.

    Reply
  219. Michelle on

    Perennials have a special place in my heart because of there amazing resilience even in our sometimes harsh northern climate and because of the ones I have been able to save from the gardens of dear friends and relatives who have since passed on. Their memories continue to live on in the beautiful blooms that faithfully return every year. Though it is so hard to choose just one favorite, I would have to say peonies because I really look forward to those few weeks when they are flowering. Bringing in armloads of their gorgeous and bountiful blooms, filling every vase I have and placing them all over the house or giving them away.
    I am truly grateful to Floret for all the information they share so freely! I have learned so much since I discovered their books and online library. I have also really enjoyed their book recommendations. Everyone I have read so far has provided to be a valuable resource.

    Reply
  220. Anne on

    I would have to say Baptisia. So care free, yet so rewarding! What an inspiring book. Always love to read these interviews.

    Reply
  221. Laura on

    My favorite have to be Hydrangeas. They evoke such strong memories for me of taking neighborhood strolls while on vacation on Cape Cod.

    Reply
  222. Juliet Taylor on

    I remember as a child, the first time I saw a thriving delphinium. It took my breath away then and still does today! … especially when it is sky blue!

    Reply
  223. Karen Bare on

    Oh how do I pick just one? Because it’s currently the star of my walled garden, I would have to say my pink Weigelia (with the red a close second.) The different shades of pink and white are spectacular even alone in a vase, or with some bare branches of birch or curly willow. But the clematis, and David Austin roses twined together…they take my breath away! Just don’t tell them I picked Weigelia over them! Thank you for introducing Rachel’s book, I try to acquire books on flower arranging and share them with our small town garden club. The photos really help the ladies with their beginning attempts.

    Reply
  224. Sheree on

    I love tree peonies. Where I used to live in Central Iowa I had a red and pink in my backyard. The blooms were phenomenal! I will enjoy reading about her knowledge on this subject.

    Reply
  225. christina moore on

    What an exciting introduction to a book about more than just flowers! How I love the woody perennials and the habitat and safe haven they provide at my little plot! I am on a short term lease but still couldnt resist some mock orange, spirea. and vitex and always still want to put in more 🧡

    Reply
  226. Suzzelle on

    First I will answer the requirement for the giveaway: My favorite shrub ( if it’s even possible to have ONE that’s better than the others) I’m going to say is a Ninebark
    ‘little joker’. Besides the abundance of blooms, low maintanance, and unique foliage color that lasts all season in my zone 3 garden, the critters I share my flowers with don’t seem to mind when I remove some branches from their “buffet”.
    Secondly, I think it’s so cool that the people at Floret welcome and encourage the sharing of information and resourses from all over the world. Rather than seeing others’ successes and accomplishments as competition, Erin is incredibly generous with her information, experiences, and discoveries. I love everything written by the folks at Floret, and so very much appreciate the concept of sharing ideas. I am inspired every time I read a recommended book, article, interview, or blog.
    …And for anyone reading this far, other shrubs that do really well in a deer infested zone 3 wooded garden: Weigelia, Baptisia, and ‘walkers low’ Nepeta…all of which have different interesting qualities at different stages of their growing season. My Pagoda Dogwood is my prized possession, but I literally would have to sleep next to it to keep the deer from eating it.

    Reply
  227. Rebecca on

    My favourite is Anemone hupehensis, I just love the airy blooms which turn up so late in summer and last until the first frost when so many other blooms have gone.

    Reply
  228. Danielle Schami on

    Thank you for this lovely introduction to Rachel’s new book. Dictamnus albus is among my many loved perennials, and my appreciation for her is growing. Her pretty florets and citrus scent are lovely!

    Reply
  229. Raquel on

    I love perennials!! Roses are my favorite!

    Reply
  230. Tricia Erly on

    My favorite perennial at the moment is Alchemilla Mollis. The way it has seeded itself into cracks in my walkways and around the garden gives me enough to blend into bouquets with Calla Lillies, Roses and Peonies.

    Reply
  231. Allison Reiter on

    One of my favorite shrubs is mock orange. I love the scent, it brings me back to my childhood when we had a huge, wild growing one in our backyard. I also have a huge love of roses, David Austin Roses in particular. Gardening is my peace and happy place.

    Reply
  232. Lela on

    Interesting interview, and the book looks beautiful! I almost didn’t comment, because I couldn’t pick a favorite. However, after some contemplation, I realized that either the foliage or flowers of my purple smoke bush (Cotinus Coggygria) end up in almost every arrangement. Even though I’m a bit of a plant collector, I tend to be drawn to blues, pinks, purples, chartreuse. Burgundy and red-tinged foliage is also sprinkled around my garden. So, the smoke bush in a bouquet just always seems to give it some depth, and pull it together.

    Reply
  233. Elle on

    One of my favorite perennial/shrub has to be Choisya ternata, it gets cute little white flowers on it.

    Reply
  234. Jessica A on

    This seems like such an amazing book full of information!! I love growing forsythia, lilacs, and hydrangeas, but I’m curious to find out what other woody perennials I am able to grow in my zone to make beautiful home arrangements.

    Reply
  235. Marie C on

    Dogwood branches are some of my favorite cuttings.

    Reply
  236. RandyRose Gagliardo on

    I have to say my all time favorite is the cherry tree! Even when the petals are blowing off the branches it makes my lawn beautiful. A doctor in our village planted 5 cherry trees alone a pond here one for him and his wife and 3 daughters. It’s so beautiful every spring!

    Reply
  237. Alwina on

    Forsythia is a favorite of ours for early season cuts, and it is a bonus that it’s such a prolific grower.

    Reply
  238. Krista McCumber on

    There are so many varieties I am excited about trying more of! I love the hellborne (sp?) in the photo above….so gorgeous.

    Reply
  239. James Fain on

    It’s hard to narrow down but I love any kind Yarrow. Here in zone 7b in NW Georgia it handles our humidity phenomenally. Calling are weather unpredictable is an understatement but through and through the Yarrow always shines.

    Reply
  240. Edyth Willard on

    A favorite garden shrub for many years is my winter (not witch) hazel spring blooming shrub. I have just planted a shrub I am excited about: ‘Simply Scentsational’ shrub arbusto (Sweet shrub) which has pineapple scented rose shaped blossoms.

    Reply
  241. Julie on

    It’s hard to pick a favorite, seriously. Hydrangeas come to mind first. Roses and peonies too. ;)

    Reply
  242. Susan Wright-Miller on

    I love all kinds of varieties of Lavender with their beautiful colors, fragrance, shape of the plants, and the deer don’t like to eat them.

    Reply
  243. Bryar Wolf on

    Blown away by the pictures of the arrangements in this!! Incredibly beautiful! Some of my favorites are echinacea and living in Colorado the state flower columbine!! So hard to choose! Does a yucca plant count? They’re in full bloom and are gorgeous I love seeing them every year!!

    Reply
  244. Julie Mitton on

    Such a beautiful book and piece of Art! Thank you for the introduction Erin.

    Reply
  245. Amber on

    What a fabulous topic for a book! I cannot wait to read it. My favorite flowering perennial shrub is our Sweet Almond. It has a honey fragrance with greyish green leaves and a white flower spike that reminds me of a tail.

    Reply
  246. Julia Ball on

    My very favorite perennial is the peonie. I have a large Takara Itoh peonies that I adore it has gorgeous huge pink blooms. I also have a smaller one with deeper red leaves I think it is a Keiko.

    Reply
  247. Licia Conforti on

    I love Heptacodium miconioidies – Seven Sons flower. It’s a tall shrub that dazzles for 4-season interest: fragrant creamy white flower clusters, followed by purple/dark red berries in late summer, colorful fall foliage, and then it sheds its tan bark to reveal lighter branches all winter. Never disappoints!

    Reply
  248. Laurie Annan on

    My favorite flowers …. Do I have to say just one.Peonies 🌸💗

    Reply
  249. Hillary on

    Two of my favorite herbaceous perennials are Agastache ‘Blue Fortune’ (for its tall, nonstop powder blue spikes) and Gaura lindheimeri ‘Whirling Butterflies’ (for its airy long stems and extended bloom period.) Both are tough plants requiring little supplemental water and each overwintering easily in the Pacific Northwest. They both attract bees and the Gaura, hummingbirds. I love them for the loose and romantic element they add to bouquets.

    Thank you for this inspiring post, Erin. As a landscaper/grower and part time flower farm employee, sustainable floristry and climate-ready gardening is at the crux of what we can all be doing to keep growing with the ecosystems in mind.

    Reply
  250. Suzanne🌻 on

    I LOVE buddleia !! The flowers actually smell like honey! Thank you for sharing this very interesting interview, and for bringing Ms. Siegfried to our attention. Her book looks incredible and what a wealth of beauty and information.

    Reply
  251. TJ on

    I have to say that *at the moment* my favorite perennials are hellebores. They are the first to burst through the snow here in Michigan spring, and it’s such a relieving and hopeful sign of the season.

    Reply
  252. Amie on

    I adore, like many that preceded me, coral charm peonies, Catherine Havemeyer lilacs, aveyron tulips, limelight hydrangea, and mock orange.

    A few years back though, I added some flowering red currant to my Seattle garden to attract birds and give height to our terraced bed. This late spring bloomer adds vibrant pink when my lilacs have withered, that evolve into little, clustered, red berries in summer and transitional color in fall. It’s been a lovely filler addition to my cut arrangements.

    We are starting over now, in zone 6 on a piece of property in Ellensburg and this is exactly what I have been trying to sort out – a perennial hedgerow style cut garden! What a resource! Thanks for sharing, Erin.

    Reply
  253. Jill on

    I love the combo of yarrow next to Russian sage. They’re a nice contrast to each other, both color and texture.

    Reply
  254. Mignon on

    A newer perennial for me is amaranth. The joy and the comedy of this flower is that it is heat-tolerant, a prolific bloomer, comes in different colors/orientations (gold/pink/red/white and draping/upright), and also self-seeds (to my delight). The seedlings I planted in early spring didn’t take, but the seeds that fell in the ground from last fall sure did- in spades.

    Reply
  255. Karen Chau on

    These comments have been delightful and insightful to read. Thank you Erin for what you do to bring people together and spread the joy and beauty of flowers.

    I love my chives that come up faithfully every year and bring the first blossoms in my little South Dakota backyard garden zone 5a.

    I am also super happy about milkweed that I started from seed and has become established now as a reliable perennial.

    Lastly my hardy, easy coneflower is also a favorite that I’d like to expand.

    I’d love to add lilacs and peonies to my future garden, but also research native perennials as well.

    Reply
  256. Ruth on

    I live in the mountain desert and so my favorites tend to be those that tolerate the harsh extremes. I love Shasta daisies for their bright, cheerful faces and old fashioned snowball bushes for their endurance and cheerful appearance each spring. They haven’t always been my favorites, but the more I have used them, the more I appreciate their positive traits.

    Reply
  257. Jan on

    Alstromeria is a hearty perennial that comes back stronger every year. I especially love being able to cut and share the flowers with family & friends.

    Reply
  258. Chi-Chi Nnakwe Whitley on

    I’m a closeted flower farmer and am in my information gathering stage. I would love to add this book for building my knowledge. I really enjoyed this interview, it was really informative. The gateway flower to my flower addiction is the peony. I am just bowled over by their beauty. I’ve also fallen in love with a green hydrangea that I received from a bouquet in February. It’s now late June and I still have a few blooms that I’ve been able to keep in water all this time! I would appreciate it if I could be considered for this drawing. Thanks!

    Reply
  259. Jess Zarling on

    Oh my goodness! What a resource! I cannot wait to order it and pour over each page! Roughly 9 years ago we bought a beautiful, country-side home just north of Milwaukee WI to fit our family of nine. I inherited a Master Gardner’s paradise and wow has it been a journey. Last year my husband cleared an acre (due to hundreds of tree’s dying from the emerald ash borer – we are talking 200+ tree’s – what an undertaking) and planted a wildflower meadow. We are becoming pretty good gardeners and we love it! My absolute favorite filler perennial is Lady’s Mantle. The yellow-green flowers accent all the pinks and purples, the dark greens, the peonies, dahlia’s, dappled willows, evergreens, boxwoods, bleeding-hearts, english lavender, big leaf lupine, goat’s beard and so much more…because we have so many gardens that surround the house, I like to use Lady’s Mantle to tamper down the weeds. It’s easy to remove, transplant and keep at bay. I absolutely love cutting it and bringing it inside the house. We have many children and a busy home so I love a cut flower/perennial that can stay pretty for days!

    Thanks for sharing (you truly are the best giver) and I’ll be watching the interview today!

    By the way, I’ve been sharing your “Growing Floret” documentary (Seas 1&2) with anyone and everyone. It is filmed so beautifully and is incredibly inspiring! Way to put something positive, uplifting and edifying into the world. Grit, hard work, commitment, experiencing blood, sweat and tears over your life’s work are many character attributes missing from this next generation. I loved that you did not shy away from what this journey has meant to you. Not many people have the unique privilege to marry their passions and purposes. You are blessed! Flowers are so, so pretty and so, so needed in this world. Beauty matters and I can’t thank you enough!

    xo

    Reply
  260. Annie on

    For the last three years, I’ve been in the process of developing a small flower farm, mainly perennials, and I have to say, hydrangeas, hydrangeas, grab my attention, like no other perennial💞

    Reply
  261. Stephanie on

    I love my Bull Shoal’s Chastebush (Vitex). I found it pushed away, all alone at a local retail garden. I had no idea what is was. It was a sad little thing. They just gave it to me. Now she is big, beautiful, and provides delicate purple flowers with a proud, straightbacked hardy stem. They have a calming, yet strong scent. And the bumblebees love them.

    Reply
  262. Jo on

    I was so excited about the book that I went to go buy it online and it’s backordered everywhere I look, so it must be fantastic. :) Can’t wait to get my hands on a copy.

    Reply
  263. Mishel Stonely on

    We just moved to our farm last year and plan to add a rose garden to our property, primarily with our favorite David Austen roses. I will line the space with a lavender hedge to help with the deer. Two of my favorite things.

    Reply
  264. Krystie DeMello on

    For me, in high desert in southern utah, one of my absolute favorites is yarrow! I love the ferny texture and the fact that it blooms allllllll season long. It looks so gorgeous for months! No deadheading or fertilizing either- it prefers poor soil and hot sun. I *have* found that while it is extremely drought tolerant, including it on our drip system leads to much larger and more lush plants. I have bright gold, soft yellow, pink, white, red, peach, orange and a pastel mix- so far ;) This year we got to begin my enormous flower bed in the backyard, and I grew an additional four varieties from seed! So far they’re all looking happy and strong- despite bizarre and harsh weather this year!

    Reply
  265. Colleen Wood on

    Living in central Idaho, zone 5, I love the deep purple and white lilacs that return each year in late spring. For summer and early fall, the colors of the echinacea flowers are beautiful followed by the cone that’s left when the pedals fade away!

    Reply
  266. Wendy on

    Carolina Allspice and Ninebark are some of my favorite native woody perennials for landscape and cutting!

    Reply
  267. Jean Bonnyman on

    Growing up in Maine, lilacs were always such a celebration of beauty, color and the best floral perfume. Sadly, the old fashioned northern lilac does not grow well in North Carolina where I live now. So I make it a goal to return to New England every spring.

    Reply
  268. Karel Klinger on

    Zinnias are my favorite flower and remind me of long summer days at my Grandparent’s farm as a child. Grandma had a long row of them at the front of her garden.

    Reply
  269. Rebekah on

    I love using baptisia. Both the flowers and foliage are beautiful.

    Reply
  270. Janet on

    I have not met a flower I didn’t like but one that I find beautiful and intriguing is hellebores. The color and delicate structure is so beautiful. I’m a little late to learning all the many amazing perennials but love the discovery all the same. Gorgeous pictures!!!!! Beautiful arrangements!!!!

    Reply
  271. Ashley on

    I love lilacs, they grow so well were I live, but I’d love to learn about other Woody’s .

    Reply
  272. Kathy Houda on

    Persicaria polymorpha, or Giant Fleeceflower is a standout in my yard! Measuring about 8’ across and 5’ tall, it presents stunning bouquets of creamy white flowers resembling Astilbe. It is virtually immune to ravaging Deer, rabbits, muskrats, chipmunks and squirrels while also completely disease and insect free! Wonderful!! Good as a cut flower for a few days.

    Reply
  273. Sharon on

    Sweet peas are the root of my garden memories with my grandmother who showed me patience and beauty through her gardening without uttering a single word!

    Reply
  274. Stacey Anderson on

    So many amazing shrubs and perennials! Living in a Zone 4 in Montana, I could not live without lilacs and peonies in the garden. Then comes the magic of bearded iris and daylilies…

    Reply
  275. Barbara Kelly on

    I moved to the Pacific Northwest in 1992, from the High Desert of Utah. During the time I was there I discovered and fell in love with the Helebore family of flowers, they quickly became my favorite. Fast forward to 2005, I came back to Utah, and can no longer grow hellebores reliably. I tried year after year.
    It’s so nice to see them surrounding Rachel’s lovely book.

    Reply
  276. Sarah Mc on

    I love adding Bupleurum to a bouquet!

    Reply
  277. Liana on

    I feel a bit silly saying this as I distinctly remember being down on them when I was growing up but I love Hostas. I love the variegated leaves and how the make a beautiful cut leaf display even when there isn’t much flowering in the garden. I love seeing everyone else’s suggestions to research and see what else I can make room for in my garden.

    Reply
  278. Jill on

    I’m obsessed with any type of nepeta the pollinators love them too.

    Reply
  279. Sheila Hlubucek on

    I grow bapisia in a variety of colors for spikes in June bouquets and for faux eucalyptus greenery later in summer. The bonus is that it’s a nitrogen fixer.

    Reply
  280. Jen Slagle on

    Happy Summer Solstice! My favorite of the moment is a Hypericum: I love the red woody stems and dark reddy purple leaves and then the bright sunny yellow flowers and of course the berries to drop in a stem or two into arrangements in mid summer.

    Reply
  281. Caroline Weldy on

    I live on a farm so planting and harvesting is therapy for me. We don’t farm the land any more, but leave that someone else. So that gives me more time to work in the small gardens. My favorite perennials are Aliums.

    Reply
  282. Aurore BEUGNET on

    So nice and interesting,
    I would recommend echinacea or penstemon :)

    Reply
  283. Ali News on

    What an amazing and inspiring lady !! I would browse this book the entire winter season, just waiting for “flower” season again.

    Reply
  284. Debby Ennis on

    Thank you Erin for this wonderful interview with Rachel. It was so interesting. I have a very small backyard in the small city of Ashtabula, Ohio ( up on Lake Erie), and I love to do what I can for the wildlife, and for my own enjoyment. I Love it…”Dirt Therapy”I call it! My favorite perennials are Lilacs and Lavender!
    Thank you for this opportunity.

    Reply
  285. Caroline on

    I am a small flower, fruit and CSA grower in zone 3b to 4a. Flowers are new to us for production, but not in practice, as we have several pollinator habitats and wild spaces on the farm. My favorite is Hellebores. The colors are amazing, they are hardy as all get-out and have an open form that invites you in. Thank you for all the work you for Erin to inspire new growers and in supporting farmers to go in new directions with confidence. So rare to have this kind of in-depth support. Abundant blessings!

    Reply
  286. Julia on

    Crocosmia has always attracted my attention. Love the variety of colors.

    Reply
  287. Donna Quam on

    Gorgeous and delightful pictures and content. I would LOVE to have her book for my coffee table!

    Reply
  288. Karen on

    Roses are my favorite. I feel like perennial focal flowers aren’t super plentiful and who doesn’t love roses? Would love to get my hands on this book, I’ve been eyeing it for a little while.

    Reply
  289. Jetta N on

    When I lived in Wisconsin, my favorite was gladiolus.
    When I lived in Germany and visited Holland, my favorite was tulips.
    When I lived in Illinois, my favorite was peonies.
    When I lived in North Dakota, my favorite was spirea.
    Now that I live in Texas, crepe myrtles are my favorite!
    Thank you for this opportunity to win a gorgeous book!

    Reply
  290. Catherine Remkes on

    There are so many to choose from. I absolutely adore my hellebores but being in the southeast bright blue hydrangeas are such an incredible staple. I keep adding more native perennials to the farm as they support all our local wildlife. I am excited to see how the beauty berry’s do this fall with their vibrant colors in arrangements.

    Reply
  291. Briahna Michalsky on

    Right now, it’s my perennial herbs I love (various mints, rosemary, sage, and thyme) because of the low maintenance and wonderful various uses in bouquets, foods and landscape.

    Reply
  292. Kate Formichella on

    We are crazy over Baptisia, especially purple smoke. I’ve been planting it for years as a landscaper before we morphed to flower farming/ wedding floristry. Then there is nepeta souvenir d’andre, swoooon!
    Ninebarks, service berry, viburnums, wild blueberry, and so much more, are all on our stewarded property. They are well loved and wildly used. I am excited to read about Rachel’s wisdom. We are all about our ‘wild garden style’ too!!! Learning daily/ hourly!

    Reply
  293. Donna Foster on

    My purple clematis is my favorite perennial shrub♡♡ I can tuck one or two into an arrangement and they steal the show!

    Reply
  294. Claire Burwash on

    Like many here, I also love my peonies!!! Bringing them into my house brings me so much joy.

    Reply
  295. Janet Clifford on

    Poppies are my favorite! Their bright orange color loudly announces the start of the garden season for me and I love that they self seed so their presence continues to expand every year. After they bloom their irregular shaped stems add an interesting visual to the garden. The poppies, along with my peonies, remind me of my mother and grandmother – both had stunning flower gardens during my childhood.

    Reply
  296. Kim Hensley on

    What a gorgeous garden! I love so many shrubs and perennials but my Peonies have my heart! I love cutting a big luscious bouquet.

    Reply
  297. Kim Rempel on

    Right now I’m going back to irises! I found some people down the way who have over 100 varieties planted and it is a SIGHT!

    Reply
  298. Leigh Ann Theunick on

    Excited to read Rachel’s new book. I love how she calls it garden bouquets! My favorite periennials are my 100+ year old peony plants from my Grandmother. They have survives four moves with me and I hope are finally in the place they will be for the remainder of my life.

    Reply
  299. Hannah McAlpin on

    I’m in love with my bridal bliss hydrangeas! I feel like with a hydrangea bush you really get the bang for your buck. They produce tons of blooms that want to be cut and spread joy. I’m currently trying to start new hydrangea plants from cuttings and so far it’s going well! In hope to expand my garden/farm I’m researching all I can about woody plant perennials that would offer a unique variety for my area here in KY.

    Reply
  300. Abbey Grady on

    Give me all the hydrangeas, they are my very favorite.

    Reply
  301. Alicia on

    My favorite shrub is the lilac, because there is no other scent like it, and because my mom had huge old lilac shrubs when I was a kid. Great memories!

    Reply
  302. Denise on

    I love peonies and also roses. I can hardly stop with just these two!!

    Reply
  303. Kelli Janice on

    Hands down, my favorite perennial will always be the peony. They make me slow down and enjoy everything in nature and they remind me that I am another year older since they bloom around my birthday. They can be tough as nails and fragile all at the same time. Every stage of their growth is worth watching. Even when their petals are gone in the wind, they leave behind unique pods as a reminder of their return one day.

    Reply
  304. Nadie VanZandt on

    One of my favorite perennials is Japanese anemone ’Honorine Jobert’. I love its pure white petals surrounding a rich egg-yolk yellow center. It’s stunning in the fall when everything else is waning.

    Reply
  305. Nanci on

    My favourite is my Fern Leaf Peony. Given to me by a dear friend

    Reply
  306. Mandy Sipko on

    Bridals wreath and lilacs together in a bouquet make my heart smile!

    Reply
  307. Pamela on

    A flowering dogwood has always been a favourite of mine, and peonies.

    Reply
  308. Christine on

    At the moment, Philadelphus ‘Belle Etoile’, and older mock orange. It cuts beautifully and is long lasting, and is a joy in the garden for its beauty -it has a violet throat- and its fragrance.

    Reply
  309. Danijela N on

    Peonies and Hydrangeas are my favourite of all!

    Reply
  310. Maria Sanchez on

    I think my new favorite perennial is the delphinium. My brother, Daniel, loved these flowers and now I understand why. I planted 3 delphiniums with the most incredible blue flowers right next to some shasta daisies in my new pollinator garden. I did this in his memory. He passed away 30 years ago today at the young age of 30.

    Reply
  311. Amy Jo Francis on

    I always enjoyed my grandma’s back porch because of a lilac bush to the side. As a kid I would play around it and enjoyed some shade during the afternoon. I would watch bees busily moving from flower to flower and take in the beautiful fragrance .

    Reply
  312. Liz Campbell on

    Despite the unflattering name, I am a huge fan of swamp milkweed. From the moment the bright green stalks begin to appear, I am excited for its growth, for the beautiful sets of pink and white blooms that will come, and for the rush of insects that soon visit and inhabit it. I believe it is vital to provide native plants and support for the critical insect population.
    We are embarking on a rehab of a small former farm we just moved onto. It is a nearly blank slate, so I am very excited to read Rachel’s book and discover additional elements that I can add to continue to support native pollinators, insects, and birds while enhancing the beauty of our land and environment.

    Reply
  313. Kristin K. on

    Lilacs are my favorite!! The smell just can’t be beat and I love a big bunch of them together!! Thanks for letting us know about this book, looks like a great one!

    Reply
  314. Nancy on

    My favorite perennial is the columbine. Each flower is so delicate but when the whole plant is in bloom it’s beautiful.

    Reply
  315. Cynthia on

    I love love love peonies and have about 20 varieties. But also I have found that both lemon balm and lovage make excellent greenery for arrangements (my primary product is culinary herbs – the flowers are just a sideline to up the sales at the farmers market, and I do arrangements for a friend’s cafe with all my market leftovers every Saturday).

    Reply
  316. Jess Taylor on

    As with all growing things, it’s hard to choose a favorite! But one hardy woody plant that holds a special place for me is forsythia. We had a plant outside our kitchen window growing up and I thought it unique to my childhood home. Then my daughter and I planted one we found on clearance and got to watch it thrive over the course of 3 years in the home we last lived in together. This spring I found myself living in a new area, and realized it was the first time in my life that I watched spring begin in a new climate. So many new plants and blooms!!!! And flourishing everywhere was forsythia!!!! A little touch of home

    Reply
  317. Margaret Donovan on

    I am so impressed by the weigelia I planted a few years ago – it blooms mightily – covering itself with a coat of pink blossoms in early June for about an month – and grows like a teenager each year.

    Reply
  318. Lisa Halas on

    Deep dark purple Hollyhocks are my fave here. Thank you for the chance to win a copy of this intriguing book!

    Reply
  319. Martha Bryan on

    Mock orange! Long lasting in a vase and it smells lovely.🙂

    Reply
  320. Kim Bowling on

    One of my favorite perennials is Hellebore. They give you the first glimmer of hope during the coldest days of winter.

    Reply
  321. Rhonna on

    I am obsessed with any fluffy grasses that will survive Uostate NY snow! Thank you for the giveaway! 🖤

    Reply
  322. Ruth on

    Hi, My current obsession is my great grandma’s 7 sisters rambling rose that is about to bloom. Enjoyed your book preview. Thank you so very much.

    Reply
  323. Jenn Amon on

    I live in New England where rows of large full hydrangeas (blue) are abundant. However, my all time favorite hydrangea is the Limelight. I’m enamored with the creamy white cone shaped blooms and enjoy the long , sturdy stems in flower arrangements. This flowering shrub offers both whimsy and structure.

    Reply
  324. Liz on

    This looks like such a lovely book! It is so difficult to name just one favorite perennial or shrub, but this year I’ve found myself using bleeding heart much more than I ever have before. I love the fragile and airy quality they add to arrangements, and they last quite a while in the vase! The white variety, Alba, is my favorite, and it has a fairly long bloom time in my shade garden here in Washingon.

    Reply
  325. Hailee Witt on

    My current obsession is the rose. I can’t get enough!

    Reply
  326. Greta Lowther on

    How wonderful!….I’ve been thinking so much about more perennial flower sources, and can’t wait to read this book!
    A plant that I discovered accidentally to be an AMAZING addition to arrangements is Highbush Cranberry, (Viburnum trilobum), which is native to northern North America. It has beautiful white lace cap flowers in the spring, and great clean maple leaf shaped foliage, and it lasted forever in a vase. It eventually rooted in fact, the only thing left of the arrangement, and still looking great. Anyway, I just love this plant!

    Reply
  327. Jean on

    I loved the arrangements from the book. My favorite is a lilac. The color, the scent and the shrub after the flowers are spent. And memories of my grandfather growing and pruning them.

    Reply
  328. Annie on

    Oh my yes… so difficult to choose .. but here we are trying hard to establish pollinator pathways so I have been revamping my garden as necessary .. this year I have developed a particular fondness for agastache blue fortune and agastache giant black adder hyssop .. they are new for me … of course I still love my peonies and coneflowers and cosmos too ! ❤️

    Reply
  329. Laura Tanglertpaibul on

    Asclepias is my favorite perennial – gorgeous color and form in arrangements. Mine get bigger every year and are a real standout in the garden as well.

    Reply
  330. Sam on

    It’s so hard to choose! 😊 Currently I’m really enjoying delphiniums and salvias. I love deep blues and purples and there are great options for these colours with both these plants.

    Reply
  331. Erin Riley on

    I love using skimmia in arrangements. The waxy leaves last a long time, and the bright, red berries are perfect for Christmas arrangements.

    Reply
  332. Julie on

    My favorite has to be peonies. Nothing compares to the fullness and size of the blooms.

    Reply
  333. Brenda Cats on

    Hard to choose one but old fashioned lilac is my favorite. My husband bought me a dwarf variety lilac with small dark violet blooms about 12-13 years ago for our anniversary . It smells great. We have a french hybrid in our backyard along the border between our house and the neighbors’s yard. Its been here over 25 years. In the spring it is full of fragrant blooms but they aren’t great for cutting so we just enjoy the 2-3 weeks of fabulous fragrance as the canyon winds blow the scent in to the house if its warm enough to open the windows! (Northern Utah)

    Reply
  334. pam barnes on

    So hard to choose one perennial but lilacs and their perfume are pretty beautiful.

    Reply
  335. Tracey Sherman on

    I live in south Texas, but was recently visiting Charlottesville, NC. There, I discovered the Sweetbay Magnolia. Though classified as a tree, at the hotel where I was staying, this magnolia looked more like a bush, and the blooms were, surprisingly, small and delicate compared to the large blooms of the magnolia trees I am familiar with. I hope someday to add a Sweetbay Magnolia to my garden, but it will have to be in a location other than hot, dry south Texas, because this variety prefers moist soil.

    Reply
  336. Nicky Pine on

    I love the New Zealand native Hebes, now in such a variery of cultivars. Great for borders, filling spaces and aren’t too fussy about the conditions they grow in.

