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October 1st 2015

Floret’s favorites: Narcissus

Written by
Floret

IMG_0567 (1)Everywhere I look there are signs that the seasons are changing. The once abundant fields and overgrown roadsides are now tattered and tinged with golden and copper tones. And even though we’ve only just started shooting the fall chapter of the Floret book, it’s clear that fall is in full swing all around. The days are getting shorter, yet my to-do list continues to grow longer. One of the biggest items on that to-do list is planting all of the spring flowering bulbs that will be arriving in the next couple of weeks.

I get asked all the time what varieties I’m planting and what some of my favorite flowers are, so today I’m launching a little three-part blog series dedicated to some of my all-time favorite fall-planted, spring flowering bulbs. In this installment, I’m sharing details on my favorite daffodils/narcissus varieties.  Tomorrow I’ll dig into the best of the best tulips that I’ve found for cutting. Finally, on Saturday I’ll round out the series with a post about alliums and a few other fall planted favorites.  Be sure to stop back to get all the beautiful details.

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After many months of gray winter days, seeing the cheery creamy white and yellow blooms of narcissus are always a welcome sign of spring.  When the word daffodil is spoken out loud, most designers cringe, but trust me, there is a world of beauty beyond the bright yellow trumpet bells that clog the aisle of big box store garden centers.

If you look beyond the common cultivars like King Alfred, you’ll see that there are many incredible shapes, forms, scents and sizes which are fantastic additions to seasonal floral designs. Last fall I went a little wild ordering different varieties in preparation for writing and shooting my book. It was the perfect excuse to indulge. When spring finally rolled around, all of the extra work was worth it and I was rewarded with armloads of beautiful and unusual blooms that were so stunning, they nearly left me breathless.

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After growing nearly two dozen different cultivars, a handful of gems have risen to the top. Get your pens ready because you’re going to want to add some of these to your cutting gardens too. Here are a few of my faves:

‘Bridal Crown’:  Each stalk of those intoxicatingly fragrant narcissus produces multiple mini double blooms. The frilly flowers are elegant enough to tuck into bridal bouquets or simply cluster with other narcissus in a vase to bring color, scent and cheer to your kitchen table.

‘Dick Wilden’ The first variety to bloom in our garden each spring, this huge, ultra-ruffled golden flowered beauty is a real winner. It is highly fragrant, lasts incredibly long in the vase, and is always a conversation starter.

‘Flower Drift’: Another highly fragrant double flower narcissus, this beauty has multiple layers of creamy white petals with sweet orange segmented centers.

‘Orangerie’: Always one of the most attention getting varieties, this split-corona bloomer has a warm tangerine center with creamy outer petals.

‘Petit Four’: Of all the daffodils I have seen and grown, none quite compare to the beauty and elegance of this stunner. Its pretty white petals and ruffly apricot-hued center cups, fringed with a subtle antique peach colored ring make it look like a collar.If I could only grown one daffodil, this surely would be it.

‘Pink Charm’: The pretty white petals contrast beautifully with the large central cup and the edges of which look like they were dipped in the perfect shade of peachy-pink.

‘Replete’ The super ruffled flowers of this variety always remind me of fancy ladies in petticoats. A showy blend of cream, peachy pink, and soft orange. One of the best on the market.

‘Sir Winston Churchill’ This variety has thick stems topped with dense white, multi-headed blooms that have a strong fragrance.

‘Tahiti’: The bright, bold double blooms of ‘Tahiti’ evoke a distinct tropical feel in its color as well as its size and scent. As one the bigger narcissus blooms, these multi-petaled flowers are a pretty golden yellow with spirals of deep orange in the center segments.

‘Yellow Cheerfulness’: One of the latest varieties to flower, this cheery bloomer has multiple buttercream blossoms that sit atop tall stems. They are highly scented and look great when combined with anything.

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Pictured (left to right): Yellow Cheerfulness, Sir Winston Churchill, Tahiti, Flower Drift, Petit Four, Orangery and Delnashaugh.

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Top row: Delnashaugh, Sir Winston Churchill, Tahiti and Yellow Cheerfulness

Bottom Row: Pink Charm, Petit Four, Flower Drift and Orangery

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Narcissus and daffodils are such great flowers because they are one of the easiest to grow, will thrive in either sun or part shade, can bloom for many years and can multiply, making them a hardy and reliable workhorse in your early spring cutting garden.  As an added bonus,  deer (and most other varmints) will steer clear of them, which is a big consideration in some areas of the country.

After a long, hot, super busy summer, we’re all ready for some much-needed rest. But I know that if we can just power through a little longer and tuck the bulbs in this fall, the reward next spring will be worth it.

To celebrate the end of the season and hopefully inspire a few more gardeners to plant narcissus, we’re giving away 3 collections of my favorite varieties (5 bulbs of 5 varieties, for each winner, shipped out mid-October). Because of export restrictions, this giveaway is only open to U.S. residents. To enter, simply add a comment below and tell me: Do you have daffodils on your fall bulb planting list? (or) Do you have some go-to varieties not listed here?

UPDATE:  Submissions now closed.  Congratulations to Jason B., Linda Q. and Jessica Powers–we’ll get your bulbs sent to you shortly.

233 Comments

  1. Floret's favorites: Tulips - Floret Flowers on

    […] a little three-part blog series focused on some of my favorite bulbs to plant in the fall. Yesterday’s post focused on my favorite narcissus varieties and three lucky readers won a collection of my favorite bulbs: Jason B., Linda Q. and Jessica […]

    Reply
  2. drea loewen on

    We grew a few varieties this last spring, and they ARE such a boost in that dreary “will spring EVER come?” slump! Would love to try out your varieties!!

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  3. Shyla on

    I do! Love your recommendations!

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  4. Krista Wiseman on

    For weeks I’ve been trying to nail down my fall bulb planting list. In and out of local nurseries – it’s been tough to decide amongst so much beauty. Your post has helped narrow the vision! The Tahitian, Yellow Cheerfulness, Flower Drift and Delnashaugh are my favorites.

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  5. Gretchen P on

    I don’t have much to spend on flowers this fall, so peonies are getting the priority, but those cheerful yellow darlings are so hard to resist!

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  6. Lena on

    Daffodils are always a must on my fall planting list, as well as tulips. This year I’m also trying fritillaria! Can’t wait to see how they come up next year.

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  7. Kathryn OBrien on

    Have you heard of Old House Gardens? Oh man…
    Favorite daffodils: IRENE COPELAND, 1915 and ROSE OF MAY, 1950
    Always a pleasure to read your posts Erin and witness your growing fame.

    Reply
  8. Stephanie on

    Last weekend I received a free daffodil bulb from the farmers market. It is just a regular yellow one, but the gift was completely unexpected and made my whole day. And with the post I am inspired to find other varieties to plant with it. Thank you for the inspiration!

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  9. Melody on

    I look forward to the daffodils blooming every year. Although I live in North Florida and don’t have a lot of cold weather, they come back year after year. When they do, I know it won’t be long till it is gardening season again.

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  10. Todd on

    Glad to be back in the NW and would enjoy adding a collection of daffodils to my cut flower garden.

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  11. VillageKid on

    Having grown up down the road from an old daffodil farm, where the double ones were prized for digging when we could, I have not planted them in decades.
    On the list this year,for the first time in AK, trying an ‘Ultimate’ mix, some White Lions and some Hyacinth….we will see how it goes.
    Thanks for all the encouragement and information…it so helps keep me going at times!

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  12. Linda on

    I’ve been naturalizing narcissus and daffodils for years along my wood’s edge. I add some every fall. I love them all, so many colors and flower shapes. These beauties really get me into the gardening spirit every spring.

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  13. Chris on

    Love, Love, them all. Im drawn to Dick Wilden and Tahiti.

