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Home Blog A Rose Story Part 4: An interview with Anne Belovich
January 10th 2022

A Rose Story Part 4: An interview with Anne Belovich

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Floret

I’m thrilled to be able to share an interview with revered rosarian Anne Belovich (pictured below with her husband Max). This interview took place in August of 2021, just months before Anne passed away at the age of 97. 

I am so thankful to have gotten a chance to know her and am so inspired by how fully and generously she lived her life. 

Anne Belovich and her husband max in the rose garden with their dog

Erin: You’ve had a very full career and an even fuller life—first as a botanist, then a teacher, then a sailor, a general contractor, and then a rosarian and a writer. Can you tell me a little bit more about your very diverse life path?

Anne: I have had a very full life and while much is owed to the length of my life, my longevity, likewise, probably benefited from having a full, diverse life. Life-long learning and growing keeps one engaged. 

It would probably surprise many of your readers to know that I used to consider myself a prisoner in my mother’s garden. We lived in Morro Bay on a high bluff. As a young child of three, maybe four, I used to run away—down the trail, that certainly wasn’t made for children, as fast as I could go down to the water. I’d get down there in the sand and there would be crabs and herons that would be fishing—so many wonderful things to see.

My mother would come screaming down after me, drag me back, and tell me to stay in the garden. The water is where I wanted to be and I managed to sneak out often until my mother put up THE fence.  My mother had a wonderful garden considering those times and her means. It was always about nature though. My appreciation of flowers came later.

My life could have played out very differently if not for losing my first husband in World War II. He was such an amazing man—very handsome, very good to me, and talented. I ran away from home to be with him and get married. He entered the military and became a fighter pilot in the 1st Air Commando group under Colonel Cochran, with the mission of flying behind Japanese lines to supply and evacuate troops and materials as well as provide fire.

My husband completed the ‘Thursday’ mission but died shortly after because of his airplane’s mechanical failure. This left me as a 19-year-old widow and new mother who had to find her own way in life. If not for this tragedy, I would have most likely had more children and settled down into a role very different from the many I’ve had since that time.

One thing that isn’t mentioned above, but is very dear to me, are the numerous volunteer and board positions I’ve held, especially co-creator of NOAH, the Northwest Organization for Animal Help, in Stanwood, Washington, which is dedicated to ending euthanasia of healthy, adoptable, and treatable homeless dogs and cats. Our humble beginnings consisted of volunteering once a week to answer phones and match the people who had lost their animals to those who had found animals on the Island.

As a result of the ever-growing need to save more animals and serve the community, we expanded adoption and a transfer/low-cost spaying and neutering program. In coordination with over 50 other shelters, NOAH transfers animals at risk of euthanasia to continue to work on giving them a second chance. I was on the board until my husband Max needed more care to stay in our home at the end of his life. However, I still donate to this important cause and others that lessen the suffering of animals, both domestic and wild, and work to conserve biodiversity on our planet. Much more work needs to be done in these areas.

Rose arborsErin: In the introduction to Ramblers & Other Rose Species Hybrids, you say that “fortunate circumstances” led you to start a small rose garden. That small rose garden evolved into 5-acres of nearly 1,000 unique varieties (which eventually became the largest private collection in North America). Can you tell Floret readers a little bit more about this fortunate circumstance? What was it about roses in particular that put you under their spell? 

Anne: I just love them so. I’m a very visual person and the beauty that roses bring into my world gives me great joy. The “fortunate circumstances” I referred to in my book on ramblers was that I read an advertisement about a nursery in Oregon that was going out of business and having a big sale.

The ramblers were a really good price, and I came back with a truckload of them which I put on the fences around the property. I also put some into trees by building trellises to help support their growth. There was something wonderfully mysterious about roses growing up the trellises and into the trees to make the tree look as though it was blooming.

Arbors overgrown with rosesErin: You’ve written five books on roses, but have a deep love of rambling roses. What do you wish others knew about this amazing group of plants and why they should consider growing them in their garden?

Anne: Ramblers are easy to grow. Once they are established, they need little care. They grow tall and are excellent for covering fences, arbors, and for growing into trees. They provide a quick and easy way to add color to the garden.   

Roses in bloomErin: You’ve scoured the globe for rare rose varieties. What are some of your favorite specialty nurseries? And besides your own wonderful books, do you have any other books or resources that you’d recommend for beginning and experienced rose growers?

Anne: While I have traveled the world, I like to support local, small business owners as much as possible. Their work is hard, and we have lost many nurseries, especially those that focus on old roses. Vintage Roses used to be the best but went out of business. I enjoy going to Christianson’s Nursery & Greenhouse in Mount Vernon, Washington. Two others are Hortico in Canada and Rogue Valley Roses in Oregon.

As for books, Classic Roses by Peter Beales is a very important reference book if you are serious about roses. Another one that was very helpful to me in the beginning was David Austin’s English Roses by David Austin and Michael Marriott. 

Roses at Anne Belovich's propertyErin: I always hate it when people ask me what my favorite flower is because there are too many treasures to choose from, but if you could only grow five roses in your garden, what would they be? 

Anne: I really don’t have a favorite. All of them are so unique and bring something special with them. If I must choose one, I think it would have to be Geranium, Hybrid Moyesii. In my book, Ramblers and Other Rose Species Hybrids, I mention that mine had grown to 10 feet (3 meters). That was in 2016. It is now running way up into the trees and spills over in a striking cascade of scarlet red in early summer. It fills the view from my dressing room window.  

Anne Belovich visiting the roses at Floret

*Anne visiting our rose garden this past summer*

Erin: Your passion for roses started much later in life. Do you have any advice for someone who feels like it’s too late to pursue their dreams?

Anne: I remember when I turned 60. I thought 60 was so old. That was almost 37 years ago, well over one-third of my lifetime so far.

At almost 97 years old, it doesn’t seem that my passion for roses started all that late in life. It’s been over 30 years since I began this journey—longer than the careers of many. I pursued many dreams after turning 60, including starting my own contracting company and building over 25 (mostly Victorian style) houses, traveling the world, and my study of the older roses. It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams. 

My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.  

In fact, I am about to launch my own website and blog. I’ve always wanted my own website and I don’t think it’s too late to do this. I bought my own domain last week.

Overhead of Anne Belovich's book, A Voyage of Determination surrounded by rose bloomsErin: In your book, A Voyage of Determination, which chronicles your incredible adventure sailing your beloved boat from New Zealand to California, you share your formula for achieving any difficult goal, which I found incredibly inspiring as a woman who has big dreams. You write: 

“When I was alone I spent much of my time thinking about the fantastic trip I had been privileged to experience. It was of great value to me in a way that was quite separate from getting the boat back. I had learned that I was capable of accomplishing very difficult goals. I was able to face considerable hardships and even extreme danger when it was necessary to achieve those goals. Without being quite aware of it I had developed a formula for greatly improving the chances of achieving any difficult goal. It consisted of three main parts.

First, don’t let being a woman stop you from doing what is traditionally seen as a man’s job unless you really need a constant supply of testosterone to achieve your goal. Ask yourself if the activity requires big biceps and a beard. If not, go ahead with your dreams and fight the prejudice where you find it. Look carefully for the same prejudice in yourself. It could be lurking there without you realizing it and could cause you to not believe in yourself and to restrict you from following a difficult goal. If you are a man you are not apt to encounter prejudice in life’s goals because of your gender, but if you do don’t let it stop you. 

