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January 16th 2024

How to Grow Dahlias from Seed

Written by
Floret

One of the most exciting and surprising discoveries I made on my dahlia-growing journey was learning how new varieties were created. 

Unlike tubers or cuttings, which produce an exact clone of the plant they come from, dahlias grown from seed offer a treasure trove of new possibilities, each one something that’s never existed before. 

The opportunities are endless, and if you find one you love, you get to name it!  

Dahlia seedlings are extremely cold sensitive, so don’t plant them outside until the weather has sufficiently warmed. We typically transplant them 3 to 4 weeks after our last spring frost. 

Seeds should be started indoors at least 4 to 8 weeks before you want to plant them out. Dahlia seeds germinate sporadically, so be patient—they will come up but it can take up to two weeks. Direct-seeding into the garden isn’t recommended. 

While dahlia seeds benefit from additional warmth to help them germinate, they prefer slightly cooler temperatures than other summer bloomers. We’ve had the best results setting our heat mats between 65°F and 70°F (18°C and 21°C). Temps above 75°F (24°C) seem to actually slow germination down considerably.

So if your seeds aren’t sprouting, try lowering the temperature on your heat mat or just removing them from the heat to see if that helps them wake up.

Dahlias do best in rich, heavily amended soil. We prepare planting beds with a generous dose of compost and organic fertilizer and then install drip irrigation. Learn more about soil preparation here.

Although they can handle the heat of summer, we recommend providing some afternoon shade in extremely hot climates. 

Space plants 12 in (30 cm) apart and water deeply twice a week. (Dahlia seedlings can be grown much closer together, with as little as 4 in [10 cm] between plants. This method will produce a jungle of towering stems and is how most professional breeders increase the number of seedlings they can grow in a season.) 

Slugs and snails love tender dahlia seedlings. We apply Sluggo immediately after transplanting to protect them while they get established. 

Plants inevitably grow tall and heavy and will require sturdy staking, which should be placed before they grow too large and topple over from the weight of their showy blossoms. 

If you’re growing dahlias in garden beds, you can pound individual stakes next to each seedling at planting time and tie them up as they grow. 

If you’re planting in long rows, plants can be corralled and held upright by pounding heavy stakes or T-posts around the perimeter of the bed and creating a string-lined box using bailing twine.

To increase the overall number of flowers and encourage long, strong stems, you’ll want to pinch them. Once plants are 8 to 12 in (20 to 30 cm) tall, use sharp pruners to snip off the top 3 to 4 in (7 to 10 cm), just above a set of leaves. This causes the plant to send up multiple stems below the cut. 

Unless you’re leaving seedpods to mature for breeding purposes, remove spent blooms often so the plants put their energy into flower production rather than making seed. 

If you discover varieties you love, you can dig them up at the end of the season to replant the following year. 

Dahlias grown from seed produce miniature clumps of tubers that are often not big enough to divide, so we store the entire bundle in a Ziploc bag filled with peat moss or vermiculite in a cool place that doesn’t freeze, between 40°F and 50°F (4°C and 10°C). 

Dahlias are not terribly long-lasting cut flowers, but you can get about 5 days by picking at the right stage and using floral preservative. Dahlias won’t unfurl much after harvesting, so pick when they are almost fully open for large, full blooms. 

For singles and other open-centered varieties, pick just as the petals are unfurling and before the bees get to them.

If you haven’t grown dahlias from seed, I highly encourage you to give it a try—it’s the ultimate treasure hunt. 

I’d love to hear about your experience with dahlias grown from seed and some of the discoveries you’ve made in your garden. 


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135 Comments

  1. janet hall on

    my first dahlia bloom is beautiful!!!! Yellow center , white around the center and then pale pick petals!! Wish I could send a picture! Her name is Lola!!

    Reply
  2. Sheryl Davis on

    I love your show and the book! I’m going to try growing dahlias from seed. I have mastered zinnias. Need a new challenge.

    Reply
  3. Anna F on

    Hi Floret team! I started the Shooting Stars dahlias from seed and attempted to transfer them to a large garden bed about two weeks ago (we’re in Zone 5). We added compost to the dirt and have consistently watered to ensure nothing dried out and none of them survived. I am so bummed. Any idea what I might be able to try next time to hopefully get a few to survive? Thank you!!