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  14. Sandy on

    I plant large quantities of mixed bulbs for variety, but have also planted Tete-a-Tete and
    Thalia. I like the smaller and dainty bulbs. Your blog is so informative…thank you!
    I will try Petit Four this year.

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  15. Nancy on

    HI Erin -this is the first time i am looking into daffodils not sure how they will fair in my clay soil but will try some of your pink varieties!

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  16. Suzanne on

    I always find room for daffodils! I love how they multiply over the years and turn up in the field beyond the backyard. My favorite are the yellow & white varieties, but I planted them so long ago I don’t remember their name.

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  17. lyndsey on

    I currently don’t have daffodils but my mother did growing up and I’d love to try too!

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  18. Ruth Lil. on

    I’m *trying* not to buy more narcissus this year, as I planted some last year, and want to see if they’re multiplying, but I’m planting galanthus, fritillarias, alliums, trilliums, eranthis, cyclamen, lycoris, eremurus, hyacinth and iris, so I need.to.stop.buying.bulbs lol

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  19. Gina on

    Already placed my first big order of narcissus bulbs! Happy to hear that a few of the varieties I’ve ordered are on your list! Can hardly wait to see them in Spring! *fingers crossed*

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  20. Jennifer on

    Yes! I’m obsessed with all the apricot/peachy varieties. As soon as it stops raining in North Carolina, I’ll start my fall planting! This is my first year growing cut flowers for my design work, not just my personal enjoyment, and I’m very excited! Your blog is a valuable resource so thanks!

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  21. Liz on

    It wasn’t until a few years ago when I found out about all the unique and beautifully different narcissus varieties. It would be a dream come true to plant some this fall!

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  22. Nancy Tucker on

    I have tried naturalizing daffodils on our property, but I was given the bulbs, so I don’t know the varieties. Love the varieties you mentioned!

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  23. Elizabeth on

    I always want to have daffodils on my planting list but I am running out of room.
    My favorite variety is an old one that does well in the South affectionately called Butter and Eggs. It is yellow and cream and full of ruffled petals.

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  24. anonymouse on

    I’m planting about 1000 daffodil bulbs this fall, as I did last year. Because of the quantity, I usually just try to choose whatever is priced in bulk, though I do prefer the creams and bicolors to straight yellow.

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  25. Chelsea on

    I’m a brand new FF next year and currently have all annuals on my list. Well, not brand new, as I spent the past year learning at the Organic Farmer Training Program (where I managed Michigan West, the cut flower field) at MSU and my partner helped start Two Hounds Farm in Milford, MI, where I will farm next year. I’ll get HALF the field to plant flowers next year, but like I said all annuals, except for 6-7 dahlia corms that once belonged to our instructor’s grandfather. I watched your video from your wedding book, during the cut flower rotation) with my Hoophouse partner, Paul. A 68 year old man who sucked the blood off my finger (without my permission!!) when I cut it setting up electric fence during a competition… but that’s another story. We had to share ear buds to listen to the video because the computer speakers was broken. It was worth it!!! I helped arrange the flowers for an OFTP cohort member’s wedding, bouts, bouquets, and centerpieces last weekend and it was so fun and easy after watching. Thanks so much :) I agree about the Petite Four, total favorite, number one, but I’m also partial to the Pheasant’s Eye. It’s the first unusual daffodil I’d ever seen, and I have a thing for it. (Also, I love the name and look of Professor Einstein!)

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  26. Linda Wong Garl on

    I get so excited about this time of the year…planting, planting, and more planting. The wonder of putting in those bulbs and waiting for the surprise after a rainy winter! Narcissus are some of my favorites, especially the yellow cheerfulness! As always, thanks for sharing!

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  27. Sandi on

    I’m helping my daughter get started with her flower farm. This was our first year. We both learned a lot and she is gifted at arranging flowers! Thanks for all the information.

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  28. Abigail on

    Daffodils and zinnias were some of my mothers favorite flowers, they took her back to her happy childhood home so when she moved across the street from me we planted a flower garden by her front door so every time she came home her flowers greeted her. My mother passed away in August so daffodils and zinnias will always have a special place in my heart. Thanks Erin for your inspiration.

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  29. Jackie RSF, in NC _ USDA Zone 8a; AHS Heat Zone 8 on

    I have had some success in the home garden with the lovely, fragrant Yellow Cheerfulness and with the older Carlton yellow trumpet type narcissus. I am new to growing flowers for market, however. I had the good fortune to attend a fabulous 2-day cut flower workshop in August here in NC. In the resource book attendees received there are links for those seeking bulbs and other supplies. Links can be found on this Cooperative Extension page: https://growingsmallfarms.ces.ncsu.edu/growingsmallfarms-flowers/ for numerous resources (national, not just NC) including bulb suppliers and other materials and supplies for cut flower production.

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  30. Mary on

    I don’t have any daffodils in my garden yet, but I would love to!

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  31. Tori Bayer on

    I am new to your blog. I came across Floret Flower Farm in the Country Living article while waiting for a doctor’s appt. I “took” the magazie with me because I was so inspired. I keep thinking ” I want to be a flower farmer”!
    We moved two years ago to West Virginia from Virginia. The deer are everywhere here, including the garden. This week, I was at my local nursery asking what bulbs I can plant that won’t get eaten and daffodils, allium and hyacinth were recommended.
    I have limited my gardening to pots thus far not wanting to to have everything eaten up however I’m ready to “dig in” so to speak.
    Your favorites listed above are beautiful. I think I”l get a few.
    Warmly,
    Tori

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  32. Mindy on

    I have one Pink Charm that usually has 3-4 stalks each year. I have lived in a house built in 1938 for 25 years and have hundreds of daffodils, maybe 10 or more varieties, none planted by me. I can barely wait each year for the spring blooms. I especially live to see the pink charm blooms. Never knew the name til now! Such a contrast to all the different shades of yellow, white and orange. I pick two to enjoy in my kitchen and leave two to enjoy outside. I’m always sad to see the blooms fade. Would love a source for them!

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  33. Tracey on

    I have an area of naturalized daffodils and narcissus. I have somehow lost most of the narcissus. I would love to add your choices to my garden. I dug up 2 patches in hopes of spreading the love so replacements would be most welcome.

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  34. Lisa on

    Lovely to read! I enjoy growing Sir Winston Churchill, too, as well as Bridal Crown from your list. For the coming spring, I decided to add some other varieties, like Bell Song and Fruit Cup. I think I’ll order a few new ones from your favorites, too! Thank you.

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  35. Melanie Hansen on

    Daffodils and tulips are our favorites. My granddaughter and I plant a hundred each year on my November birthday. We started when she just turned 1, and have been blessed to do it each and very year since….. She is a fast learner, always listening and asking questions. Best time of my life is sharing flowers with my sweet girl.

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  36. Annette on

    I wasn’t planning on planting daffodil bulbs but now that you have shared such lovely varieties I feel I must.

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  37. Dawn Hill on

    I recently found your instagram, which lead to your blog and website…You are an absolute inspirational gardener and artist with flowers! I will definitely be looking for some new varieties of bulbs to plant! I am excited to read more about tulip varieties when you post about them as well! Thank you for sharing your gifts and talents!

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  38. Audrey Hoving on

    I am planning my first garden (so no I don’t have any go-to’s… yet!) and I have been debating about planting narcissus and this post has definitely convinced me! Thank you so much!

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  39. michelle on

    Love this post and yes I add a few new varieties each year. It’s wonderful to see spring color after a LONG winter in Buffalo
    NY. One I’d like to add this year is narcissus bell sound, and all the varieties you have must now get added to my list as well. Love them all. Thank you.

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  40. Linda McGinley on

    I tuck narcissi into all my garden beds. I look forward to seeing them in the spring. I seek out the varieties with interesting color, shape and form. One variety I’m planting this fall is ‘Golden Echo.’ Love the name!