Next, you should try to know yourself, your talents, and limitations, but be careful to not underestimate what you are capable of doing. Becoming a rocket scientist will be a difficult goal if you struggle with math, but maybe some remedial instruction in math would help you overcome the problem. I learned to navigate the old-fashioned way with a sextant even though I didn’t learn my number combinations when I was a child because of constant moving and now I compute manually with difficulty.

On the other hand, you might want to pick something that comes to you more naturally. A passion for a particular hobby might be an indication of a special talent that could be pursued and turned into a rewarding career. Then, be willing to spend some time and energy preparing for what you want to do. I owe much of my success to this one.”

Anne: I put some things in the Voyage of Determination, and you have to do all of them. Determine what it is you want to do and then acquire any skills or knowledge that you are going to need, get the books, take the classes. I bought three books when I decided to build the house on Camano Island; how to frame a house, how to wire it, and how to do the plumbing. You need to study and become an apprentice.  

You can do anything a man can do except those things that require a lot of strength…I think I said ‘big biceps’ in there. However, you can even figure out how to use mechanical means to overcome that. For example, I bought and used a wall jack on a house I was building to lift the walls into place all by myself.  

You can meet and exceed your goals if you prepare yourself over time. You can’t become a rocket scientist without a great deal of study, and neither can anyone else. 

Arbors overgrown with roses Erin: You have so generously shared what you’ve learned with so many and I would love to know how myself and Floret readers can support your work into the future. How do we ensure that these rare and heirloom rose varieties live on? How can we pick up the torch and help carry your legacy forward?

Anne: Keep them watered, fertilized, and in a place with lots of sunshine. Roses, especially the old roses, are very easy to grow. However, inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy.  

Max and I used to have people over all the time to enjoy the property, and many friendships as lovely as the roses developed. I couldn’t do that for a while, but now that my son and his wife are restoring the gardens, we have been able to do this again on a very limited basis (and keeping public health recommendations in mind). It’s such a joy to see old friends again, such as you, Erin. I believe you were a young lady when I first met you. So many memories tie us all together.

I have given many roses away over the years—to individuals, nurseries, and to other special collections and demonstration gardens. Recently I was notified by Claude Graves, curator of the Chambersville rose garden in Texas and the Anne Belovich Rambler Garden there, that the American Rose Center Committee voted to begin the process of replicating my entire rambler collection in Chambersville into a new garden to be constructed at America’s Rose Garden at the ARS Headquarters in Shreveport.

It is a comfort and honor knowing that my rambler collection will be duplicated and conserved in a permanent internationally-acclaimed garden. I am grateful to Dean and Carol Oswald and Claude Graves for their dedication to and hard work on this large project. I am also grateful to my friends who have watered, fertilized, and put one of my rose cuttings in a place with lots of sunshine and continue to share cuttings with their friends, both old and new, and younger family members.

In addition, consider organizing volunteer efforts to help out in rose gardens that need extra hands. What we consider older roses now can be found in many home gardens that were started by people in their younger years. The work of weeding, fertilizing, and pruning can be satisfying but enriched by stories, expertise, cuttings, and new friendships. We will have our first pruning party in February with area old garden rose enthusiasts and garden clubs. Consider these kinds of events in your local community.

Roses growing along a fenceIf Anne’s story has moved you, please consider adding one of her books to your library. Proceeds from the sales of her books will help support the preservation of her rambling rose collection.

Anne’s family recently set up her website and have published two of the eleven blog posts that she wrote before her passing. Be sure to bookmark this special spot since her family will be providing updates about her roses too.

Gallica Roses by Anne Belovich

Large-Flowered Climbing Roses by Anne Belovich

The Little Book of Alba Roses by Anne Belovich

Moss Roses by Anne Belovich and Harald Enders

Ramblers and Other Rose Species Hybrids by Anne Belovich

A Voyage of Determination by Anne Belovich

Overhead of Anne Belovich's rose booksI thought it would be fun to give away Anne’s complete library to one lucky reader. To enter to win, please share what part of her interview most inspired you.

This giveaway is open to anyone in the world. The winner will be announced here on Wednesday, January 19. 

Update: A big congratulations to our winner Denise Bollinger!

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1,831 Comments

  1. Delphine Bienvenu on

    Magnifique! Thank you for that tender and sweet story. Salutations from up north, in the cold Quebec province of Canada.

    Reply
  2. Sheree Sieg on

    Truly amazing and inspiring . Thank you so much for sharing

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  3. Fiona Lovely on

    Loved this series on Anne! Thank you for sharing Team Floret! 🌹

    Reply
  4. Carrie on

    Thank you so much for sharing some of her vast knowledge! She sounds like a very special person that touched many lives not only with regards to roses but to her philosophy of life!! Thanks to you Erin for telling us about a wonderful person!

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  5. Julia Burnett on

    While Anne’s comments from her book A Voyage of Determination inspired me to share this interview with my high school students, the idea of simply sharing a rose clipping touched my heart today. Sharing is at the center of spreading joy to others in our lives. Thank you for this reminder.

    Reply
  6. Laura Hale on

    What a courageous and generous woman! I loved the part where she emphasized live long learning, but appreciated the humble way she has incorporated generosity throughout her life. Thank you for this article Erin. Please know you have the same gifts: courage and generosity!

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  7. Jeannette Bull Robison on

    Anne’s comments on age and ability spoke to me. I was rooted in Texas – and loved the state and my family (still do!) At age 40, my husband, sons and I moved to Pennsylvania. What a beautiful state, and so many gardens! I got a fresh perspective on what was “out there” and what I could do. While still in my original career as an art director, I set my sights on working in education. Our next step, when the boys were grown, was an opportunity to move to South Carolina – another adventure, at our age! When jobs proved to be scarce for me, I decided to go back to school, and study horticulture. What a fresh, new perspective for my artistic foundations! Now, approaching 67, I am a landscape designer, combining my lifelong love of plants with my other love, art. Just because some opportunities are past you, does not mean that there are so many more ahead! Keep your eyes – and your heart – open to the possibilities.

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  8. Mia Cahal on

    What a beautiful and full life! It’s is so inspiring to see what she accomplished later in life. I’m in my late 20s but have already felt the doors is possibility closing around me as I age. Ann’s story reminded me that dreams are possible no matter when you begin. The important thing is moving forward and taking steps to achieve your dreams. Wow! So grateful for her life and that you have shared her with this community!

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  9. Beth Ann on

    Wow! I love the wisdom she shares. Quite frankly what has inspired me most about what she said was the simplicity of what she said about each thing. I over think everything and she was so simple and made everything sound so easy if you just remember to take things one step at a time. Let things fall into place and enjoy the ride. ❤️

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  10. Karen on

    What a moving interview! I found the part where she said although she was 60 when her passion for roses began, it has been longer than the careers of many. (the big biceps bit was also very funny!) Thank you for sharing this Erin. x

    Reply
  11. Eric on

    Thank you so much for sharing this interview and providing more information about Anne’s book. Her zeal for a life full of learning and betterment is so, so inspiring—especially now during this never-ending, inescapable pandemic.