    Reply
  337. Michelle Kavesh on

    I love sweet peas! So excited for this book – been wanting to plant delphiniums and other perennials. Thank you for entering me in the book drawing!

    Reply
  338. Hanna on

    So difficult, but right now I fell in love with Geum. Oh, and I planted some different Hypericum for their coloured berries, and they don’t mind the unusual heat and drought we’re having for weeks now. Could become a new favourite (easy to propagate, too!)

    Reply
  339. Barbara on

    I love Luculia gratissima, it has such beautiful scented flowers and it blooms when not many things are flowering.

    Reply
  340. Rachel on

    My favorite shrub is rose of Sharon. It’s so beautiful and dependable and shares the same namesake as my beloved mom. What’s not to love!

    Reply
  341. Jennifer on

    So many! Hellebores, lilacs, peonies, irises, old roses, aquilegia, knautia, echinacea, all my perennial herbs, and the natives for the pollinators.

    Reply
  342. Krista on

    Roses! I love that I can do a heavy trim if I feel like it and they still thrive.

    Reply
  343. Ivy on

    My favorite perennial of this year is the perennial pincushion. It’s quite prolific in flowering in its second year in my garden, and I LOVE the shape & color of its flowers! The view of a clump of purplish blue flowers is so distinctive and soothing.

    Reply
  344. Abby Miller on

    I live in Spokane, which is nicknamed lilac city. They will always be a favorite.

    Reply
  345. Dora on

    My favorite shrub is lavender. I have about four that are thriving. I love how beautiful they look and when I water or pass them I love the smell. Makes me happy.

    Reply
  346. Josephine Blasi on

    I have slowly discovered over the years that shrubs are amazing in the garden. Hydrangea is probably one of my favorite and I love all the different varieties that I have discovered. Another shrub I thoroughly enjoy, and use quite often is a shrub whose name I do not know. I’ve been able to grow starts from cuttings, and I have quite a few shrubs now on our property and my daughter uses them in many of her floral arrangements. I’ll have to look up that name somehow. Another shrub that has so many varieties that are so lovely are the viburnums. Thank you for the chance to be in the drawing.

    Reply
  347. Kathy Ivie on

    Peonies are my favorite flower, wish they bloomed all summer long.

    Reply
  348. Starr on

    I have really been loving the enormous number of different Salvia plants. Every year I get to know more and more about how different varieties work in my bouquets. There are so many and I have found that there are several that hold up well in floral arrangements.

    Reply
  349. Karin Johnston on

    Sanguisorbas have captured my attention in the last year or so. I noticed a picture of one in the article. They are quite resilient perennials. Mine grow in acidic, very damp conditions and in part sun and they do very well. Another bonus, the deer are not terribly interested. They do get nibbled in the spring but if you use a spray deterrent early in the year, it seems the deer are no longer interested once the bloom starts. I would love to add more to our garden but they are so hard to find locally. Maybe I need to start growing these lovelies en masse to get them out there?

    Reply
  350. Tami brundage on

    I just really love echinacea, it is such a lovely and useful flower!

    Reply
  351. Alison Freeman on

    I enjoy how abundant and versatile my Strawberry Shortcake hydrangea bushes have added to my summer/fall home arrangements. The flower bundles are white in the summer and slowly blaze into pink and deep maroon. The leaves are a fantastic addition as well.

    Reply
  352. Vada Grindy on

    I love the return of the salvias. There are so many forms and colors. With each year they become more beautiful and endearing. I look forward to them every year like an old friend returning for a visit.

    Reply
  353. Renee Fisher on

    I have a neighbor who allows me to cut curly willow branches from her tree. These branches make a wonderful winter arrangement in a large urn with boughs of evergreen clippings, pinecones and red possum haw berries!

    Reply
  354. Lenore Messick on

    I love all the bellflowers. Their petals are so delicate, and rhe cool colors, shades of blue, violet and dusry pink, are wonderful with the peonies and lady’s mantle that are a highlight of the June garden here in Northern Europe. They are endkessly interesting to look at, and to grow.

    Reply
  355. Peter Krimmel on

    My favorite is daphne. They smell incredible right in the middle of winter and just a few of them perfume an entire room!

    Reply
  356. Tera kinzel on

    I am currently adding woodies to my new cut garden. I don’t have a favorite, perhaps because I like so many plants! I have always loved anything cherry when in bloom.

    I am looking forward to reading this new amazing book! I am so greatful to everyone that has taken their ideas and passions, and seen them through.

    Reply
  357. Jenn Davis on

    I think hellebores are my favorite because they are often the first sign of spring after a long winter. I love all the varieties they come in and are great in any arrangement.

    Reply
  358. Jade Elms on

    I fell more deeply in love with daffodils this spring than ever before. They are so early and so cheerful during our rainy springs in Oregon. And the deer wont eat thim (which means I can plant them everywhere)!! Planning to plant a thousand more this fall.

    Reply
  359. Leah on

    There’s just too many! I don’t know how she narrowed it down, but I love, along with the rest of the world, peonies and hellebores, but I, too, love micro-seasonally. Any given week, whatever’s creeping back in, I love. I like seeing the dogwoods and lilacs slowly fill back in. I love all the bulbs PERIOD. Nigella, feverfew, buplereum, Bells of Ireland, lavender, etc., etc. Roses, Queen Anne’s lace, the mints….
    Her book sounds fantastically useful. I imagine it’s quite the resource. And how awesome to be able to quickly reach for one book instead of 45. Great interview .

    Reply
  360. Leah on

    There’s just too many! I don’t know how she narrowed it down, but I love, along with the rest of the world, peonies and hellebores, but I, too, love micro-seasonally. Any given week, whatever’s creeping back in, I love. I like seeing the dogwoods and lilacs slowly fill back in. I love all the bulbs PERIOD. Nigella, feverfew, buplereum, Bells of Ireland, lavender, etc., etc. Roses, Queen Anne’s lace, the mints….
    Her book sounds fantastically useful. I imagine it’s quite the resource. And how awesome to be able to quickly reach for one book instead of 45. Great interview .

    Reply
  361. Lisa Edelhuber on

    My favorites are daffodils because they take me back to my childhood carrying armloads from my grandparents field! I actually have some growing here at our new little flower farm that belonged to my grandparents from many many years ago. They have both passed on, but those memories from so long ago come flooding back when I see these flowers & smell their wonderful perfume each spring.💖

    Reply
  362. Carmen on

    My grandmother grew beautiful delphiniums many years ago when I was a child. Today, I cut my first bloom from my own plant!

    Reply
  363. Alexa on

    Mock orange. The smell is heavenly, and I’m always impressed how long it lasts in the vase.

    Reply
  364. Jessica Rosenberry on

    I love my bearded iris ‘. My Grandmother always had them and I still have one from her garden. They range in all colors and always bloom for me in the spring.

    Reply
  365. Stephanie Hough on

    What a beautiful book – it looks like inspiration galore!

    Reply
  366. Becky Walstead on

    I received a start of a weigela years ago. Every year I am so amazed at the color and beauty of it!

    Reply
  367. Denise Thanepohn on

    Lily of the valley is one of my favorites. The ones I have are my great grandmother’s stock which grew at the side of her house in Illinois. I never knew her, but I often visited my great aunt who lived in that house. I picked them every spring for her and my Mom. I still can see my grubby hands gently sliding up the flower so it didn’t break. The scent is wonderful and means early summer to me now that I live in Alaska. Perennials are truly the gift that keeps on giving. Two of my children have recently bought their first houses and I’ve promised them both some of Great Grandma Helene’s lily of the valley. And the tradition continues…

    Reply
  368. Charisa on

    Something is just so charming to me about Hellebores. They bring beauty at a time I seem to need it most!

    Reply
  369. Mary G on

    I love peonies, the many bvarieties , the beautiful fragrances. I wish they would last all summer long!
    Hydrangeas are a close second, with the variety of colors.

    Reply
  370. Lindsey Gunsauls on

    My favorite perennials are my David Austin roses! They just do something for my soul <3

    Reply
  371. Miriam on

    As a child, I loved my grandmother’s flowers, especially the bridal spirea and the mock orange. Now, I love the panicle hydrangeas in summer and fall.

    Reply
  372. Jennifer Shirar on

    This year I added scabiosa to my garden and I am slightly obsessed. They are so sweet and make such a lovely posy.

    Reply
  373. Michelle Brodsky on

    Hydrangeas are one of my favorite perennials. There are so many varieties and colors. My mother-in-law has a huge white that has blooms the size of a volleyball.

    Reply
  374. Melanie Stallings on

    I love hydrangeas as part of a beautiful arrangement. I’m looking forward to devouring this book.

    Reply
  375. Gerry G. on

    It is difficult to choose one perennial but I will choose peonies. So many varieties, gorgeous long lasting blooms, low maintenance and a very long lasting plant that gets better every year.

    Reply
  376. Judith Garlick on

    Shortly we will be leaving our beautiful farm and moving to an urban property more suitable to 3 generations of our family; at mid-seventy this seems like an adventure still. Today I indulged in the clipping of a huge jar of Winter Sweet (Chimonanthus praecox), inspired by your interview with Rachael. The kitchen smells divine. The tall shrub shows no sign of it’s trim. The glass jar full of bare branches with lemony brown buds and almost translucent cream flowers looks spectacular on the black granite bench.

    Reply
  377. Alison Densley on

    I love lupine! They don’t bloom for long but their flowers are so beautiful.

    Reply
  378. Dolly Perry on

    My favorite is the Mock Orange in my front yard. But I also love Lilacs and Forcythia.

    Reply
  379. Sheila on

    Right now I am obsessed with roses. I love the scents, colors, varieties of bloom style and size, and much more. I also enjoy the lavender around some of my roses, too, for the complementary colors and scents. So many more wonderful plants and that’s what’s in my viewfinder this week.

    Reply
  380. Michele A. on

    My favorite shrub is my doublefile viburnum. It’s very old and so elegant. In bloom, she’s a showstopper.

    t

    Reply
  381. Heather on

    My favorite Perennial is the one currently in bloom! There are too many to pick just one. This book sounds dreamy and full of wisdom and knowledge. Which will help me and many other to expand our flower farms

    Reply
  382. Jeanine L. on

    For the past couple of weeks I have been enjoying feverfew and Campanula poscharskyana together – the blue and white looks fresh and crisp, just right for this early summer season, and they have lasted a couple of weeks in the vase. And they both are easy perennials to grow and propagate.

    Reply
  383. Colleen Lopez on

    This year I discovered a perennial named “Astilbe”
    I’ve planted two of these and her light pink spires are so beautiful and fit lovely into my sweet little garden. Im very excited that she will bloom year after year.
    Colleen Lopez
    Zone 9

    Reply
  384. Sarah on

    One favorite is Philadelphus ‘Belle Etoile’

    Reply
  385. Rebecca Herzfeld on

    My favorite perennial is the camellia, but not for the flowers. The leafy branches make long-lasting greenery that provide a structural background for all types of flowers. If cut on the diagonal, slit at the bottom, and kept in water with flower food, the cuttings can last for several weeks and used for two or three arrangements. In the winter I have also picked branches with buds on them and put them in a vase. The evergreen leaves look great, and the flowers will slowly open and bloom inside when nothing else is flowering.

    Reply
  386. Stacy Stewart on

    Hello! So excited to read this book. My favorite perennial is delphinium. 😊

    Reply
  387. Kim on

    Love this so much, so inspiring! Can’t wait to read ideas for planning my perennial garden🪻

    Reply
  388. Deborah Carman on

    My favorite plant right now is persicaria. It’s like an exclamation mark with gorgeous leaves.

    Reply
  389. Elissa Arnold on

    New Love Clematis shrub, Clematis heracleifolia,
    is a beauty and adds such a lovely touch to the garden.
    The purple-blue blooms are stunning. The perennial
    is even better than the vine variety because it forms a
    bushy, upright silhouette that is self-supporting.
    A true gem❣️🎊🎉🌿🎊🎉🌿🎊🎉

    Reply
  390. Josie on

    One of my favorite perennials is Roses! Love them so much and this year they are just pumping out the blooms!!

    Reply
  391. Vannessa Osbourn on

    Peonies are my favorite perennial to use in arrangements. Sometimes you only need one!!

    Reply
  392. Anna Berry on

    I’m so excited for this book! I have an entire 1/4 acres of my property that I’ve decided to plant with shrubs and flowering trees. I’m eager for guidance and ideas. This books looks like just the think I need!

    Reply
  393. Ann on

    The first favorite that comes to mind is a peony. My Mom had pink and white ones in the back yard when I was growing up and the smell was just heavenly! I remember sitting and watching the ants busily climbing all over the blooms. Would love to have some for my yard some day! Favorite shrub would be the lilac. It’s another wonderful smell that triggers childhood memories and I am fortunate to have several in my yard.

    Reply
  394. Mike A on

    My favorite perennial “this season” has been yarrow. It grows so upright and blooms for such a long time. If I am lucky I can get a second late season burst. It self seeds well also. Works really well for filling in a flower bed over time.

    Reply
  395. Laura Brunk on

    My favorite perennial are my purple coneflowers. Not a lot of fuss and it’s fun to see the goldfinches ear the seeds. Missouri 6b

    Reply
  396. Jane on

    I love hellebores in the early spring. Ice and Roses is my new favorite hellebore.

    Reply
  397. Karen on

    My favorite for years has been hydrangeas. I also have grown to love peonies as well. Both of these plants have many different varieties and colors of flowers. This book looks beautiful!!

    Reply
  398. Becky on

    I love perennials and your arrangements are so earthy I love them, looking forward to getting ahold of your book,

    Reply
  399. Daisy Henderson on

    My favorite perennial is a Malvaviscus arboreus, aka Turks Cap. It’s native to North Texas, and I love it because it’s such a fast growing shrub that has the cutest little red blooms that attract hummingbirds, and it comes back every spring even during our coldest winters.

    Reply
  400. Karen Turner on

    My favorite is a peony…any peony…I love every one of them but especially my first 3 as they were a gift from my Grandmother 43 years ago. Now we have 250 in our yard, 70 varieties. About 40 of them are in our germination beds, ready to be gifted or sold at our valley wide plant sale. The plant sale proceeds support our elementary school pollinator gardens and a college student scholarship fund.

    I have been doing ‘peony rescues’ for about 30 years. Folks call me to come dig them from the churches, barns, yards, farms…usually due to construction projects. I dig them, divide and pot them for the plant sale. My neighbors are the recipients of some but after so many years their beds are full and their family’s bed are full. But there are always a few new neighbors, it’s a great way to make friends…’want any peonies?’…it’s a rare birds that declines. 🥰

    Reply
  401. Renee Link on

    yarrow is native plant (for my region), grows easily, holds up well and offers a complimentary fill to nearly any arrangement.

    smoke bush and nine bark are unique and generous.

    Reply
  402. Mechel Wall on

    I have been blown away with my Purple Poppy Mallow. I planted it in a full sun berm and it’s covered about a 6×6 area. With a new landscape at our new build, plants that perform well are a blessing when everything else is small and immature.

    Reply
  403. Cheryl on

    I love my mock orange bush. It reminds me of a special time during my childhood, when my mom and I were able to move from a decrepit, scary old house to an adorable and freshly redecorated little home in a small nearby town. A huge mock orange bush reigned over the gorgeous garden in the back yard. That was the beginning of happier times for our little family.

    Reply
  404. Katrina Kaufman on

    I am by no means a seasoned flower grower at the age of 65, but I am a seasoned flower lover! I’ve always had a flower garden for as long as I can remember but since retiring, I have been inspired to start planting cut flowers. I got a late start here in Indiana as I was busy in the spring moving my mom from TN to IN to live with me. We had to leave behind her 40 year old rose bush which broke my heart! 💔 Someday I want to start growing roses here. Right now, my pride & joy is my Smooth white hydrangeas! They remind me of snow in summer! I am learning how to cut them so my mom can enjoy them in her bedroom! I LOVE “Growing Floret”!

    Reply
  405. Emily T. on

    What a beautiful book! I would say hydrangeas and forsythias are my favorite!

    Reply
  406. Cristin on

    My three year old baptisia burst at the seams this Spring; I think it might be my new favorite. In the summer, my Henry Eilers Rudbeckia gives and gives, and then gives some more! To me and to the pollinators 💛
    This new book looks divine!

    Reply
  407. Jocelyn Delong on

    It’s hard to decide on a favourite but maybe because it is blooming in my garden now, I love Mock Orange. The smell is amazing and it takes me back to my childhood growing up on a small hobby farm with parent who were gardeners. I’ve just discovered that I can add it to my bouquets.

    Reply
  408. Veronika on

    Is extremely difficult to choose just one favorite! My current favorites are delphinium, lilac, and hollyhock.

    Thank you for bringing this beautiful book to our attention, and for all the resources you provide! 🌺

    Reply
  409. Meagan Rossi on

    Hard to pick a favorite – I love roses, they remind me of gardening with my mom and Pake (grandpa). Peonies are a challenge for me and very frustrating but I am going to keep working on them hah. I also have a hydrangea tree that I planted in honor of my dad after he passed that is special. I want to add in some lilac shrubs and climbing roses next!

    Reply
  410. Lyn Bonham on

    I love gardenias and hydrangeas. I have just started gardening this year, at age 66, and it is bringing me such peace and joy. I feel a deep connection to my grandmother when I am working in the garden. I would love to use this book as a beautiful resource to brighten my garden!

    Reply
  411. Susan Martin on

    I was given 5 alstroemeria seeds 30 years ago. Just beginning to garden then …I didn’t know what those seeds would become. I have not seen this variety anywhere … the yummiest coral, peachy pink with yellow eyes on 3’ sturdy stems. They last two weeks as a cut flower.
    Now a modest flower farmer … they are in the earliest bouquets sold in front of my home. All proceeds are donated to local charities (last year $12,000)
    My annual gardens are now filled with Floret delights. People go crazy over these unique bouquets! It is so fun to see the happiness the $10 bouquets bring.
    Total full circle experience. I get to do what I love … and people get fantastic generous bouquets.
    Meals on Wheels and Animal Services are the beneficiaries. I feel 🍀 lucky to be living this life.
    Thanks Erin
    ⭕️❌ Sue Martin Olympia WA

    Reply
  412. Jody on

    I love my lemon verbena shrub. Whenever I walk by it I have to grab the leaves and run them through my fingers then inhale the fragrance. So wonderful!

    Reply
  413. Rachel C on

    I finally got some peony blooms this year, so I would call those my current favorites!

    Reply
  414. Teri on

    We had huge viburnum snowball bushes growing along the fence of my childhood home, and I just planted some in my own yard this year.

    Reply
  415. Anna on

    Thank you for sharing – the book looks gorgeous. I will never grow weary of beautiful books on floriculture. Currently my favorite (and one I don’t see anyone talking about for arrangements is Baptisia (False Indigo). The leaves are spectacular with a super long vase life. They’re a nitrogen fixing perennial native to central/eastern North America and a workhorse in the garden and earlier bloomer than many others. Their lupine-like flowers are beloved by bumblebees and they create super unique black pods in late fall that persist through winter. Hope others will enjoy her and fall in love like I have!

    Reply
  416. Dusan Clark on

    So many options, but my current favorites are roses, peonies, and hydrangeas.

    Reply
  417. kat on

    I have so many favorites that show off their beauty, but I look forward to the blooming of my Lenten Rose in early spring in Michigan.
    That first of the year, coming up in the snow, peeking out of their last years sheltering leaves helps me know that Spring is finally on its way.
    Plus the blooms last into the start of Summer.

    Reply
  418. Sherrie Young on

    My favorite is the lilac because of the fragrance! I think including it in a bouquet adds character to the bouquet, even when it is just in bud.

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  419. Lisa B on

    That’s a tough one, but having just wrapped up peony season, I would have to say peonies.

    Reply
  420. Lori Christian on

    I typically swoon over whatever is in bloom. This week my favorites are Campanula ‘Pink Octopus’ for its whimsical blooms and Campanula punctata x trachelium ‘Sarastro’ for its phenomenal color.

    Reply
  421. Stephanie on

    My absolute favorite perennial in my garden are the Sunset Hyssop/Agastache rupestris. They smell wonderful and attract all the hummingbirds and bees.

    Reply
  422. Amie on

    I love delphiniums, Gillenia, Henry eilers, and smoke bush

    Reply
  423. Mary on

    Roses! I love the smell of them and all the beautiful colors. My grandfather had a rose garden when I was growing up and they always remind me of him and his garden.

    Reply
  424. Rachel Webb on

    Definitely daffodils.. I always know spring is right around the corner when I see them coming up! The earth is warming up from its winter nap!

    Reply
  425. Brie Quinn on

    My favorite perennials currently are herbs – sage, oregano, rosemary. They are often overlooked in the cut flower space, but they can be very popular design elements plus they all smell amazing! Additionally I love dogwood for woodies. My neighbor has a patch and it looks so pretty in the summer with its variegated leaves, and is so bright in the dull Maine winters when they are the fiery red sticks! Can’t wait to add some to my production.

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  426. Cathy Baker on

    My absolute favorite flower is the peony – its beauty and fragrance – yet such a tough plant. This article really spoke to me because my biggest gardening challenge is doing it all by myself and never being able to get to everything I wish to accomplish. The perennial is most certainly an aid on that front (something that can be done much better with flowers than with edibles !)

    Reply
  427. Ashley Bowes on

    Oh so many to choose from but if I had to choose, it would be snap dragons I love the way they open up and look like little fairy flowers 😍

    Reply
  428. Ann Kerker on

    My favorite perennial is Clematis, it’s the gift that keeps on giving year after year….I never tire of all the beautiful colors!!

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  429. Tracy Gartner on

    I’d have to say the lilac! The smell takes me back to childhood, picking them for my mum & making “perfume” with them by filling a little glass bottle with water & their flowers 💜

    Reply
  430. Carol on

    Not much of a gardener but feel myself getting pulled in to flower gardening by all the lovely inspiration Erin and her team provide.

    Reply
  431. Stacie Bettinson on

    I have several varieties of Hydrangea in my yard and love bringing them in for bouquets from July to October. They last quite a while in the vase and even love them dried thru the fall. The huge Limelights are probably my favorite.

    Reply
  432. Kalynne Gray on

    My favorite perennial is my daylily. I bought it for my grandma for her 80th birthday and gave it to her in a pot. About a year later, she asked me to take it and plant it in my garden. A few months later she passed away and when it bloomed in my garden later that spring, I felt like I was so connected to her. The next spring (May 29, 2023), this daylily had its first bloom of the season, on her birthday. She is always there with me, in my garden. After her birthday, I bought a couple more daylilies and they have been putting on a show!

    Reply
  433. Autumn on

    My favorite right now is my butterfly bush! It’s in full bloom and so fragrant! The bright pink flowers are so beautiful. They just make me happy!

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  434. KP on

    I love blue vervain, sedum, and mostly my oregano when it flowers

    Reply
  435. Sandra Zendner on

    My favorite? Oh depends on the season. I do love lavender though. Especially the taller varieties that soert of wave in the breeze.

    Reply
  436. Megan on

    Hydrangeas, hydrangeas, hydrangeas!!

    Reply
  437. Kathleen Clemons on

    Seeing my grandmother’s Peonies open each year at my home brings me great joy, grateful for her legacy plants.

    Reply
  438. Catherine Thorne on

    Today my favorite is the mock orange bush growing outside my dining room, where its aroma wafts in through the window. Heavenly!! 💫

    Reply
  439. Amber on

    Peonies are so beautiful and I love the fragrance.

    Reply
  440. Monica DeMars on

    I would love to check out this new resource and wealth of knowledge from Rachel. I have a very small garden and I love cut flowers. So incorporating perennials that do both is the goal. I love hydrangeas, roses, lavender and peonies. Great blog! Thanks

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  441. Johanna George on

    Liatris! I planted 50 bulbs last year and wish it had been 500 with how wonderfully they have come up and multiplied this year! P.s. pick me,please!

    Reply
  442. Deb Moss on

    I have been growing Milkweed for the last three years. The first year the plants did not produce any flowers or pods. Last year there were a few more and the runners pretty much took over my little flower bed. In the spring this year I pulled and cut stems that I did not want. I now have these beautiful flowers with the sweetest aroma. The bees and loving it. And I saw my first butterfly today. Hoping for a few monarch butterflies this year. I also have a stand of Tiger Lillies that I started four years ago. I just love these beauties.

    Reply
  443. Denise on

    Again, the flower, and stem rules, teaches and inspires. To keep going, moving through dreams and visions of our own.

    Reply
  444. Kayla on

    My favorite is peonies for sure! But there are so many good ones and I am excited to keep learning more!

    Reply
  445. Kathleen Palanca on

    Hi Erin, thanks for this giveaway and opportunity to share my love for Roses! I’ve been growing them in containers – about 21 and adding a few more heritage. It has been an adventure to track down discontinued David Austin varieties and learning old garden roses. I absolutely adore them – their colour, fragrance and form, its winter now in Australia and can’t wait for rose season.

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  446. Joanne Fetting on

    My mood changes season to season and year to year. This year some favorites are hellebores, lupines and foxgloves

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  447. Maggie Kaiser on

    So hard to choose! Peonies and lilacs! I hope to expand with more perennials next season.

    Reply
  448. Angela Good on

    Native Azaleas are my favorite plant of any type. I planted 13 where we last lived, in the Florida panhandle. We have returned to Memphis and I have plans to tuck them into every corner of our small walled backyard. Watching them bloom every spring is one of the greatest joys of gardening for me. I love the airy form of their branches and the small amount of space that they take up. The fragrance of Florida Flame is amazing.

    Reply
  449. Carrie on

    I love lavender, peonies and black-eyed susans. Each of these fill me with a sense of calm and contentment. I often divide my black-eyed susans and share them with family and friends.

    Reply
  450. Sarah B. on

    I love hydrangeas! Hydrangeas are so low maintenance and are beautiful as a stand alone flowers or with other flowers.

    Reply
  451. Catherine Rousselle on

    Peonies and lilacs, because I mean, THE SMELL. And bonus, they look amazing.

    Reply
  452. Susie Tollstrup on

    Oh what fun! I’m anxious to widen my scope when it comes to perennial flowers and shrubs. My favorite perennial? Probably my David Austin Roses, particularly the Eden climber. Planted late last season along a picket fence, they have performed exceptionally this year and surround my raised beds. My own garden of “Eden”!

    Reply
  453. Jane on

    I love so many perennials but some of my favorites are echinacea, peonies, climbing roses, oh and foxgloves!! So beautiful!! I’m curious if the book references the zones the perennials work in, I feel like England is very different than Vermont.

    Reply
  454. Rhonda Niblett on

    My favorites are lavender and peonies. Due to harsh winters here in Montana I like the idea of perennials and shrubs. We have such a short growing season often that the most bang in the shortest time is valuable. I also like the more wild and earthy arrangements when incorporating plantings other than the traditional flowers for arrangements. Thank you for the nice interview.

    Reply
  455. Patty on

    I had the most gorgeous blue spirea shrub and it was my baby but I lost it it this year and I don’t know why so now I need something to replace it this book woukd be a great addition in helping me to that ..anything I can plant and cut is a winner for me .

    Reply
  456. Kelly McNeill on

    My absolute favorite are my grandmother’s calla lilies. I moved them many many years ago and mistakenly covered them with silage tarp. I never marked where I planted them so I just knew I had killed them because they never appeared again for years. But this year, they have reappeared in the old spot and the place I replanted them in. My Nana’s flowers are absolutely beautiful!!!!

    Reply
  457. Lindsay on

    My favorite perennial is yarrow – I love the delicate flowers and the airiness it brings in a bouquet!

    Reply
  458. Nancy on

    Ten years ago I moved from the coastal area of California to the mountains of northwest Arizona. I now live at 5,500 feet altitude in zone 6b. To my delight my beloved roses grow well in this area and I have 36 bushes. However, I have discovered a new perennial that grows extremely well in this dry mountain climate that I have come to love. It is salvia. There are so many amazing colors from purple to red and orange and they bloom profusely all summer. I am always amazed at how they come back every spring stronger and larger than before. If you cut them back to the ground after the first flush they arise victoriously and give you more glorious blooms. A true winner

    Reply
  459. Lindsay on

    Mophead hydrangeas are a perennial that I grew up with, seeing it everywhere on Long Island, NY. My aunt is somewhat of a hydrangea whisperer and grows many of them in her small garden. It is for sure a fairy perennial to me.

    Reply
  460. Randi Pratini on

    Kerria japonica stirs my fancy as well as so many others fancies whom I share it with.

    Reply
  461. Judith on

    My favorite shrub is the forsythia. Not really for aesthetic reasons–although yellow is one of my favorite colors, and it is particularly welcome as one of the first signs of Spring–but for very sentimental reasons. I lived for years in coastal Southern California, where there was insufficient chill for it. But now I live in Northern Texas. I planted it the first autumn I lived here.It’s thriving, and this Spring I brought some delicate branches into my home. I’ll stop now. I might cry.

    Reply
  462. Clare on

    I love to use the old rose families in an arrangement- species, gallicas, albas, noisettes and damasks to add fragrance.

    Reply
  463. Stephinie on

    I’m not sure I can pick a favorite, but I’m currently burrying my nose in every peony and putting giant blooms in every room in the house! Definitely excited about this book as I’m currently designing some large new perennial beds on our farm!

    Reply
  464. Rebecca on

    Hellebores are absolutely lovely!

    Reply
  465. Kate on

    Peonies, hydrangeas and roses!! ❤️

    Reply
  466. Debbie Dorst on

    My favorite bush is Cotinus ( smoke tree) . It adds such amazing color and interest to arrangements!

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  467. Danielle on

    Smokebush is so interesting and beautiful, it’s definitely one of my top 3 favorites. This book sounds like a must have for all gardeners!

    Reply
  468. Bethany on

    One of my favorite bushes lately has been my pussy willow. It is so prolific and I love the greenery it puts off. It adds a great depth and fullness to a bouquet!

    Reply
  469. MaryBeth Brandt-Mailhot on

    I love flowering quince. When I was a little girl, we always included small branches of them in the May baskets we delivered to friends. I’m trying to collect cuttings from the bushes at my mothers’s home. She passed this last year and the bushes are so huge, I can’t imagine trying to move them.

    Reply
  470. Mendy Pelster on

    What a wonderful idea for a book! I can’t wait to read it. There are so many to love but gardenia, hydrangea, and crape myrtle are some that I love. Beyond that, my newest addition is curly red willow and it is beautiful and prolific. I could go on but apparently can’t pick just one.

    Reply
  471. anne on

    Daffodils are my absolute favorite.

    Reply
  472. Cathy Roche on

    My favourite is magnolia fairy blush for floral arrangements all year round. Gorgeous with just leaves, flower buds before opening, flowering and after flowers. No maintenance oh and the little waxeye birds love it.

    Reply
  473. Stephany Bryant on

    Favorite shrub is nandina bush used for greenery. Favorite perennial is phlox.