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  41. Anne on

    I just bought some daff bulbs yesterday! I would love some more for my garden for the spring so I could cut them and spread the daffodil love!!!

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  42. Amanda Eastvold on

    I always plant a few new varieties in the fall. I’m going to try these. The only ones I have already are ‘Sir Winston Churchill’ because I visited his estate in Englad years ago!

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  43. Jean E. on

    I’m always looking for things that will do well in my mostly shady garden in North Carolina. An suggestions for daffodils that would do well under these conditions?

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  44. Rene' on

    After many years of dreaming if having sturdy flowers to last every year, I finally have a pink variety of daffodils and tulips on either side of the small bunch of daffodils. They will be so much fun to cut and put in vases!

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  45. Michelle on

    I love daffs! Punk charm is one of my favorites. I have quite a few and just ordered more. Here’s to spring!

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  46. Liisa on

    What have a lovely selection of daffodils!! I do not have daffodils on my fall planting list for this year; however, I have a spot where I think they would be just perfect, and hope to plant them by the dozens. ?

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  47. LindaQ on

    I have little ‘theme’ gardens around my yard and when I looked back at my records I found that I did plant Replete daffodils in my Fairy Garden 3 years ago along with some wood hyacinths! I also planted some Poeticus Actaea along my driveway. I have a serious chipmunk & rabbit problem and tulips are Gone before they can bloom! I was at the farm this afternoon cutting the cafe au lait dahlias I ordered from you & just when I thought I was done planting for this year you have once again inspired me to plant some more!

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  48. Muriel Stephenson on

    There’s always room for more bulbs. I’ve been removing some big box store hostas and have plenty of planting space now. Love your site.

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  49. Carolyn Q. on

    I’ve been wanting to plant daffodils for a while but am tired of the big yellow beasts that, as you say, clog the stores. Can’t wait to try the varieties you mention – thank you!

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  50. Renee on

    I love the fragrance of jonquils, sweet but not cloying. ‘Pipit’ has a white cup and yellow petals, opposite of the usual presentation. And super fragrant, all-white ‘Thalia’ is another favorite, although ‘Sir Winston’ is definitely up there, too.

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  51. ang on

    I love daffodils, but don’t have any plans to plant some….yet.

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  52. Jill on

    So many amazing ones..I try different goes each year. The poeticus narcissi and Gay Tabor are fun and great for bouquets. Loved getting your list of favorites-got my pencil out and will keep adding as you post more favs on your blog. Thanks! Blessings

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  53. Connie Homerick on

    After losing many crops this year to the deer, I have decided to rethink many of my crops! Deer resistant (such as daffs & narcissus) have quickly moved to the top of the list! Thanks for all the guidance!

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  54. Laura on

    I’ve managed to plant a few daffodils every year since I was a teenager, whether in a pot at my first apartment or years later in my backyard. This year’s additions are Cheerfulness with it’s pretty double petal face and Thalia with it’s whispy petals. Now that I’ve seen your pics of Delnashaugh I’m going to have to add them to my list too! Thank you for sharing!!

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  55. Rosita on

    We’re starting pretty small, so I’m not sure if daffodils will make the list this year. I loved seeing the different varieties you grow and would like to try Sir Winston Churchill and Yellow Cheerfulness next year.

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  56. Annette Crawford on

    Yes! I will be planting my first crop soon as well! I have ordered 1,000 bulbs to start my first year as a flower farmer and I am so excited to get stated on this journey of growing seasonal flowers. If you would give us a few tips about how to plant them for use as cut flowers that would be so helpful. Thanks again for sharing your knowledge and experience!

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  57. Ashley on

    I call April “my one month love affair of daffodils!” I spent years restoring the gardens in my yard. With that came 10s of 1000s of yellow daffodil bulbs that I grew to hate! They were embedded everywhere. I have since moved a lot to my wood line and added some beauties. I love the pinks and I have one that looks like a lil yellow dress! Welcome ‘happy faces’ here in the NE!

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  58. Meg Renninger on

    Thank you for this list! I want daffodils but I was overwhelmed by all the choices. I ended up getting hundreds of crocuses to plant in the lawn.

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  59. Laura on

    We are in the process of moving, so don’t know that I will be able to plant any bulbs this fall, sadly. However, I was reading about using daffodils in orchards and while it seemed worthwhile to do, daffodils have never been my favorite- until I saw these! I had no idea there were so many kinds/looks/colors! I’d be happy to plant the ones pictured!

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  60. Kathi Wiuff on

    Thanks for the encouragement to plant narcissus this fall. I planted some a few years ago and none since. I’ll definitely be planting some this year. I love the Delnashaugh!

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  61. Terry on

    Not planting any this year – but several hundred have gone in over the years – I plan on cutting them and selling the bounty in the spring – will be the first time we offer spring daffodils.

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  62. Lorraine Smith on

    Just finishing up the last iris bed today & look what happens! I find your recommended varieties of narcissus–just what the doctor ordered to keep these old joints moving another month. I have resisted due to a spotty memory. I keep digging up last year’s bulbs during other planting of daylilies, fuchsias, clematis etc so I already have too many crocus that need a new home. Tete-a-tete come up in surprise bunches where they shouldn’t be & I have given many if not most away to new gardeners where they should be better remembered. Most of my bulbs are hiding in my annual containers & will pop out in the wheelbarrow after the first frost, then be replanted in them to be forgotten once again until spring. (Although one year I added bonemeal to the mix & my chickens & dogs knew exactly where every single bulb was planted –chickens will dig to China for bone meal !) You want a more colorful/productive yard? Get lots of recycled containers, put bulbs in & add other plants on top, rearrange them like furniture for shade & sun, season etc. Those big 5 gallon tree size will hold over 15 tulips & the black nursery types are indestructable.

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  63. Wendy on

    After a long, cold winter on the east coast, daffodils are a beautifully welcomed sight come spring. I’ve not had much luck in the past with the ones i’ve purchased locally. I’m super excited to plant the ones my daughter ordered from you :)

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  64. Kathy Wirtala on

    I love the Tete-a-Tete daffs that I planted several years ago..they are so delicate.

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  65. Katie on

    I haven’t planted narcissus before, but I’d love to plant Petit Four and Delnashaugh. I love their ruffly, pink texture!

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  66. Verana Barron on

    My daffodils are old , very tiny with a light, sweet fragrance. Perfect for that first spring bouquet.

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  67. Laura Timmerman on

    I love daffodils! One of my favorites is Sun Disc, a tiny, round, and sweetly fragrant one.

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  68. Suzanne on

    I have always loved the fragrance of Sir Winston Churchill! Glad to see suggestions for additional fragrant varieties. Thank you!

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  69. Kristen L on

    I planted ‘Pink Silk’ and ‘Bahama Beach’ from Brent and Becky’s last year and loved them. Bahama has multiple tiny creamy yellow blooms per bulb with a powerfully sweet scent. Thank you again for another wonderful opportunity!

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  70. Kim Anspach on

    We are planting our first daffodils for cuts this year. I have ordered too many varieties to remember, but I know tahiti, pheasants eye, and a lovely apricot and cream variety were among my choices.

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  71. Susan Rode on

    I have always planted white narcissus for Christmas..pots of bulbs that I put everywhere..But these varieties are just lovely..Where do you get your supply from? I have seen a few in more high end nurseries here in the East Bay, California.
    I also plant tulips and pots of muscari bulbs for spring blooms..They just make one feel happy when you see them all pop up…
    I have tried Ranaculas but have had mixed luck with them.. Thank you for your blog..As a fellow flower lover I am learning a lot!

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  72. Jason B. on

    I am seriously considering getting some! We had loads of them at my childhood home, but I haven’t had any since I left. I think it’s about time.