    Reply
  12. Helen Andrews on

    This is an amazing story, interview with an inspirational] gardener, person! At 85, I so admire her determination and
    desire to do, whatever it takes! Bravo Ann, I will be planting roses among the trees on Vashon Island, and, a very proper lawyer friend of my husband once asked me, with a blushing face, “where did you get those biceps?” To which I answered, “ lifting babies!” It helps to keep working!! Cheers, Helen

    Reply
  13. Toni on

    I loved the interview. Her love for life in general was my favorite part. I also loved that she built a house and used a jack to raise the walls. Nothing would stop her! What a great story and a great life!

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  14. Stephanie on

    I started my adulthood as a performing artist and dedicated my life to it. However, over the years, it broke me down a bit and I realized there was so much else out there I wanted to try but couldn’t due to fear of missing out on an opportunity. I finally decided to start listening to my heart and in my forties finally met my insanely supportive husband, and I’m pregnant with the baby I thought I’d never be able to have. Marrying my husband resulted in a move out of big cities and here in rural Pennsylvania, I found gardening. A passion I never knew I’d had buried inside me (and had been trying to assert itself through tiny herb gardens on window sills for decades). I began apprenticing at a local flower farm last year while in my head thinking I wish I’d found this when I was younger. But late bloomers are my favorite, and reading this interview was a fresh reminder that there is no such thing as too late if you love something. Thank you for this interview.

    Reply
  15. kayla on

    my favorite part of the interview was when she was talking about how your gender doesn’t matter as long as the job doesn’t require a beard or big biceps, only for her to double back later and say that the biceps don’t really matter either a what a lovely person and a wonderful interview :)

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  16. Janet Biernacki on

    I think it’s her building of her home and then building more. But it’s the attitude mainly of how we can do things. “Even rocket scientist had to study “

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  17. Daniela Schimpf on

    I really enjoyed this interview because it wasn’t only about roses. It was a journey into my inner self , knowing to be strong if it needs to be,like she as a sailor & open up to show kindness on the other hand like she shares her knowledge & garden .Actually the rose reflex her life as a rose is : tough ,thorny,beautiful, cheerful. The most fun part was the “ bicep & beard” part .
    Thanks so much !

    Reply
  18. Brooke on

    The most inspiring part of this interview was the part where she mentioned using a jack hammer. I’m a single woman with a large garden and having the right tool because I don’t have biceps is so crucial. A fair amount of people think I’m crazy, but I get results so it is worth it.

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  19. Jamison Williams on

    Thank you so much for a wonderful interview. I love roses and want to learn more! Anne is truly inspiring and my favorite take away is that you’re never too old to begin your dreams!

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  20. Autry Cataldo on

    I planted my first David Austin roses last year. I can’t wait to see what they do this summer.
    I’d love to learn more about roses, and Anne’s love of them is inspiring!

    Reply
  21. Geoff Rigney on

    Really enjoyed the entire series. The interview with Anne is incredible. We are blessed to meet such souls on our journeys through life. They offer so much inspiration. I’m a sailor too so I ordered Voyage of Determination. I can’t wait to read it and share it with my daughter Anna. I’m looking forward to looking over her website and other books as well as well. 60 is the new 30. I should know; I’m almost there myself. Tracey and I just beginning our new journey at Homer’s Bay Art & Garden, a flower farm plus more. Keep the inspiration coming Erin. We’re watching and reading. We appreciate you.

    Geoff Rigney

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  22. Joanna Z-Wynne on

    Thank you for sharing this inspiring and moving story of this amazing woman. Truly a life well lived

    Reply
  23. Deb on

    Oh my, what a lovely read. I will keep this post as I will try to make it my inspiration to get my rose garden growing stronger. I have just recently, the last 2 years, started to enjoy roses in my garden. My husband keeps on telling me to slow down, I’m the same age as Anne was when she took her sailing trip. I just keep telling him that keeping busy in my gardens is what is keep me young(er). Love your site BTW.

    Reply
  24. Armik on

    Such a lovely way to wrap up the series with this interview. Ann’s advice to stay out of bed is what I need to remind myself these days. Meeting with friends and family and sharing your expertise and not being stingy is such a great way to live one’s life.
    At the age of 34 I struggle with changing my career completely, thinking that it is too late, but this interview with Ann reminded me that it is never to late to chase your dreams. Thank you.

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  25. Rachel on

    These lines brought tears to my eyes.

    “I remember when I turned 60. I thought 60 was so old. That was almost 37 years ago, well over one-third of my lifetime so far. At almost 97 years old, it doesn’t seem that my passion for roses started all that late in life. It’s been over 30 years since I began this journey—longer than the careers of many. I pursued many dreams after turning 60…My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.”

    At 46 with a chronic auto-immune condition that includes small fiber neuropathy pain throughout my entire body, I sometimes feel like I live in a 97 year old body and tend to isolate myself. This reminds me that I have a full life to live and possibly more years ahead of me than behind me. I could literally be reborn tomorrow and have another 51 years of incredible living…..thank you Erin and Anne.

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  26. Ramona Anderson on

    Lovely thanks for sharing. I love the part about giving away the roses.

    Reply
  27. Marina Dillingham on

    Anne’s advice on staying young by remaining active is what touched me the most. My mom is turning 79 in a couple of weeks and no one believes her when she says her age because, like Anne, she never stops moving, learning and seeking out new experiences. After a long career as a high school teacher and administrator, two masters degrees, 4 children, etc., she reinvented herself as a painter after retiring from education and she now travels the world showing her art. Like Anne, my mom is an inspiration and living proof that age is just a number. Like heirloom roses, Anne and my mother have only grown wiser and stronger with age.

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  28. Teri on

    Thank you. I love that she was young at heart and was never too old for a new adventures

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  29. Clarice Hampel on

    I am impressed learning that she co-founded NOAH and had a deep respect for animals. And how nice that Anne liked to share her plants with others. Spread the beauty and enjoyment of her collection. Thank you for sharing Anne with us.

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  30. Heather Cease on

    Thank you for sharing your interview with Anne here- for honoring her legacy. The part of her interview that most inspired me is how she looked for ways to overcome obstacles. She didn’t let difficulties stop her. Incredible!

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  31. Kristi on

    What an honor to have shared this time with her, Erin. Memories you will cherish always. Thank you for bringing her encouraging words to us, so we can also be blessed and inspired to muster up the determination we need to reach our life goals! I’m so glad you do what you do, how else would we have learned about this marvelous woman!!

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  32. Heather Cease on

    Thank you for sharing your interview with Anne here- for honoring her legacy. The part of her interview that most inspired me is how she looked for ways to overcome obstacles. She didn’t let difficulties stop her.

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  33. Heidi Roycroft on

    There are many motivational speakers who haven’t lived the message the way she has. She is an elder to listen to. I will get her books because I’d like to hear more of her voice. I liked when she said there are ways to overcome obstacles with work and tools! Thanks for bringing her to us Erin.

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  34. Margaret on

    Wonderful interview and so true in her words – be strong, love what you do, be curious, keep learning, and SHARE. No limits. Go for it, but be smart. Love it. Thank you!

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  35. Wendy Vanwagoner on

    Her comments about it never being too old to pursue something new really encouraged me. I started a new business when I turned 50, and now three years later I think about starting more new businesses or pursuits in a wide variety all the time!

    Loved this series! Thanks so much for sharing it.

    Reply
  36. Mel Smith on

    I am sitting here writing this in my bed – procrastinating going to bed early so that I can be up early for my desk job. Something stirred in me just now and for some reason I feel like crying. So often we are taught that life is simply school, career, family if you are lucky, retirement, and that’s that. But look at the life that Anne was able to live outside of that structure. There is so much beauty and life to find, cherish, seek. Although I do not know her outside of the words she shared here, this quick glimpse into her life has moved me. Why should I compare my life to the progress of the life next to me? In a world full of roses, Anne is a rambler rose.