    Reply
  4. Trisha on

    Planted 12 bees choice dahlia seeds indoors, and 11 germinated. Planted out doors April 14. I’m in 9a and have my first bloom (took 6 weeks outdoors). It’s a beautiful creamy yellow that goes to white tips. I have buds on 4 other dahlias and they are tolerating 90 degree days well. Love not knowing what will bloom!

    Reply
  5. Colleen Taylor on

    How best to stake my newly transplanted seedlings when they grow up? Do I tie the dahlia to a single wooden stake, a 15” 1×1 ? Or do I tee pee style over the dahlia?
    Thank you!!

    Reply
  6. Nancy S on

    I’m south of Seattle in Zone 8b. I just bought some dahlias and zinnas. Can I plant them in the ground?

    Reply
    • Team Floret on

      Hi Nancy- Direct sowing can happen, now that its warmed up. Birds and pests love the taste of young seedlings (and seeds!) so you’ll need to keep an eye on them or protect them from critters to ensure they survive and thrive after being planted. Another thing to keep in mind is maintaining the moisture in the soil until seeds sprout. If the soil dries out during germination, any roots that are growing beneath the soil will dry out as well.

  7. Heidi Jungwirth on

    Hi, I’m so excited to grow these beautiful dahlias. In my enthusiasm, I bought 3 different packages of seed. My plan was to make one long row of dahlias in my garden, but now I’m wondering if I should isolate the 3 varieties so that they don’t inter-pollinate. Thanks!

    Reply
  8. Cecilia Mitchell on

    I over watered my seeds (Dahlias). Will they still sprout? I planted them in seed trays about 3 weeks ago and only half of them sprouted. Thank you!

    Reply
  9. Will on

    Following up on my April 9th comment – I was wrong, I did not grow using a heat mat. So I started in a fairly warm room but not with mats. So the heat tip is probably not right!

    Reply
  10. Judy on

    Our last frost date range is May 20-31. My Bees Choice seedlings are looking wonderful! They are now almost 5″ tall in 2″ square cells. Some cells have up to 4 seedlings. Since they have at least 3 more weeks indoors, should I transplant the seedlings to individual deeper pots? I have 3.5″ deep x 2″ wide pots. Also have 5″ deep x 3.5″ wide pots. This is my first experience with Floret Originals and I do not want to risk these beautiful seedlings beginning to peter out because they are too crowded. Thank you for your advice!!

    Reply
    • BriAnn, Team Floret on

      You can pot them up into bigger pots so they don’t get root bound.

  11. Ellie on

    Is it normal for the bottom set of leaves to brown and shrivel as the plant grows? I’ve been very careful about watering and light. When I lift up the tray you can see a little bit of the roots but not a lot. I’m not sure what’s wrong :(
    Any help would be appreciated! Thanks!

    Reply
  12. Rebhecca on

    Thank you so much for all your info! I was wondering if I can “seed save” from dahlia blooms a freind gave me a boquet of? I don’t have a plant, but I do have a vase of her blooms. Would I seed save the same way you described from these cut blooms?

    Reply
  13. Michelle on

    Hello! Is it too late to order and start seedlings now? I’m in zone 7a. If it is, How long do the seeds last for storage? Could I order them this year for next year? Both for Dahlias and Zinnias.

    Reply
    • BriAnn, Team Floret on

      It’s not too late to start them. If you wanted to stock up on some varieties, the seeds can be stored for several years.

  14. Jacqueline on

    Hi there, Please Help! I’m on the late train! It’s May 1st, and I’m in California, Los Angeles area . Zone 10a and 10b. Is it too late to sow my dahlia seeds? The weather has been mild, in the mid to upper 70’s, I’m concerned that I missed my window for sowing. Thanks for any advice.

    Reply
  15. Larisa Williams on

    Hi there! I am growing your dahlias from seed this year and am about to transplant them outdoors. I am a bit worried the night time temps are still too cold. If it is in the low 40s, will they be ok? Or should I wait until they are mid 40s/low 50s? Your instructions mentioned to wait 3 to 4 weeks after the last frost date and I have done that but I have been worried it’s colder than normal this year. Thank you!