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  73. Anne Anderson on

    It’s funny, daffodils have never been on my list of favorites till I started following your blog! Now I just love them. I love all the different varieties!!! I want to plant them in pots this year. I would be so pumped to get this give away!

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  74. Marian on

    Yes, I have daffodils on my planting list. I have already bought the bulbs, but mine are not as beautiful and unusual as the ones you listed. One or two will show up on next year’s planting list!

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  75. Elizabeth R. on

    I haven’t got anything on my planting list, but these are beautiful and I’d love to!

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  76. Jane on

    Do you have a list of favorite suppliers? Are these varieties okay to use in vases with other flowers?

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  77. Kate on

    I am definitely planning on some daffodils – for the first time! I’ve ordered a few different varieties from Brent and Becky’s. Planning where to interplant with other things so that they all grow well together is the trickiest part for me, in the home garden.

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  78. Jessica Powers on

    You guys do such a great job and I’ve thoroughly enjoyed following all of your beautiful posts. My mom has a little flower cart back home on Cape Cod and I’ve always enjoyed having flowers in the garden. Now that we actually own dirt here in Oregon I am so looking forward to planting more perennials and bulbs! Would love to see some of these beauties peeking out come Spring time. ;) Keep up the great work! – Jess

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  79. Aline on

    Daffodils are on my list but I have not ordered them yet! I remember my time living in England, where daffodils were everywhere.

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  80. amber on

    I am so grateful that ive found your blog with such a wealth of knowledge and your passion is truly refeshing. I love flowers and the excitement of waiting for those springs flowes is so exciting. I live in an area with deer so i would love to plant more dafolldils.

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  81. Nate on

    In Northwest Arkansas bright yellow daffodils that are probably the offspring of daffs planted years ago bloom all along the roads come spring. This is the year for some in my garden!

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  82. May on

    Most definitely will be planting more daffodil and tulips this fall. My daughter is developing a new organic flower business here on cape cod Massachusetts so we have big ideas! Would love to win

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  83. Susan on

    We have tulips galore that bloom early, mid and late and a few stunning allium that are beautiful and whimsical at the same time. Living in the northeast We also have deer roaming the neighborhood. Daffodils would be a welcomed addition to our garden.

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  84. Whitney on

    I’m working on my tulip order right now. I don’t have our new landscape completely figured out, so I’m sticking to some annual bulbs until I know exactly where the daffs are going to go. I’d love to hear more about how you condition your daffs to sell. I was surprised to see how tightly closed they are in that last photo. I’d love your advice on extending vase life once I do put these in.

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  85. Terri on

    I love ‘Cragford’, ‘Acropolis’, and ‘Sovereign’. In addition to Yellow Cheerfulness, I also like ‘Cheerfulness’ too. I hope I win! I’d love to get my dirty little mitts on some ‘Petit Four’!

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  86. Tonya on

    They’re on my list, but just the genetic ones from the home improvement store.

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  87. Mary on

    Every year, I ask that my college age son give me for Christmas- daffodils. I don’t care which one. Just some, that he has to dig around, get dirty and plant. So, while he is off in college, they will bloom and I think of him, instead of miss him.

    Reply
  88. Julia P on

    When you posted pictures of your beautiful daffodils this spring I was hoping you’d send a list of what you grow! Daffodils have always been a favorite of mine. My grandma had a farm with daffodils in her grazing pasture and I loved picking my favorites while standing with the cows. I’m so excited to find Delnashaugh so I can plant them this year. My favorites have always been the ones with pink or the faintest amount of color.
    My family lives on Whidbey Island, I’m hoping to be able to visit your farm some day on a trek up from Portland! Happy farming!!

    Reply
  89. Jennifer- Sweet Posy on

    Erin,
    Thank you, thank you for being for being so inspiring and generous with your knowledge and love of all things floral!
    I agree, the Orangery has to be my favorite narcissus as well. It is encouraging to know that you prize it as well.
    Your timing again, is spot on. We were just deciding, contemplating and being hopeful as to which varieties to grow, being this is our first year planting everything floral. On roughly two acres we are wondering if we just plant these in open field so that we don’t take up precious space in the few hoop houses that we will have to start with?
    I look forward to the continued posts over the next couple days and maybe this will be answered then. Happy Fall from Bend, OR
    Cheers, Jen

    Reply
  90. Cheri on

    I don’t have them on my list at the moment but I’m pretty sure I should…and will get right on it! Last year I was lucky to get the opportunity to travel to Amsterdam and visit the flower district, even got to bring home some tulip bulbs and ranunculus (certified of course!) but I didn’t get any daffies but I should have!

    Reply
  91. Diane on

    I love daffodils! I need to dig and divide my daffodil border this fall and I few new varieties would be wonderful.

    Reply
  92. Alex on

    I definetely have daffodils alongside some tulips and crocus they are all spread out in bunches so that when spring arrives they can make a big scenic view for both myself and my neighbors. Alliums are also a to get in the future. Do you know of a good place to buy some good qualities?

    Reply
  93. Vicki on

    We moved to our 11-acre retirement/forever home this past winter and I found that previous owners had planted NO FLOWERS, especially not bulbs! I can’t wait to rectify that oversight – White Flower Farm has some beautiful offerings but next year, I’m planting swaths of your recommendations.

    Reply
  94. kristen on

    no daffodils, but this post may change my todo list!…This year i wanted to try some fritillaria!

    Reply
  95. Shelly DeJong on

    Thanks for the ideas! So grateful for the information. Would love to know where you purchase bulbs from…Gloeckner?

    Reply
  96. Maggie on

    Absolutely! But not nearly as many as tulips this year…I am hoping to turn my backyard into a mini Skagit Valley come springtime! :)

    Reply
  97. Yuliya on

    I do have daffodils on my to do list for planting in fall. Hope I get some pretty flowers in the spring. ❤️

    Reply
  98. Ciel Evans on

    No daffodils planned yet, but I would love to plant some!

    Reply
  99. Vanessa Campbell on

    Narcissus weren’t on my list but they are now! They bloom a little early for our farmer’s markets but I’ll try the yellow cheerfulness and the pink charm to start, maybe plat them in the spot where the slow melts last. From the picture of you with the crate, it looks like you harvest them completely closed and store them dry? Thanks for your inspiration always.

    Reply
  100. Jesi on

    I’ve been dreaming of planting daffodils–especially some scented, double varieties!–this year ever since I signed the lease on my current home and YARD! It’s been years since I’ve had a real yard to play in and I’m thrilled, obviously!

    Reply
  101. Jackie on

    All of our flowers (including cafe au lait dahlias) rotted out from abnormally excessive rain earlier this summer..except nasturtiums and calendula. But, anything that keeps me out in this crisp fall air is worthy of our planting list and gets me all hopeful! These varieties are just SUPER.

    Reply
  102. Stefanie H. on

    Not yet planted daffodils. Look forward to planting ‘rose of may’ double narcissus.

    Reply
  103. Graham R. Spearman - Broken Chimney Farm on

    We had terrible luck this last year with our daf’s – tried “Green Pearl” which were supposed to be a pretty white and green flower but they just didn’t show strong or consistently in the spring. Calling up Gloeckner right this minute to see if any of the beauties you mention are still available! Deer are a big issue for us here in upstate NY.

    Reply
  104. Colleen Cowin on

    I have a few but have really sandy soil so hard to keep them with good nutrition. Like to use organic rather than chemical feeding but still struggle. Suggestions?

    Reply
  105. Susan Soto on

    Ps :: what do you do at the end of the season? Leave in the ground? Do you do the whole tie in knots thing with your Bulls? That’s always been a deterrent for me –

    Reply
  106. Susan Soto on

    I usually force or plant in containers however I’ve always wanted to plant Delnashaugh and petit four in the garden – who do you buy yours from? That’s been my hurdle – I haven’t launched into finding a good supplier yet.