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  37. Jenn Goonan @Cheers_to_Flowers on

    Her words will be taped on my fridge, “My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.”

    Thank you so much for sharing this series, so beautifully written and inspiring!

    Reply
  38. Sheryl Jump on

    What an inspiring woman full of great knowledge! I find her advice to be practical, don’t let being a woman stop you, know yourself, learn what you need to accomplish a goal. I might be interested in some climbing roses or ramblers for my back yard. Inspiring that she kept her body and mind fit and interested in life.

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  39. Tina Pender on

    I was so inspired by her tenacity! I love that she found a way to accomplish her goals despite prejudice, even prejudice hiding in her own mind. That’s such great advice! I think she truly understood the concept of sowing and reaping. She sowed generously and reaped a legacy!

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  40. Marilyn Holliday on

    Erin, thank you for sharing your interview with Anne.
    I would have never known about her and her life. I love how she planted the roses in the trees. That she was always learning and sharing her roses. She is another Pioneering Spirited women that we have as part of out heritage. Thank you so much for this. I have enjoyed it so much.

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  41. Mary on

    I was drawn in by your questions and so looked forward to Anne’s answers. One word instantly came to mind while reading the interview: Fortitude. Anne had it and you were so, so lucky to be a part of her life story and experience her friendship. Well done!

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  42. Lana Duvall on

    What an amazing interview! It’s inspiring that her passion with roses started when she was 60 and she cultivated that passion for 37 years. Many people would not start a new hobby or interest at that age, but she did and it enriched her life and many others. I love that she pursued her goals throughout her life. 💕

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  43. Laura Wall on

    The words that resonated most were these: “inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy.” Sharing in the experience of a garden is what matters most to me from those who’ve guided me to those who I have also been able to share with and inspire. Thank you for sharing Anne’s story!

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  44. Terrie Kilroy on

    What a lovely interview. Before reading the interview, I was disheartened that she had spent many years laboring to build beautiful gardens and amass a collection of prized roses. Only for the gardens to become overgrown, in need of care that she could no longer provide. I wondered what words of wisdom she could share with us. Then she reminisced about she and Max having friends over and told of how they were able to share the beauty of the gardens. How, in years past, she’s given many cuttings to younger friends and now they’ve grown into the “old” roses. In her words one can feel the joy of sharing the beauty of those gardens. It is comforting to know that in giving cuttings to others, she was able to share the roses’ beauty far more reaching than her own gardens. A sense of continuity, in that her hard work will not be lost because she is gone. Thank you for sharing this.

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  45. Marlee Hakes on

    What a sweet interview. I would have loved to have sat and talked with her about her adventures. Her books looks inspiring! I love how she pursued her goals and dreams all throughout her life, not letting life circumstances or age keep her from it. If we could all have such beautiful attitudes!

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  46. Gunner Rozploch on

    What inspired me most about the interview with Anne was that its never too late to pursue your goals and dreams. Even though she was 60 when she got started she still pursued her passion for roses and started her incredible collection despite feeling like she had a later start.

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  47. Britany Lunderg on

    I loved and I am inspired by how generous Anne was with her knowledge– to write books, to open her garden, to share her time with you and now all of us. It was a beautiful reminder that one is never to expert to support even the most novice (thinking of myself in this case at the beginning of her gardening journey).

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  48. susie marglin on

    Most of us womenfolk know we can grow something. Wether babies, if that’s our bodies choice, or at least geraniums from the local Home Depot. Now renting equipment to raise a wall we just constructed or learning to cross the Pacific ocean with the guidance of a sextant and the stars takes an unusual belief in self. I don’t like committed exercise or sweat but at 70 I ran my first half marathon. Too bad I spent so many years not thinking I could do that. Anne showed over and over how belief in oneself never should stop. Amazing how the fragile beauty of roses and the joy of watching them ramble over fences and up trees was her final delight.

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  49. Simone Osthoff on

    Anne is certainly a remarkable example of what it means to live a full and meaningful life. I particularly enjoyed her first advice “don’t let being a woman stop you…” emphasizing that gender limits can obstruct one’s aspirations from both within and without. And above all, her love for learning is palpable and generous. Thank you!

    Reply
  50. Kathy Fiero on

    Your posts whether on dahlias or cut flowers, and now roses are always so inspiring. What I greatly appreciate is your effort to honor the past while moving forward on your own journey.
    “Meeting” Anne Belovich through your interview and documentation of her garden was so enjoyable, thank you! This year I hope to add some roses to my garden to join my dahlias and cutting garden flowers. Thank you for the nursery suggestions.

    Reply
  51. Elizabeth Burke on

    I am most inspired by Anne’s message that you can achieve your dreams regardless of age or gender. Just focus on your goal and do the work necessary for success! As a parent and second career retired teacher, that has been and will always be a very important message to pass on to our children.

    Reply
  52. Rebecca Craythorn on

    As someone who works in a male dominated industry (construction), I found Anne’s reminder not to let gender be a barrier really struck a cord with me. Ironically, being an avid backyard gardener, I have found it largely to be a space dominated by women! I find myself echoed in parts of Anne’s voice in the duality of being able to perform ‘male’ roles but also having a great love of the more nurturing ‘female’ space of the garden. She sounds like an amazing lady Erin, and I am glad you have shared her words with us. It reminds me, yet again, to slow down and take the time to get to know the people behind the plants, and the stories they have to share. Can’t wait to see how your collection progresses!

    Reply
  53. Jill on

    I loved her advice to share with others and to give freely, and to build community events around your garden. Especially in recent times, it’s so nice to have these types of opportunities to connect with our neighbors!

    Reply
  54. Sharon Weaver on

    I was inspired by how later in life she started her passion for roses. I am turning 59 soon and have never had a lot of success with my roses. I am now ready to be determined and succeed! Also the fact that she was a woman never held her back from achieving her dreams. She was a very wise woman that reminded me of my grandmother who was a working farm wife who succeeded in her dream of becoming a painter ❤️. You were very privileged to know this great lady

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  55. Wendy Chase on

    I’ll be 60 in a year, and her interview was so encouraging! I went back to school in my late 40’s and there are still more things I want to do. Sometimes I feel like I’ve missed the chance, and it’s so good to hear stories like hers. I adore roses and although I live about 125 miles south of the Arctic Circle, I have some! Rosa Rugosa Hansas are very hardy and they have a lovely fragrance. The biggest problem I’ve had with them is moose think they are pretty tasty in the wintertime. I dream of the garden I’ll have when we retire and move to the Lower 48.

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  56. Gretchen Heard on

    Just when I think I’m done and ready to retire, my daughter asks me to help with her new passion; growing flowers. Anne’s story is a reminder to me and many other 60 something’s that we have a lot left to offer. It keeps us young working outdoors and oh, the flowers. Loved the series of articles. Thanks, Floret.