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  474. Cindy Conner on

    What a beautiful book❤️
    My heart swoons every spring at the sight of lemon yellow Forsythia when it is paired with coral flowering Quince. The colors together are like a gift as the garden comes to life. I like them best when they’re allowed to grow wildly out of control.

    Reply
  475. Gwen Van Netten on

    One of my favourites is ligularia. There’s a type for all gardens, be it sun, part sun or shade. The purple leaves add a wonderful colour impact as well.

    Reply
  476. Karla on

    My favorites are always changing, sometimes daily, today my favorite is baptisia…

    Reply
  477. Nancy Duran on

    I love peonies and lilacs. Both come and go so quickly, but I sure enjoy them when they’re here!

    Reply
  478. Danee on

    Im in Zone 6A in Michigan. My favorite perennial? I absolutely love hellebores. I had planted two at our old house and I now realize they weren’t getting something they need because it took 5 years for them to do much. We moved two years ago and I planted 12 new ones and they were prolific this year. I am thrilled that most of them have beautiful flowers still. I wanted to pick them so badly but my kitty eats everything I bring in. I decided a nice shelf that is higher than she can reach is the answer for next year.

    Reply
  479. Natalie Larson on

    I love any type of rose! I have a hard time getting them to thrive!

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  480. Amy on

    Love so many, but have a growing love of hellebores and how amazing they make an arrangement!

    Reply
  481. Amber Doig on

    What a marvelous interview. Thank you for putting this beautiful flower story on your blog. I have many favorites, don’t we all? If I have to select one woody, it is woody sage for fragrance, strength and color. My all time favorite perennial has to be Shasta Daisy,.

    Reply
  482. Katherine Morin on

    My favorite perennial is echinacea. I love it in all its shapes and colors. I am starting a collection for cold climates on my land. I can’t wait to discover all the varieties adapted to my climate.

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  483. K McG on

    Lavender is my favorite. The smell and color and stately beauty.

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  484. Karen Risser on

    Rachel’s book speaks to me. I have always loved the textures of the out-of-the-ordinary plants to incorporate into arrangements. Most folks are surprised by the unusual.
    Thank you Rachel for your dedication to growing and perseverance in writing a book to share with all of us!

    Reply
  485. Rebecca Hammond on

    My favorites are lilacs and peonies. They were both favorites of my Gran, who passed on her love of flowers and plants to me. Luckily, I got her green thumb, too!

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  486. Anna on

    I love cotinus!

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  487. Bonnie Doane on

    Bonnie Doane June 20th 2023

    I have so many favorites, but “Rockin Playin’ The Blues” Salvia longispicata x farinacea is right up there with the best. It is easy care, blooms
    profusely. It hangs on to it’s flower petals for a very long time. Very showy in the garden.

    Reply
  488. Margie Harper on

    It’s hard for me to choose my favorite! I have been unable to do my gardens this year because of an injury that happened while tending to our Koi pond.
    I happen to come across your program and haven’t stopped watching. I went through season one on a Saturday and loved everything about what you do.

    Looking forward to many more episodes and plan on ordering seeds and other items from your site.
    Than you for sharing your family and your passion with all of us garden lovers.

    Reply
  489. Annie Cohen on

    My favourite perennial is Verbena Bonariensis, I bought three plants to interweave among my tall grasses at the back of my front verandah border, only to find a few weeks later that the 300 Acre farm my husband and I had just bought on semi arid land in western NSW, Australia, is absolutely packed with these beauties!

    Anyhow- I love it so much that “wasting” the money on them wasn’t even slightly painful. And now I get to enjoy endless fields of purple through most of the summer, gently waving in the breeze.

    Reply
  490. Michele Paciunas on

    Wow! I am reading these 1500 ( so far!) comments and writing a list! So many are new to me. I agree it is impossible to pick a favorite but hydrangeas are pretty amazing!
    Erin I tried your boiling water trick the other day for some “Limelite “ that I needed for a wedding- amazing! Whoever discovered such a thing??
    Thank you so much for your generosity and all the knowledge you share. I will be looking for Rachel’s book and enjoyed the interview!

    Reply
  491. Nancy Lucas on

    I’m currently enjoying our hydrangeas here in the Sacramento area…but the gardenias may win over because of their intoxicating perfume! Too hard to choose a fave perennial💜

    Reply
  492. Lea on

    So hard to pick one favorite! I would have to say tulips. Love seeing them pop up after a long winter.

    Reply
  493. Charlotte on

    Goodness so many favorite perennials but my newly discovered perennial is Baptisia! I absolutely love the foliage and the gorgeous purple flowers that the gigantic bumblebees must find intoxicating! My mom and I just visited a botanical garden and that’s where we discovered there are all different colors of Baptisia! I’m thinking my next color to add to my garden is Pink Lemonade!

    Reply
  494. E. Lorraine Thomas on

    One of my favorite perennials are the hollyhocks. These beautiful, stately flowers really makes my garden pop!

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  495. Lynda Dorrington on

    Rachel and Erin, thank you for being so inspirational and generous with your knowledge. I garden in Australia and while weather is a constant challenge, wildlife runs a close second. It has taken time to find the middle ground between growing and sharing a percentage of everything with the critters that call the garden home. I love lilacs and daphne for the richness they bring to winter and early spring with roses, hydrangea and dahlias filling the summer months with shrubs like viburnums’, crepe myrtle and smokebush for their unique flowers and autumn foliage. Having recently retired, I’m finally doing what I was always meant to do…I’m a fulltime gardener.

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  496. Tracy Teed on

    Hydrangeas!! Its always been hydrangeas!

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  497. Andrea on

    Camellias are my favorite perennial because when mine unfurl their petals on the bush, I am transported to my childhood and watching my mother float the beautiful, bright pink blossoms in low crystal bowls filled with water and candles. Flowers are powerful memory holders. ❤️

    Reply
  498. Natalia on

    The photograph with the pale coneflower really caught my eye. When I see a flower arrangement with echinacea is the echinacea purpurea and not the echinacea pálida, which lives in the garden longer than purpurea. I mostly make arrangements for myself from my own garden/backyard and mostly use perennials that are blooming at the time, so a book that is all about using perennials as cut flowers seems fascinating.

    Reply
  499. Erin on

    Lilacs have always been my favorite because they remind me of my childhood and make me think of my mom and her bright purple kitchen! The smell never fails to perk up my spirit.

    Reply
  500. Jane warner on

    I have to choose forsythia as it was the first blooming spring shrub. Coming from Buffalo , New York it was such a welcoming sign of new life after a long, cold winter. Covered with snow, it still survived the elements. We also used to take cuttings inside and it was easily forced into blooming. Just loved it’s bright yellow flowers!

    Reply
  501. Betsy Walbridge on

    I love the concept of using predominantly perennials and woody plants for arranging. As I shift my garden cutting garden to sustainablity and helping pollinators I am looking to follow her approach.

    Reply
  502. Allison Fraker on

    Favorite perennial is the peony and I love to research and share it’s age. Love to share with folks that the plant can live for decades, something to share with your children’s children! Her book sounds exactly like what I need. Thank you for the many resources!

    Reply
  503. Linda Asberry on

    The book looks amazing!
    My favorite has to be lilacs, my grandmother had them in her yard and whenever I smell a lilac it reminds me of her and takes me back to my childhood.
    We now live on the family farm and still have some of her lilacs that I treasure.

    Reply
  504. Milya on

    My favorite shrub has always been Ceanothus, or California lilac. Love the bluish purple color of the flowers and love that it makes the bees happy! Salvia is a close second for much the same reason!

    Reply
  505. Christina on

    Lavender is my fav perennial…relaxing scent and pretty textural spires that I sneak into our kitchen bouquets. Excited for this book!

    Reply
  506. Jennifer Hawke on

    I would love this book!
    My favorite perennials to use in bouquets are roses, delphinium, spirea, mint, agastache, and yarrow.

    Reply
  507. Amie on

    Cliche perhaps but my little Lilac ‘tinkerbell’ is such a treat every spring!

    Reply
  508. Heather Bright on

    I am looking at the beautiful picture of flowers, trees, shrubs, and arrangements wondering what’s the names of these beauties. Some I have never seen before. I want to grow them and I am fascinated about Rachel’s book. I want to learn as much as possible for my flower farm I just started last year. I hope to read this book soon.

    Thank you so much for continuing to share your knowledge of the flower farming would. I have learn so much already from your post, blogs, Facebook, YouTube, and classes. I hope to continue learning for years to come.

    Reply
  509. Antigone Smith on

    Currently have a huge crush on smoke bushes, especially in the dark chocolatey tones! Great addition to a more ephemeral arrangement.

    Reply
  510. Kathleen on

    I love the Eden Climber Rose. It is resilient in or hot summer months and has a gorgeous display of roses in spring.

    Reply
  511. Olivia on

    I love the idea of letting your garden walk inspire your arrangements! I can’t wait to get my hands on this book.

    Reply
  512. Cindy McCormick on

    My favorite perennial today is agastache. I love the variety of colors and sizes of the blooms. It has a long bloom life and the humming birds go crazy over it!
    My favorite shrub had to be viburnum…all varieties. So many leaf textures, colors and flowers.

    Reply
  513. Pheigi Sughara Macdonald on

    Living in Japan spring is all about the cherry blossom but I much prefer the plum blossom which come out about a month before and are a much deeper pink colour which really pops out against the bare dark branches and tells us that winter is really over. My favourite micro season is: Kawazu Hajimete Naku – frogs start singing.

    Reply
  514. Lee Ann Beckwith on

    So many beautiful options! My favorite has to be hydrangeas. I love all varieties and
    Get excited to see them bloom. I love using them in floral arrangements. One of my favorite to see bloom is my climbing hydrangea and its beautiful lacey blooms. Thank you for
    This opportunity.

    Reply
  515. Helen Brown on

    My favorite in my garden is the purple Cootamundra wattle, Acacia baileyana ‘Purpurea. It’s foliage is absolutely stunning but unfortunately it doesn’t flower for me here in Queensland Australia as it is not cold enough but it buds up beautifully and along with the purple silver foliage is just stunning.

    Reply
  516. Donna on

    My favorite perennial is a 12 inch day lily/trumpet lily called Happy Returns. My brother who has a garden center calls this pale yellow beauty Happy Faces because it makes people smile.
    I have a row of these at the front of our lawn that reappears every spring and lasts until November. Having never really thought of myself as a gardener, I realize now that I love to grow beautiful plants and carefully plan containers year after year to complement the garden. I guess I am a gardener.

    Reply
  517. Andrea on

    I don’t have one specific favorite perennial. Each is great at filling its little niche in the garden. Currently, the baptisia is a favorite, but last week the peonies were! And maybe the daylilies in the coming weeks will be next! Can’t wait to get my hands on this book.

    Reply
  518. Andrea on

    My favorites are peonies and grasses – so much color and texture with both!

    Reply
  519. Rebecca Bolton on

    “I’m a plant addict.”
    Pretty much sums it up.❤

    Reply
  520. Kathleen Kennedy on

    I have a brides pearl or brides bouquet that I know is at least a hundred years old. My neighbors all get some of this glorious bounty early in spring. Every year I say I will root cuttings so I can ensure it continues to make people happy. Note to self, root cuttings.
    Kathleen Kennedy [email protected]

    Reply
  521. Michelle on

    Lupines! Shrub would be Huckleberries (a native here). It has such delicate looking leaves (of course the berries are yummy too) :)

    Reply
  522. Jeanne on

    I love calycanthus and I think my favorite shrub is hydrangea and all types colors and shapes, I just can’t get enough of them. They look so great with Dahlias at the summers end!

    Reply
  523. Heidi on

    I love including raspberry branches in my bouquets. They last a long time in the vase and there are so many sprouts to use.

    Reply
  524. Janet Mandeville on

    Here in the Pacific Northwest I have discovered how wonderful my honeysuckle plant does in my flower arrangements. The sweet smell is always an added bonus. The draping of the stems adds to the fullness of the arrangement. Blooms every year and attracts many bees and hummingbirds pollinators.

    Reply
  525. Roxane Rolon on

    My favorite flowers are delphiniums and my favorite shrubs are hydrangeas. I love blue flowers the most along with soft pinks and lavender shades. Another favorite of mine are coneflowers. They come in such beautiful colors like orange, red, and hot pink. Of course it’s not easy to choose just one.

    Reply
  526. Sarah Griner on

    I love peonies. The burst of color is gorgeous but you can also do so much with the beautiful, shiny green leaves

    Reply
  527. Pauline Keenoy on

    My favourites are the roses, which flower in abundance in my garden and are at their best in June. I grow a variety too numerous to mention but more recent additions are the English roses, Emily Bronte and Darcy Bussell, both from David Austin. One of the first one’s I planted was Gertrude Jekyll, sent as a replacement for the one I ordered which was out of stock. It’s been flowering it’s head off every summer for the best part of 30 years. I love to fill the house with bowls of the bright pink flowers, which are so beautiful and the scent is wonderful. Happy days.

    Reply
  528. Sherla Hecker on

    I’d have to say my all time Summer favorite for many, many years has been Echinacea (if I could ever learn to spell it right). I love that now I keep finding new color variations but the pink one will always be in my garden. Such a happy plant and the bees love em too.

    Reply
  529. Melissa Bokman Ermer on

    I have so many favorite shrubs I started on this farmed we moved to in 2018. The one worthy of mention here is Cephalanthus occidentalis or Buttonbush. It’s a native here and it’s finally ready this year for me to cut some stems for use in my designs! :) I love the white spiky flowers and it’s a pollinator favorite.

    Reply
  530. Frieda on

    Pink dog roses are my absolute childhood favourite. They were growing in the dunes at the beaches everywhere and I believe there is nothing better than the smell of the ocean and those roses combined. Unfortunately I have found myself relocated in Iceland and the harsh winds, cold and salt are doing my head in. I am glad I can always count on my aquilegia and lupins to return every year faithfully outside of my greenhouse oasis.

    Reply
  531. Gale Schwarb on

    I enjoy bleeding hearts for their long bloomtime and ferny foliage. I use both the stems of hanging blooms and the foliage in mixed bouquets from my garden.

    Reply
  532. Mary Collins-Lyman on

    Our favorite perennials are hellebores…..they never disappoint and are glorious right out of the gate when the last bit of snow melts. They seem to thrive in our gardens mo matter where we put them so every year we add more…….we just love them!!!!

    Reply
  533. Donna on

    I love the nine barks!! I took cuttings of the ones I have, to expand my plants!! I now have a couple dozen year old baby shrubs!! Thanks for the chance to win.

    Reply
  534. Susan on

    Hello! My name is Susan and since I was a young child my favorite Perennial is Black Eyed Susan. I grown it in Georgia where we live in the North Georgia. I would love a copy of your book. Thank you.

    Reply
  535. Kathleen Woods-Smith on

    I love Hydrangeas, any and all of them. When I lived in Alaska (37 years) it just wasn’t possible to have them for more than one season except in a pot. Now that I retired to the Olympic Peninsula of Washington, I can grow them in my garden. I love leaving the spent blossoms on the shrubs throughout the winter because the papery remnants are so beautiful. It is exciting to watch them come to life every spring.

    Reply
  536. Cheryl Mills on

    Well, it’s hard to chose one or two, but I love lilacs for the fragrance, and hellebores for winter bloom. So glad someone wrote a book on this subject as I am developing a garden where I can cut flowers and foliage for arrangements.

    Reply
  537. Rachelle B. on

    Such a stunning cover! Favorite woody shrub is the hydrangea! I hope it is in your book not remains a mystery to me! I also have started a small rose collection that has taken over my heart. ❤️

    Reply
  538. Rhoda on

    I love peonies. My grandmother had a deep magenta peony that she passed starts to any of her 56 grandchildren that wanted them. I just love seeing them grow in my cousins gardens.

    Reply
  539. Rhonda Chilton on

    It is hard to pick a favorite perennial or shrub. I would go between peonies and lilac bushes. I grew up in Iowa where both of these grew in abundance, but now live in the mountains of AZ and at our elevation, they struggle, but I still look forward to seeing what happens each spring with my AZ peonies and lilacs.

    Reply
  540. Dee on

    I love the colors of blues and purples so I love lavender and lilac plants

    Reply
  541. Sheila on

    What a valuable resource this book would be in my library. My favorite plant changes frequently but today it would be lavender. The scent is calming and magically to me.

    Reply
  542. Mary Menendez on

    Roses (particularly the old-fashioned ones) and Peonies… two of my favorites… a third favorite is hydrangeas… these flowers bring me happy memories and remind me of my youth and being a young mother!

    Reply
  543. Mary Richardson on

    Great interview!
    Right now I’m in love with my peonies, and the weather (drought) this year actually seemed to enhance their beauty because they didn’t droop and turn brown from excess water.

    Reply
  544. Jean on

    Thank you for posting the interview. The pictures were wonderful! One of my favorites is Echinacea. Any color!

    Reply
  545. Bobbie on

    I love Deutzia cut just before the bell shaped blooms open. I have two varieties, one from each of my grandmothers gardens. They are long lived, deer resistant, and drought tolerant.

    Reply
  546. Heather on

    I love peonies and lavender. LOVE. I’m currently working on converting our front yard into a wildlife and pollinator wonderland and am super excited to learn about other perennials.

    Reply
  547. Heather Herbay on

    One of my favorite perennials to grow in my garden is Mondarda Jacob Cline as it attracts hummingbirds to our garden and late in the day my husband and I enjoy sitting on our patio and watching them.

    Reply
  548. Amy on

    My current favorite perennial is scabiosa—it blooms here in NE Ohio from May through October and lasts for ages in a vase.

    Reply
  549. Sebastian Durán on

    What a lovely interview – thank you for sharing the generosity and inspiration!
    Nothing makes me happier than a good narcissus. Any colour, any shape. The joy they spark along with the hope of spring is immeasurable.

    Reply
  550. K on

    I’ve always grown food but this year is my first real dive into perennial flowers & shrubs. I lost my sister & mother last year & have been trying to go back in my memory archives to plant things that remind me of them. The pink daylily bulbs (300!) mom had us plant with serving spoons, the lemon balm that tried to take over the yard, and so many plants in the background of old photos I’m trying to identify. No favorites right now…well ok …maybe the foxgloves & icelandic poppies😊

    Reply
  551. Stacie on

    Oh there are so many good ones it’s hard to choose a favourite. I adore echinacea, but I’ve recently fallen in love with sanguisorba and Geum, I’m hoping that they grow well here in my Aussie garden.

    Reply
  552. Jacqui on

    For the last 7 years you have been my inspiration Erin-thank you with all my heart.
    Perennial chocolate cosmos is my favourite. It is a strong smaller plant which blooms prolifically and has the sweetest dark velvety bloom with a hint of chocolate perfume.

    Reply
  553. Sandra Wilkinson on

    How beautiful. I find all your knowledge and how your willing to share amazing. And now there is another amazing person willing to do the same. 🌸🌸🌸

    Reply
  554. Melissa Kane on

    It’s hard to focus in on one favorite but when pushed, I’d say baptisia. I love the spiky flower, especially when arranged with peonies that bloom at the same time in my garden. I also love using the foliage all summer long as a filler/accent

    Reply
  555. Samantha on

    Because they can be enjoyed throughout generations, the peony is my all-time favorite perennial. I am still cutting from the peonies that my father planted before he passed away 22 years ago when I was 14, and nothing brings me more joy than that. :)

    Reply
  556. Logan Stoltman on

    My favorite shrub right now is Hydrangea. There are so many wonderful colors & forms to chose from. I am eagerly adding a few new ones each season.

    Reply
  557. Julie Koster on

    I enjoy using rosemary in bouquets or tied to gift packages. Rosemary symbolizes remembrance and that makes it all the more special. I hope to learn so much more thru Rachel’s book.

    Reply
  558. Jessica on

    My favorite shrub for cutting is our native Mahonia aquifolium. Its early yellow flowers smell just divine! Once you take the prickly leaves off it will leave folks guessing as to what plant it came from. I always let the plants establish in gardens for quite a while (5+ years) before using them for cut flowers because they are valuable early pollinator plants when not much else is blooming in the garden.

    Reply
  559. Tonda Seyl on

    I am just getting started with flower arrangements. So far I love using my mountain mint in arrangements. It smells lovely and comes back every year and it’s a native plant in my zone 8b.

    Reply
  560. Jan Smith on

    My favourite flowering shrub is the camellia. They come in so many varieties, colours, and shapes. The foliage is just amazing for floral work, evergreen and long lasting. This fact also means structure and form during winter. Cheers Dunedin, NZ

    Reply
  561. Susan Cox on

    Primula denticulata would be at the top of my list, since they are usually some of the first blooming perennials in my garden. Countless other primroses do very well in our Southeast Alaska climate as well, blooming at different times throughout the summer.

    Reply
  562. Chris Braet on

    I suppose my favorite right now is the hydrangea. They are just coming on and I love the variety of colors and shapes of flowers and leaves. But, my favorite pastime is looking at weeds for the airy look in my bouquets!

    Reply
  563. Barb H. on

    Baptisia, false indigo, is one of my favorite perennials. It’s spring time beauty is unsurpassable and the foliage is so versatile all summer long!

    Reply
  564. Jolene Hitz on

    Right now my favorite is a Ruby Penstemon. The first of the summer flowers to bloom after a harsh winter at the 1,500’ level in western Oregon. It is so bright and beautiful. And the hummingbirds are ecstatic!

    Reply
  565. Amber Torline on

    As a child, I grew up loving my mothers hedge of spring peonies and to this day, it continues to be my favorite of all flowers. The double blossom white and pink are so beautiful and fragrant. I think the fact that you only get to enjoy these for a short time each year makes them that much special.

    Reply
  566. Kim on

    Thank you for sharing. Looks like a worthy addition to our garden Library.
    My favorite shrub is the sweet olive. The smell is enchanting and the greenery a perfect addition to floral arrangements.

    Reply
  567. Jacqui on

    I think my favorite has got to be Sage (Salvia). This little workhorse shrub blooms from Spring until Winter arrives. Add in a rejuvenating trim and she is off and at it again. They come in a million different colors and variations and are perfect in my drought prone part of California. I have so many different ones in my yard I cannot pick a favorite.

    Reply
  568. Jacque Healy on

    This winter I went to the home of a new friend for lunch. As we were cooking, I looked out the window and glimpsed a pale pink Camelia bush in abundant bloom against the barren muck of March—a vision of beauty amongst bleakness! It was…unforgettably spirit-lifting and taught me what power flowers have.

    Reply
  569. Wendy on

    I live in the Arctic and there are only a few perennials hardy enough to survive our harsh climate. Columbine is probably my favorite. It reseeds itself and surprises me with the different shades of blue/purple and creamy to bright yellow centers. I’ve never tried cutting them for a vase, I don’t know how to make them last longer than a day.

    Reply
  570. star walker on

    I really enjoyed the interview. I always struggle with what to choose for an arrangement.love the beautiful pictures. one of my favorite perennials. Is gooseneck
    loosestrife.

    Reply
  571. Sharon Alley on

    Wow! Perennials and Shrubs! I have been wanting more information about growing these, especially flowering shrubs and how to uae on arrangements. My favorite shrub is Weigela. My sweet gardening Granny planted one at the corner of her front porch. It spilled over the lawn and porch rail with these beautiful soft pink flowers. The branches were covered from top to bottom with what seemed like a million pink flowers. My Dad took care of her yard after she became ill. He would shave it bald and I would cry but in no time at all it would come roaring back.

    Reply
  572. Diane Lawrence on

    Red flowering current – I believe it is native to the PNW – is on my garden wish list. I love the bright & cheery blooms in the spring.

    Reply
  573. Katrin Noon on

    The Snowball Bush Viburnum would have to be one of my favorites. My Mom grew one in our backyard and it will forever remind me of her and her love of flowers which she thankfully passed down to me.
    Rachels book looks dreamy.

    Reply
  574. Susie Marglin on

    Having spent years as a florist and creating a garden as a source for my arrangements I understand how one moves from one art form to another. The scrubs , perennials, annuals and grasses all take their turn to create those short but continually, sometimes very subtle, changes in the garden and thus arrangement of flowers. The themselves seasons bring a different view and perspective of the garden.The wonderful additional benefit of such a mixed variety of plants is the habitat the garden provides for pollinators and other insects and birds that continue to spread the creative genius of nature.

    Reply
  575. Jessica on

    Here in Kamloops, BC, Canada my favourite perennial would have to be peonies. It’s an absolutely stunning bush in every variety and although the flowers last a week or so the greenery is lush and extends well into the growing season.

    Reply
  576. Sandra Christie on

    I love tansy – easy to grow, frilly foliage and those cheerful little yellow blooms. And, it can be divided and gifted so easily.

    Reply
  577. Vicki Bolinger on

    My favorite shrub is the honeysuckle. I’m not sure if it’s technically a shrub, but I love, love, love its sweet fragrance. Nothing smells more like summer to me than honeysuckle. I remember as a child riding my bike on a 5-mile trail that was filled with the pale yellow blossoms all along the way. Now we just need someone to figure out how to make them bloom all summer long! That would be heaven!!

    Reply
  578. Carla on

    Oh I have a ton of favorites, in early summer I can’t resist a big vase of delphinium but maybe the one that makes me the happiest are hellebores, because they bring so much joy when (almost) nothing else blooms.

    Reply
  579. Kris Elledge on

    I have been incorporating so much landscape into my farm space, I am looking forward to reading her book. I have been loving the perennial, Nepeta lately. It is a great pollinator, fast growing and beautiful mounding purple color. I also love sweatbox, Sarcacocca. It makes great foliage for arrangements and love the cute little, fragrant white flowers. Thank you for sharing her interview.

    Reply
  580. Kate Stephens on

    My favorite plant is Romneya Coulteri. Not easy to find in the Vancouver, BC nurseries, but I’ve seen the plant over in Victoria. Absolutely stunning!

    Reply
  581. Mel Janecka on

    Right now I love deutzia. I pruned a large Deutzia “magician” shrub and kept three (3-6 feet tall) branches for an antique glass jar on my front porch. The huge “arrangement” has graced my entry for almost a week amd smells heavenly.
    MJ

    Reply
  582. Alyson on

    I can’t get enough of “limelight hydrangeas!” Last forever in a vase and dry beautifully!

    Reply
  583. Christine McLaughlin on

    My favourite tree is the Japanese plum planted on the boulevard by the municipality. There are a number of them planted the 3 blocks of our street and are unique in our neighbourhood. Looking down the street in early spring or the sunsets through the branches from the stairway landing heralds the return of spring. And then the petals fall like snow and everything is covered in pink! Such a joyful sight.

    Reply
  584. Mary on

    This looks dreamy. The timing is awesome as we just moved to a new home & there is lots of space to create a “new”beautiful garden. Thanks for sharing Erin!

    Reply
  585. Philippa Foes-Lamb on

    I loved this interview so much! I grow perennials, predominantly older varieties and ship them all over New Zealand. I adore flowers and this book would be the most wonderful addition to my collection of gardening book treasures! Fingers crossed too!

    Reply
  586. Maureen on

    My favorite shrub is the mock orange I have outside my southern facing side door. This year the abundance of flowering branches is amazing. The scent takes me back to my childhood.There was a large shrub outside our back screen door growing up. I believe the sense of smell has a deep root in our memories and flowers bring back some of life’s best simple moments.

    Reply
  587. Celeste on

    Hard to pick just one, but Baptisia may be my favorite. I have them in just about every color! They never disappoint.

    Reply
  588. Erika McLean on

    I am from south Alabama where the summers are always predictably hot and humid, and the rest of the seasons are…. well, they are still hot and humid with a dash of cold thrown in. As a child, my favorite shrub/tree that brings back my fondest memories is a chinaberry tree that sits in front of the main Butler barn. (My family makes feed for livestock, grows peanuts, cotton, corn, etc -lots of row crops- the Butler barn was the hub of the farm); somehow, it never became invasive. My cousins and I loved to pluck the berries and perch in its limbs and have “chinaberry fights”. During the summers, every person in the community who came to the farm, always found their way under its limbs, and that is where the men would stand and talk for literally hours. It had the sweetest smell and the most beautiful flowers. I am 46 now, and that chinaberry tree is still there. I pass it when I go to the horse barn and feed my horse, and I see its perfect canopy still just as it was when I was a child. If trees could talk, that one would have a lot of tales to tell.

    Reply
  589. Karen Burnett on

    Thank you for the wonderful interview and pictures. Adding this book to my collection is a must! Fingers crossed.

    Reply
  590. Heather on

    My current favorite is my Viburnum but it changes weekly 😆

    Reply
  591. Noelle on

    I am so excited for this book! Hellebores are one of my favorites and I hope to add them to my garden!

    Reply
  592. Kathy Blakeslee on

    How perfect would this book be to my flower library. I love that Rachel shares this knowledge not only for plants but wildlife too.

    Reply
  593. alicia johnson on

    I love my gardenia bushes more than any other! There is just nothing like that thick, flowery aroma lingering in the southern summer’s dense, heavy air.

    Reply
  594. Laura webley on

    My urban property that is my flower farm is becoming somewhat of a secret garden. Each year I try to add more perennials and useful shrubs that I can grab to add into bouquets

    Reply
  595. Kathryn Casey on

    Hellebores for the win! I’ve been amazed at the potential of these flowers. But beyond that, mums. They are an old an faithful friend.

    Reply
  596. shelagh on

    Thank you Erin for bringing more beauty into my day by sharing this inspiring interview with Rachel. A favourite native shrub of mine here in the Pacific Northwest is Oceanspray; the profuse sprays of creamy-white flowers are gorgeous at this time of year, and what’s not to love about its name! Perhaps my favourite perennial in the photos of Rachel’s acreage is her sweet whippet :-)

    Reply
  597. Jill P. on

    I grew Sweet Williams last year from seed, and wasn’t impressed with the amount they flowered. So I dug them out, and left the clumps under the rhubarb. This year,they pushed flowers out around the rhubarb leaves in amazing quantities and colours, right at the time between spring bulbs and summer annuals. They go so well with lambs ears, and oregano that is just ready to bloom. Yes, I will replant them in the fall, they are a definite favourite!

    Reply
  598. Helen Farrington on

    The real truth, if I am being honest, is that my favorite shrub or perennial is the one I am standing in front of at any given moment. If I am stepping out of my front door, it is the Rosa glauca. If I turn to the right, it is the White Gold Spiraea. If I walk to the north, it is the Cotinus Royal Purple. Or the Fothergilla gardenii. Or the Salvia Burgundy Candles. Or the Geum Totally Tangerine. Why not ask something easier, like, “Which is your favorite child?”

    Reply
  599. Diane Karchner on

    Salvias are my passion right now. So much to learn about such a versatile long-stemmed beauty. Thx for all you share to continue my lifelong learning in all things perennial! And for introducing to this new voice. Excited to get a copy of this!