    Reply
  107. Rebekah sampson on

    I am planning for my first cutting garden. Daffodils are on my list! I told my husband that fresh flowers make me so happy so my goal is to have a beautiful cutting garden so that we can have fresh flowers and give fresh flowers every day. Can’t wait to order some of our suggested varieties!!

    Reply
  108. Lee Smyth on

    These are truly lovely. I would love to plant some bulbs to enjoy this spring since I am now retired. More time than money ??

    Reply
  109. Justine Muench on

    I have to admit I’m one of those shoppers that has bought bulk bulbs of the typical variety just to have lots to flower in the spring ! After reading this blog and writing down the names I’m going to try and find something new to try each fall. The problem is in a small community options are limited and many great catalogs will not ship to Alaska or charge exorbitant shipping fees for a small amount of bulbs . I’m hoping to try some of your suggestions thank you Justine

    Reply
  110. Jo Birns on

    Yes! I love narcissus and I asked for bulbs for my birthday this year. Now I have a better idea which varieties to request. Also would love to hear how you amend your beds. Thanks for your generosity and the beauty you spread all around!

    Reply
  111. Jill on

    I am planning a small backyard flower farm for next year and daffodils are definitely on my list of bulbs to plant this fall. I love the sight (and scent) of daffodils in the spring, even the more common ones. But I had no idea how many beautiful varieties there are until I read your posts from this past April. I am in love with all of them! I can’t wait to finally order some. Thanks for taking the time to do these trials and pass the information on.

    Reply
  112. Ruth Peebles on

    I would love to plant daffodils! I always get so excited when my local trader joes is selling them by the bunches

    Reply
  113. Jill Meyer on

    You are inspiring with these suggestions. I have concentrated on allium bulbs in the past but hope to add some daffodils this spring.

    Reply
  114. Jessica on

    Love this post! These varieties are so pretty! We’ve ordered around 100 spring bulbs but a pretty random mix because it will be my first official flower farmer season and I have no idea what will work best for us. I’d love to try some of your favorite varieties!

    Reply
  115. Mary Schulz on

    I live in a condo in the warm climate of Arizona. I would love to plant dafs on my patio and see my neighbors faces when they realize the blooms aren’t silk. Forcing some bulbs indoors to give as gifts would be an appreciated surprise.

    Reply
  116. Katie on

    Just this year I planted a willow fence/hedge that I am training in a diamond pattern…., underplanting with daffodils, tulips and the ground cover lanium. Can’t wait for spring already!! Thank you for this series…looking forward to the alium blog!

    Reply
  117. Mary Schulz on

    I live in a condo in the warm climate of Arizona. I would love to plant dafs on my patio and see my neighbors faces when they find out the blooms aren’t silks. Also forcing some bulbs indoors to give as Christmas gifts would be an appreciated surprise.

    Reply
  118. Keri on

    Yes! Daffodils are my favorite flower, but I have only recently started planting them. My dream is to naturalize them across my yard. Too bad the squirrels like them so much!

    Reply
  119. Amy on

    Yes! Have been scouring for interesting daffodil varieties and you did the work for me :) Thanks!

    Reply
  120. Lori Tran on

    Daffodils are definitely on my planting list after reading this post!

    Reply
  121. Ann Neal on

    Thank you Erin! My heart literally blossomed as I read your blog and saw your beautiful,beautiful flowers!! My family has had to rent these past 5 years leaving behind my beloved garden. Despite everything this year I will plant bulbs again! I simply cannot live without beauty! Thank you for putting that joy back into my heart! Dostoyevsky was right in saying, “beauty will save the world.”

    Reply
  122. Margaret Thorson on

    Always have to put in at least a few daffodils each fall. My favorites are Mrs. R. O. Backhouse, Mrs. Lantry, and February Gold, the latter just because it is so early.

    Reply
  123. Melissa D. SC on

    No bulbs on the plan due to finances but in my mind I see them planted everywhere on my property!!!

    Reply
  124. Lena Wittrock on

    Really enjoyed reading your post on fall bulbs, can not wait for next ones to come…my fave is humble Thalia variety, looks stunning in my garden.

    Reply
  125. Maureen Campbell on

    I’ve planted daffodils and crocuses already and am putting in tulips today. What a generous offer Erin. Someone will be very happy with those lovely bulbs.

    Reply
  126. Danette/Nettie's petals on

    I have some traditional yellow daffodils, but am intending to add more varieties for cutting this year. This article was a perfect help!

    Reply
  127. Karen Voss on

    I love all of your choices. All are beautiful.

    Reply
  128. Kristy on

    Thank you so much for sharing your favorites. I had already placed an order, but now I think I am going to have to order a few more of those. I have done bridal crown in the past as well and loved it. Like the above person commented, I need more ruffles!

    Reply
  129. Jennifer on

    They are now, never a huge fan of the standard daffodil but those varieties are gorgeous!

    Reply
  130. Marina on

    I have ordered narcissus bulbs for the first time this year. All the plants I currently have in the labyrinth are from planting the swollen and ripened heads from plants in friends’ gardens, parks, and old house sites in the woods. Most of these, though lovely and fragrant, do not make particularly good cuts.

    Reply
  131. laura jones on

    I love narcissus and they are definitely on my planting list. They used to grow in neat little patches in the fields around my childhood home and the smell brings back happy memories of those times.

    Reply
  132. Lindsey on

    I commandeered a section of my parents back yard last year and planted daffodils, tulips and allium to which I received many pictures from my Mom! Thanks to you I want to plant some in my new place… the plotting (pun intended) has begun! Though I more so have September flowering beauties on my mind for my wedding next year :) Thanks so much for sharing, with <3 from Wisconsin!

    Reply
  133. Kristen on

    Yes we are awaiting the arrival of our daffodil bulbs which will be new to us this year. Thank you for this list of beauties and great info. It has been so very helpful!!

    Reply
  134. Jillian on

    I’m just starting my flower adventures. I keep asking my husband to rototill some more grass up. I’d love some of these flowers in my yard!

    Reply
  135. Elise Luck on

    I love that you featured daffodils on your blog! They are also a favorite bulb of mine to grow and all of the varieties featured are soo beautiful. I will forever love Winston Churchill for the fragrance and beauty of the ruffles. More Ruffles!!!! Katie Heath is one of my favorite pink cups to grow. I have a small row dedicated to narcissus but would love some of your picks! Thanks for your dedication to sharing your knowledge and passion for flowers.

    Reply
  136. Ainsley on

    Yes! Last year I planted tulips, alliums, and daffodils. The daffodils never came up. :/ We did have some very busy squirrels stealing my freshly planted bulbs last year so wherever they were replanted by those busy little squirrel hands I’m sure someone enjoyed them!

    Reply
  137. Sarah on

    I had added tulips last year, but look forward to adding more daffs and muscari this year to add some dimension to spring bulbs! Love spring!

    Reply
  138. Sarah Barkhouse on

    I have been so lucky in the last 4 years to have been growing on a property with a HUGE, naturalized planting of a sweet variety of daffodils. Next year begins our first growing season as a family on our newly purchased land and we’re leaving a lot behind. I know just where I want to start my own daffodils. Daffodils have a very special place in my heart as they were my grandmother’s favorite and we would pick them together when I was little. Thanks so much!

    Reply
  139. ANGELA LONGHURST on

    I wasnt going to bother with growing daffodils in my first year of growing for market but after seeing these I definitely am ordering some of these today!
    Thanks for the great info, your blog is amazing.

    Reply
  140. Lauren on

    I have never ordered daffodils, but am always so grateful to find them coming up here and there around our farm in the Spring when I am starving for some color and scent! I think I will order some Tahiti this year…. those will warm up the cold WA spring nicely!