    Reply
  57. Michelle Taylor on

    I am 54 and I feel as if I have spent my life being a mother and have forgotten who I am and what I wanted to be. It is scary to realize a part of your life is changing and coming to an end. Not that you ever stop being a parent but you get to focus on your needs and wants again. I have felt lost and out of direction. Two years ago I meet and became friends with a lovely woman Phillis May who is 97. She has become a great inspiration to me. Her life philosophy is very much like Anne’s stay open to new things get up and out of bed everyday and enjoy as much time out in nature as you can. Never stop learning, challenge yourself as much as you can and be thankful for what you can do rather than frustrated with what you can’t. These sentiments have meant so much to me and truly have changed my outlook. How fortunate you are to have met and spent time with such an inspiring person as Anne. Thank you for continuing to sharing your journey /story with us.

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  58. Rose Valencia on

    What an inspirational interview! “I remember when I turned 60. I thought 60 was so old” these words made me smile and warmed my heart. I will turn 60 next May. And next May I will graduate with a degree in Landscape Design. Covid opened the door for online learning in a field that otherwise is not obtainable online. I bought the books, I passed the classes (only one left) and I will take my passion of gardens as far as my life allows. Thank you for sharing Anne with us. Can’t wait to read some of her books and her blog.

    Reply
  59. Anna White on

    Such a beautiful interview. I love her fearlessness and courage. Had to reach for the tissues..

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  60. Barbara Lindberg on

    I so enjoyed the other three postings of this story that I couldn’t wait to read this one. I will buy one of her books for sure. I loved how she talked about not letting being a woman stop you from pursuing goals that are non-traditional. I’d love to know more about the Victorian homes she built! She was so incredibly diverse in her experiences. I’m certain that it’d be fascinating to sit and talk with her. I wish I had met her but I’m very grateful Erin that you’ve shared the friendship that you had with her with us. I do feel like I know her after reading the stories.

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  61. Jo Moore on

    Clearly Anne embraced a positive outlook and curated a life of challenge and personal growth. Possessing an evolved aesthetic often manifests by surrounding oneself with the most beautiful elements of nature. The reverence and honor this amazing woman bestowed upon her beloved roses will live in perpetuity in gardens of friends and in America’s Rose Garden. I can only imagine how many lives Anne has touched and inspired with her many talents and passions.

    Reply
  62. Leslie Trecha on

    I’m getting close to retirement and I’m a little nervous about staying engaged after having a long career with a full schedule. I love Anne’s advice to “keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up-to-date with current events, be open to new ideas and commit yourself to lifelong learning and skill development.” What a perfect call to action! I’m going to keep this quote and use it as a guide.

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  63. Jan Crane on

    I loved her story. She is an inspiration to people to never stop learning…whether it is about flowers, building or current events.
    I’ve just begun to grow roses in the last few years and I’m 64. I hope I live to 97 to enjoy them in their full glory!

    Reply
  64. Wendy Keiser on

    Anne said in an interview she had a done a few years ago “for as you know well enough, rose gardens seldom outlive their owners for long”. Her legacy will live on, not only with Chambersville Heritage Rose Garden but now with Floret Farms.

    Reply
  65. Chloe kirsch on

    I just sobbed reading this. Her love of life is what is so moving to me. She obviously loved roses just as much. I like when she says ” don’t be stingy” . The generosity from the floret team and from people like Anne are what drove my mom and I into flower farming. I want to give give give so her saying not to be stingy hit me right in the heart. ❤❤

    Reply
  66. Polly Vollmar-Heywood on

    As a person who has worked with elders most of my career, and the last 20 years creating handicapped accessible garden beds for elders in care settings, I love that you are commemorating Annes life in this way! My favorite part of this interview is her 3-step advice on how to approach your Big Picture, or life goals. It’s basically to ‘do it’. Don’t lie in bed dreaming about how great it could be, if only. Study, try, and try again until you’re capable of reaching that star!
    Thank you so much for sharing your relationship with this amazing woman!

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  67. Linda Hovgaard on

    “Keep roses watered, fertilized and in places with lots of sunshine!” Advice that applies to people as well. However, there were so many other things in her interview that inspired me deeply as well. “Inviting people to your garden and sharing is perhaps most important.” I love her advice to keep moving and commit to life-long learning and skill development. I am inspired and driven by her “3 main parts” for achieving any difficult goal. I heartedly agree that supporting local, small business owners as much as possible is vital. And last but certainly not least, I love the fact that she pursued many dreams after turning 60, including her passion for roses. What an admirable, strong, inspiring, beautiful woman! Thank you Erin for sharing her legacy with us!

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  68. Jackie on

    Each summer, I lived with my grandparents who also both lived a long life full of love and adventure. My lust for gardening began while helping them with the gardens that surrounded their cottage in the woods. I watched and helped them prune and fuss over their little plot of paradise. We lived each summer there along a creek and they taught not only their grandchildren, my sisters and I, but also neighboring and visiting children how to swim. Ann reminds me of these two fine examples. Never slow down and give to your community and friends, human and furry, and indeed the world. She led by example. Her care for others and future generations is remarkable and I recognize your contribution to her legacy by sharing her story and giving to the floral community. What an opportunity you are given to honor this wise crone’s legacy.
    Thank you,

    Reply
  69. Lori-Anne on

    Profound words from a life well-lived. Anne’s guidance and knowledge of roses, encompasses great life endeavors and achievements. The life advice “go ahead with your dreams and fight prejudice where you find it. Look carefully for the same prejudice in yourself. It could be lurking there without you realizing it and could cause you to not believe in yourself and to restrict you from following a difficult goal.” is motivational and inspiring. I would definitely enjoy reading and learning from Anne’s library. She has left a legacy of gardening roses and living a long, full life.
    Thank you for sharing her story and interview 🌹💕

    Reply
  70. Cristen Atkins on

    Nearing the middle part of my life (almost 50) and still not know what I want to do with my life (except for my 2 daughters Katy and my dog Dolly ), Ann inspired me when she said:

    At almost 97 years old, it doesn’t seem that my passion for roses started all that late in life. It’s been over 30 years since I began this journey—longer than the careers of many. I pursued many dreams after turning 60,

    “At almost 97 years old, it doesn’t seem that my passion for roses started all that late in life. It’s been over 30 years since I began this journey—longer than the careers of many. I pursued many dreams after turning 60…”

    So, hopefully there is still something out there for me to find…seeing that lol Ann didn’t figure it out till she was 60 makes me think I still have a chance not to waste my life and make my parents proud of me (even in their passing).

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  71. Josh H on

    I loved this part: “inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy.” It’s definitely what I have tried to do with my own garden. Almost everyone that comes by leaves with at least one new plant and it makes my heart so full to share the beauty God has blessed me with.
    Amazing interview with an incredible lady!

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  72. Kim Pike on

    Her background is so interesting and inspiring. I would have loved to just sit and listen to her talk about her life. What an amazing experience she has had.

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  73. Megan Daline on

    I, too, am a rose lover and Anne is my new idol. I just turned 70 and I find her to be so inspiring. My favorite is that she wrote her books in her 90s! I also love the way she figured out how to accomplish difficult goals.

    Thank you for sharing this interview.

    Best, Megan

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  74. karen lindsay on

    I love how her zest for life and the great outdoors started at the ripe old age of 3 or 4. How she would ‘run away’ down to the beach to frolic in the sand. And
    how her mother would come barreling after her, screaming, to drag her back to the garden surrounded by THE fence. Such a feisty little thing. It’s no wonder she lived to 97! Her life came full circle ~ she started in a garden filled with beautiful flowers (though she didn’t know it at the time), and ended surrounded by her own lovely paradise. May she rest in peace.