    Reply
  600. Anne on

    How can you choose just one?! I guess iris edges out everyone for me, with peonies a close second. ❤️

    Reply
  601. Ellie Schneider on

    My most favorite shrub is the lemon broom…I have several growing together in a large section on my garden. It plays an important part , for this is where my children hide among its twisted branches. I use it’s fern like greenery in the winter for fillers in my bouquets and from late spring to early summer I enjoy the abundance of tiny, golden, sweetpea like flowers, that give off a heavenly lemon scent.

    Reply
  602. Sherry on

    Gold variegated Japanese forest grass Hakonechloa macra ‘Aureola’ makes my heart (and garden) sing for 10 months of the year. The way it pokes up with strength and hope in early spring, catches wind and light, sparkles in the sun, brightens the shade and sways with the breeze all summer, and adds a sense of the harvest season as it dies back in late fall make it a perennial favorite.

    Reply
  603. Lauren Athey Penrose on

    I am an avid perennial gardener just recently moving into cutting flowers in general. I heard about this sweet book on the Let’s Grow Girls podcast and was disappointed when we found it wasn’t available in US yet. So I’m elated to see it come to us! I began gardening as a way to cope with a difficult day job as a hospice music therapist and haven’t looked back. I began giving cut flowers to patients last year and was hooked. They were such a great way to connect and reminisce with them. I especially enjoyed giving them to the dear folks who couldn’t get out to even see their gardens anymore. Thanks for promoting this book!!

    Reply
  604. Petra on

    The incredibly beautiful and long lasting hellebores are my all time favorites in the spring.
    What great pictures of the farm! I wish there was more of them!

    Reply
  605. Sandy Powell on

    What a lovely looking book with inspirational photography. Picking just one shrub is quite hard, I used to manage a public garden that was full of rare and unusual plants (for New Zealand) we had an Enkianthus that grew like a shrub/almost small tree and it has the most stunning, delicate flowers ever.

    Reply
  606. Ruth van Rensburg on

    I’m so excited about this new book! My absolute favorite perennials are Lupines. Every year they reseed new plants that are a shade different than the original one I planted (from seed!) so it is a beautiful start to the blooming season to see all the new variations of purple develop in spring.

    Reply
  607. Nickole mitchell on

    I love my black lace elderberry. The deep dark purple leaves with the show of white/pink blooms has a calming effect on me.

    Reply
  608. Brenda B on

    Growing up in South Texas, my grandmother had a large gardenia bush right by her front door. Every morning after feeding her family, grandkids and neighbors breakfast, she would put coffee grounds around the roots of her gardenia bush. To this day gardenias hold a special place in my heart not only because of their pure white beauty and intoxicating scent — it’s all the wonderful memories of Memmie’s gardenia bush.

    Reply
  609. Jocelyn on

    Favorite shrub is the understated native snowberry. The different leaf shapes depending on age are so surprising, and it’s such a resilient component of our hedgerows. (But also giving a shout-out the Twin Blackberry who seems to be beloved of all the bumblebees and hummingbirds)

    Reply
  610. Anne McGilvray on

    I think the dwarf flowering almond would have to be my choice. She is a stunner surrounded by loads of tulips to welcome the spring season.

    Reply
  611. Maria on

    What a wonderful resource – regardless I am sure a copy will find a way into my collection next to my Floret books. Right now my favorite perennial is hydrangea, but the fragrance of the peony is a very close second.

    Reply
  612. Leticia on

    My Favourite perennial are peonies.

    Reply
  613. Jocelyn on

    Goodness, I can’t wait to formalize the names of my microseasons! When the Boysenberries Blush, the first Nesting of the Bumblebees, Lemonbalm High Tide… how fun 😍

    Reply
  614. Katie on

    The vibrant flushes of fuchsia from rose campion (Lychnis coronaria) and orange from California poppies (Eschscholzia californica) in my drought tolerant garden are some of my favorites this time of year. And, they are SO easy to grow!

    Reply
  615. Laura Olson on

    I love peonies!! I have about 10 varieties which is small but I love them 😍

    Reply
  616. Laurie Ford on

    I am in the process of building a home and have roses and peonies that I’m ready to transplant once I have a “real house”. Some of my peonies have been moved three times in the transition of getting to my permanent spot. I hope they will acclimate and thrive in their new home.

    Reply
  617. Sheena on

    I love my perennial garden, I would have to say Daisies are my favorite! 🌼

    Reply
  618. Sandy Mattes on

    We have been enjoying a longer than usual cool spring here in Virginia this year. As a result our spring bloomers are lasting longer. I especially love my different colors and varieties of Veronica!

    Reply
  619. Diane on

    I love the Rose of Sharon trees that I have added in the last 5 years. There are two beautiful pale pink ones as you enter our drive in the summer. They
    are just loaded with blossoms and bloom all summer in the sweltering heat of Texas near DFW airport(we are suppose to reach 100 degrees today). I have two more of a different variety and they are all in full bloom right now. They seem to thrive even extreme heat. I plan to add some more in our back yard which are a shrub variety that will get much larger. I just love flowers! In recent years, I have gravitated more and more to perennials. I look forward to this wonderful new book!

    Reply
  620. Carrie on

    It is a huge dilemma to narrow it down to one favorite! Right now it is roses, and lavender, along with gorgeous grasses. Thank you for sharing this interview and photos.

    Reply
  621. Jennie B on

    The photos in the article gave me new bouquet ideas! Beautiful!

    Reply
  622. Patsy Jennings on

    I live in northeast Texas and work with natives when possible. Callicarpa shrubs grow well here and provide beautiful lush filler. I grew up calling it buckbrush but that’s just a local name. Later in the season branches are covered in vivid purple berries. It’s lovely either way.

    Reply
  623. Cheryl Nelson on

    I love peonies! I have 4 bushes that my mom gave me 28 years ago, one of which is at least 4’ diameter. Mom’s been gone for 25 years now but the plants she gave me live on. I learned so much about gardening from her. They are great in bouquets and the fragrance…!

    Reply
  624. Joan West on

    I am looking forward to checking at this book, I am wanting to add shrubs and trees to complement the flowers I have.

    Reply
  625. Kirsten on

    Favorite shrub or perennial…hmmmm…

    OK, I’m going to say hydrangea. They come in allsorts from antique to white to bright bright crayon colours. I used bright blue and hot pink interwoven with light pink spray roses for my Gran’s memorial service. And I love to dry the antique pinks and creams for winter crafting. They work well in both shade and sun and are soft and lovely and olden.

    Reply
  626. Marebear on

    I was just at a nursery and saw a golden white spirea. I think I must go back and get it!

    Reply
  627. Linda on

    What a wonderful, inspiring interview! It’s allowing my daydreams to incorporate woody shrubs in my soon-to-be “forever” garden. My son has gifted me a home of my own in east Tennessee now that his dad has passed over, and the backyard is an empty canvas. The gardens I’ve planted over the decades are essentially English gardens, but I’d love to expand this one to include those flowery shrubs. (I, too follow the Japanese micro seasons–such a delight to take part in nature’s changes every few days!)

    My favorites? The fragrant perennials! Peonies, lilac, lavender, honeysuckle, roses.

    Thank you for all the love you send out from Floret to so many of us online! Because of you, dahlias will be an essential part of my new garden!!!

    Reply
  628. Judith on

    In Spring I love the few short weeks of Lady Banks Rose with its long canes of tiny light yellow buds.
    In Summer I love canes of berries
    In Autumn I love Viburnum as the leaves turn red.
    In Winter, big branches of Holly with berries.
    These are just a few – I love foraging for branches all year long.

    Reply
  629. Ginny Talbert on

    Oh, its so hard to choose! I love calicarpa/beauty berry for its fall berries and ninebark “coppertina” during spring bloom. And I wish Black lace sambucus wasn’t so stinky because its foliage and blooms are exceptionally beautiful.

    Reply
  630. Kelly on

    In my area of Oregon, mountain mahogany thrives and this time of year has the most beautiful, whispy seeds pods. Such a delight to arrange with!

    Reply
  631. Andrea on

    Itoh peonies, Limelight hydrangeas, climbing roses, purple beardtongue, Soda Pop heuchera…how do you pick a favorite child? This year I am especially enjoying my large purple alliums that rise out of the peonies and heuchera. They are magical!

    Reply
  632. Sandy on

    My Alliums are very beautiful and unique. I love their majestic height and bountiful flower heads. They pop up each year and make us smile!

    Reply
  633. Sarah on

    I love love love Viburnum bodnantense! The smell of their flowers, borne on bare branches in winter, is so beautiful and makes all the difference as the daylight gets shorter.

    Reply
  634. Lizzie on

    I would have to say Roses are my favorite perennial. There are so many beautiful colors and designs. And they smell amazing. I have a ST. Swithun, English Climbing Rose that is blooming right now and it is just magnificent.

    Reply
  635. Lauri Meyer on

    Hydrangeas have to be one of my top 3 favorite perennial shrubs to grow, both for its landscape beauty & use in floral arrangements. It’s hard to find fault with them! Back when I used to do wedding design work, I would always purchase live hydrangea plants at the flower market rather than cut stems for use in my arrangements. This would guarantee my blooms would be fresh & plump when I was ready to use them. And when the work was done & the flowers were delivered, I had all kinds of young hydrangeas ready to plant around my property & to share with the brides & their family & friends! I still love wandering around the farm & recalling which plant came from which wedding & how much they’ve all grown!

    I moved on from the floral design business about 6 years ago to farm the flowers instead, naively thinking that farming might not be so hard on my body! (LOL) However, the backaches (and the bulging disc!) still remind me that flowers are a labor of love no matter where they come from! They feed my soul. That makes them priceless. And at the end of the day, I’ve discovered that I’m a much easier client to please when it comes to choosing flowers for my arrangements! :)

    As always, thank you for the opportunity to share a little blurb about my love for all things floral and a chance to win a recommended book by one of your favorite gardeners! Your generosity is endless! L.M.

    Reply
  636. Francoise on

    Gardinias Growing up in southern California we had one gardenia plant up against the south east corner of the house near a perpetually leaking faucet. It bloomed nine months of the year creating miasmic wafts of scent that made it to my second-floor bedroom. I now live in Portland, Oregon where I am grateful for the potted gardenia that we have that achieves blooms sporadically in spring and summer. We bring it in fall and winter and put it near south facing window where it heroically battles our German Shepherd fur factory and the occasional whitefly infestation. It is outside now where it has regrouped itself and is throwing out three or four gardenias every week, competing with our two-story wild haired Jasmine. Heroic.

    Reply
  637. Jay Hamilton on

    It looks like I’m the 1,417th comment. Lord knows who is going to dig down this deep, but you never know…

    Life isn’t as full of surprises as it once was. (I waited to find out the sex of both kids.) May be it’s because we get set in our ways as we age. We don’t take risks or are try new things. I got caught in the rain while riding my bike and that hasn’t happened since I was 12 years old. Great fun, exciting and a total surprise. That’s how I describe my dara’s. I started then from your seeds last year, my first as a backyard naturalist attempting to sow a clipping garden. What a surprise! The Dara starts out as an unassuming plant and then takes off with the heat of the summer growing well beyond what its stalk should support only burst open in a dot matrix of tiny blooms that cover the darker end of the color palette from brown to purple. But the big surprise is how this supposedly annual flower reseeded itself to spread its pedals like a peacock and show off again this summer. Like being caught in the rain, life’s surprises are organic, natural and bring you joy. My perennial Daras are the centerpiece of my modest flower garden in Arlington, VA. They act like royalty showing up late but displaying impeccable manners just like the English.

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  638. Kristina on

    Hellebores may be my favorite flowers, next to dahlias. Their beauty reminds me orchids, but a heck of a lot easier for me to grow and maintain! The variations in colors, and the surprise in what colors end up growing each year after seeding different varieties together is fun and such a gift to see every year.

    Reply
  639. Jennifer Williamson on

    My absolute favorite shrub would have to be Azaleas. Here in South Carolina they are around almost every corner. They come up in spring and usually stay until summer. The way they completely fill themselves with blooms is gorgeous. There are so many different colors too. Definitely brings me back to my childhood and all the times we would play hid-n-seek and we would behind my grandmother’s Azaleas.

    Reply
  640. Ernie on

    Clethra for the smell. Physocarpus ‘amber jubile’ for the color show…. And flowers to boot!

    Reply
  641. Mary Combs on

    I’ve always tried putting shrub cuttings into my bouquets, and am constantly buying new shrubs with that in mind. My favorite that I use to harvest along the roadside when I was younger, but have since bought to have my own is Button Bush. It gives such a fun whimsical look to arrangements.
    I would love to have help in using my shrubs more as most seem to wilt so quickly. This book sounds like the perfect resource!!

    Reply
  642. Jen on

    I use lavender in all the slightly ignored spots in my garden, it doesn’t need much attention, comes back every year bigger & better, & when I accidentally bump it , it reminds me it’s there with its fragrant lavender scent.

    Reply
  643. Trish Konieczny on

    I can never get enough of Thuja green giant.
    Its fluffy, soft fullness is cool and compliant.
    My hands ruffle through the shrub’s mesh with delight.
    To bring in a branch displays life fresh and bright.

    Reply
  644. Libby on

    I really love camellias. And in the south they add so much cheer in winter.

    Reply
  645. Angela Grandgeorge on

    I just discovered Ninebark and I have 3 varieties in the garden. It has been a huge hit in our bouquets thus far

    Reply
  646. Barb on

    I’ve always been drawn to Delphiniums. My Dad used to grow these tall beauties in his garden, and as a child, I was mesmerized by their brilliant hues.

    Reply
  647. diane hunter on

    I love anything that blooms but a few favorites are bee balm , coneflowers and zinnias. This summer has been hard with this horrible heat wave but that is the beauty of natives perennials , they are so adaptable. It’s so wonderful to have ladies like the two of you to help us all in this wonderful journey. Thank you both ❤️

    Reply
  648. Jane spencer on

    I love the uniqueness of my blue billow Korean hydrangea. I moved it 3 times before it found its happy spot but now it is so lovely and super easy to propagate

    Reply
  649. Guy Zimmermaan on

    Dahlias for the variety of size and color! Oakleaf Hydrangea. What’s not to like!

    Reply
  650. Tami Alderson on

    Thank you for sharing the interview with Rachel. Looking forward to following her on Facebook. I love roses. I have a pink cottage style rose bush that is a piece from over a 80 year old bush. It was from my husband’s Granny. It’s beautiful and produces a lot of blooms,funny thing is I still have it in a 5 gallon bucket! I do have plans to move it to my flower bed.
    I would love to have a copy of Rachel’s book,it would be inspiring.

    Reply
  651. Stephanie Stickley on

    I adore lilacs- always have since I first discovered them on my great grandmother’s Newport property. The scent is pure heaven, the flowers so delicate and lovely.

    Reply
  652. JoAnn Fisher on

    I’d liver her book and I enjoy following progress at Floret, on Discovery and thus website. My favorite woody shrub is little lime punch, but I’m exploring other perennials and shrubs. Good luck to both of you.

    Reply
  653. Jean Marie on

    What a fantastic interview. I would love the book as I now have a garden to plant and love perennials and shrubs.
    Thank you Erin for doing what you do!

    Reply
  654. Linda on

    I’ve recently discovered Sunshine Ligustrum. It’s like a bright light, shining in the garden. And, I’m amazed how tough it is. I’m experimenting with trimming up the lower branches to shape it in a more tree-like form.

    I’m also having a wonderful time shaping topiaries from boxwood and eugenia.
    Thanks to you, Erin & your books & videos and to Rachel’s new book, I’m learning & growing right along with my garden.

    Reply
  655. Lisa Philipps on

    I especially love the photos of the hellebores! I have lots of hellebores but none of those gorgeous pink ones! thanks for sharing.

    Reply
  656. Diana on

    Love lysimachia as a perennial.

    Reply
  657. Trish DiFilippo on

    I love my buddleia – pugster variety in indigo blue and amethyst. The blooms are so full and the tips curve a little – so unique, so Dr. Seussish. Where I live in PA, they start blooming around the 4th of July and they don’t stop until close to Halloween (obviously not with same summer vigor, but they are still pushing them out). The smell greets me when I open my kitchen door. Even in the winter, they have structure worth staring at when they are lined with frost or snow.
    Love them!

    Reply
  658. Pam Woodson on

    I enjoy ferns, they are simple, but always showcase the flowers they are paired with:)

    Reply
  659. Alesa De Jager on

    The shrubs I cut from most often in my garden include smoke bush, nine bark, hydrangeas, and forsythia foliage (which moves and has its own agenda). The perennials I am always thankful to cut year after year are daffodils, fritillaria, Japanese anemone, and of course the peonies.

    Reply
  660. Connie on

    Jasmine Sambac is one of my favorite shrubs

    Reply
  661. Jessica Hudspeth on

    I’m not sure I could pick a favorite but the reason I prefer the perennials and shrubs over annuals is the long term investment. I plant them with purpose and intent with the thought of a generation of family I will never meet harvesting from them. In a way it allows me to be apart of our family long after I’m physically gone.

    Reply
  662. Maria Giddens on

    I would have to say Alstroemeria and my favourite would be Indian Summer..stunning bronze foliage and bright orange and red flowers with tall/great picking stems

    Reply
  663. Elizabeth Trow on

    Ninebark – Physocarpus opulifolius

    Ninebark is one of my very favorite shrubs. It’s easy to grow in full sun or light shade. I enjoy arranging with unique foliage. I love the size, shape, color and texture of a ninebark leaf. Whether my arrangement calls for a long arching branch, a medium length or a short piece my Ninebark will supply it.

    Reply
  664. Kate Carter on

    My favorite perennials are peonies! They are just fininshing in my garden, lucious scents and beautiful petticoat blooms. They are so welcome after our harsh, cold winters here in Wisconsin. I can’t get enough of them!!!

    Reply
  665. Karoline Bröckel Wörle on

    My favourite shrub is an English rose shrub called „Vanessa Bell“. It blooms in large clusters , is pale yellow with a dark yellow eye. The fragrance is similar to green tea with aspects of lemon and honey. It forms a bushy, upright shrub.
    Right now the roses in our garden have started to bloom and it’s always such a bliss.

    Reply
  666. Cris Walton on

    I adore lavender!! The purple with the sage green is the most lovely combination. Of course, I can’t look at any plant without smiling! I love your books Erin and I love that you got to meet this amazing gardner and share her story with us!!

    Reply
  667. Robin Nowakowski on

    I would absolutely love this book!
    My favorite perennial is the Annabelle Hydrangea ❤

    Reply
  668. Vicky Vega on

    I live in New Jersey in the US.
    One of my favorite woody flowers is my common lilac bush, although I have many others as well as perennials the sent of lilacs is my absolute favorite. And I am excited to plant some different varieties.

    Reply
  669. Mindy Tillery on

    I was delighted to receive your newsletter today & really enjoyed reading the interview with Rachel. I would love to be considered for a copy of the book. One of my favorite shrubs here in Florida is the Philodendron specifically the Tree Philodendron though is is more of a low & spreading shrub than a tree. I love the lushness & the large, thick above ground roots that cover over the beds outside my patio as they provide year round jungle like beauty. The huge spreading leaves look especially amazing when cut as a single in a large vessel. Thanks so much for this wonderful interview Erin & Rachel.
    xOx,
    Mindy Tillery

    Reply
  670. Tori on

    Delphinium are side of my most favorite perennials. My mom has beautiful ones in her garden and whenever I see a delph it reminds me of her!

    Reply
  671. Sarah Dunn on

    Great interview! Great information.
    My favorite perennial is catmint. Nepeta works so well as an “underplant” in my zone 7 garden. Filling in under peony and other upright plants. A close second are the hardy geranium. They work in the same way in the shade gardens. I’m excited to be able to possibly win a copy of the new book, it certainly sounds quite detailed and interesting.

    Reply
  672. Barbara Jo Moran on

    At our last house I planted Lenten Rose under the canopy of Winterberry. Pretty in the fall for the colorful berries for the birds. Then in the late winter and into early spring a breath of color from the Helleborus.

    Reply
  673. Jolene Lowrey on

    Black chokecherry bushes! Birds love the fruit, it withstands all weather and soil conditions, and the fall leaf color is phenomenal!

    Reply
  674. Susie on

    I just discovered a deciduous shrub in the hydrangea family this year: hybrid mock orange philadelphus x purpureomaculatus ‘Belle E’toile’. Gorgeous and incredibly fragrant! I wonder if it would make a good cut flower?

    Reply
  675. Sam Wehunt on

    One of my favorite shrubs in beyond midnight caryopteris. It has lovely blue flowers in late summer that the bees really love. I recently added a chartreuse variety to my garden and I love to look out and see it glowing.

    Reply
  676. Jolene on

    I have always loved the shrub temple bells pieris which is SPRING. I can’t get enough of it. It grows well in southern New Zealand and is amazing in any wedding or funeral work.

    Reply
  677. Stephanie on

    Love this inspiring interview! I always look forward to flowering quince and especially (invasive) honeysuckle because I feel free to cut as much as possible!

    Reply
  678. Haley Whittington on

    Oh my favorite woody shrubs would be forsythia! It’s one of the first things to bloom in the south and let’s us know that Spring is near!

    Reply
  679. Elisa Allen Arias on

    I farm in Baja California Sur, Mexico and one of my favorite perennials is the banana tree! The five banana varieties we grow provide such lovely shade & structure to the farm beds, and I love seeing how chefs and retreat leaders use the big leaves in recipes and on tablescapes.

    Reply
  680. Katherine Wisdom on

    My favorite perennial is Lamb’s Ear – whose flowers probably don’t often make it into many flower arrangements, haha.
    But love the softness, from the colors to the texture.

    Reply
  681. Stefanie Dixon on

    Currently obsessed with Ninebark (any and all), I’m always keen to try anything that catches my eye when wandering the garden or nearby woods.

    Reply
  682. Stacey Spencer on

    My favorite perennial is echinacea. It is a beautiful, big, sturdy, long lasting flower. I even like to fry them for a totally different look.

    Reply
  683. Trish Rapson on

    I have a Climbing Geranium with pink flowers that has covered a fence at the front of my house. I am amazed at how it grew from one little cutting. It seems to flower all the time. I have shared so many cuttings from it. But I really enjoy seeing people walking past, stop and pinch a little cutting.

    Reply
  684. Rosemary on

    Looking forward to reading this. Enjoyed reading about Rachel’s background in the post too.

    Reply
  685. Kellie S on

    I’m working on adding woodies for foliage cutting. Boxwood, laurel, ninebark, mock orange, vine maple, snowberry, salal, and candy willow are ones I’ve added in the last couple years.

    Reply
  686. Courtney Underwood on

    I did not grow up amongst gardeners, only people who love lawns. But, I bought my first house solely because it had daffodils and a lilac tree outside the front window. So, I suppose my first love of flowers started there. While I am floundering through my first year of starting some plants from seeds, I am thrilled to see that my favorite perennials and shrubs now have a brilliant highlight. Thanks, Rachel!

    Reply
  687. Kellie on

    How to choose? Roses, hydrangeas, viburnum, stock, veronica, peonies, yarrow, artemisia, monarda, clematis to name a few.

    Reply
  688. Tina Gamache on

    I just love a variety that can both landscape my yard and provide cut flowers. Lavender is going very well in my area right now so seems to be my current obsession 😃 can’t wait to read this book!

    Reply
  689. Carol on

    My favorite perinneal shrub is lilac. I grew up on a farm, where my mom had a huge lilac bush. And both grandmothers had lilac bushes on their ranches. When I had to move to the city, I brought several transplants from them with me. 18 years in, I’m so thankful to have them and the memories they evoke.

    Reply
  690. LeAnn Richard on

    Sweet Williams are my favorites. My granny had a row of them in her north Alabama garden. I used to sit by them and pretend they were wearing their best velvet coats. Sweet William sounds like little English men all dressed up.

    Reply
  691. Leslie Fishman on

    I live in the high desert area of Southern California and am always creating arrangements from our natives and perennials from our 100 acre farm. I love to discover books that take me on new adventures. I look forward to viewing Rachel’s book.

    Reply
  692. Lindsey on

    I love roses and false indigo! Looking forward to seeing this book!

    Reply
  693. Cindy on

    My favorite perennial is roses. My favorite rose memory is visiting gardens and hearing my mother almost singing when she talked about them. My mother died when I was very young and, I think, I am always trying to create a sacred space through gardening that I can somehow connect with her within. My experience with roses is beauty, perfume, elegance, happiness, sadness, struggle, pain, knowledge…just like life.

    Reply
  694. Allyce Capps on

    Limelight hydrangeas work so beautifully in our hot summers.

    Reply
  695. Kirsty Duberly on

    One of my favs would have to be the leucadendron family… there is such a range of colours and they can be anything from the main feature to the supporting structure of the foliage in an arrangement…plus they last ages in a vase!

    Reply
  696. Sarah G. on

    Hmm…my current favorite is probably narcissus. They are just so easy and critter proof, and I love seeing their cheery blooms at the end of winter when I’m sunshine and flower starved :)

    Reply
  697. Adele Anderson on

    I love roses… I have rose bush beside my house that is over 60 years old! I look forward to planting g more perennials in my yard.

    Reply
  698. Mary on

    My favorite perennials are lavenders.

    Reply
  699. Diane D. on

    One of my favorite shrubs for design work is bridal wreath spirea. It it gives a light and airy feel to any arrangement.

    Reply
  700. Sharon Mirtaheri on

    When we moved last year I had to leave behind several beauty berry bushes. Callicarpa Americano. It has the most vivid fuchsia colored berries on it in the fall like no other shrub I have ever seen. None of the garden yours I have ever been on have had this shrub so I don’t think people really know about it and in my area of Virginia they are not easy to find either. I bought two for my new garden and can hardly wait to see the berries color up this fall!

    Reply
  701. Erin Sedlacek on

    I am really growing to love ninebarks. Their movement is great and I have many wine colored ninebarks in my garden to cut from!

    Reply
  702. Karlena Lynn on

    I’m really into hardy fuschias right now. I have 9 different ones that range in color – even a yellow!! and from partial sun to shade and our hummingbirds love them. They are not as showy as the tender fuschias but i love the unexpected surprise on folk’s face when they recognize the trumpets growing on the plants

    Reply
  703. Marian Luther on

    This beautiful story and book has come at a time when I’m entering my retirement years, however, I will only be trading my desk job for my farm job as I start my small farm in the PNW. My dream has always been to have land and grow flowers and food, but with climate change it became apparent it needed to be much more and so I am learning agriforestry and gaining knowledge of the plants beyond the norm that can not only create beauty in a garden but sustain us with edible parts. Along with that comes growing for beauty and artisan uses and so I have to say that Korean Spice viburnum is one of my favorite flowering shrubs, beautiful incredibly scented blooms and a shrub with interesting leaves and form. Thank you for ever enlightning us Erin!

    Reply
  704. Elizabeth on

    My favorite perennials are definitely peonies!

    Reply
  705. Linda on

    There was a Burkwood Viburnum on the property when we bought our house 37 years ago. I look forward to smelling its fragrant flowers every spring and seeing its red/orange foliage in the fall.

    Reply
  706. Adelaide Lunceford Schreiber on

    Growing in the deserts of Utah I love Arrowleaf Balsamroot and Cutleaf Balsamroot. (Balsamorhiza spp.)

    Both of these perennials bloom with multiple yellow daisy-shaped flowers every spring even without any irrigation. They are also native to the western U.S. which fuels my passion for finding native cut flowers and useful plants.

    Reply
  707. Marlene on

    I live in an area that has a short season and is difficult to grow in. I’m interested to learn more about shrubs and hardy perennials. I’m looking forward to reading this book
    I do love the delphiniums which reliably come back every year

    Reply
  708. Natalie Brockman on

    My favorite perennial flowers are snowdrops. Many flowers outstrip these little beauties in one way or another, but after a long, cold winter nothing is so welcome and so cheerful, so reassuring than seeing those tiny white bell-shaped darlings peek through the snow. They may not make it into a bouquet, but they are the herald and promise of what is to come.

    Reply
  709. Elisia Barber on

    One of my favorite perennials that can become a small shrub is cimicifuga. I absolutely love the foliage and the smell of the spikes that catch you off guard while walking down a shady path.
    My first time adding in irrigation was so that I could put a few of these into my own shade garden. I recently celebrated getting my masters degree with a new variety called Brunette and I can’t wait for it to bloom!

    Reply
  710. Michele McNelley on

    It is so hard to pick just one! Elderberry would have to be my go to. Medicinal, useful in arrangements and part of our farm’s sustainability, it’s one of the most sought after perennials we grow.

    Reply
  711. Wendy Keller on

    I have so many, now that I live in Florida annuals seem to become perennials too! A very good thing! I love shrimp plant and I have a French hibiscus that I marvel at daily!!!

    Reply
  712. Amanda Nolt on

    My favorite perennial is definitely peonies.

    Reply
  713. Lisa Jay on

    Being from the south, Crepe Myrtles are one of my favorite “structural” shrubs for arrangement. The branches have a beautiful drape to them and the stems are strong and supportive. I don’t use their beautiful blooms too often, as they are delicate and like to drop, but the seed pods are just a dream for added texture!

    Reply
  714. Cathelene Morris on

    We absolutely love our Lenten roses. About 3 years ago we started ordering online and buying what we could find locally here in South Carolina. They are so drought and heat tolerant here in the Deep South, which is great. However, our favorite part about them is to be able to go outside in the barren winter and see these beautiful flowers blooming. (As well as the fact that their blossoms last so long!)

    Reply
  715. Jennifer Jordan on

    Tough question to answer. Actually, in my gardens I only plant perennials and flowering shrubs. My absolute favorite is Hydrangeas, she is the belle of the ball.
    Every year there are new varieties and I always manage to squeeze one or more in. Can not wait for next spring’s offerings.

    Reply
  716. Nicole Dillon on

    I’m going to go with Peonies. I just ordered 250 bare roots! I currently have zero on my property! It’s super scary and exciting at the same time. I am dreaming big little of a perennial one-acre cut flower farm. This book could not be any more perfect timing.

    Reply
  717. Jenna on

    Salvia and Lavender are my go-to. They stay in shape, smells amazing and compliment my rose garden nicely.

    Reply
  718. Lindsey on

    Elderberry bush! Beautiful, delicious, medicinal, and the birds appreciate it. The blooms and the berries make it a versatile plant at different times of the year. Thank you for sharing your perennials. I would love to win your book!

    Reply
  719. Cathy M. L. on

    I have to say, hand’s down, my favorite perennial has to be Alpine Strawberries. The first year I grew them was when we lived in Minnesota. The plants were thriving that first summer in a “strawberry pot” with the little cups on the sides and producing amazingly many tiny berries with a huge punch of sweet flavor. After our first seasonal frost in early October all the strawberry leaves shriveled up and turned brown. I initially thought they were done forever. So I stored the pot under our deck with the intention of emptying it out and starting again the following Spring.
    Magically and much to my delight and amazement, when I pulled the pot out again in late April, there were new little strawberry leaves emerging from the all the dried out “dead” remnants. Year after year the plants thrived in a similar cycle and grew heartier and more resilient in the process.
    Another amazing perennial in that climate were hostas.