    Reply
  141. Candace on

    You have been such an inspiration to me. After reading your blog, I will be planting many more varieties of narcissus. Thank you for sharing so much information!
    Candace

    Reply
  142. Andrea Heffernan on

    I’ve been poring through catalogs and have a number of daffodils on the list, along with tulips (Belle Époque?! So hard to find!), and a number of Dutch irises. Though I’m just getting things started, so no great quantities just yet.

    Reply
  143. Mara - TheFarmAtOxford on

    Thanks so much for recapping your trials, Erin! I placed my orders way back in June for best selection, but thankfully I got a few of your favorites on there ..also I adore Bridal Crown, one of my FAVORITES. I want to hoard them all for myself…#flowerfarmerproblems

    Reply
  144. Lorna on

    I do have daffodils on my planting list. We’ll see if they come up!

    Reply
  145. Nanc on

    I don’t have many but would love to start some small groups around my many perennials!’ Love your blog.

    Reply
  146. Kristi on

    Last year was the first year ever planting narcissus. I tried to get a few varieties other than the typical yellow. In the spring I was thrilled with what came up, and interestingly enough i kind of wished I would have done some of the traditional. So this fall in go some traditional with a few new varieties. And now maybe I will be ordering more after your list.

    Reply
  147. Brooke T on

    This is going to be my first year planting daffodils!! Getting to plant some of your tried and true bulbs would be amazing!!!!

    Reply
  148. Julia on

    I finally have a place of my own in which to plant. Time to learn how and what to grow in the garden. Grateful for your blog.

    Reply
  149. Sharon S on

    Love daffodils. Beautiful varieties here today. I have a couple pots with daffodils that I leave the bulbs in & put sweet peas around them so when one is done the other is not far behind. Thanks for all your inspiration.

    Reply
  150. KRISTEEN GRIFFIN-GRIMES on

    Thanks for this list of your faves and the offer! As a perfumer, I get reeled in by the scented varieties and am excited to add Tahiti, Sir Winston, and Dick Wilden to my fall list to join my Yellow Cheerfulness and Mount Hood (non-scented heirloom, but spectacular & classic almost white daffy).

    Reply
  151. Natanya on

    I don’t have many daffodils yet but now,thanx to you, I just might have to add them to my list! :) I am a beginner at flower farming and am currently adding to my tulips and perennial stocks here at Enchanted Oaks. I always enjoy reading your blog, keep up the inspiration, I know we all benefit and soooo enjoy you!!! ♡♡♡

    Reply
  152. paula on

    We had a side bed next to our foundation where I had planted dozens and dozens, but, alas, the soil was too shallow and they all died in the last couple of winters. I’ve now added as much soil as I can, and am about to plant 100+ in the next week or so. Wish me luck

    Reply
  153. Liz on

    Oh gosh! So very pretty, Erin. I do not have any of these lovelies. Thanks for telling us about your favorites. I just dug in this year as a fresh cut flower grower and I am so excited to be growing my flower power!

    Thank you for being so earnest in sharing your knowledge with the world. It is hard to be a farmer, and the fact that you care enough to take all of this time and care to grow floral interest is noteworthy.

    ‘Nuff said. Big hugs.

    Reply
  154. Julie Aarsvold on

    I’ve not been a huge fan of daffodils in the past, but looking at your lovely pictures, who can resist! I have a new garden that I’ve just begun planting with perennials. I was just thinking that daffodils would really brighten it up in the spring when the snow melts and nothing else is blooming. I will check out your recommendations for daffodils this spring! thanks for all of your inspiration and beauty on the blog. I enjoy reading you immensely!!

    Reply
  155. Jill on

    I LOVE daffodils! They come up early and naturalize well. I’ve recently moved from the desert to the Pacific Northwest, so this is all new and fun for me.

    Reply
  156. Gina thresher on

    I love the little varieties of narcissius! I have the average daffodils in my garden… But I would love to plant something more fragrant. Also, the squirrels keep digging up my bulbs! Any advice on keeping the naughty lil guys from doing that?

    Reply
  157. Rachel Costenbader on

    Thank you for offering such a generous giveaway! I have always planted daffodils throughout my garden. They are like cheerful little sunshine’s in the rainy Pacific Northwest springtime! Two of my all time favorites are jetfire and Tete-a-Tete.

    Reply
  158. Jo on

    I started with 100 King Alfred bulbs 40 years ago. It took me many years to try other varieties. A few years ago I ordered some daffodils that had a pinkish hue. At first it didnt seem right that daffodils should be pink but every year I look for those flowers and always include them in a bouquet. I’ll be digging, separating, and replanting many bulbs this year. Thanks for your list of new varieties to try.

    Reply
  159. Shannon Klein on

    I didn’t have them on my list to plant but now I do. I live in a house that has been here since 1835 and have daffodils, single and double, in varied pales of yellow and white, which pop up everywhere! All along this old plantation land, as we emerge from winter, we seek their path and believe (because we see patches especially in front of old slave quarters and my house was in fact just a hunting cabin) they were signs of hope and still contain strong spirits and prayers. I’ve felt blessed enough by their miraculous spring vigilance that I never thought of planting different varieties but you have inspired me to add beauty to the landscape of my descendents. . . . Thank you!

    Reply
  160. JC on

    I always plant bulbs over Thanksgiving weekend here in California. Time to get out my bulb catalogues! Thanks for the Fab photos and suggestions!

    Reply
  161. Heather on

    I always love looking through the bulb catalogs at all the variety of daffodils there are. I was going to try forcing some bulbs indoors this year, but maybe I’ll have to find some space outside afterall and try out some new varieties!

    Reply
  162. Jesalyn on

    I inherited some traditional yellow daffodils. I’m new to bulbs but loving the journey. Grew my first full dedication of Dahlias this summer and LOVED the whole process. Now I’m debating on what to get going for spring. So appreciate the time you put into your Instagram, your website/blog. Thank you for sharing!

    Reply
  163. Ashley on

    I did not have daffodils on my list this year… only because I’ve been seriously put out with the options in my area! I LOVE daffodils and plan on adding some of your recommendations this fall – THANK you!! <3

    Reply
  164. Hillary Talbott-Williams on

    We have a few rows of Tahiti daffs in our spring bulbs. I’m always looking for late blooming varieties to plant because our farmers market doesn’t start until May 1st. Customers love Tahiti in bunches, but I find it tricky to mix with the softer tones of other spring flowers. I’d love to try out some softer, peachy or buttery varieties. Thanks for the recommendations, they really help.

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  165. Gloria on

    You are an inspiration! Thank you for all the knowledge you share. Every picture you post is not only beautiful but also brings calm, joy and peace to my day. The garden is my happy place. Looking forward to beautiful blooms in the spring!!!!!! Thank you.

    Reply
  166. Desiree Dean on

    Just four days ago, after reading one of your blogs on how “you don’t need 6 plus acres to be a flower farmer” everything changed for us. We have been looking up land to purchase and of course asking the question can we handle that much land, are we prepared form two payments. After reading what you had written we got a sense of “why not use the land we are already paying for! “We decided to use the land we own and now that fall as arrived, try to produce product starting in the spring. In the local shops surrounding, I started scouting out daffodil bulbs and found a lot of varieties I loved as well as some allium and irises. Also a lot of tulip varieties took my breath away. While getting ready to pay my husband said to me, perhaps we should wait till after hurricane Joaquin, we don’t know how much flooding we are in for so, I think I’m going to wait till next week! But I am beyond exciting to get muddy and get out there an plants bulbs! Hopefully I can incorporate them into my spring 2016 bridal center pieces and bouquets. I have lots to learn but beyond excited to be able to look out my window while drinking my morning coffee and see beautiful varieties! Can’t wait! Thanks for the amazing information!!!

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  167. Paige on

    I do have daffodills on my fall planting list! I have a few in the ground that I planted last year, but they are pretty ho-hum. Thanks for some more inspired ideas!