    Reply
    • BriAnn, Team Floret on

      I’d suggest waiting until the night temps are around 55 degrees.

  16. Cathren Saunders on

    Hello! I’m in Houston, 9a. Our temps are mid 80s high and mid 70s low. Next week is forecasted to be in the 90s 😩. Can I still direct sow my seeds into a raised bed or should I wait for the fall?

    Reply
    • BriAnn, Team Floret on

      We don’t recommend direct sowing dahlia seeds. Starting them indoors gives them a better start and to establish before planting them outside.

  17. Debbie Henson on

    Hi! I’ve planted my dahlia seeds in trays, transplanted to peat pots under grow lights and moved them to grow bags. They are now looking leggy and have stopped growing. I did the same thing last year and they were fine. Do they need fertilizer? And if they do, what do I use?

    Reply
    • BriAnn, Team Floret on

      You could give them 1/2 strength fertilizer like liquid fish emulsion for a boost of nutrients.

  18. Jackie Cushman on

    Hi !
    I am getting a late start on my dahlias.
    I live is zone 7 (western NC) ,is it to late to start my Dahlia seedlings ? This is my first time starting dahlias from seeds. Also my first year experimenting with cut flowers.

    Reply
    • BriAnn, Team Floret on

      It’s not too late to plant dahlia seeds in your area. Happy planting!

  19. Carrie on

    I found that it really helped my seed dahlias and seed zinnias to have an oscillating fan set on a timer to blow for 1/2 hr every couple hours to toughen them up! The stems grow nice and straight too. Especially helpful with my tomato seedings.

    Reply
  20. Maci on

    Hello! The dahlia seeds germinated beautifully but are growing insanely tall (almost twelve inches, three sets of true leaves) at 4 weeks, despite being an inch under grow lights for 13 hrs/day. I’ve potted up but still have 3-4 weeks before they can safely go in the ground… What else can i do to avoid further leggy-ness? Is pinching recommended when they are thin and not in the ground?

    Reply
    • BriAnn, Team Floret on

      You can pinch the stem above a leaf node to encourage branching.

  21. Julie on

    Hi BriAnn,
    I planted my zinnias and dahlias March 26th. They are in 72 cell trays. They look lovely….just leggy in my opinion. Is it OK to keep them in the 72 cell tray until I plant them in May? Will they get stronger? This is my first time planting seeds. It is very exciting. I have learned a lot. Just want to make sure I am doing the best things for my babies!!
    Thank you!!
    Julie

    Reply
  22. Kevyn Quigley on

    My Floret Original Dahlia seeds sprouted 32 out of 36 cells 5 days and they look so fragile. They are too tall for the covers in the seed cells so I took them off a few days ago and they look fragile. What do I do with them next. I don’t want to mess this up! I live in Zone 9.

    Reply
  23. Casey on

    I started my floret dahlias from seed about 4-5 weeks ago. They have 3 sets of leaves and range from 3-8 inches tall, but many of the bottom leaves are yellowing. What can I do? Thank you!

    Reply
    • BriAnn, Team Floret on

      They may need to be potted up if they are getting root bound. A little fertilizer like diluted fish emulsion may help for a boost of nutrients. I hope this helps!

  24. Kathy Thomas on

    I am just amazed. I didn’t know until this article that I could even grow dahlias from seed. I got my order in to Floret, and planted your seeds a week later. Every single seed came up within the first week. They are now over two inches tall and I’ll have to raise the grow lights probably any day now. I can not wait to put these in the garden. Thank you for all your incredible garden expertise. My gardens have been so enriched by Floret. 7b Northwest Georgia.

    Reply
  25. Will on

    I recently started dahlias from seed for the first time and found something interesting that differs from your article so wanted to share in case it is useful for anyone. I did not keep them cool – they were on heat mats in a warm room (75F+). I had 80% germination in less than 3 days.

    Thanks for all the great free resources!