    Reply
  720. Jean on

    We have a Turk’s cap plant that we inherited in our last move. It grows large and wild each year with very little care. In July the flowers pop out and stay till the first frost.

    Reply
  721. Alli on

    I love coneflowers and all their different colors. Just as summer is fading they start to bloom and the fun lasts a little longer!

    Reply
  722. Gabrielle Baker on

    I am still in the process of familiarizing myself with woody perennials/shrubs, but my favorite at the moment would have to be forsythia! As a harbinger of Spring, I appreciate it’s vigor and resilience to harsh weather, and its multi-faceted nature. Aside from being gorgeous holding its own in a vase, the edible flowers make the most delightful syrup!

    Reply
  723. Beth Cathey on

    I love so many different things, it is hard to choose 1or 2! For many years we could not have hydrangeas or hostas due to a serious deer issue! We finally broke down about 10 years ago, and had a space properly fenced, so that we could indulge ourselves! At the moment, Hydrangea Twist ‘n Shout ( great loose form, and the almost purple lace caps look like little spaceships circling all around), and every hosta we’ve planted, are at the top of my list . Beth Cathey, Zone 8, Northeast GA!

    Reply
  724. Martha Chavez on

    I am excited to find and read Rachel’s book.

    I have to say that it’s hard to narrow it down to one favorite but if I had to, it would be roses. Other faves are rhododendrons, hydrangeas and lilacs. I have a Korean spice viburnum that I absolutely love for it’s fragrance.

    Reply
  725. Emilie on

    The common Lilac always makes me think of my grandfather. He had full hedges of all kinds of varieties growing on his farm but his favourite one was down in the cow pasture. Years of grazing had beaten down the little shrub, but once grandpa fenced it off it quickly bounced back. It has the most beautiful dark purple clusters of flowers with a rich lilac scent. I was fortunate enough to dig up a small offshoot of the plant to bring to my own cottage garden shortly before my grandfather passed. My shrub always makes me smile and think of his old hands putting up his little lilac fence.

    Reply
  726. Tess Chawi on

    I’m sitting here thinking of how hard it is for me to achieve what I love so much about your life on Floret. I am a native Floridian and strive to grow flowers that are not from my region because I love them so! A plant that I use that is a flourishing shrub that needs no help in my hot and steamy home is the beautiful Golden Thryallis. So simple compared to the peonies and dahlias I read about in beautiful books. But….it’s a winner in Florida! Delicate, space filling, spikey and lovely! Thank you for all your wonderful inspiration!

    Reply
  727. Rebecca on

    This year, I’ve been captivated by white lilac (syringa). It looks so pure in the spring and the scent is divine. I’ve just got one recently… now all I have to do is find space for it (which is going to be a problem) 😅. Can’t wait to get my hands on this book, it looks amazing, long overdue ❤️

    Reply
  728. Moe Matthews on

    I absolutely love Hydrangeas… I don’t think you can have too many or enough.

    Reply
  729. Sand Davis on

    If I’m honest I would have to admit it is the spring flowers I love the most. Maybe it’s because, well, it’s spring! I love all the bulbs, peony’s and for woodys I love pussy willow and forsythia. Of course hydrangeas in the fall. And here in Vermont there is no shortage of beautiful fall foliage to add to arrangements. I’d love to win one of Rachels’s books!

    Reply
  730. Anne Kasten on

    There is a revolution underway in how we see our gardens, what we choose to plant in them, and the plants we choose to bring indoors to brighten our lives. I am so very grateful for the ever increasing information and INSPIRATION! It is such a delight to me to understand that I really need to look at everything as I make my decisions for what to cut and bring into the house, as well as what to add to my planting selections. This book would be an invaluable resource to me. Thank you for introducing us to Rachel Siegfried and her book. And thank you, Erin, for your ongoing inspiration and sharing with all of us.

    Reply
  731. Kayla on

    Hellebores are one of my favorites – they are such a bright spot in the winter when they begin to bloom!

    Reply
  732. Linda Q on

    Oh, this is like children-how do you choose a favorite! Some of the very first shrubs I planted in my yard were double file viburnums- a row of them along my border. They have a horizontal branching habit loaded with white flowers that bloom in the springtime. They also produce red berries in the fall.

    Reply
  733. Melinda on

    My faves at the moment are white gaura, also known as “whirling butterflies” because they are so light and dance in the wind, and salvia mystic spires which has velvety purple stalks nearly year round here in Northern CA.

    Reply
  734. Jes R on

    The resilient humble striking quality of Russian sage makes me just grin from ear to ear. Its silvery feathery purple tipped foliage is just lovely as sprays on its own or in arrangements. That sucker will come back every year better and bigger too!

    Reply
  735. Nicole on

    What a difficult question! I think I have a favorite flowering perenial for every week of the year 🤣! Mock Orange is at the top of my list right now in Summer. I love riding my bike and seeing them spread throughout town.

    Reply
  736. Suzanne Niedrich on

    Hellebores are my favorite – planting some for this first time earlier this spring. I never thought about adding them to my cut flower arrangements from my seed garden – I will now! Thank you for all that you do to inspire us novice flower lovers.

    Reply
  737. Bibiana on

    I moved to Woodinville WA almost two years ago. Before that I lived in Mexico City and for a few years in Seattle. I never had a garden before. I am excited but also overwhelmed with the possibilities. The first thing I learned was perennial vs annuals. Sounds silly but I didn´t know that and I´m still figuring out the very basic garden knowledge. My first loves are perennials and the idea of something coming back every year to remember you the winter is over and life goes on. I planted some hydrangeas, hostas and coral bells for the shady parts.

    Reply
  738. Ellen Jones on

    In the garden of a Japanese Buddhist temple, we saw a host of Honorine Jobert Japanese anemones dancing like butterflies buffeted by the breeze. In our garden, smaller pink Japanese anemone flowers seems like fairy flowers, with spun cotton seed heads in the autumn. I would love to have a copy of Rachel Siegfried’s book; thank you for offering the possibility of our owning it.

    Reply
  739. Jana Sharpley on

    L-O-V-E!!!
    Wonderful material! Thank you for blogging about it.
    Please register me for one of the free books.

    Reply
  740. Lou Bauer on

    I have been slowly adding shrubs for cutting to go along with all my other perennials that I cut and sell to a florist. I just recently added a mock orange and a Summersweet. I am excited to see how they do. I have many ninebarks and spirea and save alot for the fall color of the foliage. It’s so hard to chose spring color, flowers or fall color!! UGH I need more!

    Reply
  741. Christy on

    This would be an amazing book add to my collection. I love to read about different gardens and gardeners.

    Reply
  742. Helen R on

    Be still my heart! I’ve been breeding hellebores for well over a decade now and am thrilled that they’re finally getting their due as cut flowers. Rachel’s new book is now on my must-have list, thanks so much for bringing her to our attention.

    Reply
  743. Kathleen Archer on

    My favorite perennial is the peony. Such magnificent flowers! But I am looking to plant woody shrubs at our newish yard that can provide foliage and filler for bouquets, so I’m very interested in Rachel’s book.

    Reply
  744. Stephanie K. on

    So many favorites and so many at our house that I would love to learn more about and add in this category – roses, lilacs, mountain laurel and hellebores are up there and so different!

    Reply
  745. Amy on

    I definitely want to plant more shrubs, your headgerows are inspiring! It’s so hard to choose just one, but a few perennials I use for cutting are baptisia, yarrow, and heuchera. Can’t wait to read the book!

    Reply
  746. Judith Kindermann on

    There are a lot of perennials and shrubs in my garden in a rural area in the midst of germany.
    My favorite is Hesperis matronalis. I love the purple ones, but the white ones just as well.

    Reply
  747. M. Ritz on

    I enjoyed the interview so much! And I‘d love a copy of the book, of course!!!

    My favorites are ranunculus, narcissus and sweet pea (although that‘s not a perennial….) , oh! And scabiosa, and verbena, and Knautia! Can‘t decide!!!

    Reply
  748. Andrea. Z on

    My favorite shrub is nine bark. It’s beautiful both on flower and not.

    Reply
  749. Sara on

    I have so many favorites, but I have a special place in my heart for a huge hydrangea that was already there when I bought my house in Minnesota. I’ve tried planting a few different varieties in my new home, but nothing compares to that beauty!

    Reply
  750. DaniK on

    My favorite perennials are phlox. They seem to tolerate many conditions and while they tend to spread, they don’t do so aggressively so are easy to propagate but still keep to the original planting plan. And they seem to go on for long time – my late dad planted Phlox David 15 years ago and it’s still going strong and reminds me of him every time I walk into the backyard. I have now collected almost a dozen of varieties, including a couple I grew from Floret seeds.

    Reply
  751. Carol on

    I learned to love the peonies in my grandma’s landscaping nearly fifty years ago. But also her lilacs. It’s a hard choice. I also love boxwood and adding it to arrangements.

    Reply
  752. Sandra Martensen on

    I love Rachel’s ability to use shrubs and cut tree branches and flowers to mix it up – charming arrangements and so inspiring. I would love a copy of her book. Thank you.

    Reply
  753. Judy Sviatko on

    I am rebuilding my garden after a fire, and besides replacing my beloved roses, I’m adding a lot of natives this time. I am so charmed by my new buttonbush! It’s still small right now, but will hopefully add some needed interest to my fall bouquets!

    Reply
  754. Renee on

    Favorites perhaps would be hydrangea, yarrow, and all my perennial herbs that return so wonderfully every spring! This looks like such an amazing and beautiful book!

    Reply
  755. Erika on

    My peony border always delights me every spring, and reminds me of a special and funny birthday memory… my husband and I had been renting a house with mature peony bushes and when the owners decided to sell, we had to move before the bushes bloomed. My husband snuck back in the evening while the house was still vacant and surprised me with two buckets full of peonies for my birthday!

    Reply
  756. Misty on

    My absolute favorite flower is the peony. They are so magical, tightly tucked into their ball blossoms then explode their beauty into the world in a big overstated showey yet elegant way. Their fragrance is so signiture and undeniably their own amounst the delicate petals 🌸

    Reply
  757. Smi on

    My favorite shrub is hydrangea. With so many colors and varieties, needing very minimal maintenance, beautiful hydrangea is top of my list.

    Reply
  758. Lindsay on

    My favorite have always been lavender! Every year I add new favorites too. Dahlias and hollyhocks are two of my new favorites to grow!

    Reply
  759. Sabrina O’Malley on

    I still have so much to learn. I love my hydrangeas and Shasta daisies and recently added a few roses. My garden is a great joy to me. Thank you for helping me along this journey

    Reply
  760. Amanda Pollard on

    How exciting for this wonderful resource! My favorites include forsythia, peonies, and garden roses… I recently just ventured into garden roses and am excited to see how they do through this coming year.

    Reply
  761. Gwen on

    I would love to win a copy of this book! I am not sure I can pick a favorite. I love bleeding hearts in early spring. I love crocosmia lucifer in the summer, they are one of my favorite to watch hummingbirds feeding on. My fall favorite is the hydrangea as the white flowers turn to a dark pink color. Even if I don’t win a copy , I am sure one will still end up in my collection.

    Reply
  762. Sue on

    I am a texture and foliage kind of a girl. A few years ago I planted an ombre row of ninebarks in my garden. The foliage ranges from shades of green to golden, bronze, red and almost black. They are one of my favorite woody shrubs to cut from and add to floral arrangements.

    Reply
  763. brigette on

    I love hydrangeas especially the limelight. I allow them to dry and enjoy them scattered throughout my house all winter.

    Reply
  764. Peggy on

    I just want to learn more about them!! And slowly incorporate more on my property. I love my peony bushes and hydrangeas, and just added some climbing rose bushes. I need plants that are maintenance free but add lots of color and beauty.

    Reply
  765. Judy Cato on

    This is a book that will fill my needs for the work at my church. We grow cut flowers and arrange them for the altar each Sunday. At home I can’t get enough cut flowers to just enjoy and love.

    Reply
  766. Bruce Nivens on

    I LOVE PEONIES. So much so that I even got (from L’Occitaine) a terrific peony-scented lotion that I use at least once a week. And yes, it would be great to have a copy of the new book! And thanks, Erin, I just watched all three episodes of your summer mini glass; it was great.

    Reply
  767. Leslie Davis on

    What a lovely resource. I would love to have a copy. It is hard to pick a favorite but I do love hydrangeas.

    Reply
  768. Eileen on

    My favorites are hydrangeas and roses—a little tough to grow in Texas, but I keep trying! I love bringing the beauty of cut flowers and branches indoors. I’d love to win a copy of Rachel’s book. It looks stunning. 🌸

    Reply
  769. Meredith Kenworthy on

    I’ve got what I think is called Obedient Plant. It is tall and has white flowers. It comes back beautifully every year and is so pretty and healthy looking no matter the weather. I also like hostas. So many options and so little work. Another very dependable option. Oh! And my dark red peonies! And I recently planted a ground cover but I’m afraid it’s going to take over. I think it’s called chameleon plant. It’s pretty cool with little white flowers. It’s too hard to pick one plant… oof!

    Reply
  770. Kelly on

    My fav….Peonies…every single one of them!

    Reply
  771. Nina H on

    Just speechless……can’t wait to read it 🥰

    Reply
  772. Felicity on

    I loved this interview! Thank yo so much for sharing Erin. Rachel’s book is right up my alley or should I say garden path. I absolutely adore spring flowering shrubs especially delicate tree blossoms that look amazing in a big or small vase as I await the spring flowers. Too many perennials or shrubs to mention that I love but roses, ferns and grasses are all right up the top of the list. I wonder if like Rachel I am a plant addict :)

    Reply
  773. Mel Scholz on

    I cannot wait to read this book! I’ve been learning mostly about the annuals forgot flowers but I absolutely love the focus on primals and Woody shrubs. Favorite perennials are hellebores, roses and peonies. Can’t forget lilacs and hydrangea and so much more! Have not grown delphinium yet but after seeing this I can’t wait!

    Reply
  774. Michelle on

    Peonies are my favorite. All of the different colors of blooms and also the foliage once the flowers are finished. I’d love to be able to identify some of the types I received from grandparents and found at sales.

    Reply
  775. Elizabeth Tovar on

    This book looks incredible. My favorite perennial has to be choke berry – absolutely gorgeous in arrangements and an excellent native plant where I live.

    Reply
  776. Danae Weaver on

    Peonies are my favorite perennials, they remind me of my mother and her lifelong pursuit of beauty. She wasn’t the most gifted gardener but enjoyed flowers immensely and in her later years worked to improve her knowledge of growing her own. – I absolutely have to get my hands on this book to begin my journey of learning this art of flower gardening. The Joy it can bring to others!

    Reply
  777. Sherry M on

    Sooo hungry hungry for those many season bouquets -especially the Early Spring bouquets–and so impressed by Chris’s use of hellebores and those beautiful greens, purples and pinks! I love hearing her mindful thoughtful moments in the garden – flowers, birds, insects- I can almost feel the color of the sun light – Thank you Erin and Chris!

    Reply
  778. Terri Lowdon on

    I love roses, peonies, lavender, jasmine, dahlias…….anything with a lovely fragrance! I would love to win a copy of Rachel’s new book, it looks amazing and inspiring! It would definitely be an awesome addition to my Floret books! 💜
    🌹🪻🌸🌺🌷🌻🌼🌹🪻🌸🌺🌷🌻🌹🪻🌹

    Reply
  779. Stephanie on

    I like to mix twigs, branches, and foliage in with my flowers. Some favorites are abelia, quince, Harry Lauder’s walking stick, epimedium, and hosta.
    Rachel’s lush, slightly unruly arrangements are brilliant. So glad she’s written a book.

    Reply
  780. Janet on

    Lilacs smell of springtime – on a stroll outside or a pitcher inside.

    Reply
  781. Cendi Botti on

    For years Erin has talked about ninebark. After planting some golden ninebark and enjoying it in the ground as well as in arrangements, this happened. — A Shasta Daisy “volunteered” to sit fashionably next to it, close to where I had planted curry, just for the smell. The two perennials and one shrub, put on quite a show. And I applaud them for their performance. This year especially, as I broke my leg and appreciate my plants that work when I can’t. 😍

    Reply
  782. Elizabeth Breuer on

    Oh what an exciting book. I LOVE that she is drawn to the flowers and plants for the arrangements rather than going to the garden with a preconceived idea.
    I cannot wait to have the book in my hands one day! One of my favorites is viburnum with the blue berries in the fall.

    Reply
  783. Krista on

    Thank you for conducting this interview! It is very difficult to choose just one, but it is hard to beat a burning bush for that beautiful fall color. I did just plant two serviceberries that I think might take over the top spot in the future though. I already love the color and shape of the leaves.

    Reply
  784. Angi on

    Choosing a favorite flower is one of the hardest things to do but Ranunculus are one of my absolute favorite flowers. The delicacy of their tissue-thin petals is absolutely amazing. There is a color for any mood you are feeling and their beauty is just so breathtaking.

    Reply
  785. Kat on

    This book sounds so wonderful! 🥰🤩 I love perennials… hard to pick just one! I think, if I have to, I’d say Peonies… but, then I also like Lady’s Mantle, Veronica, Monarda, hostas… etc etc. 😂 And then roses, mock orange, lilacs, ornamental flowering cherry trees… so many beautiful plants! 👌🥰

    Reply
  786. Stacey on

    My Favorite shrub is the Western Redbud. It’s native in California where I live. I love how stunning it is in bloom with bright magenta flowers that produce seed pods. Their leaves are equally beautiful in colors of green- blue in summer and yellow red rust in fall. I can’t tell you how happy they make me feel every time I see one. My husband purchased two for our property as a 12th wedding anniversary gift. I am beyond excited to see how they grow and develop to support native pollinators.

    Reply
  787. Janet on

    What a beautiful book!!
    One of my favorite perennials are Delphinium, I started some from seed this year, and planted them out in the garden. But then I read, it’s best to start them in the fall… Anyway .. maybe having a copy of the book would really help me lol. They are small, but thriving and weather has been weird this year.
    I can’t wait till next year when I have a row of beautiful, blooming delphiniums, hopefully!

    Reply
  788. Kathleen Houser on

    I live in the Midwest USA. I love my bee balm, coneflowers, yarrow, prairie smoke. The prairie plants do well here in my growing conditions. I also love my hydrangeas, wiegela bushes and my lilacs. Love reading about gardens and the flower arrangements in this article are so beautiful!

    Reply
  789. Jane on

    Thank you for the interview with Rachel and beautiful photos. Can’t say I have a favorite. Every plant is unique to its self and the season. I do enjoy Lilacs and hydrangeas especially the Oak-leaf hydrangea,
    .

    Reply
  790. Laura De Los Santos on

    Pushy Willows and cherry blossoms. Just love the whimsical arrangements both can make. Also Mt new favorite is cotton clusters. Fell in love with cotton fields in bloom when we visited South Carolina last year. Had never seen a cotton field in bloom until then and my gosh was it just magical. So beautiful in natural arrangements!

    Reply
  791. Amanda McDonald on

    Lily-of-the-valley are my lifelong favourite flowers. Their delicate blooms and captivating scent take me away to deeply imprinted childhood memories of my grandmother, in the sunshine, wading through the garden….
    Rachel’s book looks, equal parts, swoon-worthy and a trove of great insight.

    Reply
  792. Erica Stevens on

    Day lilies and alliums – I can never get enough of them.

    Reply
  793. Ruth Oie on

    My favorites have changed in the last six years as we have relocated to a new small city and and the deer population within the city limits is unreal. I presently enjoy clematis, foxglove and variety of sages as the deer don’t seem to have an appetite for them. Enjoyed the interview and the book looks gorgeous.

    Reply
  794. Alyssa M. on

    I adore my roses, but I think the humble, versatile, and productive echinecea or rudbeckia still has to win out for me! ♥️

    Reply
  795. Jodi on

    Such a timely post and interview – I’ve been wanting to plant more perennials and shrubs for cut flowers! So many lovelies to choose from, but I really enjoy the many types of hydrangea.

    Reply
  796. Kirsten F. on

    I love peonies! They have always reminded me of my childhood home in Vermont where they were abundant on my parent’s and grandparent’s properties. I got married there last year just as the bushes were coming into blossoms and it solidified them as a flower I will always hold dear!

    Reply
  797. Abby Ostler on

    One of my favorite Perrenials is Monarda… I call it the “Dr Seuss do you like my Hat” flower because it’s very jaunty and makes me smile. I like all the colors but especially the red… my Dad loved to call it the Bee Bop and my mom had it in her gardens .. nostalgic for me🌻❤️

    Reply
  798. Shari D. on

    My favorite shrubs to put in vases are lilacs, snowball viburnum, and all the flowering branches, especially dogwood.

    Reply
  799. Abby on

    HARD to choose, but always I come back to shrub roses. They make me so happy! On the other end of the spectrum, I love Blue Arrow Juniper. Such a delightful accent plant.

    Reply
  800. C Burks on

    Privet, my roses bushes, and globe thistle

    Reply
  801. Mary on

    Thank you for sharing your interview with Rachel. Her book looks gorgeous and so informative. I have a small backyard planted with perennials, shrubs, trees and some annuals. Hellebores are my favorite perennial. The flowers are so beautiful and I love that they stay in bloom for such a long time, adding color and beauty to the yard during the winter. Hydrangeas are my favorite shrub. I have panicle, mop head and lacecap ones and love them all for their gorgeous long lasting blooms.

    Reply
  802. Marianne Dasch on

    I’d have to say that catmint is one of my favorites. It smells wonderful and the bees are always on it! I think they love it too!😊.

    Reply
  803. Cindy Addison on

    I moved to a small coastal town with my new husband and baby many years ago. I found our home , by hearing about the overgrown garden from the realtor – “every tree blooms in spring “ . It was created over 40 years by a British woman who got her trees and shrubs by post. Many trees food producing , pears, plum cherries hazelnut , walnut and a huge beautiful old Transparent apple , were all productive standards of the day . Older shrubs filled the under story , the Guelder rose , massive old climbing roses and rhodos .. but the tree that starts my year , that takes my breath away every spring as I look up into it’s 60 foot ecosystem of unfurling leaves , is her copper beech . She ordered it from Scotland over 80 years ago. I think it has been the inspiration all along for my “ wild” garden . Its grey bark and graceful branches , burgundy leaves in spring turning green with a rosy hue , its beech nuts in fall , and then in winter , its massive stately presence quietly stands . I learned about cutting beech leaves for bouquets from Erin Benzakein ; their addition transforms any assortment from the garden into a woodland . My daughter will marry in our wild garden this August . I eagerly looked forward to filling 2 statuary urns with my beech , to stand with her . I will be forever grateful for that inspiration.

    Reply
  804. Emily on

    It’s so hard to pick just one! Roses, quince, and forsythia are my top 3 – and if pressed I’d have to say forsythia because it just screams “spring is coming!!” when I see it blooming in late winter, early spring. Also, my dear friend Cee, whose real name is Cynthia, likes to call it for-Cynthia — and she feels like this plant was made just for her!! I just love that it makes you feel hopeful, happy, and special!

    Reply
  805. Anne Munch on

    I love hydrangeas, both in the garden and as workhorses in arrangements. They can boot up the scale of an arrangement or just be used in a modern, edited arrangement. That being said it’s hard to pick just one shrub or perennial. For myself, I like the freshness of whites and greens, so hydrangeas really work for me. I grew up with a Granny and my mother going out to their gardens and just snipping whatever appealed to them – conifers, fruit branches, flowering bulbs – what ever looked healthy and would work in a small glass container or a large patterned bowl. It’s a very natural and local approach to arranging plant material and it still resonates with me. Looking forward to this book!

    Reply
  806. Ariel Balog on

    For my wedding this past February we used roses with cut greens from magnolia, American holly, and laurel. It was a lovely winter theme without being too Christmas-y! The magnolia leaves looked fantastic with my light brown velvet ribbon too!

    Reply
  807. Michelle Lucas on

    My all time favorite is the lilac! The beautiful white & purple blumes, the heady scent just perfumes the spring air. Adding to the scented air is the mixture of apple & pear blossoms. They make a beautiful arrangement and the wonderful smells make me smile!

    Reply
  808. Beth on

    Hydrangeas are also my favorite but getting them through the heat and drought of summer is a challenge. I don’t have room for much annual production so I am very interested in a better use of perennials.

    Reply
  809. Anita on

    My undefeated favourite is the rose 🧡

    Reply
  810. Debbie Fortney on

    My favorite shrub is Korean Spice Viburnum. I look forward to spring each year and the spicy scented blooming of this shrub in my gardens. I love how the flower clusters fade from light pink to white. KS was the first Viburnum I added to my yard. I liked it so much that I have since added a few other varieties of Viburnum to my yard and I love them all! ❤️

    Reply
  811. Jan on

    One of my favorite perennials is hostas. There are so many varieties. I love to use their leaves and blooms in arrangements.
    I also have pussy willows I like to incorporate into spring arrangements.

    Reply
  812. Brenda Miller on

    One of my favorite shrubs is Corylus contorta (contorted filbert) – great in all seasons, and the bare branches are perfect for arrangements!

    Reply
  813. Debbie Alger on

    Choosing a favourite flower would be like having to choose a favourite child/grandchildren however it all comes down to the seasons for me…Spring brings the awakening of my world with lilacs & peonies paired with sprigs from an arctic dogwood …Summer marches in with Jacob’s ladder & Lily of the valley surrounding both huge & miniature leaves of my many varieties of hostas and as the leaves of the maple trees change colour for Autumn, hydrangeas burst forth with hues of cream& lime to deep magenta & subtle strawberry pink, letting me know that there is always more to come and then, alas, Winter blows in putting all to rest but leaving sprigs of dogwood, drying hydrangea & sunflower heads still full of seed to make indoor arrangements for the season of rest…

    Reply
  814. Trisha Brink on

    Smoke Bush…such a wild name right? This jewel otherwise known as Cotinus coggygria is definitely a steadfast favorite of mine. I love that the sun produces this blackened ruddy-red leaf for contrast in my often pastel leaning spring bouquets. But the shade gives me a cool colored blueish-green, silver dollar sized leaf to compliment a woodsy arrangement filled with ferns & hosta. The puffy, ethereal blooms are magic in contemporary displays. I even like how I’m able to utilize the long, lean limbs into round woody wreath bases for my autumn & Christmas offerings. It’s an all around winner in my book!

    Reply
  815. Danielle on

    Roses… always roses! Looks like a wonderful book to add to my collection!

    Reply
  816. Maureen S on

    So excited for this book!! My favorite perennials right now are violas and Indian Blanket. I can’t wait to try others.

    Reply
  817. Eva on

    I am so needing such a book to learn more about growing perennials and shrubs for cutting! My favorite so far are hellebores!

    Reply
  818. Janelle Bretz on

    I love watching our deciduous trees — white oaks, Japanese and vine maples, cherry and dogwood trees, and more — leafing out in an array of greens in the spring. It means a canopy of shelter and food is growing for all the baby birds and animals that are being born. And, at long last, our colorful growing season here in the Pacific Northwest is under way!

    Reply
  819. Rachel on

    Hydrangeas and lilacs are my all-time favorites. I used to have hydrangeas in my yard. They would bloom all season in the loveliest array of colors. They fill up a vase so quickly and can easily stand on their own!

    Reply
  820. Linda O'Rourke on

    I live in the low Country of South Carolina and sometimes gardening can be a challenge due to the heat and humidity. I have made a small garden around the perimeter of my yard going from shade to sun. I try to use native plants that attract bees, butterflies and hummingbirds to support their needs. I am also interested in using woody varieties and perennials in the garden to support any cut flower arrangements that I am able to make and would love to learn more.

    Reply
  821. Jessica kitch on

    So hard to choose but I’ll have to go with one of our main crops, which is willow! Pussy willows and interested shapes and texture abound! Dried and fresh they are reliable and versatile!

    Thanks for sharing!

    Reply
  822. Connie Kelly on

    I live in New Mexico and the environment is tough for delicate flowers. To my surprise my Hellebore’s are doing well, reappearing at the last of winter. I hope to have success with other offerings this year. Thanks ladies for all your help with our garden dreams.

    Reply
  823. dawn on

    it would have to be daisies .. the natural ones that fill a field .. they always feel so happy and welcoming :)

    Reply
  824. Jonanne on

    Currently, Magic Carpet Spirea. It has pretty pink flowers that look nice in a vase with Roses :). Would love to be able to read the book and learn more!!

    Reply
  825. Hilary on

    Looking forward to reading this book. I’m a lover of my black lace elderberry bushes… and our wild Lupine season which is currently in full glory. Thank you!

    Reply
  826. Susan Friedman on

    There are many, but first and always would have to be lilacs. Their delicate beauty, aroma and history are what makes this a perfect favorite. And of course, the colors are always special ❤️

    Reply
  827. Tara Westby on

    So excited for this book! My favorite perennial has to be lilac, although as I am very new to this wide world of flowers, I’m excited to learn more about perennials and woody flowers.

    Reply
  828. Anna Cacoilo on

    It’s hard to choose but one perennial that stand out the most for me is the upright sedum. Looks great in the garden, has an abundance of flowers, comes in pink, rose, purple, burgundy, green and chartreuse. They make a beautiful statement just by themselves in vase. Great tip to grow more of sedum is to snap the stem and directly plant it in the ground.

    Reply
  829. Lee Ann Parrish on

    This book looks fantastic! I’ve always been a lilac fan. Brings back fond memories of my grandparents’ farm & my grandmother’s lilac bush. The fragrance was amazing.

    Reply
  830. Niina on

    I love Dogwood (Cornus), so many lovely varieties with exciting foliage and pretty flowers and the bare branches look amazing in the winter!

    Reply
  831. Lisa D. on

    Love the photos and the book sounds amazing! My favorite perennial is fairly common here in the Midwest: purple coneflower. :)

    Reply
  832. Deborah Plunkett on

    As a newish gardener (my second season actually growing ornamentals and herbs), I’m in love with all my perennials (and enjoy the annuals, too).
    But, as hard as it is to select just one, I’d have to choose the David Auston shrub roses. We’ve had some hard weather the last 2-3 years, drought, extreme temperatures, very little snow, but late killing frost, and now weeks of steady rain. I lost some plants, those that survived didn’t bloom this year, or their blooms came and went quickly (azalea, rhododendron, lilacs, alliums). The roses came through beautifully, thriving, and bringing in lots of ongoing blooms.

    (If I could choose a second, it would be the inkberry holly, they came through so beautifully as well, they provide privacy, some shade, and I love their petite, delicate flowers.)

    Your photos are stunning, and Rachel’s book is a perfect sourcebook of inspiration and practical information. Congratulations to Rachel, and thank you both for sharing your knowledge with us.