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  168. Kathy walsh on

    I’m always planting daffodils in the fall as we have a lot of deer in the area. Any suggestions for reliable varieties to plant under black walnuts?

    Reply
  169. Anna Price on

    I do have them on my fall planting list, but unfortunately I doubt that I will get to them! I’m definitely planting some tulips, but we shall see how much more I have the $ for. Thanks so much for this post. These varieties are truly gorgeous !

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  170. Carly on

    I don’t have dadfodil bulbs this year, but I should! My one and a half year old son, Waylon, and I planted some great tulips and hyacinth though. The tulips are beautiful dark purples and reds, with some peachy orange. Some day I want to run my own flower farm; about to graduate from Oregon State with a horticulture degree. Flower farming, here I come!

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  171. Gail Wynne on

    My long standing favorite is King Alfred,. After reading your blog I realize how boring I’ve been with daffodils. I’ll work on that!

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  172. Patricia Hatfield on

    Winston Churchill has been on my wish list for a long time- this post has just added several more to my list.

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  173. Becky on

    We have a lovely hillside planted in daffodils and watch vigilantly for their noses to poke up in early March. That little bit of green makes everything okay.

    Reply
  174. laura on

    I hadn’t thought about planting yet but now I’m anxious to get some bulbs in the ground. This little patio garden of mine needs some pretty flowers! Thanks for all you do and share with us here. It is so inspiring.
    blessings
    ~*~

    Reply
  175. Helen on

    I’ve always grown tulips, but I’d love to try daffs, especially after seeing those beautiful varieties on this post! Thank you for everything you do, Floret family :)

    Reply
  176. Sarah on

    Yes, yes! I must replant my hyacinths as a mole apparently thought to feature them at a grand feast a few weeks ago. ? I’m thinking daffies might be a good replacement. Winston Churchill is in my list. My go to daffies are from old House Gardens Heirloom Bulbs and it’s a rare one called “Fire Tail”. I would love to replenish my beds with whatever you have to share!

    Reply
  177. Lanette on

    Some lovely gardener who lived here before me planted clutches of daffodils and narcissus around the farm. I love rediscovering them every winter. This will be my first year planting my own to sell as cut flowers. Thanks for the tips!

    Reply
  178. Allie Tolbert on

    Unfortunately we don’t have a great selection of flower bulbs in my area so I hadn’t added daffodils to the list (I get a little bored of the plain yellow varieties sold everywhere). We just finished construction on our new home last spring I’ve been searching like a mad woman for the perfect additions to our garden. My first bulbs in have been crocus-love seeing those little faces break through to let us know spring is coming!

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  179. Allison on

    I’m trying tulips and daffodils for the first time for the cutting garden. I chose similar looking varieties to those you talked about; Pipit, White Lion, Kedron Apricot, and Delnashaugh White. It was such a hard decision narrowing down varieties. I’d love to try your favorites! thanks for the opportunity!

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  180. Jennifer Haf on

    Saddle Up!!! Muck boots on. Thanks for the motivation to start digging! Always fabulous content and inspiration Erin! Thanks always! xo

    Reply
  181. Linda in Arlington on

    I love narcissus because the deer usually exclude them from the dining menu (but, not always). Thank you for sharing your chosen beautiful varieties. This will be my first year to be home everyday for fall gardening, and I am looking forward to all the chores and opportunities to be rewarded in the spring. Questions for you: 1) Do you have moles in the Skagit Valley? I often find my bulbs are undermined by the moles – very disappointing. 2) Do you replant the previous seasons bulbs? Love your blog, website, and Facebook posts. Thanks much for generously sharing your knowledge with all.

    Reply
  182. Dani on

    Hello! What a sweet offer!
    I ordered a few as I started my flower farmer journey this year! BUT of course I’m soooo glad to see your list as I have a tendency to follow along and gleen from your expertise! I may have to order more… ;-)
    So far these are due to ship any day….
    GIANT TRUMPET DAFFODIL MIX
    TAZETTA DAFFODIL MINNOW
    DOUBLE PHEASANT EYE
    Thanks!
    ~Dani

    Reply
  183. Leah Anne on

    Yes! I have a daffodil addiction, so they’re on my list every fall. This year, I’m looking for some with green in the blooms.

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  184. Heather m on

    A remodel has taken it’s toll on my yard this year – some daffs will fix it right up, don’t you think?! I go to Christiansons and look for whichever varieties claim to have the most fragrance. I love the scent of fresh flowers after a long winter!

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  185. Carmel on

    No, I have never planted ANY spring blooming bulbs in my yard. I was waiting for this post, I guess! I’m accustomed to seeing the usual suspects from our local nursery and big box stores. I’m inspired by the beautiful and unusual varieties you’ve showcased. Thank you for sharing your knowledge and suggestions. (Will you be offering them for sale on your website for those of us that are not fortunate to win a collection?)

    Reply
  186. CATHERINE CAPEN FERGUSON on

    We are a trifle behind, whilst still searching for our land! It has been a loving lesson in patience and dedication to scan the real estate posts daily, but it will arrive. Late bloomers, we’ve only just begun our flower farm dream by getting married a wee bit ago…actually this past Sunday, September 27th in the Monet Garden at the botanical gardens here in Overland Park, Kansas. I currently work at a garden center, and all of my flowers, many transported from several moves, are cozy on a mere patio space, awaiting their permanent home. My new husband and I speak daily of our ‘flower farm’..the dream is very much alive and is our inspiration to get up each day and work at jobs we don’t necessarily like to get closer to fruition of the one we love. Thank you, Erin..

    Reply
  187. Martha Reed on

    I have daffodils I planted last year. A lovely mix from Van Engelen. This year I am investing in allium and tulips. Next year, I’ll take advantage of your wonderful daff details and add some more.

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  188. Emilia on

    I have some daffodils bulbs from last year, but they are nothing like you have. Yours are just gorgeous. Thank you for listing their names.

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  189. Meredith on

    Daffodils are my absolute favorite, especially after living in Wales, where they’re the national flower. I’d love to bring some of those Welsh landscapes to my Hudson Valley home!

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  190. Ellen santacroce on

    The timing of your post is perfect, thank you! Now to find the best sources.

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  191. Beth S on

    Your favorite variety posts are always so inspiring! Looks like I lucked out and got a few of these varieties as I blindly ordered my bulbs this season, and I can’t wait to add the rest next year! Looking forward to the post on tulips! Thank you for all you do!

    Reply
  192. Carlee L on

    I was considering daffodils this year but haven’t purchased any- I have just started to learn that there are many unusual and surprising varieties that I would love to try.

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  193. Mary on

    Beautiful! Every year when I see the spring daffodils I always say, I need to plant daffodils, but I am completely uneducated as to when and how. Now I can add narcissus to this ever growing list of inspirational flowers to learn more about. Thank you.

    Reply
  194. Elizabeth Ott on

    After moving to Washington a few years ago, I had to plant a few daffodils as they seem to herald spring’s arrival. I just bought a few basic yellow bulbs from the store, but the varieties you show are gorgeous! My friend nicknamed my daughter “Petit Four”, and it would be a joy to plant those!

    Reply
  195. Jenny Modaffari on

    Yes, I plant Daffy’s every year. Some favorites are Tahiti, Thalia, and Tete a Tete. Thanks for sharing your picks.

    Reply
  196. Jennie Martinez on

    I don’t have daffodils but I’ll have them in my garden. Thank you for all the wisdom you share!

    Reply
  197. Deanna Kitchen on

    The first year we moved into our house, I planted hardware store bulbs all around our old tree. Even though they are generic as they come, they still bloom sunshine come spring. I’d love to try out some of your recommended varieties!