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  75. Samantha on

    What an amazing interview! I feel so inspired. Thanks for sharing

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  76. Iza Iseri on

    Thank you for this lovely interview and for introducing me (and so many others) to Anne. I loved her can-do attitude. The idea of her using a wall jack on her own is my favourite! That is my kind of person! Your interview really highlighted her diverse interests, generosity, warmth and passion.

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  77. Pam Jenness on

    What an incredible woman she was. She has left such a legacy to this world. I loved it when she said that because of roses many “Friendships as lovely as the roses have transcribed”.
    Thank you Erin for sharing this incredible series with us. You are our current day Anne.

    Reply
  78. Amy on

    Wow! I am in awe of this woman! What a life and career! Her determination and not putting limits on herself convinced with her giving heart truly have inspired me. I love what she says about sharing your garden and not being “stingy”. We, as flower lovers and gardeners, should be out there sharing our knowledge and the beauty we create with others. Flowers bring so much joy to so many. I’ll be doing free tours for the elderly in a nursing home this season and I’ve been workin on making my garden spaces accessible for them. The participants always have a great story to share and the nostalgia they feel is so beautiful. Thank you, Erin, for sharing your knowledge with the world and for helping to preserve this woman’s legacy!

    Reply
  79. Jean Lynton on

    I live in New Zealand and have a passion for roses . At the moment after 25 years of being our garden with many David Austin roses, we are planning a new house and garden with roses once again. You have spurred me on to get progating.
    I would really love to have all the books.

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  80. Donna on

    I found her advice most inspiring – keep moving, stay out of bed – commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.
    I’m approaching 60 and her story is so inspiring; I myself will ‘keep moving and learning’.

    Reply
  81. Corinne tomlin on

    Just wow ! What an incredible person on all levels I love her take on life , we can do anything if we want to to, also the instinct to share all . My personal favourite is to walk through my garden and visit my people who have so generously shared their favourite plants with me I have a conversation with those that love passed and am so grateful to have a little bit of them with me . I too am now able to share my beauty with others and am always so excited to gift a piece of beauty to others . Thank you for sharing this story what a treasure to have known this lovely lady . I am truly grateful today for this read ❤️🌸

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  82. Diane Kreider on

    Ann Belovich reminds me of my grandmother who was born in 1897. My grandmother was resourceful and multi-talented, and she nurtured my love of growing flowers. Like Ann, her gardens were much admired by friends, family, and folks just traveling past on the busy road that bisected our farm.
    Ann’s advice in the interview regarding determination and acquiring skills and knowledge, taking on any challenge regardless of gender, and being prepared to work on your goals over the long haul resonated with me. What a wise woman with a giving heart. She didn’t stingily keep all of her knowledge and bounty to herself. Her generosity of spirit, advice, intelligence, fortitude, grit, and willingness to share are an example for all of us. It would be such a pleasure to walk through her gardens, enjoy her roses, and linger in the beauty.

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  83. Billie on

    This is such an incredible story of a life well lived. One most of us can only dream about and that is the incredible message I learned. We can all achieve our dreams and goals through hard work, always learning new things and giving back to others. What a beautiful environment to dream in. Thanks for sharing.

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  84. Laura V on

    I love that she was also an activist for animals.

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  85. Sue Balston on

    Wow, thank you for sharing this. For me, “inviting people in and sharing the roses” my heart skipped a beat. Anne is a gorgeous beautiful soul ❤️ X

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  86. kasse duffy on

    I love her formula for achieving a difficult goal. I also love the advise to stay out of bed and have lunch with friends. Thank you for sharing this gem.

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  87. Brenda on

    I love her passion for life long learning! That you can pursue something you are passionate about, you may just need to be creative in how you achieve the knowledge or background it requires!

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  88. Andrea Woodhall on

    So many aspects about this interview is inspiring… the one I needed to hear is that it’s never too late to begin your dream. Thank you!

    Reply
  89. Karl Holzknecht on

    Wow, just wow! I knew Anne and Max through their construction company and the beautiful Victorian homes they built throughout the years. Anne was always so gracious and sweet. I recall hearing about her gardens and roses, but I, in my busy life never penetrated further, then our friendship through the lumberyard. My eyes were full of tears and my heart full of joy while reading this inspiring interview. I now understand more fully the depth of her strength, character and joy of life. I love the inspiration and encouragement she shared, and I will definitely share this story with my wife and daughters… and my son too.
    God bless you Erin for sharing a true vintage rose, Anne Belovich!

    Karl Luis Holzknecht
    Cascade Lumber, Inc.

    Reply
  90. Amy on

    Never too late to start perusing your dreams. Get up and move, don’t just lie around. Enjoy life with others.

    Reply
  91. Sally on

    An inspiration that an entirely new life can open up in older age, when so many are sinking into their couches.

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  92. Evelien van Schoonhoven Smid on

    The part were she said, just buy the books, learn and do what you learned! And also the always keep learning, you are never to old!
    Just a lovely lady.

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  93. Connie Reeve on

    My favorite was the Voyage of Determination answer.
    I grow roses and am helping at the American Rose Center and am working with Claude to get everything set up to duplicate Anne’s RAMBLER COLLECTION.

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  94. Terri Dux on

    My favorite part is pursuing her dream at age 60. At age 58, this hit home to me. I can’t stop thinking about Anne and her lovely life and mission.

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  95. Rad on

    She is such an inspiration for not only flower growers but to every one . Be passionate about your dreams and never give up .

    Reply
  96. Darlene on

    This has been such an inspiring series. Thank you so much, Erin, for sharing it with us. The quote you took from her book made me reflect on my own life. How many times did I have a dream just to see it squashed by nay sayers? Unfortunately, too many. At age 66 I am now retired and I want to do something to make me feel like I have accomplished something. Her words of encouragement combined with the Cut Garden Mini Course have lifted my spirits and encourage me to try growing a small cutting garden. I have ordered 3 packets of seeds from Floret and 3 others from RareSeeds. My goal is to have my own flowers to use in our home. Fresh flowers bring joy and peace and I can look at them and thank God for His beautiful creation. Wish me well.

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  97. Kirsten Redman on

    This impacted me the most about her – first as a botanist, then a teacher, then a sailor, a general contractor, and then a rosarian and a writer. This is such a wonderful example of a life well lived, and I loved that she said there is nothing a man can do that a woman can’t unless you need strength.

    You can see she was a generous, kind soul just looking at her! Thank you so much for sharing this!

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  98. Kirsten YOung on

    “Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy.”

    My Grandmother use to say the exact same thing. “Don’t be stingy.”

    I find the more I give, the more I get. Clearly, the same was for Anne. Sometimes I forget, when caught up in the traffic of life. This was a good read and a good reminder.

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  99. Christy Snowder on

    This whole story made my heart happy, but if I had to pick a couple of things it would be the part when Ann talks about it never being to late to chase your dreams, but my absolute favorite would be the part when she talks about inviting people into your garden and sharing because it is an act of love and of friendship. This world could definitely use more positivity and love that’s for sure.

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  100. Aya Haley on

    A well lived life, Anne! Bravo!
    Erin thank you also for also being an example of what inspires me most – curiosity that becomes talent that is inviting and celebrated, sharing so deeply it becomes a legacy. Wow. I agree, do you. I am a Marine Corps veteran excited about my own baby rose garden that I have carried around.. finally able to grow in one place! Yes, do let your dreams lead you, you can!