    Reply
  833. Sarah V on

    So excited for this book! I have several varieties of Coreopsis in my garden, the moonbeam variety is my favorite. I love the color and texture it brings to my garden beds.

    Reply
  834. Amy on

    I love the clovers… red , crimson, yellow. They are beautiful, long blooming, compliment anything they grow next to or are placed next to in an arrangement. Not to mention they are super friend to pollinators and soil, germinate easily, prolific, and seemingly disease free!

    Reply
  835. Jo Ann Fritsch on

    I love Bleeding Hearts. They make me happy I can’t help but smile when I see them hanging on the branch.

    Reply
  836. Jojo Shepard on

    I always had a few dahlias in my garden, but last year I grew a lot of them and fell in love with the summer full of flowers, so many colors and shapes. And watching the bumblebees on Rumble Bumble all day every day brought extra magic.

    Reply
  837. Deborah on

    I really enjoy my butterfly bushes and the smell to me is of honey. I enjoy just about any flowers, but hydrangeas are so beautiful.

    Reply
  838. Maylene W. on

    The Green and Gorgeous tour was the one that spoke to me during the workshop. It was inspiring.

    Reply
  839. Robin on

    Absolutely Love!!! I’ve been looking into growing more Perinnials and this book is perfect!! Still love My Annuals, but looking forward to growing more Perinnials!

    Reply
  840. Jacque Hutson on

    I love baptisia/wild indigo, both the flowers and the foliage. I wish it bloomed longer!

    Reply
  841. KC on

    Can’t wait to read the book– looks lovely. I added bee balm to my north Texas garden a couple of years ago– she is putting on a show right now in the intense heat we are having– need to add more!!

    Reply
  842. Marie Brodeur on

    I love that she comments on the fact that perennials and shrubs are a natural part of the environment that surrounds us. It reminds me that we should respect our natural surroundings and try to work with it. I love many perennials but my favorite ones are those that can also be medicinal such as echinaceas or calendulas. Such wise and generous plants :)

    Reply
  843. Mak on

    I love Hellibores and daffodils they just are so lovely after a cold dreary winter

    Reply
  844. Megan Kim on

    I’m excited to fill my north garden beds with hydrangeas and hellebores. Not popular here in Southern California (zone10), but seems to be doing well so far.

    Reply
  845. Kim Felcher on

    I’ve just started my cut flower garden so for years I’ve been using my perennials and stuff I find at the edges of fields, woods and ditches (there’s some really cool stuff that just grows in the wild and, bonus, it’s free!) My favorite perennial is false indigo…it last forever in a vase and I use it as a flower in early summer and for foliage all summer and fall. I have both purple and yellow flowered varieties. My other 2 favs are spirea (again as a flower while it’s flowering and foliage before and after) and weigelia (flowers and then as foliage)…both surprised me with how long they last once cut. Oh, and my coneflowers…soooooo many colors and shapes! Oh, and chive flowers are super cool, last forever and are a different shape from anything else I have. So many options, I find new cool stuff all the time!

    Reply
  846. Lanelle on

    One of my favorite perennials is the purple coneflower. I love the arrangement in this article that combines woodsy with the bright flowers! Thank you for the interview and the information about the new book!

    Reply
  847. Wendy on

    I love plants so this was a hard decision to make! I love mock oranges for their fragrant bloom, ornamental red elderberry for the beautiful leaves, and bee balm for its bright pop of color along with the amount of hummingbirds that visit it in my garden.

    Reply
  848. Patty A. on

    My garden continues to evolve, and this year I’ve added more roses into the mix of my favorite perennials such as salvias and rudbeckia. I’m hoping for some beautiful bouquets.

    Reply
  849. Carlo on

    While my wife and I don’t have a “cutting” garden, we do have a very ‘cuttable’ many woodies and perennials are tried in arrangements in the house. No pruning happens outside without material being cleaned and brought in. Like many others here it is nearly impossible to pick a favorite and it changes constantly. Two stalwarts—the glossy leaves of Ilex and Cycas.. both are useful in arrangements and are often featured on their own. (A particular favorite any time of year is a centerpiece of four silver mint julep cups filled with trimmed Ilex tip cuttings—low enough to see over at the dinner table.)

    Reply
  850. Tammi P on

    American beautyberry is one of my favorites. The delicate light pink flowers are opening now and the purple berries to follow are amazing, with the bonus that it’s native here.

    Reply
  851. Johanna Cash on

    My middle name is Heather which has led me to love Heather bushes. They’re woody and perennial and I love that there are varieties that bloom in different seasons! They also attract pollinators to my garden which is awesome!

    Reply
  852. Julia on

    Mine are Rose’s! This book sounds lovely! What awesome pictures.

    Reply
  853. Melissa Weaver Dunning on

    I have a new focus on native shrubs, and my current focus is on bayberry, spice bush and ink berry.

    Reply
  854. Nila Mae Howard on

    I’ve always loved lilacs. I climbed in woody shrubby trees as a child intoxicating myself with their scent. I have several in my small yard and eagerly await their blooming each year. I also am fascinated with all the arrangements that Rachel makes. They are beautiful and interesting combinations.

    Reply
  855. Joanne on

    I have always been drawn to the Rudbeckia family as their rich colors and diversity of shapes is just wonderful. I really cant get enough of them in my garden.
    Rachel’s book sounds beautiful and a good garden resource, I’m excited to read it.

    Reply
  856. Jen on

    I adore plants and flowers. I love roses and hydrangeas. Im definitely a beginner and would really love to win a copy of Rachel’s new book … it looks absolutely gorgeous. P.S. Floret Flowers is my favorite 💕for inspiration !

    Reply
  857. Susan Towndrow on

    I have always wanted a cutting garden even before I had heard the term. It is only now in my golden years that I actually have one. It is on borrowed land on the banks of the St. Lawrence River, with full sun and wonderful soil and it fill my heart with joy! My favourite is the double Feverfew that I grew from seed a couple of years ago and now just pops up generously here and there. 😘

    Reply
  858. Cheri johnson on

    I wish I could narrow my list down to my top 50!! Every flower I see, whether annual or perennial, leaves me in awe. This book is a must for me!

    Reply
  859. Angela Gross on

    Sounds like a lovely and useful resource. I am especially drawn to perennials. I have Rosemary planted near a corner of the pathways in my garden. I enjoy it for so many reasons, but can’t say it is my favorite, but it does bring constant enjoyment: scent, pollinators, cooking… I loved seeing the hellebores on the front of Rachel’s new book. In the last three years I have planted several varieties of them.

    Reply
  860. Alycia on

    How can I pick just one?! Phlox, Hosta, Peony, Salvia. I love how much color and joy flowers bring to the world. I love to add different varieties to my garden every year knowing that they will come again. My girls have also caught the joy of flowers. It all started with a pink anemone so maybe that’s my favorite because that’s where it all began.

    Reply
  861. Vicki Tayloe on

    I have always loved roses, wild, cultivated they always bring me joy. Mixing in local plants and creating unique flower arrangements is the best of traditional floral gardens and the native plants. I can’t wait to read this book!

    Reply
  862. Gwen on

    I love countless perennials, Daphne’s to early spring bluebells to foxgloves, delphinium, feverfew, yarrow, black eyed Susan’s, cosmos , hydrangea and Japanese anemones , to name a few! Will be needing this beautiful book!

    Reply
  863. Sarah on

    Snowball viburnum!! I want one for my garden but don’t have a spot yet

    Reply
  864. Stephanie on

    Such a tough thing to choose a favorite perennial! I think hellebores might be it. They are the first to show green leaves after a long winter. The flowers are beautiful and change over time – even faded they are lovely. Pretty in the garden or cut arrangements and the leaves are every bit as interesting and useful in bouquets as the flowers.

    Reply
  865. Rachael on

    Peonies are my favourite (at the moment) and bring all the glory into a nice vase in the house

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  866. Colleen on

    Hi Erin. Thank you for your dedication to floral beauty in so many avenues. Love Rachel’s arrangements. I live and Florida and am challenged with embracing the tropical. My current favorite is Queens Wreath vine.

    Reply
  867. Lynn Shepard on

    Hi, I am new to gardening and just planted peonies this year. They are beautiful! I would love to learn more!

    Reply
  868. Mary on

    How to pick just one? I’d say the perennial I cut from most to get some depth in arrangements is a smoke bush. Thanks so much for the interview and sharing details about Rachel and her new book!

    Reply
  869. Christina on

    What a great resource Rachel has created! So excited to dive in! It’s difficult to choose a favorite, but I sure do love Hydrangeas!

    Reply
  870. Marcia G on

    Love the use of the natural branches and incorporating those into a flower arrangement.

    Reply
  871. Jo Ann Wright on

    Perennials have been my passion for more than 30 years. They are the backbone of my garden and especially my cutting garden. I had a cut flower business with my young grandsons for 2 years and my perennial garden got us through many times when there were few cut flowers available from annual flowers. Perennials are like old friends that come for a visit every year. I have some that have survived for years and are not so available to purchase anymore. I can’t say which is my favorite because I think they all are each year at their glorious bloom time catch my attention. I do a weekly arrangement (or two) for my daughter-in-laws place of business. It is such a joy to make something that all will enjoy as they enter her shop. I love working with flowers and enjoying the beauty that only God could create.

    Reply
  872. Shannon Jay on

    I love going into the garden and choosing the flowers which are blooming to create bouquets. Flowering perennials bring birds into the space and that is such a joy to see!

    Reply
  873. Andrea V on

    Baptisia is my favorite at the moment.

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  874. Kimberly on

    It’s so hard to pick a favorite flower but if I most I do love Ranunculus !!!!

    Reply
  875. Amy Richardson on

    I love hellebores…the first little flowers peek out reminding that winter doesn’t last forever.

    Reply
  876. Loren on

    I was so inspired by the interview and the idea of using perennials and non traditional flowers and plants applied to me. I have a great backyard with lovely trees and would like to incorporate a side yard with perennials instead of a fence. The picture were inspirational and motivational. Thank you for all the beauty you bring us.

    Reply
  877. Bj on

    I’ve been planting elderberries, hawthornes and herbs to attract wildlife and pollinators. I’m a micro rose hobby grower on a tiny lot and want to add foraged plants as well for wild bouquets.

    Reply
  878. Elisabeth Waring on

    Where to start!
    Perennials have become my favorite resource in my garden, and I definitely want to learn more. Every year I wait expectantly for my lime-light hydrangeas, the salvias, anemones, sea hollies, and a host of other beloved plants.

    Excited to read this beautiful work!

    Reply
  879. Linda Hovgaard on

    One of my favorite flowers is Queen Anne’s Lace. I love the delicate lace flowers and fernlike foliage – gorgeous in bouquets. I have grown the Floret chocolate, green and white varieties from seed. This year I also grew the Floret Autumn Splendor Hibiscus from seed and just transplanted my starts into the garden. I can tell these are going to be one of my favorite foliage plants – beautiful. I am so excited about Rachel Siegfried’s book. I love incorporating woody cuttings into my bouquets and fillers that are unusual and stand out. I also love just cutting a bouquet of branches to display by themselves. Winning a copy of her book would be such a treat and honor!

    Reply
  880. Karen Singh on

    Hi! My favorite shrubs are viburnums. I like all of them but the leathery leafy ones. They bloom from very early spring to summer and can grow as they will or be pruned as you wish. Some are fragrant and all are lovely.

    Reply
  881. Val Taylor on

    One of my favorite shrubs is buttercup winter hazel, Corylopsis pauciflora. I like to force winter branches to bloom around Christmas. I include in arrangements during the holidays and the twigs look great with evergreens. They open to sweet creamy yellow flowers. I also love watching their pleated like leaves open in spring and they have a cool purple margin. Birds like to nest in them and forage. It’s a very versatile, fun shrub to have.

    Reply
  882. Leora on

    I’ve been really excited about this book because I want to learn more about perennials and woodies. I’m interested because I love that they add to the garden ecosystem by providing for the songs birds and pollinators, and I can’t wait to learn which ones make excellent cut flowers! I don’t have a favorite yet but looking forward to learning which ones to plant next!

    Reply
  883. Kyle Adams on

    It’s hard to pick a favorite but I’ll go with bleeding heart

    Reply
  884. Kathi Wilson on

    I love lavender. We have 2 different types growing in our yard – I do not know the names. I just appreciate the beauty, fragrance and differences. It is only in the past year, since finding Growing Floret that I have realized and begun cutting the beautiful flowers, and plants my husband has planted and nurtured, to make arrangements for our home and for others in our neighborhood, that I share them with. Erin and Floret has added a new dimension to his hobby. I also share the arrangements with family through technology.

    Reply
  885. Samantha Robillard on

    In 2021, my husband and I bought our first home. We knew going into that there was a lot of work to be done on the inside and out. I had a blank slate to work with for landscaping and that is when I took a dive into perennials! There are so many I have discovered and found that I love, but my favorite has to be peonies! This past spring was my first spring to see the first blooms for a couple plants and it brought so much joy knowing that my hard work and dedication to plants over the last two years is showing!

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  886. SUZ Kling on

    I garden in the middle of a 39 acre PNW forest on the Oregon coast that should satisfy all native plant movement proponents……beside an old micro one room cabin/think aging hippies searching for affordable real estate in the late 70’s……..there is a small circle of occasional sun…..chairs are positioned…Beverley Nichols is being read multiple times….I contemplate a swath in pots (difficult to dig holes in soil filled with Douglas Fir roots) filled with Chantilly peach snapdragons…….some summers I dare to add multiple colors…..this makes me feel brave and happy……..

    Reply
  887. Kara on

    Berries! =) Blueberries are my favorite perennial here. They’re beautiful to look at and they feed my family.

    Reply
  888. Cassidy on

    Wow! I need this book! I’ve actually been thinking about adding lots of perennials to my farm the past few weeks, but didn’t know where to start! I only have a few at the moment, so I am hoping to dig through this book for suggestions!

    As far as my favorite goes, that is a very good question haha! To name a few of my favorites, I absolutely love delphinium, hellebore, foxglove, echinacea, yarrow, salvia, English garden roses, and basically all the perennials haha! I don’t think I could ever pick a favorite! Whichever one is in front of me at the time, I will tell you that is my favorite!

    Reply
  889. Kathleen Jackson on

    🌿 O, Yay!! Mahalo to Rachel!

    I shared this interview with my husband this morning because the “micro week” concept just lifted me straight out of my 4 season brain! What a truly inspiring moment we shared as we agreed to create our own unique seasons beginning with the arrival of our favorite mourning doves. I’m grateful you two ladies fostered a concept of planting a seed called “perennial permission!” Not just thinking outside the box but planting your ideas out in your Hügelkultur bed…

    I appreciate your continued inspiration. You sharing your wisdom means the world to me, to remain focused on growing the good things in life. 🌱

    🦋🌻

    Reply
  890. Lora on

    Snowdrops and daffodils! They bring me so much joy and say winter is almost over but most importantly – deer don’t eat them! Ha!

    Reply
  891. Susan on

    Wonderful chat with Rachael… so much inspiration. I’m just getting started after a recent move. New landscaping fun, but boy is it a lot of work this time around, maybe it is my age talking to me. Mostly a blank slate to start with and so far the trees/shrubs are going in and then to the under plantings. Trying to get perennials in and learn the new zone and what I can keep my monsters away from (aka deer). So far I’m loving the Natchez Crape Myrtles, Hydrangeas, Confederate Rose, Lantana, Hosta and various Grasses, along with the climbing roses that we just planted.
    I can’t wait to get my hands on the new book, it will be a wonderful read especially when the heat hits and it is to hot to do any planting.
    Thank you for sharing… I love this plant community!!

    Reply
  892. Chris Wayland on

    I’d love to have peonies. The flowers and the foliage are great for home bouquets.

    Reply
  893. Catharine on

    Mock Orange in bloom now is a short season favourite, the fragrance wafting on the air is magic.

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  894. Sarah Allen on

    Thanks for sharing your wisdom Rachel! I love the lavender perennial bush!

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  895. Diane on

    I just removed a tree from my small perennial boarder and am working now on enriching the soil and figuring out what to plant in this, now sunny, spot. I’m looking forward to reading the book and using the plant guide as I start planning for fall and next spring’s planting. I plan to incorporate all of my favorites- peonies, alliums, larkspurs and foxgloves.

    Reply
  896. sushma kommineni on

    My favorite shrub and perennials are peonies. Their bloom period is short, but they make a statement in the garden or in the vase. They are a symbol of elegance and beauty packed with a delicate fragrance. They can live lifetime! Thinking about them makes me realize that I need to enjoy every tiny moment that is before my eyes and not take time for granted.

    Reply
  897. Kristine H on

    In 2021 my family and I decided it was time to upgrade to a bigger home. While I was a little hesitant to move after loving my home and garden of 20 years I caved in !!!! One of the biggest reasons was the house we were looking at had a great backyard to start a new garden and this most wonderful tree as I thought it was. Turns out it’s a Paeonia suffruticosa, ‘Joy of Longevity’ Japanese tree peony . The very first spring she put on the most amazing show of beautiful flowers I have ever seen!!! Needless to say I’m in love with her to this very day!!! 💕💕

    Reply
  898. Carol H on

    I live near the Oregon coast – plenty of wind and not much summer heat. Rose Jude the Obscure does beautifully here and has become a favorite! It’s filled with gorgeous blossoms in June, and continues to flower throughout the summer.

    Reply
  899. eric on

    I love the idea of using more perennials, natives, and nontraditional flowers and plants.
    Thanks!

    Reply
  900. Elizabeth Ludwig on

    My favorites are my tiger lilies. They have always been one of mya favorites since I was little.

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  901. Shannon conley on

    One of my favorites is vitex. It grows so well here and the beautiful purple and white flowers add a wonderful vertical shape to my rounder cut flowers.

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  902. sara on

    favorite perennials, easy- roses. hands down roses. for all the work they are, all the problem solving and constant observation, every time they emerge beautiful and fragrant and full of personality, its all worth it. they might be my first flower love. and in western ny its a bonus to have them as perennials that can tough out the harsh winters up here.

    i feel like the topics on these blog posts come out at the most perfect time when i need :)

    Reply
  903. Tatiana Hodges on

    Viburnum is lovely spilling over the side of a vase. It reminds me of my grandmother’s garden when I was a small child.

    Reply
  904. Sarah hissong on

    My favorite are lilacs… I have shed a tear when the season is over.. I just want to lay surrounded by them in the grass and soak up their scent in their short season the whole time. Eep! Love them.

    Reply
  905. Kartini on

    We’ve recently moved and my goal is to put more perennials in our garden and landscaping for cut flowers. Echinacea is one of my favorite perennials that I look forward to planting in our garden.

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  906. Cathrine Zachara on

    Peonies! I would love to fill my yard with more flowering perennials!

    Reply
  907. Suzanne Gappa on

    So many things that I love in the shrub and perennial garden…. But hands down, my favorites are the two ‘Blue Moon’ wisteria vines that grow on the pergola on our patio. It is a labor of love each early spring (three hours per vine!) to prune them for good flowering. And then, once in flower, we love watching the giant bumble bees gorge themselves on nectar and gather pollen. Our son calls them “dirigibees” for the way they hover and hum above our heads. One of the joys of late spring and early summer in our Zone 4 garden!

    Reply
  908. Carol Hibbard on

    What an inspiring interview! For many years, my garden was primarily fruits and vegetables for feeding our family on a shoestring. As all have grown and it’s just the two of us , transitioning to flowers, mostly perennials, has brought so much joy to me and the many I share my flowers with. I’d love to have her beautiful book to read and as a reference through the coming years!

    Reply
  909. Alison Hirt on

    Queen Annes Lace has been a favorite of mine since I was a child, the smell takes me back to summers on Cape Cod and I find its beautiful unbrelles old fashioned yet wild.

    Reply
  910. Heather Schouten on

    I am so excited to read this book! I grew up working in a perennial greenhouse as a summer student, and fell in love with Crocosmia every year. They seemed to be unlike anything that typically grew in our Ontario gardens and just had the most beautiful tropical colors!

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  911. N on

    Foxgloves!

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  912. Jan Shefferly on

    The voluptuous lavender that is starting to swallow one of my garden beds in my pint sized garden has totally captured my heart! The bees and butterflies are attracted to it and there are so many ways to enjoy and preserve it. Happy gardening!

    Reply
  913. Robin Lamb on

    It would have to be peonies. I love the blooms!

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  914. Elizabeth Sallee Bauer on

    What amazing timing! I was just taking a break from planting a huge row of catmint. We have found we can never have enough catmint plants, the flowers are great spires but the foliage is such a wonderful filler, we use it constantly.

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  915. joy gower on

    Cannot wait to read and see the beauty of the gatden on the pages of the book!

    Reply
  916. Nancy Grant on

    I have falling in love with the itoh peonies. I love all peonies but these are bigger, supposedly don’t need peony rings and can have as many as 50 blossoms on an established plant. Amazing!

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  917. Sharon on

    My favourite perennials are peonies. I have eight of them in my garden!

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  918. Barb Johnson on

    Got so carried away, I forgot to share what my favorite cutting perennial or shrub was! I’m a huge fan of height, so I gravitate towards foxglove, delphiniums and forsythia for that, but my favorites are dahlias

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  919. Olive Mondello on

    Cape plumbago with its gorgeous sky blue flower clusters is a highlight of my summer garden!

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  920. Paula on

    Here on our acreage in central Texas, we have a sea of black-eyed susans each Spring, along with milkweed, phlox, Texas thistle, coreopsis, monardas, and indian blanket and paintbrush. So, I guess my favorites are the things that grow here as intended.

    Reply
  921. Cheryl Roe on

    I love when the Peonies and False Indigo bloom together in early Spring.

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  922. Beth on

    What a beautiful book. I’m so inspired to bring some of these plants to our landscape!

    Reply
  923. Jackie on

    Such an inspiring title. Your interview with Rachel reminds me of my morning walks inspiring each unique bouquet I would take to work. One of my favorite plants is the one Floret often uses, my burgundy leaved ninebark. It makes such a great base for the other flowers to shine. But truly my first real perennial basic are my hosta leaves. I have green, variegated white and guacamole colored that can surround a bouquet really helping the flowers stand out and look regal. They last a while too. I have brought the standard green ones from my first house, basically it was a shady hosta filled 2 acres. They are some of my foundation plants here on my sunny hilltop. I have 14 beautiful acres and roam it freely picking what nature gives me and combining it with my garden flowers. I would love a copy of Rachel’s new book for more inspiration.

    Reply
  924. Susan Lewis on

    I have recently fallen in love with Black and Blue Sage. The hummingbirds just love it and it contrasts nicely with bright blooms on my annuals such as Oklahoma salmon zinnias.

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  925. Elaine Gilman on

    As a home gardener, I am appreciating more and more the workhorses of the perennial shrubs. Thank you for the great insight and resource!
    Elaine G.

    Reply
  926. Susan on

    Hydrangeas from fresh blooms to dried flowers!

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  927. Sangita on

    I love lilacs and hydrangeas, lilacs, because their scent is just lovely and hydrangeas because they are so pretty. All flowers are pretty, but those two just make me happy.

    Reply
  928. Norene on

    I have many peonies and can never get enough of them. I also love the mock orange when it is in bloom.

    Reply
  929. Faith on

    I absolutely love peonies, however my snap dragons do incredibly well where we live and really fill my yard with color. Roses in shades of sunsets will stop me in my tracks, poppies of all varieties are my favorite of all flowers. Delphiniums, Larkspur will break the bank for at any garden store. I love them all. :) can’t wait to read the book.

    Reply
  930. Ashley Van Meter on

    Blueberries and witch hazel! Blueberries provide 4 seasons of interest and fruit for us and the animals, witch hazel is so unique and blooms in winter. My witch hazel has been getting these galls every year on its leaves that have not caused much harm to its growth, really, but that have actually added a fair amount of interest in their shape and color.

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  931. Melinda on

    For perennials, I’m obsessed with nepeta and scabiosa in arrangements right now, they both last forever and look so whimsical and their colors are perfectly harmonious together. In the garden they are incredibly floriferous and long blooming all while being zero maintenance. They’re the perfect plants haha! For woody plants, I always find myself using Andromeda foliage because it has so much delicate variation in color, from a bright warm green to a bronze.

    Reply
  932. Terri on

    This book is going to be a wonderful treasure trove for us shrub lovers!! How can I pick just one?!? I love lilacs, hydrangeas, snowball viburnums, roses, hardy hibiscus, spirea, yellow and red twig dogwoods to name a few but a big bowl of glorious blue hydrangeas will make me swoon!!!!

    Reply
  933. Becky Brownlie on

    I am in love with my Ribus aureum (clove current). It is a small shrubby American native plant that is beautiful in its subtlety…until of course, it blooms and you pass her by to be stopped in your tracks by her gorgeous spicy clove scent! My current was a gift from my sister and is planted near my front door and now holds a very special place in my heart💛

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  934. Barb Johnson on

    It’s so wonderful when 2 people you admire, colide in such a delightful way! I don’t think I’ve ever been slightly jealous of both sides before! To tour Rachel’s gardens or to have Erin pop over for a visit! Thank you, Erin for sharing this journey of your with is and thank you Rachel for giving us such a wonderful book to learn from and enjoy! Thank you, thank you, thank you to you both!

    Reply
  935. Diane - Wildhorse Ranch on

    Thanks for sharing all this wonderful information with us! I love the Daisy’s – they are my go to perennial. We have lots of wildland on our ranch near Rocky Mountain House AB where I forage for unusual accent items for bouquets. I love the “wild look”!

    Reply
  936. Jane Purdy on

    The mock orange, state shrub of Idaho, is one of my favorites every spring! Fragrant, dreamy clusters of white bring so many opportunities for whimsical, dreamy arrangements!

    Reply
  937. Sheila Edwards on

    daphne odora summer ice – we love our beautiful, and enormous daphne of many years, (after planting and failing with two tries of this variety ) who blooms and shares her fragrance to our neighborhood. Recently has spread with two daughters : D

    Reply
  938. Courtney on

    Currently obsessed with my Lilac tree in my front yard + all the hydrangeas!! Can’t wait to read this book!

    Reply
  939. Peggy on

    I have so many favorites but one of them is Echinacea or Coneflowers. They have so many different colors and sizes. They bloom for a long time. Every year I try to get one of newest.

    Reply
  940. Pam on

    Reading about other people and their passion always fills my soul with new wonder and inspiration. After all, we all should be aspiring to follow our own unique passions as we pass through this gift of life. I moved to the PNW in 2021 and this is my first year to grow perennials. As I look out over my garden, I am enjoying the foxglove, calla lilies, and bleeding hearts so for today these are my favorites😉

    Reply
  941. Kim Beaumont on

    Lilacs and lavender but there are many others. I started gardening with only perennials and shrubs and have a yard full of them. I didn’t really plant annuals (except for a few pots or hanging baskets) until I found Floret. I can’t wait to read this book!

    Reply
  942. Michelle Gillette on

    Excited to view this book. I am in the midst of planting 10 acres and can use the ideas!

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  943. Suzanne on

    I was so excited about the book. I forgot to post my favorite bush or perennial. I love phlox. They are light and airy!

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  944. Sheila on

    I love Deutzias! Beautiful flowers and an easy care shrub❤️

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  945. Jennifer Neville on

    It’s hard to nail down a favorite! Especially when, with each season there is something new and amazing, literally popping up. But I have always loved the arrival of lilacs. They signal the beginning of summer and the desire to run outside and start digging in the garden once again!

    Reply
  946. Lindsey Reed Curl on

    What a wonderful resource! We just moved out to our 11 acres in Alabama about five years ago and since then, I have been trying to think through, redesign and grow beauty that is functional and sustainable! There were already some azaleas on site around the home, but also some wild hydrangeas in the woods that we were able to split and plant and add as ornamentals in a few choice spots! This book is exactly what I’ve been looking for to learn how to add the right thing in the right place, so that I can bring in cut flowers as well! My favorite is hydrangea- all varieties!!! We are in the country but my favorite garden style is New England so I’m trying to create a nice combination of classic, manicured, and casual! I’m excited to look through this new book!

    Reply
  947. Gigi Sharp on

    Huckleberry. The shiny dark leaves and scaly bark set off the color and form of meadow flowers. With the added benefit of the blooms and berries for us and wildlife.

    Reply
  948. Mindy on

    This is exactly what I’m looking for! We’re moving onto some property and I want to landscape with mostly seasonal perennial floral bliss in mind but I haven’t quite found the resource to help me choose–till now!! I love forsythia, and lupine, and foxglove, and camellia, and apple blossoms, and tiny wild irises, and antique trailing roses, and unfurling ferns, and daffodils with pinky peach edges, or petals like clouds! I’m also a novice potter and am always looking at the lovely pots you flower farmers use for the lovely photos like in this post!

    Reply
  949. Katie Bach on

    One of my favorites is Nigella. The texture & flowers are so amazing and they last forever. They will reseed if you let them. It has gotten hard to find the seeds in the Pacific Northwest but I always buy a package when I see them .
    My other favorite is Delphineum . I love, love these. The vibrant blue’s are amazing.

    Reply
  950. Suzanne on

    I love the enthusiasm in this interview! I can’t wait to read this book and swoon over the gorgeous pictures!

    Reply
  951. Diane D on

    Roses and delphinium are some favourites here. I tried winter sowing for the first time this year and have planted a dozen new delphinium plants in my garden. Arrangements to come. This book looks wonderful. Thank you!!

    Reply
  952. Margaret Wellik on

    Raspberries are a favorite here! The foliage is resilient and a wonderful shade of green!

    Reply
  953. Kristy on

    One of my favorite shrubs is Mock Orange. Can’t wait to see this book.

    Reply
  954. Melissa Smith on

    We have a little farm-based brewery and I love my hardy but delicate looking geums (to add with some fragrant sweet peas for the bathroom counter arrangements ;)).

    Reply
  955. Bethany Stewart on

    Lilacs! I just planted several and cannot wait to watch them (and smell them) in the years to come!

    Reply
  956. Kathleen Miller on

    Catmint, Red Valerian, Yarrow, Salvia, Lavender, Purple Leaf Sand Cherry: these beauties are reliable in my southern Rockies garden. I am always on the hunt for more perennials and shrubs; I prefer full gardens to attract more songbirds if possible and they need places to hide from the hawks and owls.

    Reply
  957. Justine Muench on

    I love hostas so many colors and stripes and ruffles they add a lot of body to an arrangement ( if the deer don’t eat them first)!

    Reply
  958. Katherine on

    PEONIES ~ my favorites were already established when my family moved to an 1890s home in 1980! It’s 2023 and the peonies I brought from that home to my first home in another city continue to thrive!

    Reply
  959. Steph P on

    I am so new to this gardening thing and so eager to learn more! Last fall I planted two simple hydrangeas and the joy and excitement of watching them grow ans bloom this year had been amazing! I hope to keep expanding my garden, but those hydrangeas I think will always be my favorite.