    Reply
  26. Jessica on

    I am terribly late starting my seeds here in zone 8b… I should have started them at least 4-6 weeks ago. What would you recommend for starting seeds so late in the season? Outside in pots maybe? Or still indoors until they are ready to be planted out? Excited to try dahlia seeds for the first time! Thank you!

    Reply
  27. Beth Parker on

    I grew your dahlia seeds last year and then saved the tubers following your course. When and how do I plant the tubers? I’m 10a north Marin, California.

    Reply
  28. Kris on

    I am so tickled with my Bee’s Choice seedlings from last years order. Great germination success! Looking forward to planting them out in May. I am a newbie to dahlias and very excited!

    Reply
  29. Shelley on

    My comment above got cut off for some reason. I have about 100 Can Can Dahlias growing in 4″ pots they are about 4″ tall right now under gro lights but they are getting leggy, do I need to pinch them? They cant go outside for at least another 4 weeks.

    Reply
  30. Shelley on

    My comment got cut off. I was asking about my can can dahlias that are about 4″ now and getting leggy even though gro lights are close, should I pinch them?

    c

    Reply
  31. Shelley Ricco on

    Do they need to be pinched yet they are getting a little leggy and I have the gro lights close. I have about 100. Floret Celosia are doing really well too.

    Reply
  32. Terry durkin on

    Hi!
    I planted dahlia pompom mix and showpiece mix on 3/15 here in CT and they were doing great. Now I am seeing some of them starting to shrivel up and die. I have them by a window with grow lights, about 60 to 65 degrees. My snap dragons are doing great. My first time planting, I just can’t figure out what’s happening. Help! Some of them are doing great.
    Thanks,
    Terry

    Reply
    • BriAnn, Team Floret on

      Check the soil and when the tops begin to appear dry then it’s time to water them. Also, be sure to have the lights set several inches from the tops of the seedlings.

  33. Julie on

    Hi BriAnn,
    I planted my floret dahlia seeds on March 26th. My Bee’s Choice and Shooting Stars have geminated nicely. But my tray of Petit Florets are not doing as well. My 70 cell tray only has 13 that have popped up. Are they slower to germinate than the others? I’m just so concerned about them. Please let me know. I still have the Petit florets on a heating pad. Thank you so much for any wisdom that you can share with me.

    Reply
    • BriAnn, Team Floret on

      If soil temp is warmer than 70 degrees, then it tends to slow down germination for dahlia seeds. You can remove the heat mat and see if that helps. It’s normal for dahlia seeds to sprout sporadically over a couple weeks because of the different genetics in the seeds. I hope this helps!

  34. Tobin rotchford on

    My d
    Seedlings are coming along beautifully. At what point do I transplant them outside? I live on Orcas, WA.
    Thank you!

    Reply
    • BriAnn, Team Floret on

      It’s best to wait a couple weeks after your last spring frost. This is usually the first or second week of May in our area.

  35. Gloria Chmilar on

    I live in Alberta, Canada and my gardening zone is 3A. We can experience full-blown snow storms on the May Long weekend, and it can be very challenging at times. I recently purchased Original Seed packets from Floret and I started the Bees Choice dahlia seeds on March 14, 2024. The Floret website states there may be 25 seeds in this packet and I was genuinely surprized when my packet contained 37 seeds! So far, 26 of the 37 seeds have germinated and I could not be more satisfied with this! That is 70% germination and who knows, more seeds may still pop out of the seed tray. I have faithfully followed Erin and Floret for many years and I have purchased many of their books. I watch them on YouTube and I feel Erin and her crew do a marvelous job of promoting cut flowers to the lay person. Cheers from Sunny Alberta!

    Reply
  36. William on

    Do you recommend succession planting for dahlias from seed? I am planning on growing all of the Floret Original Dahlias this year.

    Reply
    • BriAnn, Team Floret on

      Since they take a little longer to reach maturity and they are cut-and-come-agains, flowering until the first frost, one planting early in the season is totally fine.

  37. Jenna on

    Is it possible to save seeds that are true to type from dahlias grown from tubers by covering the bloom in an organza bag before it opens and hand pollinating? Then tag that bloom to identify it as one to keep seeds from? I don’t have good luck keeping quality tubers over winter but I can save/start seeds just fine.