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  198. Jackson on

    We always put a new batch of narcissus somewhere on the farm in the fall. In the spring, drifts pop up here and there adding a dash of color in a just-barely-greening landscape. One of my favorites is a highly scented, old style pheasant-eye narcissus. We rescued them from a deserted farmstead that was being demolished. Someone years ago had carefully planted them and enjoyed them and it was painful to see them blooming amid all the destruction. Two days later we passed by the site and the entire area had been scraped clean and bulldozed. Our little pheasant-eyes have a happy home here now, and we are very grateful for that.

    Reply
  199. Ashley Mauricio-Flores on

    After seeing these beauties, wow, they will most definitely be added! Thanks for the list and the gorgeous pictures :)

    Reply
  200. Marissa Dawn on

    My Oma was a fantastic gardener and my mother always has her hands in the dirt. She loves to garden and I know she would love love to have some new varieties of daffodils. Her birthday is this month and it would be a nice surprise if I could give her some of these amazing daffodil bulbs. Please consider me as a winner! Thank you for sharing your passion and gift with others! :)

    Reply
  201. Cassie on

    I loved Cheerfulness – the triple and quad blooms on each stem were so cute! How do you amend the soil of your daffodil bedseach year? What annuals or other perennials do you plant with it so that the bed doesn’t go unused for the rest of the season? Can’t wait for your book!

    Reply
  202. Pamela on

    My favorites! My yard needs spring color and I wondered if they grow well in a shady yard. I may try planting this fall!

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  203. Jamie wolma on

    Erin- I had never really even considered flower gardening until I met you and I am so inspired!! We planted some lilies this summer and a whole patch of wildflowers and it was so incredibly rewarding!! I’m going to do some research today in planting fall bulbs for spring and I could not be more excited. Thank you for inspiring me do much, friend. I’m so grateful for you!!

    Reply
  204. Natasha Davidson on

    Hi! I’m from South Africa so our planting times are different. Daffodils have to be the most rewarding bulb to grow, and definitely one of my favourites! Love the different varieties you have there!

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  205. Gina lee on

    Definitely but they certainly do not look as unique and as gorgeous as those!!
    Freesia is always a go to for me as well.. And hyacinth…. Tulips….
    Bulb flowers are my fav and they do well in los angeles

    Reply
  206. kelly preslar on

    i am so in love with narcissus! I got my first selection last fall and was head over heels this spring with their abundance and ease to grow! Can’t wait to see more post about spring bulbs!!

    Reply
  207. Meriwether on

    I love Flower Record; and I’ve just seen a new variety called Martha Stewart that looks beautiful. I also love Fragrant Rose, Angel Eyes and Fortissimo. I love your website and blog!

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  208. Whitney on

    I did not, but I do now! Thank you for the inspiration!

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  209. Rachelle Clark on

    We moved last year to our new farm, so I’m just getting the lay of the land. I’m still in the process of deciding what can go where, and how to navigate the abundance of water that we seem to have running off our hill behind us during the ‘wet’ seasons. While it may make the grass grow like crazy, I doubt having soggy bottoms would work for spring bulbs. But, I do have a few spots where I plan on tucking some bulbs anyway, and hoping for the best! Thanks for all the inspiration, and for sharing your experiences. Forever grateful!

    Reply
  210. Laurie | Hedgerow Rose on

    Thank you for sharing your favorites with us, Erin! I’m always keen to try new-to-me cultivars. My favorite has always been N. poeticus and since we recently moved, I bought a bunch more to plant this fall along with a ton of Alliums. I know what you mean about fall…I always think it’s going to be a time to finally relax but there is so much to still do! But winter will be here soon and we’ll all be poring over our garden catalogs and counting the days until spring. ;)

    Reply
  211. Jillian mcfadyen on

    Daffodils are nice to have and we are definitely planting some. It’s so nice to have some color at market among all of the beautiful flowering branches! Can’t believe it is already that time to direct seed for next season! Time sure does fly when you love your job!!!!

    Reply
  212. Karen on

    Our farm has a number of “old-fashioned” daffodils around but it is fun to add some new faces to the group: )

    Reply
  213. Angie Ebert on

    I have never grown daffodils. I was hoping to to grow bulbs for cut flowers this fall, but it doesn’t look like I’ll get to. Next year, though. If you don’t mind sharing, I’d love to know where you source your bulbs from. Also, do you treat most bulbs the same way as tulips? Pluck them and toss the bulb? Thanks!

    Reply
  214. Denise on

    I have tulips that have naturalized and have been great at coming up every year. Only one variety of ordinary daffodils, that have been divided so many times. Seeing your success is inspiring-I want more!

    Reply
  215. Kristyn Golier on

    I do not have daffodils due to space constraints in our current house. We move next Friday and can hardly wait to start planting bulbs!! I’m more excited about the endless possibilities of our new property than the house itself!! Would love to win!! Thank you for the endless inspiration you bring to me every day!!!

    Reply
  216. Suzanne on

    Daffodils are always on the list for Fall. I appreciate you sharing some of your favorite varieties. Your work is amazing and inspiring! Thank you!

    Reply
  217. Kyler on

    I didn’t have any narcissus or daffodils planned for this fall, but now…… I will have to find some. They are so interesting and unique! As always, thank you for your generous sharing of information. I cannot wait for your book to be published :)

    Reply
  218. Jamie on

    I would love to plant these this year. My grandpa recently passed away and these were his favorites. I want them to represent him every time I walk out my front door.

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  219. Katie Smaglinski on

    Yes… bridal crown was my most favorite one I planted last fall… adding more and some cheerfulness as well. Thanks for all the suggestions!

    Reply
  220. Andrea on

    This year I experimented with some new flower varieties and sold flowers at our local Farmer’s Market during the month of June. Next year I am expanding my business. I just bought a small bag of Narcissus bulbs to try out. Thank you for sharing helpful tips and information with us. It is always appreciated!

    Reply
  221. Megan on

    We have a yard full of daffodils, and are always planting more! Such an easy flower to grow! Thanks for the list, going to try some of these!

    Reply
  222. Sarah on

    I have always wanted to but didn’t have the place. We just moved and I was hoping for just the advice you gave!

    Reply
  223. Naly Jasengnou on

    I have tulips on my to do list this fall. I’m really excited about this blog!! Thanks for the info!!!

    Reply
  224. Katy Phillips on

    Thank you so much Erin for your recommendations! I am excited about planting narcissus now. They are such a lovely, whimsical flower!

    Reply
  225. Nikki on

    Thank you Erin!! I am placing my first big order of bulbs this year, but was feeling lost, and then of course you swoop in and save the day! Will you list your favorite bulb sources?

    Reply
    • Susan Soto on

      Where do you source your bulbs?

      I have only purchased at the big box and feeling ready to branch out.

  226. Jamie on

    I saw your posts last year about narcissus and told myself that is definitely on the list for this year. I just ordered some fun varieties of bulbs from Dutch grown but I am still looking for more unique to add to my cutting collection. I love that they come back year after year and that the deer avoid them. Makes you not feel so bad to spend that extra dime on them.

    Reply
  227. Karen on

    I haven’t been planting these because of the sap issue. Perhaps I need to take a 2nd look? These varieties are lovely!

    Reply
  228. Lynn on

    Yes, I do want to re-plant daffodils – mine were lost to mega rains then summer heat :( And like you, I have always prefered the unusual, multi-petaled varieties. Thank you for the opportunity to enter your give-a-way, you are truly the most inspiring, generous person I’ve ever known, and am hoping to attend one of your seminars soon!!

    Reply
  229. Amber Ogden on

    I have foxglove in the plans for next year! I appreciate your site, blogs and everything you do! Anything I learn I have been inspired by you to pass on to help others!

    Reply
  230. Katie Aurand on

    I do not have daffodils on my fall planting list this year. I am brand new at this and am so thankful for the wealth of information your blog offers!!! Thank you!

    Reply

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