    Reply
  960. Judy Sullivan on

    We recently moved into a home by the ocean and are trying to learn more about coastal gardening in terms of what works best in this environment (lots of wind and fog!). Regardless of location, one of my favourite flowers is the begonia. They remind me of a rose but without the thorns!

    Reply
  961. Karen Boldra on

    Smokebush. The deep burgundy leaves are always wonderful with the orange, red, bronze dahlias I grow.

    Reply
  962. Catherine Stewart on

    Finding little treasure in the forest and around our property for arrangements is one of my favorite things to do. We have a smoke bush that was already planted here and I love the dark reddish/burgundy leaves. It pairs so well with blush & white flowers to give a beautiful contrast of light & dark. So excited to read Rachel’s book and learn more.

    Reply
  963. Kara on

    Peonies and lilacs – and they each need their own season!

    Reply
  964. Leni Liakos on

    Lilacs would have to be my favorites but they don’t grow well here in the SF Bay Areaa. Mock orange, is another r

    Reply
  965. Rudy on

    Foxglove is one of my favorites! I just love how bumblebees will crawl right in 😁. Thank you or introducing us to this lovely lady and her beautiful garden.

    Reply
  966. Jenny on

    My favorite perennial is a Lily. It started from one plant that I purchased and now I have four barrels of beautiful orange flowers around my house, and several other ones that I have shared with my coworkers.

    Reply
  967. Liz A on

    Excellent. I agree with the concept of micro seasons and , thus, each seems to have its own ⭐️ . So how can you pick just one favorite.? If forced though, I eagerly await the appearance of my Lenten Roses each year as it signals the end of my winter hibernation. What has been my greenhouse focus is now shared with the awakening gardens and my passion for working in tandem with Mother Nature in all her vast beauty.

    Reply
  968. Sarah J. on

    I love hydrangeas & coneflowers. Hydrangeas for the variety of blooms, textures, leaves & size. In winter they lend some interest to the landscape as some flowers dry & stay attached to stems. Coneflowers for heartiness, beauty, & simplicity in their care.

    Reply
  969. Leslie Elgert on

    I love Lilacs. They are so beautiful and the scent feels like spring to me. They make wonderful bouquets and cheer up any room they are in.

    Reply
  970. Emily Lucas on

    My favourite is my mock orange. Although it’s only around for a very short time every year here, I cut as many stems as I can to enjoy for as long as possible. The scent is to die for.

    Reply
  971. Verna Mirtaningtyas on

    I dont have any garden yet, but love to see some pic of flowers it as a runaway from my rent place 🥰

    Reply
  972. Abby Gibbs on

    On Memorial Day in Utah my mom’s peonies bloom. Each year we cut them and take them to our grandmothers grave and share our memories of her. One of my favorite memories of my grandmother is watching her work in her garden until she was 80 years old. She loves every minute and fought to keep gardens in her life till the very end. As a recreation therapist, I now try and keep her memory alive by facilitating a garden wellness program. Our classes reap the health benefits of nature and I can feel my grandmother helping me along through each new bloom.

    Reply
  973. Debbie Boulware on

    Thank you for sharing this lovely book with us. I love my hardy Shasta Daisies, and the voracious Mint that add so much to my arrangements.

    Reply
  974. Vanessa on

    I just LOVE perennials! Yarrow is a major favorite for us as we love to dry and press flowers too. Hydrangea (limelight) is another staple in our cut flower garden for its greenery and it’s flowers.

    Reply
  975. Gwen Hersha on

    I recently discovered “smoke bush” and bought one as soon as I saw one available! The dark purplish foliage works great in a bouquet, and when they bloom, you get tufts of smoke-like florets! Super amazing!

    Reply
  976. Courtney Christian on

    I absolutely love Tulips and Peony’s! I get so excited to see those fresh little sprouts of life come back year after year and getting to experience their beauty!

    Reply
  977. Jennifer on

    Too many beauties to choose a favorite but I do love the details of Lady’s Mantle- those verdant kiwi green fanned pleats!

    Reply
  978. Fina on

    We tend to plant mostly with perennials and lots of native and low-maintenance shrubs as I live in the harsh climate just outside of Whistler, British Columbia. I love my elderberry bushes for flower arrangements, their dark burgundy lacy foliage, their umbel spray of delicate pinky-rose flowers, they way the branches arch up toward the ski past the heavy twig dogwoods and dwarf conifers around them and then they still offer so much in late fall interest with their small peppercorn-like berries that we try to pick before the birds do so to make elderberry syrup to keep the kids cold-free all winter… yep definitely a favourite!

    Reply
  979. Roz Theesfeld on

    One of my very favorite perennials is the Blackfoot Daisy native to Texas. The floral arrangements seen in the blog interview are stunning! Thank you for sharing with us Rachel’s story.

    Reply
  980. Mim on

    I have two beautiful hydrangeas in my yard. I love to watch the buds develop into flower clusters, and then the flowers shift in color as they mature, shades of pink & lavender. They are even beautiful when they dry!

    Reply
  981. Lauren Martin on

    Hands Down: Lilacs
    Lilacs hold such a nostalgic place in my heart. My dad had a lilac bush by our driveway and he’d often pick them and set a sweet vase of them on my nightstand. I’d wake up to the smell and the beauty of them there on the table with the sprung sun shining through the window. He passed almost 12 years ago now and lilacs are one of the few things that can really bring me back to him. When we bought our home 9 years ago, lilacs were the first perennials I planted. Now I put them on my kids’ nightstands to wake up to!

    Reply
  982. Pam Huntet on

    I love hydrangeas but struggle growing them in Texas. I always had beautiful ones in Washington and just loved the flowers and loved how they would dry also very easily.

    Reply
  983. Paige Southwood on

    I love perennials and flowering shrubs! It’s like Christmas morning every spring! My favorites include hydrangeas and lupin.

    Reply
  984. Megan Aumiller on

    I love love love lilacs and they bring me joy. Otherwise a shrub with such a short season of interest would get the boot. For perennials, usually my favorite is the last one I saw. I love Dianthus ‘Rose de Mai’ for its color and fragrance; I love the color and shape of penstemon, and I love salvias.

    Reply
  985. Michelle Sison on

    I love roses and love how they stay blooming for an extended amount of time. Plus with careful deadheading, you can get a second flush at the end of the season.

    Reply
  986. Nancy Massar on

    One of my favorite perennials is Echinacea / Cone Flower. I have at least 18 of them across several of my gardens. I have many varieties an enjoy them all.

    Reply
  987. Janet Nrink on

    My favorite perennial flower for arranging is Baptisa. The blue is my favorite. It is stately in an arrangement. It provides for me both framework and focal point.
    It also reminds me of my mom, a wonderful flower arranger and teacher. Baptisa is a native species for me and is long lived in my garden.

    Reply
  988. Laurie McKenzie on

    This year I discovered how beautiful and amazing Norway Maple flowers are – they are now one of my favorite go-to early spring woody stems. I also really love curly hazelnut – it’s great in all seasons! I’m excited to learn more about perennials from Rachel!

    Reply
  989. Joanne Hoblak on

    What a beautiful interview, so inspiring, some of my favourite cut flowers are flox glove and have been adding hosts leaves as my greenery. Elderberry flowers are also one of my favourites those mixes with raspberries are beautiful and natural.

    Reply
  990. Ruthi on

    The early Hellebores are one of my favorites, breaking the spell of our cold, gray winters. The variety is wonderful & getting closer just brings more joy seeing their intricate structure.

    Reply
  991. Heather Champney on

    I’m obsessed with hydrangeas. All types. I just keep adding them to my property!

    Reply
  992. Moe Bowman on

    Our swallows have returned! To know their is a micro season to honor this is enough for me to purchase your book. Amazing gardens and habitat. (Moe on Whidbey)

    Reply
  993. Gail on

    I absolutely love trilliums. 35 years ago I noticed a plant that came up in the garden tucked under a rhododendron. I didn’t have a clue what it was. Soon, one flower emerged. I did my research (no internet back then!) and found it was a trillium. I’ve never moved it, never disturbed it, we have a conversation every year and I tell her how beautiful she is. This year she had seven flowers! She gets more beautiful with age!

    Reply
  994. Susan Hansen on

    How do you choose! So many wonderful plants to pick depending on the time of year.
    Hands down for me are David Austin Roses. I love the old English cabbage rose. Dahlias would be my second choice.
    Sweet peas for their lovely tendrils and Nine Bark for foliage.

    Reply
  995. Megan on

    At the moment, the peonies are out in full bloom around here, so they’re my current favorite. I have a really hard time settling on a single favorite – I love so many things when they’re in season.

    Reply
  996. Niña Neilson on

    Fell in love with your beautiful garden/face a couple of years ago. Planted my first serious cutting garden this year!! Using Floret seeds of course!! Being retired, 72, I’ve not worked this hard for awhile❤️ Seeing a glimpse of this book sounds like a symphony to me!! I love your inclusiveness!!
    Say “Hi” to Nina for me!!!

    Reply
  997. Courtney Nash on

    Salvia and Nepeta (catmint) are mainstays in my pollinator garden that I’m constantly adding to. It’s next to my fenced in garden (no deer and bunnies) where I grow annual flowers and yummy food. I love how hardy and versatile they both are, and make amazing fillers for arrangements. Catmint is my go-to for a space I want to fill without a lot more thought, and it’s Grand Central Station for the bees, they absolutely love it!

    Reply
  998. Lauren Strach on

    Lilacs are so special to me because their beauty and my memories are so linked. They are one of the great scent-memory flowers. That’s why I loved your deep dive into all the varieties that you did this spring.

    Reply
  999. Christi B. on

    Geraniums are one of my favorite perennials, I love the variety and hardiness. I would be thrilled to be a winner of the giveaway!

    Reply
  1000. Stephanie on

    My favorite perennial is delphinium! The way they survive a harsh Alaskan winter, only to grow leaps and bounds in such a short season always inspires me! Looking forward to reading this book!

    Reply
  1001. Beth Smith on

    I love Ninebark. It’s a medium tall shrub but I love limbing it up into a small tree so that the beautiful peeling bark can be enjoyed. I have used the flowers and leafy branches in flower arrangements. I have had success with propagating it and when tall enough I took three of them and braided them together for an interesting tree trunk. It’s still fairly young so not a lot to see but I am excited to see it grow.

    Reply
  1002. Christie Roberts on

    Hellebores and succulents are two of my favorite perennials! Can’t wait to get the book! What a great interview!

    Reply
  1003. Carmen Ladman on

    Hydrangeas are my all time favorites. I love all about them, shape, size, colors!! I am excited for this resource book and I can’t wait to learn more about perennials and shrubs in a cut flower garden.

    Reply
  1004. Erin L on

    I love lilacs, but also lately I’ve been in love with my roses! I love that they bloom all summer!

    Reply
  1005. Emilee MacInnes on

    One of my favourite perennials (as I have many) are hydrangeas. I love the variety of colors, and the way they can be dried so nicely. I have two in my garden right now, and look forward to their blooms every year!

    Reply
  1006. Sasha on

    Perennials are the workhorses of my garden and so look forward to reading Rachel’s book. It’s incredibly difficult to narrow down favorites. But smokebush is starting to look really great right now in my part of Central California and I’m so excited to start using it again in my arrangements….

    Reply
  1007. Laura on

    I just purchased an 1910 home in Northern California, which comes with a huge front lawn. I’ve been busy designing ( attempting) the yard to put in many flowers rather than grass. Most recently I planted 16 shrub roses across the front, and many others flowers around the yard. My goal is to have a picking garden to be able to create and give out bouquets. Lilacs, cosmos, snapdragons, hydrangeas and lenton roses are some of favorites that I have planted so far! Looking forward to reading this book!

    Reply
  1008. Darcy C on

    This book sounds wonderful, and exactly in line with how I’m setting up my gardens around my house. Everything for cutting! Just added some Veronica to my garden with the hopes of cutting and adding it to arrangements—that might be a new favorite.

    Reply
  1009. Sandra De Luca on

    I have 4 favourites… lilac the fragrance my earliest floral memory from childhood, then big blousy peonies, roses in their special glory and sweetpeas, remind me of my Mom. She grew amazing sweetpeas and fed my love for flowers and gardening.

    Reply
  1010. Karen Brackett on

    I would say that Lilacs have to be my favorite. I can not breath in enough of their heavenly scent and oh those amazing colors.

    Reply
  1011. Stacie on

    My favorite perennial is the bleeding heart. I’m just fascinated by its unique shape and opening.

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  1012. C. Allen on

    My Helen Elizabeth poppies are on fire right now. This is their second summer and I cannot get over the amount of buds this year.

    Reply
  1013. Hearher on

    I am currently in love with skimmia! Evergreen, white flowers and then red berries!

    Reply
  1014. Amy on

    I traveled to England with my daughter for her senior trip this past fall. I fell in love with the countryside and the picturesque gardens. My favorite perennial (at the moment) is yarrow. It’s a great filler and lasts a long time in a vase!

    Reply
  1015. JackieC on

    Some of my fondest flower memories are from growing up at home. I’ve always loved my mom’s lavender bushes and walking through the hydrangeas in her garden. Like walking through massive marshmallow bushes, they’re amazing.

    Reply
  1016. Debbie on

    My favorite spring flowers are tulips. As they fade lilacs then peonys bloom. And of course hydrangeas which I think are my true favorites.

    Reply
  1017. Rosalie on

    I love Moonlight Grevillea!!! Beautiful blooms and pollinators love it.

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  1018. Lorraine on

    I love everything about this. My favorite is, of course, is hydrangeas. But for early season I like winter hazel. Early summer I like kalmia.

    Reply
  1019. Anita Vanberkom on

    Hmm…my favorite perennial. I don’t know that I can pick just one. It somewhat depends on what’s available at the time in the yard. If I had to pick, it would be roses. I love the colors, the scents, the different shapes available. I actually love the high maintenance(ness) of them. Every season has something that I can go out and tend to and I like that.

    Reply
  1020. Joanne Czarnota on

    Hydrangea’s are my favorite. I love the color varieties and their enormous blooms throughout the summer. I have so many shrubs and continue to add more. I enjoy giving bouquets to friends and family when I go to visit and they love them too!

    Reply
  1021. Erin on

    I love baptisia! Not only for its lovely flowers, but also the funky seed pods and the beautiful arcing blue-green foliage that lasts forever in the vase.

    Reply
  1022. Monae G on

    Limelight hydrangea. The only hydrangea that seems to thrive in our part of the world (southeast Idaho).

    Reply
  1023. Rachel Boyers on

    I’m so excited about this book! Thank you for telling us about it. I love my filler perennials like nepeta, alchemilla, and corydalis and how they add a fun, airy, lightness to bouquets.

    Reply
  1024. Rebecca on

    Love! Perennials really are the best! Favorite ? Snowball bush, lilacs, peonies, honeysuckle, it’s like picking a favorite child, lol.

    Reply
  1025. Karyn Kistner on

    I planted some perennial digitalis ambiqua from seed this year. I probably won’t get blooms until next year. I love to grow things that speak to me and I don’t see anywhere else. I am also trying some echinacea “Magnus” as I transition from annuals to more perennial production.

    Reply
  1026. Angela Hickman on

    I live in the PNW and one of my favorite things that bloom effortlessly and come back year after year are my hydrangeas. I have 2. One is a beautiful medium blue color and the other is a purple-pink/berry color. Both are gorgeous and bloom with gusto. I have recently tried cutting some of my flowers and plants I have for arrangements here and there for my own pleasure and to give. The hydrangeas make a lovely addition to the mix.

    Reply
  1027. Ellie on

    I love seeing my peonies pop up every year, but they’re so short-lived, so I would have to say hydrangeas. They look beautiful in any setting and are both whimsical and elegant. I also love cutting them post season for indoor dried arrangements.

    Reply
  1028. Jolene Cetak on

    I have a peony, it’s this beautiful deep purple pink color that is difficult to describe. I used to give the first blossom of the year to my best friend’s mom, who I loved so much. She has passed, but with each year that my peony blooms it brings me sweet memories of this beloved friend.

    Reply
  1029. Susan on

    It’s so difficult to choose a favorite but I will choose Foxlove. From the time I was in my late teens I dreamed of having an English style cottage garden. I have my garden now and it’s not quite there ( it never will be 😉). Plants come and go but I always have Foxglove.

    Reply
  1030. Kendra Tennant on

    I would have to say that my favorite would be any kind of honeysuckle. Not only do they smell divine in the early morning and early evening but look beautiful in natural form or in a vase. They also attract many wonderful and beneficial insects and pollinators. I love watching all the hummingbirds (and hummingbird moths) enjoying the sweet nectar it provides. Lastly, in the Fall, when everything is preparing for its Winter slumber, the red berries are relished by many bird species.

    Reply
  1031. Jo on

    I’ve just sown seeds for perennial baby’s breath which I can’t wait to use in my arrangements

    Reply
  1032. Grace on

    I noticed ‘Ogon’ spires in one of Rachel’s arrangements. That is one of my very favorites. In the spring, lovely, fleeting white flowers cover a gracefully drooping bush. After the flowers fade, chartreuse leaves that seem to complement everything are the next offering. Elegant, wispy growth that is at home in almost any bouquet. In the fall, the colors take on an burnt orange tint along the edges, deepening the palette to perfectly coincide with the more melodramatic tones of Fall (stage shown in photo). It is a stunner in the garden and in the vase for 3 seasons, from earliest spring blooming along with the daffodils and hellebores to late fall.

    Reply
  1033. Christianna Bach on

    Right now all the mock orange in our neighbourhood are blooming, and they’re just so gorgeous. Definitely adding them to my wishlist!

    Reply
  1034. Nancy Keay on

    My dreams begin with Delphinium….the bluest blue… not the ones with white “eyes”…. the true blue!!!

    Rachel is giving me hope that I can keep growing my delphiniums that might someday look like hers💕

    Reply
  1035. Andrea Raleigh on

    I’m a beginner! My favorite perennial so far is yarrow! I love that not only is it prolific year after year with very low maintenance and watering needs (I’m in the desert so watering is often an issue), but also it’s medicinal properties! I absolutely love cutting some for a vase, but saving all the leaves I pull from the stem and putting them in a jar I have prepared. I use the leaves to make a salve that helps my childrens’s constant eczema. It’s so easy, and so effective!! Easy, beautiful, AND helpful!!

    Reply
  1036. Tina on

    One of my favourite shrubs is the Ocean Spray (Holodiscus discolour). Its delicate lace like petals softly move with the summer breeze. If you catch the sun filtering through the flowers will glimmer. Even more beautiful beside the coast where they are watered by the ocean mist:)

    Reply
  1037. Deanna Krushinsky on

    I’m all about the scent, so it would have to be my roses! Though my lavender comes a close second. 💗

    Reply
  1038. Abigail on

    I can’t wait to get my hands on this book! As a first year flower farmer I am growing many annuals from seed but have also planted many perennials. While waiting for my summer blooms to bloom I started experimenting with incorporating salvia into my bouquets. So with that being said I love salvia! It has amazing vase life and look so beautiful. I am excited to learn more about other woodsy perennials to add to my cut garden for bouquets.

    Reply
  1039. Denise on

    Another gardening book I can’t wait to learn from. Thank you for keeping us up to date on beautiful new books.

    Reply
  1040. Linda on

    Thank you, Erin and Rachel for the lovely interview and photos.
    One of my favorite shrubs Golden Spirit Smokebush. Such a bright color and beautiful in the autumn too.

    Reply
  1041. Sheila Appel on

    This is an amazingly beautiful interview. I love an English garden full of delphinium, foxglove, lupine, etc. My issue is I live in Kentucky and struggle to grow them. I’m very curious to read her book to see if she suggests other plants that offer similar looks but will grow well in our summer heat. Every year I try again with a different approach… regardless I have fun trying.

    Reply
  1042. Julie Leemkuil on

    I love perennial shrubs. In our central NC location, I particularly like native Beauty Berry. Plenty of gorgeous purple seeds for both bouquets and the birds!

    Reply
  1043. Janet Green on

    My favorite addition is the curling tendrils of Clematis that give and unexpected twist of fancy to the composition.

    Reply
  1044. Deborah Hill on

    A favorite of mine for bouquets is perennial ageratum. It’s a late season bloomer and lasts a long time in a vase. Plus it dries beautifully. It can become invasive but it’s very easy to pull out and maintain.

    Reply
  1045. Catherine Michael on

    One of my favorite perennial woody shrubs is winterberry holly, Ilex verticillata, it has year round interest and is such a wonderful shrub for my garden. I also love spirea and abelia I love their flowers and how the stems are just to architectural when I cut them for arrangements.

    Reply
  1046. Gail B Wynne on

    In my zone 7 garden on the plains of NW Oklahoma Annabelle hydragea is a staple. It never disappoints and gives me cutting flowers every week for months till frost.

    Reply
  1047. Ronda on

    The nine-bark has to be mine. It is gorgeous and continues to provide the lasting piece needed for a gorgeous arrangement…

    Reply
  1048. Melinda on

    Peonies are the state flower for Indiana (my home) and my hands down favorite in terms of beauty, fragrance and a picture of hope for the beginning of my back yard flower bouquets!

    Reply
  1049. Amy on

    I’m so excited for this wonderful book & resource! My favorite plant changes from year to year & even season to season but I’ve always had somewhat of a love affair with trees. All kinds! My longest favorite would probably be the Kousa Dogwood varieties.

    Reply
  1050. Angela J. on

    Hellebores or Lenten roses as they are often called here in NC. I absolutely love them. I love that they are one of the first flowers we see around here (February) and bloom through May to early June depending on the weather. They always look stunning in an arrangement. They have this antique , old world feel about them. Plus they do well in shady areas which is about all I have got.

    Reply
  1051. Robin on

    Smokebush is my current favorite shrub! The color, shape of leaves, its delicate blooms… so pretty in the landscape. I cut some blooms this year and tried them in a vase and they did not last long at all. The book looks lovely! I’m dipping my toe into cut flower gardening and it will be a great resource.

    Reply
  1052. JKD on

    I like Hellebores and their late winter arrival.

    Reply
  1053. Stephanie Galarza on

    Lavendar is my absolute favorite and I’m just getting into roses this past year.

    Reply
  1054. Carol Lockwood Wheeler on

    This was truly needed. Can’t wait to read the book. I love peonies and poppies. They add so much color to the garden. Looking for ideas to add more to the garden. ❤️🌸🩷💚

    Reply
  1055. Yvonne on

    PS. I forgot…. one of my favorite perennial is: Cirsium atropurpureum. Nice for many insects and such beautiful Burgundy red. In bouquets its a nice dotty spot. There are so many more very cool plants I can write a book full of it ;)

    Reply
  1056. Kerry Merchant on

    Lilacs! Here for such a brief time but they signal the coming of summer weather with their giant purple flowers and their heady scent.

    Reply
  1057. Ellen B on

    Living in the Bay Area and working at creating a drought tolerant garden. While We had so much more rain this spring than we have in a very long time, we know that’s unusual in these times. Plants volunteered in the garden that were gorgeous. Wild Borage, Johnny Jump Ups everywhere. Hellebores under an oak, Aquilegia from the Watershed Nursery in Richmond is establishing itself. Our garden gives us tremendous joy in all its seasons. This book looks amazing.

    Reply
  1058. Kayla Sullivan on

    I love any rose bush. I am also fond of star gazer lillies, yarrow, and foxglove. This books sounds amazing!

    Reply
  1059. Julia on

    I’m in love with Forsythia and Elder flowers, I feel like they are so cheerful and inspiring in the spring!

    Reply
  1060. Symantha Jones on

    As I’ve started gardening, I’ve realized that so many flowers I’m drawn to are memories from my childhood. Lavender, honeysuckle, magnolia, crepe myrtle, azalea, they all have such nostalgia. I’m excited for the new book, I need all the help I can get to help keep my garden alive!

    Reply
  1061. Ellen A on

    What a lovely interview! This book sounds like just what we need as we begin planning for new plants on our family farm. We are new to owning the place (in eastern Washington) and look forward to bringing it “back to life.” There is a shrub/tree growing along the house that I’ve always loved with its sweet smelling, simple white flowers and bright green leaves. Fairly certain it is a mock orange. Thanks for always providing such wonderful resources Erin and the Floret family!

    Reply
  1062. Kerry on

    I am just starting my garden on four acres, learning what grows naturally and the different conditions I have. Currently I’m obsessed with ferns. There are SO many in the Pacific Northwest.

    Reply
  1063. Andrea Fraga on

    Daffodils! They return every spring like old friends, and just when you really need evidence that spring is actually possible here in southeast Alaska. I love that they multiply easily and resist pests, needing not much more than a blanket of seaweed for the winter.

    Reply
  1064. Chris Wiseman on

    I love hydrangeas! So many leaf shapes and the different flower shapes. Rachel’s book sounds like a book I need in my gardening library.

    Reply
  1065. Christine Allen on

    In my corner garden a couple of my favorite perennials scrubs are the hydrangeas and Hebe. I love to mix them into arrangements of roses, dahlias and zinnias. Gifting my flower arrangements and posting on my fb page, giving tips and people I follow; floretflowers.

    Reply
  1066. Sarah Kaye on

    I am still very much learning about perennials and gardening, but for now my favorite one is the sweetest little bunch of primrose we have growing in our backyard. When I see it pop up and start blooming I really know spring and warmer weather is truly on it’s way…..my daughters also can’t resist picking it to make a tiny bouquet for me to put on the kitchen windowsill :)

    Reply
  1067. Anne Gassner on

    My absolute favorite shrub is the Hydrangea. They come in such a wide array of colors and tend to last a long time for a perennial. Also, once they start to die, they STILL look beautiful. I use them in arrangements in the fall, even after their vibrant colors have become muted. At Christmas time, I will take dried Hydrangeas and spray paint them gold and put them either on the mantle or the tree! I particularly love the Limelight Hydrangea which will turn pinkish as it ages. My next venture with Hydrangeas is to try the climbing variety!

    Reply
  1068. Denise Veggerby on

    I love peonies … I enjoy watching the first growth emerging in late Winter. They give me hope when it is still dark and cold.

    Reply
  1069. Diane on

    One of my favorites is the majestic dark purple foliage, striking pinkish purple, and smoke-like airy seed clusters of the purple smoke bush.

    Reply
  1070. Melinda on

    My absolute favorite are English Roses! The scent and petal intricacy is always so beautiful.

    This book looks fabulous, I’m looking forward to seeing what awaits!!

    Reply
  1071. Leda Bower on

    I really liked the answer to the question of explaining how the arrangements come together, they are quite whimsical and so appealing….

    Reply
  1072. Gina Ruz on

    Great interview. I love cushion spurge (Euphorbia polychroma) because of the gorgeous chartreuse flowers. They give such a bright pop of color.

    Reply
  1073. Erin Krauter on

    I love to use grapevines in my early season bouquets. The tendrils are so whimsical and the fresh green leaves give early season arrangements a little extra brightness that compliments the pinks and blues of early season annuals. It also helps me keep the vines in check because they grow so fast!

    Reply
  1074. Susann on

    I’m building my garden from scratch, and we built on sand so I have a lot to work on. I love adding Abutilon flowers and orchids as well to my bouquets.
    Beautiful idea pictures and interview. I need this book!

    Reply
  1075. Karin on

    I love so many flowers and shrubs. But I love the impact of azaleas in the spring, and the magic of alliums throughout the spring and into the summer.

    Reply
  1076. Sarah White on

    Mock orange! I grew up in Southern California, in the middle of orange orchards, and no longer live there. This is a perennial I can grow in my area whose scent brings me back to my childhood days of running through the orange trees 🍊 I love it!

    Reply
  1077. Kristen on

    One of my favorite perennials is a Festiva Maxima Peony that I found trying to grow under a very large lilac bush in my new yard. At the time I wasn’t sure what it was but I dug it up and moved it to a new location where it started to thrive and is now a gorgeous, prolific bloomer in my garden.

    Reply
  1078. Lenore Schmidt on

    Minimal water in the Central Valley of California means growing plants that thrive and survive in the heat of summer; the native California golden poppy is truly the star!

    Reply
  1079. Verna Ruiz on

    My favorite is a hosta! I love all the different sizes and shapes and colors and they are so hardy!

    Reply
  1080. Nancy Hoell on

    My favorite is hellebores, beautiful flowers, sturdy stems, and simply lovely.

    Reply
  1081. Liz on

    I love so many it’s hard to choose a favorite, but dahlias are high on the list!

    Reply
  1082. Yvonne on

    I’m work with flowers and all my heart is beating for them. The botanic is so various and all time ready to create some nice combinations and beautiful arrangements. I hope here in Germany the slow flower movement will grow much faster than the years in past, because it’s so necessairy to change a lot of unsustainable points and sources in the florist work. Local flowers, good and healthy conditions for nature as the base and people who work with. That’s what I like to see.

    Reply
  1083. Marilyn Norberg on

    I love the Smokebush as it fills in my arrangements so beautifully and balances out the soft pink flowers I have with more depth

    Reply
  1084. Laura Sones on

    I’m excited about my spirea. The dark pink, light pink and chartreuse leaves on the lighter ones just pull in great foliage to set apart your focal flower. However they are incredibly bright to stand alone!

    Reply
  1085. Jennfer on

    I love Beauty Bush! I grew up in a yard designed and planted by my grandma. She passed before I was born, but I felt connected to her through the flowers, shrubs and she planted. The Beauty Bush was always a favorite! And the lilacs, columbine, peonies, daisies, roses, hawthorn, bridal wreath spirea, I guess I have a lot of favorites!❤️

    Reply
  1086. Yan on

    Sweet pea is my must have every year!

    Reply
  1087. Meegan Davis on

    Oooo, it’s so hard to choose just one but if I’m forced to…….Deutzia is my favourite right now. I have one variety that is literally dripping in the most beautiful pink flowers with a bit of white outlining the edge!

    Reply
  1088. Leah on

    I am new to the flower growing world and new to gardening in general. I am loving this community and so encouraged and inspired by you all! I have never heard of Hellebores until this year and I have become slightly obsessed!

    Reply
  1089. Diana M Jonassen on

    Hard to pick one! I love peonies and hydrangeas the most-classic and classy.

    Reply
  1090. Colton on

    It’s too soon to pick a favorite!! Right now I am new to exploring shrubs and perennials, but I am eager to continue to learn more! I know the previous books I have ordered helped a ton with increasing my knowledge and I can’t wait for this book to do the same.

    Reply
  1091. Cindy on

    Salvia is my obsession! Whether a shrub, herbaceous perennial or annual, there is a Salvia for every place in your garden. Low water needs, easy care, hummingbird friendly – it’s an essential in my garden.

    Reply
  1092. Adrianne on

    I’ve been beginning my garden in zone 4 Montana, a much slower growing season than western Washington where I lived most of my life. Thankfully, my favorites peonies, lilacs, and hydrangea can handle the extreme hits and colds we have. It’s a learning process, but a fun one.