    Reply
  38. Judith on

    I have another question about my dahlia seedlings. They are between 4 inches and 6 inches tall. Just recently some of them have their top two leaves curled back toward the stem. I don’t see any sign of bugs or mildew. Do you have any idea what could be causing this? I know I’m due to lower the racks for some of them, as they’ve gotten so close to the lights. Could that be the source of the problem? Otherwise I’m very pleased with my results.These are my first seeds started under lights. It’s great fun to be learning new gardening skills! Thanks for being so generous with your expertise.

    Reply
  39. Azure on

    My Dahlia and Zinnia seedlings are thriving outside in the garden here in Hawaiʻi. I debated keeping them inside but lately we’ve been having on and off cold/warm weather so I’ve just let them figure themselves out outside and it’s going great! definitely buying more seeds next year. I can’t wait to see these flowers in full bloom!

    Reply
  40. Dana Pelaez on

    Help!!! My dahlia and zinnias have sprouted but are droopy. I’m not sure what I’m doing wrong. I have them under lights 10-12 hours a day. I water when soil is dry. They are kept in the my kitchen, so the temperature is the same everyday.
    My celosia are doing great!!

    Reply
    • BriAnn, Team Floret on

      Increase it to 14-16 hours of light each day and set the lights 3 inches from the tops of the seedlings.

  41. Liesl on

    I have saved and dried several flowers from my dahlias last fall and I can’t figure out which parts are the seeds! Can you show a photo of the seed part? Mine just look like dried petals. I save my zinnia seeds but I can clearly see them at the end of the dried petal. Please advise!

    Reply
  42. Davis Taggart on

    I may have started the seeds too early ,2/20/24, in our greenhouse. The dahlias all germinated well, but some if them are tall enough that they are starting to flop. The question is should I stake them or transplant them to larger pots before I transfer from the flat to the garden?
    Thank you,
    Davis

    Reply
    • BriAnn, Team Floret on

      If they are floppy, they may not be getting enough light and have grown leggy stems. You could plant into larger pots and bury some of the stem.

  43. Maria on

    Hi Erin, I am so excited to tell you 12 of my 36 seeds have germinated. Getting their almost second set of leaves. It’s been 2 weeks now and they all have t woke. Up yet so I believe the heat may might be the culprit like you said in your seed starting email. I will remove it see how they do.
    My question is :
    I’m in zone 6 b~ should I keep them under grow lights till they’re ready for warmer temps? The problem is that’s not till the enrich of April. How should I handle them till them?
    Thanks for your inspiration~ Maria

    Reply
    • BriAnn, Team Floret on

      They will need 14-16 hours of light each day until it’s time to transplant them outside.

  44. Julie Briggs on

    How do you keep deer out of your Dahlia beds?

    Reply
  45. Laura McCann on

    Do the dahlia seeds have a direction they should be planted, ie horizontal or verticle?

    Reply
  46. Ana on

    Hi, I sowed my seeds 3 days ago and they are already starting to sprout! I’m super excited. Just have one question. I haven’t watered the tray since the day I planted them. The soil is still slightly damp. Do I need to wait until most of them sprout before watering the tray?

    Reply
    • BriAnn, Team Floret on

      Awesome! Water them again when the top of the soil begins to appear dry.

  47. Julianne on

    Should I germinate the seeds in a wet paper towel or directly into soil ?

    Reply
  48. Jenni on

    In Napa, CA can I plant them directly in the ground? I see that you say to not do this.

    Reply
  49. Mary Brunette on

    Hello and thank you for such great Dahlia and Zinnias seeds! The germination is rate is high with no heat mat used. They are doing well under the lights and I’m wondering if they need to be “potted up” and at what height? If they don’t need potting up, yay for me, but I’d like them to have a great start once outside.

    Reply
  50. Lauren on

    I purchased the Bees Choice Mix last year and used the paper towel method to germinate 40 of the seeds a little over a week ago & almost all of them germinated within 3 days!! I put them into trays by a sunny window and many are already getting their second set of leaves sprouting up!! So impressed with the quality of these seeds!! Y’all are amazing! I’m brand new to Dahlias – loved your zinnia seeds so much I’m branching out!! Thanks for all the information in this post! It’s been so neat to enjoy with my kids!