    “Keep them watered, fertilized, and in a place with lots of sunshine. Roses, especially the old roses, are very easy to grow. However, inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy.”

    Reply
  101. Connie on

    What a wonderful story and connection for you and rose lovers like myself. I love the old rose varieties and grow a few some purchased, some I’ve propagated as well as shared from friends gardens. Rainy weather challenges on the east coast of Vancouver island have not deterred me. I grow the climber New Dawn which my granny grew, Dorothy Perkins, American Pillar;,Alychmist,Rosa Spinosissima(has black rose hips);Frau Karl Druschki;Rosa Mulligani; Rosa Glauca, Honorine De Brabant; Bonica, Westerland(a favourite) Madam Hardy; Climbing Peace; Abraham Darby;Henrie Martin moss; soft pink unknown moss, Scabiosa rugosa; and a favourite Albertine. Some are a challenge but I love them all.

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  102. Mary Darling on

    What an amazing woman! I loved her positivity and can-do spirit that she applied to her endeavors. Her message to share the beauty of gardens with friends and family, to make them a place of community, resonated with me. And she sailed (single-handedly?) from New Zealand to California!!

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  103. Mindi Bruckhart on

    Thank you for sharing this interview. I love how she didn’t let her age stop her from pursuing a new interest. Determination, hard work, and study.

    Reply
  104. Susan O'Halloran on

    I am inspired by Anne’s diving into rose growing at age 60! Some may think it is too late to start a new project at that age, but she did it anyway. And she was rewarded by enjoying that project for 37 more years. And we have all been rewarded by her collection of roses that have been saved from extinction and the knowledge she has passed along.

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  105. Jan on

    Anne was a special woman whom I admire greatly! Not only for her wonderful collection or roses but her determination and ambitious spirit!
    She is an inspiration that resonates with me for her determination. While at 70, I am healthy with a new cutting garden, a job with a fiber arts travel company and aspirations to buy a sailboat in Mexico. I love the “never too late “ idea. Surround yourself with the people you love and those with similar interests!
    Thanks for introducing us to this wonderful woman whose legacy is so amazing!

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  106. Cassidy on

    Wow, how inspiring! My favorite part of the interview was where she said “don’t let being a woman stop you from doing what is traditionally seen as a man’s job” I didn’t realize she was a general contractor. I love old houses and would love to renovate some in the future, but I’ve kinda let that dream go as I didn’t think I’d be good at it, but I can learn!

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  107. Annelise on

    Invite and share! I love that about Anne and Erin’s interview. Isn’t that what gardening is all about? Share the beauty and listen and observe others as they receive the beauty. I am inspired by Anne and Erin to keep searching for the “why” that sends me to the garden to smell the roses!

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  108. Martha on

    What a great interview, thank you!

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  109. Sandi Stewart on

    What an incredible gift you’ve shared with us Erin! Anne’s story leaves one feeling they have so much more to do in life. I especially love her quote “First, don’t let being a woman stop you from doing what is traditionally seen as a man’s job unless you really need a constant supply of testosterone to achieve your goal. Ask yourself if the activity requires big biceps and a beard.” This definitely gave me a good chuckle.
    Thanks again, Erin, it’s a joy reading your blog and visiting your site. There’s a true sense of your love and passion for flowers.

    Reply
  110. Mackie Neely on

    How inspiring! I love that she didn’t start many of her adventures until later in life. She gives me inspiration that I can try things that feel daunting.

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  111. Emily J on

    I’m so inspired by the open-hearted generosity that Anne has and I see it in how Erin runs Floret! You both are an inspiration for open, loving, sharing sunshine! I’m trying to do what you do in my garden and in my heart. Thank you for your example and for introducing us to Anne’s beauty as well.

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  112. Sherry L Dampier on

    What an amazing lady. Every obstacle, heartbreak, and challenge she took on with determination and strength. The woman built a wall in her home, by herself, with a wall jack! I was so inspired by her tenacity and ability to find creative solutions by looking inward, into her own heart and mind.
    She gave me hope, and a renewed sense of self to find a new lease on my own future, regardless of how much time I have left. It is so easy to be led into the darkness and fear in todays world. We must embrace the beauty and light that surround us, let that ignite the passion in our souls to create a better path and renew our energy, and fight the urge to succumb to challenges when we feel helpless. She grew more than a garden full of roses, she grew independence, self confidence, bonds, love, and passion. Wisdom comes from many experiences in life. I gained perspective from her story. Thank you for sharing, and continuing her legacy, she will inspire many through new and old blooms.

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  113. Jamie Schmidt on

    Having just turned 50, I sometimes feel like I shouldn’t start new things because I’m too old. What inspired me most was Anne’s start with roses at age 60. Amazing and inspiring! I’m going to pursue some dreams, take some classes and never stop learning or moving! Thanks for sharing Anne’s story.

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  114. Sandi Thompson on

    Unless one needs big biceps, constant testoserone, and a beard, a woman should consider any pursuit interesting and available to her. As a 63 yr old woman, who may also have a 1/3 of my life remaining, this is perhaps the push I need to jump into a new life interest!

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  115. Claire Lewis on

    Her whole interview was inspiring, but the part that really touched me and stood out was when she was talking about sharing her garden and cultivating friendships and relationships. I teared up at the part when she spoke about how when she met you, you were a young lady. I believe you came back into her life for a reason and to help share her story and to help keep her legacy alive. Thank you for sharing 💕

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  116. Janet on

    The part where Anne said she started pursuing many dreams after 60 really resonated with me, since I will be turning 60 soon and plan to start pursuing new adventures!

    Reply
  117. Pat Bywaters on

    How precious Erin you met her and were a beautiful rose in her garden; and that you have given this floral community a piece of her to share.

    I am inspired, and wrote in my journal:
    “It’s never too late to act on your goals and dreams.
    My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (do not isolate yourself, read….be open to new ideas and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development”—I am touched and brought to tears by this beautiful soul. Thank you Erin for bringing her story to life.

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  118. chantelle ellis on

    Tears! On my vision board one thing that stood out to me was the cut out that says… Better with age. As the years creep in Anne reminded and inspired me that it’s never too late to act on your goals ands dreams. The beauty of roses make my heart happy. Thank you Anne!
    Chantelle Ellis

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  119. Anita Fraser on

    “Don’t be stingy.” That simple motto changed her entire life, rather opened up her entire life. Anne wasn’t stingy with her time, her love, and her garden. Most importantly, she wasn’t stingy with her beliefs about her own capabilities, she had a generous attitude towards herself and what she could accomplish. If we could all follow that one simple principle, our world would be beautiful, in all the ways that matter.

    Reply
  120. Holly Starr - JoMiLL Farm on

    I think the part about inviting people into your gardens to share the joy with them stands out! She’s such an inspiration to many people. Do what you set your mind to do and see what the possibilities bring to your garden. Her legacy includes not being stingy share with others the beauty of the rose!

    Reply
  121. Dianne Gomez on

    She reminded me that we are the ones that can easily hold ourselves back when it comes to do doing something new and we don’t even realize it. It’s so easy to make excuses. She reminds me to be smart, to prepare and to just be brave!

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  122. Natalie Lairamore on

    I found it so encouraging that Anne discovered her love of roses later in life. It gives me hope that it’s never too late to chase a dream.

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  123. Mimi on

    Wonderful story. Thank you for sharing. Am inspired to add to my rose collection!!! It’s never too late to live your dream.