    Reply
  1093. Meghan Thompson Payne on

    I live on a steep hillside and many think it’s impossible to live let alone have a garden on. I have terraced section and let other areas stay on slope. I enjoy the shrubs and perennials in these on slope areas. Currently a favorite of mine is pincushion protea.

    Reply
  1094. Sandy Mitsch on

    I love, love, love hydrangeas of all kinds, colors, and shapes! 🩷💙🤍

    Reply
  1095. Mikayla on

    My favourite shrubs for bouquet making are hands down ninebark, and then roses- I’m a sucker for a dark leaf and ninebark comes in so many colours! Despite the fact I don’t have a garden of my own, I’m allowed to grow in pots and I would never be without ninebark!
    My favourite perennials to grow for cut flowers are white bleeding hearts and muscari baby’s breath in the spring, penstemons, jacobs ladder, helenium and yarrow during the early to late summer, and asters, dahlias, perennial sunflowers and joe pie weed in the fall!

    Reply
  1096. Myra on

    I love Stonecrop Sedum!

    Reply
  1097. Lisa on

    I love mock orange! It’s a native here in the PNW, divine scent and lovely white flowers.

    Congrats to Rachel Siegfried. I love your work and can’t wait to get the book.

    Reply
  1098. Amy on

    I love hydrangeas and am working to incorporate more. I love how productive they are, and I feel like I get a hug from my grandmother whenever they come into bloom 😍

    Reply
  1099. Shannon on

    I love viburnum because they are the first major bloom of my garden and at some point some of the blossoms will become ammo in a springtime snowball war.

    Reply
  1100. Jen Goodlin on

    I have never heard anyway talk about micro seasons… this is incredibly fascinating to me and I feel like my lense has just changed and i am very excited to see and understand my garden in a new way. Can’t wait to dive into this book, the interview alone is enchanting

    Reply
  1101. Tiffany Geehan on

    I’m so excited to see a book on the subject of perennials. I’m a complete newbie to flowers and shrubs, I’ve always used my garden for herbs and vegetables. But I was gifted a plot for veggies a couple years ago and that allowed me to use my home garden for flowers. It was a total blank slate so I decided I wanted the workhorses of it to be perennials that I could rely on to come back each year and then I could change up the annuals, what I considered the showstoppers, each new season. As it turns out, for me, ASTILBE, is the showstopper. Those furry like plumes, in their different shades, capture the sunlight so beautifully and the way they sway and dance in the wind, I could watch them for hours.

    Reply
  1102. Kelli Nichols on

    I’m in love again with an old lacecap hydrangea , variety unknown, which is opening now in shades of periwinkle and lavender. A mass of that in a vase with some lady’s mantle tucked in—gorgeous. It needs nothing else. I can’t take my eyes off of the colors, and it gives me the feel of miraculous, abundant spring.

    Reply
  1103. Sherri on

    Peony is my favorite! I have over 40 containered and olsn to sell rustic bouquets at the local farmers market here in the PNW of Washington state zone 6 although this year I feel like it’s been zone 4…

    Reply
  1104. Janie Olp on

    I have developed a new appreciation for Hydrangias! You never can be sure of what colors you will get…the soil and exposure to different elements gives you a thrilling suprise each year. I love the unique gifts they offer!

    Reply
  1105. Brenda Ruckstuhl on

    I adore and of course this book needs to be added to my collection! Beautiful pictures and wonderful interview.

    Reply
  1106. Rhiannon Le Fay on

    One of my favorite shrubs is romneya. Still not sure if it’s a good cut flower but I love how wild and beautiful they are.

    Reply
  1107. Shaleigh on

    My favorite is the Foxglove! It’s so stately and unique. I’d love to lean into more perennials on my little farm.

    Reply
  1108. Carol on

    Before our grandmother’s home was sold, my sister and I dug up some of the pink and white peonies from her yard to bring home to our gardens. They bloom every May and are gloriously abundant, providing flowers for many arrangements and bouquets for friends.

    Reply
  1109. Kris on

    My new fave perennial is Hellebore. Dramatic leaves and flowers. I still haven’t acquired it for my garden (hard to find!) but admiring it from my mom’s garden.

    Reply
  1110. Debbie Dehoney on

    Just new to perennials! I love annuals but I like the idea of year round color of shrubs and flowers that will come back each year. Always learning!!!!

    Reply
  1111. Chessy on

    My flowering almond is my pride and joy! Every Spring it is absolutely gorgeous 🌸

    Reply
  1112. Jeanne on

    Your flower arrangements are so gorgeous!! I love how they look so airy and natural. I love flowers, and right now, the peony is my favorite. I have many beautiful colors/shades of peonies and they are all spectacular. Thank you for the opportunity to win your book. :)

    Reply
  1113. Emily Pietz on

    Witch hazel varieties are my favorite! Their aroma combined with their interesting structured florets are a joy in the colder season. On their own they have an almost extra-terrestrial quality!

    Reply
  1114. Cathy Kennedy on

    My favorite is Peony. It does well here in Middle Tennessee as does Hydrangea.

    Reply
  1115. Sarah McGrath on

    I have several blueberry bushes and I just love that they are both beautiful and productive! This book looks wonderful because the longer I garden the more I love perennials!

    Reply
  1116. Eliana on

    I LOVE lilacs. They were my mom’s favorite flower, and now they’re mine. <3

    Reply
  1117. Christina Zalisti on

    The roses for me as well as the peonies which I planted for the first time this year two plants. One did not succeed. I hope to be able to see these beautiful flowers in my garden soon!

    Reply
  1118. Lindsay on

    Delphinium are becoming one of the perennials I look most forward to. They signal that summer is about here. I so wish I had my passion of flowers and gardening when I lived in England . I would have been able to have seen so many of these gorgeous gardens up close. I’ll just have to make a trip back!

    Reply
  1119. Patti Moree on

    This book looks amazing, and exactly what I’ve been looking for.
    My favorite perennial is ‘Southern Comfort’ verbascum. I love the different colors of the blossoms as they change as the blossom ages.
    Thank for the opportunity to win an amazing book!

    Reply
  1120. Erika Glocker on

    Peonies, I wish they had a longer bloom time, though. Roses, rudbeckia, hellebores, red and yellow twig dogwood, nine bark. I also have some type of a black lace leaf elderberry that is fantastic right now.

    Reply
  1121. Barbara on

    I will always love hydrangeas—every variety of them!

    Reply
  1122. Stacie on

    On my farm, lilacs kick off our growing season. The scent is nostalgic to so many.

    Reply
  1123. Kay on

    My favorite perennial is the peony. I would like to learn how to add more perennials into the landscape. Can’t wait to get this book

    Reply
  1124. Dearborn on

    I have so many favorite perennials it is so difficult to choose one favorite. I love the Bridal Wreath Spirea in the Spring, followed by the unruly nature of the Geum blooms. I also love Astrantia, Verbascum, Aster, Hellebore, Baptisa, and Columbine. Flowering Dogwood branches are lovely, as are Crabapple. I also love Oakleaf and Panicle Hydrangea.

    Reply
  1125. Tracy on

    Just one favorite is hard! But the first that comes to mind is the bougainvillea!!! When the dry season is at its driest here just before the late spring rains begin these plants shine with all their glory if they are in the right place! Full sun and sandy soil makes these a happy happy star of the garden. To top it all off the pests here don’t seem to bother them and that is saying something for here in South Florida!

    Reply
  1126. Tracey Brookshier on

    Lilacs! The short time frame they bloom; the tiny blossoms in big masses; the SMELL! I’m not a very girly girl, but I like my flowers girly.

    Reply
  1127. Kathleen Fitzpatrick on

    I am pretty new to flowers, I jumped right in with seeds this year! Weather has been so gloomy and cool that everything is so slow. Need ☀️

    At this point, my favorite is black eyed susans. The color and stature are powerful.

    I would ♥️ a copy of this book !

    Reply
  1128. Shawn on

    It’s precisely what I have been looking for for ages. I always struggle to fill out my bouquets with more greenery and variety. I have followed her for some time and I am so happy she has published this book.

    Reply
  1129. Esther on

    There are so many perennial/shrub favorites, but I always come back to lavender! I could sit in a field of it forever. Its color, fragrance, herbal uses—everything about it is just so lovely and timeless.

    Reply
  1130. Gayle Eubanks on

    I’m a big fan of Dahlias. Since I’ve been following Floret, I’ve also started noticing woody plants in my garden to add to cut flower arrangements. I have been enjoying using the branches from my Purple Smoke Bush as an accent or filler in my arrangements Thanks for the inspiration.

    Reply
  1131. Jenny on

    My favorite is mock orange. I just love them, the smell of the flowers is wonderful.

    Reply
  1132. Justine M on

    I love cotoneaster and escallonia as fillers. Smoke bushes have lots of colours to chose from and great leaves (of course!). So many great shrubs out there.

    Reply
  1133. DeeAnn on

    I like to put asparagus tops and feverfew in my vases to compliment whatever flowers I have picked.

    Reply
  1134. Ashley R on

    Perennial white stock has held a spacial place for me for years. Every year it’s beautiful white flowers, silvery green foliage, and intoxicating aroma are the highlight of our summer perennials!

    Reply
  1135. Ashley on

    Choose a favorite?? Ugh if I haaaaad to choose… roses and lilacs would maybe be a hint above the rest! So nostalgic for me and you can’t beat their scents!

    Reply
  1136. Shanna on

    This book looks like an amazing resource. I live in the deep southern part of Louisiana so I have to plant flowers that can take the heat. I love hydrangeas and camellias. I really want to plant foxglove & peonies but I’m not sure they will do well here.

    Reply
  1137. Charlie Ryan on

    One of my favorite shrubs is flowering Quince, Chaenomeles speciosa. It’s best to me in the cool months of the year after the leaves have fallen and it’s form is highlighted. Most all cultivars have some if not almost all contorted branches, which are great for arrangements in the winter and early spring. Once they start flowering, they become a wonderful stem for arrangements, especially in a taller vase where the stem can drop below the lip of the vase. A wide range of colors too.

    Reply
  1138. Debbie Gaughan on

    What a great interview… and introduction to a new way to approach growing. Favorite? Hmmm, I do love hydrangea and oh those peonies, and let’s not forget roses and.. and… and…

    Reply
  1139. Brenda on

    That is a beautiful English garden. And a lifetime of work. I planted a Delta Blues Chastetree this year, for future blooms. I miss my beautiful lilac bush in Michigan. I’ve lived in the South for many years now, and mostly working on planting native perennials and establishing native milkweed. Some of my favorites here now in Alabama are in bloom currently, Oakleaf Hydrangea, and Elderberry. I have a Pee Wee Hydrangea we are getting ready to plant, picked up recently from a nearby nursery. Here’s to future blooms!

    Reply
  1140. Torrie on

    I loved hearing about the concept of micro seasons — I like how that challenges me to pay much closer attention to my farm and how it evolves.

    I just ripped out a bunch of ugly/dying shrubs on our property to make room for some new ones that will be good for cutting. At the top of the list? Ninebark, in about every shade I can get it :)

    Reply
  1141. Elizabeth Cash on

    Salvia is one of my favorite perennial. The flowers last for a long time and I love the unique smell. Also you can cut it back for a second bloom!

    Reply
  1142. Melissa Stonehocker on

    In my garden I have a mini rose bush that produces the tiniest white flowers. It was my great grandma’s, then my grandpa’s, then my dad’s, and now it is mine. It is an honor to be given the responsibility to care for this beautiful rose bush and to watch it bloom multiple times each year. I feel a special bond to each previous owner every time I look at it.

    Reply
  1143. Maureen on

    Living in Alberta, close to the mountains, I have been sourcing hardy perennials and shrubs for my garden. My favorite is hydrangea. There are several varieties that do amazing here. Not only are the blooms gorgeous on the plant, many of them dry wonderfully and are beautiful for wreaths and arrangements.
    This books looks divine! 🧡

    Reply
  1144. Sue Waiter on

    I’m so looking forward to getting this book. I’ve been slowly converting my front garden to mostly perennials so this is perfect timing. Plus, the book looks absolutely beautiful.

    Reply
  1145. Rebecca on

    I love lilacs and roses….both for their flowers and their greenery…so different from each other, but beautiful together.

    Reply
  1146. Rebecca on

    My favorite perennial in my garden is bleeding heart. My grandparents had several well-established bleeding heart bushes in their garden and I loved seeing them bloom as a child. Now that my grandparents have passed, my bleeding heart is a reminder of them and the fond memories playing in their yard.

    Reply
  1147. Janet on

    A favorite perennial of mine is hydrangea. There are many many varieties and they’re all amazing. I am in zone 5 of Minnesota where they grow very well.

    Reply
  1148. Fran on

    Peonies, any and all varieties light up my life! Means summer has truly arrived here in the north when they start blooming! I also often use cuttings from my ninebark shrub in arrangements!

    Reply
  1149. Tricia Farrar on

    I really like using Honeysuckle & Yarrow when I make arrangements.
    ❤️

    Reply
  1150. Leigh on

    It’s a bit corny but I love love love peonies!
    We had the most gorgeous coral and pink peonies for our wedding flowers last year. No only we’re they so vibrant and joyous but they lasted! So much so that on our week roadtrip post wedding, we brought them along to brighten up our airbnbs and continue the wedding sparkle!
    We’ve just bought our first house and I’m so excited to get planting!

    Reply
  1151. Margaret Gino on

    I’m fortunate enough to have a vast blueberry grove on our farm. From spring through fall it offers stunning foliage and its berries at all stages work magic. Blueberry brings me back in time… the slow days of childhood summers.

    Reply
  1152. Margaret Thorson on

    I’m always interested in learning more about growing cut flowers.

    Reply
  1153. Catherine Lundvall on

    I love old garden roses and I have been growing them for 40 years. Lilacs hold a special place in my heart because I have fond memories of my grandmother’s lilacs. When my father passed away a few months ago, I planted over 20 new varieties all over my yard.

    Reply
  1154. Erica Cooper on

    Hydrangea’s, Hostas and Peonies grow great here, add interest to the garden and provide elements to add in cut flower arrangements. They are hard workers!

    Reply
  1155. Joanne on

    So many favourites, but this year seems to be hellibores, I love the different colors, their leaves and structure. After pollinated they last longer after cut too. For an early spring flower it a welcoming site. It’s almost July and they still are in the garden! ❤️

    Reply
  1156. Nicki on

    Roses and hydrangeas; oh my! Looking forward to reading this new book. Thank you for sharing.

    Reply
  1157. lori on

    definitely a favorite on our farm is baptisia-it’s such a triple threat: native, nitrogen fixer that makes and excellent cut greenery.

    Reply
  1158. Susan on

    I love Hydrangeas and Coneflowers. The Cut Flower Source book looks like a great resource!

    Reply
  1159. Lydia on

    My favorite woody plant is the serviceberry (Amelanchier). I love how much value it adds to my garden!
    In the spring the delicate white blossoms can be forced inside, in the summer the red to blue berries are edible and delicious as well as a favorite of the birds and in the fall the leaves turn the most magnificent orange to red ombre.

    Reply
  1160. Mike Young on

    I love all flowers but all the spring buds are my favorite. Makes me think the earth laughs in flowers.

    Reply
  1161. Margrette Ramirez on

    It’s all about hellebores for me. Their blooms signify the turning of the season and the countdown to spring. Also, I live north of Seattle so their blooms are a reminder that the amount of daylight each day is getting longer and longer.

    Reply
  1162. Jennifer on

    I love the camellias that bloom, depending on variety, from November through April, here in western Washington state. The sheer profusion of gorgeous flowers shows us it is finally spring! Hooray! Camellias ask for so little and give so much back. It’s great fun to collect their chunky seeds in autumn, plant them, and many will become darling baby camellias. After blooming, their thick evergreen leaves provide shade and structure in the garden border. Blessed are those who live with and enjoy the beauty of camellias!

    Reply
  1163. Susan on

    This book sounds fabulous. One of my favorite perennials is camellias because they’re often blooming when nothing else is flowering.

    Reply
  1164. Cristen on

    Spike Winterhazel (Corylopsis spicata) is one of my all-time favorite shrubs; the soft yellow descending flowers at the end of winter and the architecture of the branches makes her magical.

    Reply
  1165. Linda Withers on

    Peonies and Hydrangeas are my favorite. I haven’t tried to grow Peonies but would love to! Of course I love Roses as well- I’m writing a children’s book about Papa and his rose garden💐

    Reply
  1166. Cheryl Jardine on

    Thank you Erin for featuring this new very inspirational book and interview. My daughter and I are first year flower farmers and I would lean toward the perennials and woodies adding in the seasonal annuals. My favorite maybe because we live in a northern area with a short growing season would be bridal wreath spirea. I love the casual and loose look it brings to an arrangement.

    Reply
  1167. Gill Graham on

    As a Brit living in California this book will be a taste of home!! I love peonies as my parents grew them in their garden.

    Reply
  1168. Ellie Lightfoot on

    What a lovely book. My favorite shrub is flowering quince. It’s red flowers are so vibrant in the late winter/early spring landscape. It’s a joy to see after a long winter.
    Cheers,
    Ellie

    Reply
  1169. Keah Schuenemann on

    After a trip to England, I’m recently in love with delphinium! I’m looking forward to learning how to grow mine taller next year.

    Reply
  1170. Jen on

    My top favorite focal perennial is peony but I love adding mignonette and feverfew to an arrangement as well!

    Reply
  1171. Lisa Woerner on

    Oh I want this book.
    Baptisia is a great perennial because I can use the blooms but the greens stick around all summer.

    Reply
  1172. Davia on

    Oh gosh. How to pick just one? But if I had to it would be peonies and I’m so excited because we’re going to hopefully be putting our first crop of them in the ground this year! I cannot wait!

    Reply
  1173. Glennis on

    It is indeed a wonderful book, but what a shame you did this interview so long ago (Jesse the whippet has been dead a while). Would have been interesting to read your assessment of the book and its concepts rather than just the interview.

    Reply
  1174. Beth Benjamin on

    Hellebores for me – so many shapes and colors and they come when you aren’t expecting them. Although it’s hard to leave out winter daphne to add for scent.

    Reply
  1175. Kathy Buck on

    My heart always skips a few beats when my tree peonies begin to bloom. I have several and one of them is an apricot blush multi petaled beauty that is incredibly fragrant. I love the simplicity of a few stems of the same flower in a vase but i would love to learn about making mixed bouquets of flowers . Thank you Erin for sharing your passion for growing flowers!

    Reply
  1176. Connie on

    Sarah Bernhardt peonies are my absolute favorite with hydrangeas close behind!!

    Reply
  1177. Dodey O’Malley on

    It is so hard to pick 1,2 or 3 favorites. When I walk around my yard, I feel a sense of calm. Love stopping to smell my Sweet Peas and the Lavender but then the Peonies and Roses seem to draw me to them.

    Reply
  1178. Kim on

    I love viburnum! Little berries plus beautiful fall foliage?! What could be better

    Reply
  1179. Tracie Coleman on

    Looks like a dream property cultivated with amazing plants. Excited to read the book!

    Reply
  1180. Cindy Cooper on

    A favorite woody shrub for cut flower use is Viburnum ‘Diablo’. The bronze foliage is beautiful but the flower bracts are ornamental long after the blooms fade away. Excited to read this new book on my favorite subject!

    Reply
  1181. Pamela Quigley on

    I’ve tranformed our small urban lot in an edible garden, starting 15 years ago. This year, I volunteered to *try* to grow my niece’s wedding flowers. I’ve been devouring books from my library on growing and arranging cut flowers, including yours. I think that I am hooked! I’ve always had a small patch of wildflowers where I toss seeds gathered from my neighborhood’s hellstrips. Coreopsis has been the dominant survivor, but every year it’s a new and wonderful mix. This year, three hollyhocks have sprouted! I can’t wait to see what colors they are. Thank you for this interview and introducing me to another amazing flower farmer!

    Reply
  1182. Laura Kirste Campbell on

    Rachel’s book sounds so lovely!
    My current favorite cutting shrub is Carpenteria Californica, Tree Anenome. It’s a harsh woody bush that tolerates our area well and delivers a lush amount of poppy-like white flowers that have a long lasting vase life.

    Reply
  1183. Debra on

    One of my faves: Spice Bush ( Calycanthus occidentalis) a native shrub with deep maroon flowers that have a rich fragrance.

    Reply
  1184. Marion Schmidt on

    My heart sings when I greet my Yves Piaget and Isaac Perrier roses in bright pink! And the fragrance is intoxicating. Pure joy!

    Reply
  1185. K on

    I cannot get enough of her Jesse photos!

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  1186. Margaret Morgan on

    I love mock orange and look forward to its bloom every year.

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  1187. Stacie Butler on

    Can’t wait to get my hands on this book! Some of my favorites are hydrangea, roses and you can’t beat camellia branches for greenery!

    Reply
  1188. Sarah McGovern on

    I love mock orange and viburnums of all kinds. They add a special touch to the spring arrangements as well as being so fragrant.
    The return of the barn swallows is a special moment on my farm too. Here it’s usually around the first day of spring, I’m March.

    Reply
  1189. Kimberly C on

    Favorite? Oh man, in the end it will always be lilac. That said, I try to plant mostly perennials (and accidental perennials that aren’t supposed to be perennial in my zone but apparently are?), so there’s always something. I love Yarrow for the flowy greenery and gorgeous flowers. My peonies bring me immeasurable joy for about 2-3 weeks in May (USDA hardiness zone 5b in the great plains). The gorgeous greenery of hostas (they work in arrangements!) and the wide variety of colors and patterns it provides.

    Reply
  1190. Ethelwyn Smith on

    Growing delphiniums is a great source of satisfaction to me and I love to sneak a few into cut flower arrangements!

    Reply
  1191. Sadie Zollinger on

    So hard to pick just one but I’d have to say dahlias. They have such beautiful variety in their colors, texture, and size!

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  1192. Gayle Wilson on

    Hydrangea is my favorite perennial. They take me back to my childhood and the view walking up to my little Granny’s house. Hydrangeas flanked each side of the the three steps leading into the sun porch. Little Granny would work her magic in making arrangements for people who were ill or needed their day brightened. She used the woody stems and leaves for other arrangements. I have not mastered growing hydrangeas, but continue this journey as an amateur gardener.

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  1193. Brooke on

    I always love when my bridal wreath spirea blooms! It blooms right around my best friend’s birthday and I love picking a bunch of branches for her.

    Reply
  1194. Margaret Hunt on

    This year, in our garden (we’ve lived here for two years/ three springs), a Mock Orange shrub that was hidden behind some wild rose bloomed, and I’m absolutely in love with its delicate white flowers. It makes such a great cut stem!

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  1195. Erin on

    I love ninebark. The intricate leaves are nearly as beautiful as flowers themselves!

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  1196. Erin on

    Peonies are just too beautiful not to be a favorite!

    Reply
  1197. Julie Kraut on

    I love that every season has a focus flower. Currently my favorite cut flowers are zinnias. Later in the season they are Hydrangeas and sunflowers. I also love using smaller hosta leaves as an accent in arrangements.

    I just love Spring to Fall and all of its varieties of flowers.

    Happy growing,

    Julie

    Reply
  1198. Sarah on

    Baptisia is one of my favorites!

    Reply
  1199. Jodi on

    Lovely interview. I’ve been loving hydrangeas the past few years. Something about watching them fade colors while still remaining gorgeous just makes me love them more.

    Reply
  1200. Autumn Busbee on

    Can’t help but love veronica and cranesbill geraniums!

    Reply
  1201. Lydia on

    I love forsythias in the early spring bouquets!

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  1202. Abby on

    I love native plants and right now am particularly enjoying my thimbleberries in the back yard.

    Reply
  1203. Jacqueline Brown on

    I love flowering perennials such as stokes asters, sages, and gladiolus. I loves shrubs like gardenias and chaste tree for long stems.

    Reply
  1204. Jill Pulver on

    If I had to choose one perennial to plant in my yard, it would be Salvia Mystic Spires. I love its size, prolific blooms and vibrant color. I’m excited to learn about more perennials for cutting and arranging. Thank you, Erin!

    Reply
  1205. Tammy Makoul on

    Oh my word….. so many to choose from!!! I really do love Philadelphia – mock orange. I wish she lasted longer than she does. I of course love my roses and peonies as they count for perennials!

    Reply
  1206. Chelsea Miller on

    I love irises, peonies, and lilacs. These are the “old fashioned” favorites in my area and it seems that fewer and fewer are remaining, so I am determined to keep their beauty alive!

    Reply
  1207. Megan on

    Love coneflowers the color they bring to a garden, and the fact all the pollinators love them is a bonus. My hydrangeas would be a close second they provide such a classic look to any garden space.

    Reply
  1208. Shelly Angell on

    What a great interview, thank you for sharing. It would be hard to pick just one or two but hydrangeas would definitely make the top of my list along with roses.

    Reply
  1209. Lynn Rognsvoog on

    Tree peonies are a bittersweet wonder — so very beautiful, and so transitory.

    Reply
  1210. Ann Haines on

    This sounds like a fascinating and beautiful book. Thank you for introducing us to it.

    A favorite perennial? Oh my. Hard to pick one from the hundreds in my garden! Lets go with something blooming now…peony. Specifically an unnamed variety with humongous white blooms and a heady fragrance. The bouquet on my table perfumes the whole house.

    Reply
  1211. Melanie on

    I grow several varieties of weigela with different variegated leaves. They have such a lovely habit when they flower and I often cut a sprig or two for graceful arches in arrangements that I give as surprises to friends.

    Reply
  1212. Kristin on

    I have never heard of micro seasons. That’s very interesting. It’s inspiring me to learn in a more detailed way, be more observant of my garden. There’s always so much more to learn. Thanks for the opportunity to win a free book.

    Reply
  1213. Nora Carson on

    One of my all time favorites in my Garden is Hydrangeas. This year, I bought “Summer Crush”. Absolutely Beautiful!

    Reply
  1214. Rosa on

    I would love to learn about more varieties to add to our farm too. Both perennials and self-seeding annuals make me really happy in the busy seasons. A favorite? Probably overall hydrangeas. The long lasting clusters with their lovely leaves are such a delight.

    Reply
  1215. Allison on

    What a lovely interview! I really resonated with Rachel :)

    My favorite perennial would have to be my mom’s massive rhodedendron. My sister & I would play under its cannopy in the summer, bringing my mom the big beautiful purple blooms to put on our kitchen table. In the winter, when it would ice over, we would go out & peel the ice from the big leaves and call then ice popsicles. My favorite hike in Asheville is lined with rhodedendron as well, hiking through the knoby twisty branches makes you feel like you are in a storybook.

    Reply
  1216. Sharon Battaglia on

    I live in Florida, zone9b. My favorite is Vinca(periwinkle). Here in Florida it never dies ! It reseeds itself. I press the flowers and use them in my mix media paintings. Roses are my second choice. I also dry the petals and whole roses to use in my art.

    Reply
  1217. Tami on

    I love hydrangeas, all colors and shapes. For shrubs, I love using boxwood for smaller arrangements. Thank you for providing so much floral education.

    Reply
  1218. Nick Masla on

    My favorite shrub is the double lace cap hydrangea ‘Wedding Gown’. It has pure white double blooms that start in July and gradually change color from pink to red then green and lastly purple-red, providing a four month show in the garden. Blooms picked in the Fall will last an entire year in dry arrangements without any special treatment.

    Reply
  1219. Wilma Knight on

    I am choosing two – peonies and lavender!
    Thank you for all of your expertise with all plants; I really enjoy all you have to say!

    Reply
  1220. Christine Hansen on

    So hard to choose 1, but I’m currently obsessed w hellebores and need to plant them! This book looks like an amazing resource and I would be over the moon to win it!! 🌸

    Reply
  1221. Scarlett Dunn on

    Upon moving to Florida 20 years ago from the mountains, I had no idea of the native perennials growing all around me. Passionflower & Coral Honeysuckle have come to be two of my favorites, needing very little help from me to flourish & feeding all our pollinators!

    Reply
  1222. Jason K on

    Thank you for the interview. Living in California with our dry summers, I love Little Ollie and common myrtle shrubs. Their evergreen leaves and adaptability to shaping provide year-round structure in the garden.

    Reply
  1223. Trina on

    Love my peonies! And find myself always going to clip my sedum.

    Reply
  1224. Molly Marshall on

    It’s so so tough to pick a favorite, but lately I’ve been collecting roses. I used to think they were “ugly” because I was really only familiar with the grocery store variety… but they come in so many shapes, sizes and colors. They fascinate me!

    Reply
  1225. Brooke Adler on

    This year I have been able to add more perennials to my garden. It’s so lovely to have contrast to the fast paced annuals and the pollinator presence has nearly doubled! My favorite one that I have added this year has been the agastache black adder. More bees that imaginable.

    Reply
  1226. Karthik mohan on

    I love roses. They are hardy and beautiful and have so many colors and growth habits.

    Reply
  1227. Megan on

    My favorite perennial right now is lavender or hydrangea. I’m still new to the world of flowers, but I’m enjoying every single one that I come across!

    Reply
  1228. Megan on

    What an interesting interview! This book sounds amazing. I love hydrangeas and roses!

    Reply
  1229. Christine on

    Roses are my all time favorite perennials but in the past few years, I’ve been seeking out all the different shades of Baptisia. Love thee shape and coloring.

    Reply
  1230. Rebekah Kristovich on

    This is great! I would love to receive a free book- The Cut Flower Source Book! My favorite perennial is really hard to narrow down to one! But I anxiously await for the wisteria, delphinium, heather and the hydrangeas to start showing their flowers! My favorite I think is the Heather and all the different varieties and colors!

    Reply
  1231. Shelly J Davis on

    I love a mock orange! The fragrance is sweet but not overwhelming.

    Reply
  1232. Meredith Williams on

    I’m going to say peonies. I love many other more subtle perennials and shrubs, but their short-lived, outrageous flowers make my whole gardening year!

    Reply
  1233. Bethany on

    Do I have to pick just one?!? Love hydrangeas, viburnum, ninebark, lavender, peonies, daisies…all make great additions to cut flower arrangements.
    I am excited to see what others I am missing!

    Reply
  1234. Sue on

    So beautiful! Thank you for sharing this Erin! What an inspiration! And blessings to you for sharing your “earth heart” with all of us!

    Reply
  1235. Sally Beach on

    My garden has a variety of so many shrubs, ferns and flowers. I am very excited to see my passion flower bloom! 😊

    Reply
  1236. Stephanie Heflin on

    I have started using Zanzibar as a greenery base for my arrangements and it works beautifully! In its early growing phase, it resembles dark green hellebore flowers and it cradles the roses and fills I add to my centerpieces. It stays fresh for a long time and I often switch out the flowers to create new arrangements.

    Reply
  1237. Barbara C. on

    Life without flowers would be a mistake. They are essential and bring such beauty to this world.

    I enjoyed growing flowers for wildlife as well as to be cut for bringing to the table. One of my fav