    Reply
  51. Gaylene on

    Hi Erin,
    I purchased your Bee’s dahlia seed mix and an super eager to start growing. How many rows do you plant in one bed? It looks like you have 4 feet between beds. How wide is your bed? Do you plant 4″, 9″ or 12″ apart in your beds?
    I plan on selling cut flowers to our local florist.
    I live in zone 9a here on the Oregon Coast (Coos Bay). Thank you for sharing your seeds and knowledge.

    Reply
    • BriAnn, Team Floret on

      We plant 2 rows in one bed and with 12″ spacing between the rows and 4″ spacing between the plants. The beds are about 3-4 feet wide.

  52. Emmy Husfloen on

    I am in MN Zone 4b, started my dahlia seeds without a heat mat in my basement, 22 of 24 have already germinated, I’m so excited!

    Reply
  53. Sara on

    Against all odds, I’ve had more success with dahlias when I start them from Floret seed and transplant to the garden versus when I’ve planted tubers – like a world of difference. No question, just a compliment to your seed quality!

    Reply
  54. Sara on

    What type of landscape fabric are you using between the rows and how do you keep the dahlias weed-free?

    Reply
  55. Kathi on

    I’m in zone 4a and started my Floret dahlia seeds March 10, on 65degree heat mats and grow lights, covered. They are already germinated!

    Reply
  56. Andrew O'connell on

    Hi Erin,
    I have been growing dahlias from seed for many years, but this year i am having issues with germination. They seem to all be germinating with the root sticking out. Never had this before, does it matter which way round you push the seed into the soil. I didnt think it was an issue, i always push the seed in fat end first.
    Are the seeds too immature, is that why i am having these issues?

    Reply
    • BriAnn, Team Floret on

      The seeds may need to be planted deeper and on their side. Also, bottom watering helps the roots grow down. You can also cover the visible roots with more soil.

  57. Meg on

    In my colder basement, these seeds actually did the best last year. I was amazed at the tubers I got from these seeds at the end of the season. I loved seeing what colors the flowers would be, it was such an adventure. I am doing double the amount of seeds this year and sharing with neighbors!

    Reply
  58. Karen on

    I was so excited to get the dahlia seeds, I started them a bit early. Because I live in zone 3b and we have such a short season, I am hoping to pot them up so that I have plants that might produce flowers by mid August for my daughters wedding. I tried about half in soil blocks and the other half in cell trays. The ones in the cell tray sprouted within a couple days with a heat mat and under lights. There was no real action with my soil blocks so I transferred those to a cell tray as well. I am very impressed with the germination of these Dahlia seeds. Thank you so much Erin fro sharing them with the world.

    Reply
  59. Michele McNelley on

    Thanks so much for the seed starting information! Dahlia seed starting commences this week. I’m excited to see what happens.

    Reply
  60. Christina on

    The picture above with Erin and her dahlia’s featured together is one of my favorites of all times. I just can imagine what she is thinking and telling her beautiful lovelies; how joyful she is for the show they put on for her. It’s like a love fest” look what mama does for us ,watch what we do for mama!!”
    Amazing Erin, keep fulfilling your purpose, your babies and we adore your passion and hard work!!

    Reply
  61. Christina on

    What spacing is recommended for
    Bees choices or any of the other floret originals?? Thank you. Your input is greatly appreciated. Happy growing!

    Reply
  62. Colleen Tilbe on

    Do you think I could grow Dahlias from seed in Zone 9b, Sarasota FL?

    Reply
  63. Juney on

    Great article but for us green-beans, how does one collect the seed?

    Reply
  64. Judith Liggins on

    I now have 20 Shooting Star dahlia seedlings. Most are 2-3 inches tall and have their first true leaves. I took them off the heat mat late. I didn’t realize I was supposed to that until they’d been up for two weeks. So my question is: Where is there information about how far from the grow lights they should be now? They look stretched out. It’s much too cool and wet here in Renton, WA to put them outdoors.

    Reply
    • BriAnn, Team Floret on

      The lights should be set 3″ from the tops of the seedlings as soon as they sprout, moving them up as they grow.

  65. Beverly Richardson on

    Thank you for all the tips growing dahlias from seeds! This is my first year trying out seeds and your info was very helpful!

    Reply
  66. Anne Volk on

    I was gifted some dahlia seeds last year..they were wonderful. The tubers are small as you said. Should l just plant the entire clump this year?

    Reply
  67. Tierra Harris on

    Yes, I agree with the question about spacing. I had two dahlias started from seed last year planted too closely and when I dug the tubers they were all entwined around each other. All the tubers grown from Bees Choice seed mix had huge (10-12”) clumps of tubers- not tiny at all- so if planted too closely they could grow tubers that are bound up together…

    Reply
  68. Suzanne O'Rourke on

    Thank you so much Erin and the entire Floret team. You never cease to impress me with you committment, generosity of sharing your depth of knowledge and your passion. You all inspire me and I’ve shared Floret Flowers with many friends and family- gifted your beautiful books as casual gifts to wedding presents. Keep up your amazing journey. Love tagging along.

    Reply
    • BriAnn, Team Floret on

      Click “Show All Comments” towards the bottom of the page.

  69. Paige Rechtman on

    I’m a little confused – when you say “Space plants 12 in (30 cm) apart but Dahlia seedlings can be grown much closer together, with as little as 4 in [10 cm] between plants.” Do you mean if we have tubers, those should be 12 inches apart? And growing dahlias from seed can be closer? Or are you saying if we are trying to breed, we should plant them closer? Also I am planting in containers – If I have large containers, can I plant a lot of seedlings in together, 4 in apart, and still expect lots of blooms? Thank you!! I got the shooting star and cancan varieties and am so excited to see how they turn out. :)

    Reply
  70. Suzanne Colaizzi on

    Would we be allowed to sell your seedlings for a fund raiser for the National Rock Garden Society? All the seedlings I just bought came up within a week and look fantastic.

    Reply
    • Team Floret on

      Absolutely- thanks for asking!

  71. Melissa on

    I started Cancan Girls, Bees Choice and Shooting Stars in soil blocks in our guest room closet on heat mat, under normal LED tubes (nothing fancy, like you said in your video). Fifty % germination in only 2 days!!! I was happily shocked! These are some powerful seeds!

    I sowed 2 per block. Do I thin out one of them once they have a set of true leaves? I’ll be so sad to do that but I guess you have to or neither seedling will do well, right?

    Reply
  72. Brooke on

    How many seeds per tray do you typically do???

    Reply
  73. Teresa on

    What kind of organic fertilizer do you use in the beds? Do you apply fertilizer during the growing season at all?

    Reply
  74. Kaoru Yuasa on

    What are different ways to overwinter the tubers? I think my basement is too warm and outside it’s too cold (Vermont)? Thanks!

    Reply
  75. Caitlin on

    What do you recommend to use for flower preservative?

    Reply
  76. Gail Dentler on

    Such great information… Glad you shared … hoping it helps me in Tx!! I LOVE DAHLIAS!!!

    Reply
  77. BreAnn on

    Do you still use heating mats if you are starting dahlia seeds in a greenhouse? Also, does the same temperature apply? Thank you!

    Reply
  78. Leslie on

    When starting from seed, do I need to transplant to a bigger co Rainer before going outside? Or can they go right from the small cell pack?
    Thank you for sharing your knowledge!

    Reply
  79. Cassandra on

    Do you have to dig up the tubers each season? Will they regrow the next year or will the tuber rot or die?

    Reply
  80. Angela on

    After growing dahlias from seed, can I just leave the tubers in the ground for next year? I’m in zone 9b or would they be too close together (if I use your 4 inch method for seedlings).

    Reply
  81. Katharine on

    Thank you for putting the temperatures in celsius:) I grew up with farenheit but everything changed to celsius when I was in my early 20’s. It’s hard to convert back now.

    Reply
  82. Laura on

    How deep should the seed be planted?
    Going to give it a try.

    Reply
  83. Becky on

    Question! I am looking to plant these Dahlias with the hope of harvesting them for an event in October. Given I’d like a later season bloom, when should I start my seeds? (Location Eastern Ontario)

    Reply
  84. Shelby on

    It looks like you are planting seedlings at 6″ in 2 rows per bed. Is this spacing best only for breeding purposes? Or is it still enough room to get sellable blooms? My idea is plant seedlings 6″ apart first year, dig up/store tubers of the plants I like. Then next year plant the tubers further apart and over-winter them in the ground so tubers have room to expand. Does this sound right?

    Reply
    • BriAnn, Team Floret on

      Yes that’s correct. Tubers can be planted further apart, about 12 inch spacing.

  85. Susie Dunning on

    Hi, I have the same question that Bailey asked on February 25 2024?

    Reply
  86. Bailee on

    I live in the Southeast and am growing dahlias from seed for the first time. I’m ordering heat maps but don’t have a greenhouse or grow lights. Can I sit the seed trays on the heat map outside with the lid on to produce the same effect as a greenhouse?

    Reply
    • BriAnn, Team Floret on

      That could work, but I would suggest using a thermometer probe with the heat mat and set to 70 degrees, this way the heat mat will turn off when the soil warms up during the day.

  87. Darlene MacDonald on

    Ive ordered dahlia seeds (shooting star) so starting from seed for first time. I’ll start 8 weeks before frost as recommended. I will plant seedlings in raised bed. I understand can plant them 4 inches apart but how close can I plant each row apart? I didn’t understand that part in the library? So I can put seedlings close 4 inches but how close are the rows? Thank you

    Reply
  88. Melody on

    Living in Iowa, surrounded by corn and cattle sun and wind; is there any of your varieties of dahlia you suggest? We are fully prepared for staking..

    Reply
  89. Val Schirmer on

    Hi guys! I’m going to start the seeds indoors now — do you recommend sowing into 72s and can I then bump them to a 4″ pot and grow on until it’s warm enough to put them in the ground? OR should I start them in the 4″ pot? It will be under lights and with a heat mat.

    Reply
    • BriAnn, Team Floret on

      We start ours in 72s and then transplant them into the ground from there without potting up. We recommemd starting them 4-8 weeks before it’s time to plant them outside. It’s important not to start them too early so they don’t get stressed in the seed trays.

  90. Gwen on

    thank you for what you offer to the world!

    Reply
  91. Cynthia O’Connor on

    I live in Northern Nevada where the summer highs can get in the high 90s. Not usually 100s but my backyard is full sun from probably 10am on. Would these flowers do well?

    Reply
  92. Germaine Licht on

    I am looking for container cut flowers that can take the heat and humidity of New Orleans, Zone 9.

    Reply
  93. Marley on

    What temperature do the dahlia seedlings need to be to survive and thrive? I am trying to figure out if I can grow them in trays in our potting shed (not insulated) with a lamp, or if they need to be truly indoors. We are located in the Bay Area, CA.

    Reply
    • Erin on

      You’ll want to keep the temp between 60-70* for them to stay in active growth.

  94. Fiela Winston on

    I just bought four varieties of your dahlia seeds. I have never planted a flower in my life but I want o give it a try come spring on my east facing balcony in Southern California. These are the most beautiful flowers I have ever seen in my life and hopefully, I get to see them in person if can manage this process correctly! :)

    Reply
  95. Sara on

    If you were to grow dahlias in pots from seed, what sort of spacing would be ideal? Say in a 14” diameter pot, just one seedling?

    Reply
  96. Donna on

    Where can we purchase dahlia seeds ?

    Reply
  97. Lyndy on

    And what do you fertilise them with please and how often?

    Reply
    • BriAnn, Team Floret on

      We use a combination of organic compost mixed into the soil and Nature’s Intent 7-2-4 fertilizer. Then we use compost tea biweekly throughout the growing season.

  98. Whitney on

    I started saving seeds from my dahlias and it was truly amazing! The beautiful first year seedlings that I grew. Such a rewarding experience. I’ll try to upload a photo and send you my absolute favorite.

    Reply
  99. Kate on

    I am so excited to start growing dahlia from seeds this year. After re-watching Floret show and reading a book Discovering Dahlias, I am very excited to try dahlia from seeds and come up with new varieties.

    Reply

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