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  124. Pat Hogg on

    What a tenacious Spirit!! Started specializing in roses at AGE 60!! Then spent 1/3 of the rest of her life fulfilling her rosey dreams! Her gentleness and generosity speak to me… What a woman! Thanks for sharing Anne’s story, Erin! 🌺🌺🌺

    Reply
  125. Lynn Metevier on

    What an inspiring woman! I love her can-do attitude. Her love of learning is what made a difference in her own life as well as others. There are many things here we should all emulate.

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  126. Charmaine Teddy on

    I love how Anne is so selfless and enduring! Great lady –
    Someone you can truly admire!

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  127. Cathy Seras on

    What an amazing interview. Anne’s heart is as big as her rose gardens. I loved her statement; “Inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy.” Anne not only left a legacy of her knowledge for roses but the act of kindness and love for others. I truly believe that is an amazing legacy to leave.
    My father grew beautiful roses on a trellis on the side of our carport as well as a rose bushes in his gardens around our home. The trellis of roses were beautiful and he always made sure we had a bouquet of roses on the first day of school to share with our teachers. I am anxious to begin my journey of roses in my gardens this year. I have recently retired from my job at the age of 61 and I am excited to begin my next journey in life and pursue my dream of floral design with some of my own cut flowers as well as local flower farmers.
    Thank you so much for sharing this inspiring story and all your knowledge you share with your followers always.
    Best to the Floret Family . . .Cathy Seras, Pennsylvania

    Reply
  128. Maddie Zack on

    I am just starting a new chapter in my life, and find ever part of this story inspiring. I think the top of my list, other than the rose garden, is how many transitions to new careers she accomplished. To begin again takes so much courage and strength. If I am half as courageous as she was I am on the right path.

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  129. Dee Vlasak on

    What an inspiration! Although Anne’s knowledge of roses brought me to this reading, it was her positive and encouraging message of passion, determination and life-long learning that inspires me most. I, too, was a teacher and now a flower grower (on a very small scale), but have many other interests and passions. Anne’s words encourage us to follow our dreams, willingly knowing the work involved, because the rich and rewarding outcomes lead to a satisfying life. It doesn’t get better than that.

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  130. Heather Champney on

    “You can’t become a rocket scientist without a great deal of study, and neither can anyone else.” What a gift to get to share in pieces of wisdom that a life well loved has to offer! Thank you for sharing her with us and thank you, Anne, for inspiring us to strive for a better version of ourselves.

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  131. Nicole on

    So inspirational. Anne sounds like a very wise woman. I was especially struck by what she says about age not limiting your accomplishments. Also how to get out of bed, keep moving forward, and keep learning.

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  132. Judy Montgomery on

    Obviously Anne was a fabulous energetic person with many passions. I was most impressed by all that she had done after she turned 60 right up to her passing at 97. Her legacy of roses and friendships will live on. Thank you for telling her story.

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  133. TONI BEAUCHAMP on

    The most inspiring part of the interview to me was when Anne spoke of turning 60, and how at the time , she thought it was old but now realizes how much more time there is to learn and explore new interests. I turn 60 myself this March, and while at times, I do feel that I am old, I am reminded that there are so many new things to learn. I have a small rose garden, and this spring I am planning on expanding it and adding some new varieties. I have much yet to learn about roses and would love to read Anne’s books.

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  134. Michelle Graff on

    Anne’s determination is contagious and inspiring. Her keen sense to see how one, can make a difference with a little helping hand, giving something or one a chance to live, (A dog, a cat or a rambling rose…) gives such joy.
    Also, to support small business is supporting someone’s dream, and makes you feel good!

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  135. Wende on

    The same as picking a favorite flower, this entire interview was a great read. Must say tho, A Voyage of Determination hit home for me, everything about her experience including sailing sounded like my mom. I know if Anne and my mom didn’t live on opposite sides of the country and instead opposite sides of town, they certainly would have been fast friends. Thank you so much for sharing your time spent with Anne, she was a remarkable woman.

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  136. Suzanne Weschke on

    I have tried to grow roses from seed, but they never take. I’m going to be watching for that book or a workshop on growing roses. I don’t know if I can come up with a favorite rose. They are all so beautiful. I would love to win the roses, but I would need some instructions to go with it so I don’t mess them up lol.

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  137. Clare C. on

    So much wisdom and inspiration from this woman. I loved reading about Anne and her story was inspiring. We just moved and are starting all new gardens at our new home. I have a love for ramblers as well, and have already purchased several for our rows of fencing. Starting over is hard, but reading how she started at what we think of as later in life really put things into perspective for me.

    “Look carefully for the same prejudice in yourself. It could be lurking there without you realizing it and could cause you to not believe in yourself and to restrict you from following a difficult goal.”

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  138. Lynda Hardwick on

    Wow! The most inspiring part of this interview was that at age 60 she didn’t look at herself as someone who would settle in retirement. She instead looked for new adventures fueled by her passions.

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  139. Theresa on

    I loved how she started in what we think is later in life.

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  140. Crystal Ponto on

    ” Don’t be stingy.” I think that’s the best quote ever…don’t be stingy… with roses, with beauty, with knowledge, with kindness. I wrote this quote out for my classroom and it hangs on my wall. Thank you for sharing this fantastic interview!

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  141. Bailey on

    Roses are a slice of heaven in your own backyard. I too have shared cutting of my heirloom roses. I also created a rose-infused honey that won the 2016 Good Food award for infused honey.
    So many ways to enjoy roses. I use the petals for blessing ceremonies to celebrate births, death and other meaningful life passages. Yes, we need to keep growing inside and out!

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  142. Rebecca Carlo on

    I loved that she pursued her dreams later in life. There is no limit to starting your dreams. Love that! Thank you, Erin!

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  143. Scottie on

    What an amazing woman at 97 years old to be so open and generous. Gives me hope as I am 67 years old work as a full time RN with Covid patients and love flowers and long to slow down and just garden . I am definitely trying roses . I doubt I will slow down but I will try roses . Thank you Floret for everything you do

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  144. Annie D. on

    She is a really inspiring woman. Thank you so much to have let us know her. I was really moved when she said that she did not feel like she had started her passion for roses so late in her life since it had been more than 30 years since she continued it! It’s a great proof that you’re never too old to start something you love.

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  145. MarySue Cromwell on

    I am impressed that she never stopped learning and trying new things. At the age of 57, it has inspired me to do the same.

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  146. MaryBeth Melchior on

    This was AMAZING! I will turn 57 next month… I discovered horses at 47 and now we have two rescued horses and just bought 8 acres for them (and us) and we’re all together now. This land needs lots of love and attention… and then Floret popped into my life! You have introduced me to flowers and I will have my first-ever garden this year!! Anne’s story so resonated with me – the journey of continuous learning and growth, nature bringing it all together. Thanks for doing this interview, Erin – and for everything you and the whole Floret team do. You’re all helping me move forward for my self, for my animals, and for the world. Love you all!!

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  147. Eileen McKie on

    This interview was so timely as I am working through the Floret Workshop. All of her advise is so inspiring to me as I’m starting a new career as a flower farmer at 64. I printed the interview and have it in the front of my Floret Workbook for the days I feel overwhelmed.
    We should all pursue our dreams no matter how old in years we are and even when the people around us tell us we are too old.
    Thank you Erin for sharing .

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  148. Amy Szabo on

    Wow.
    What an inspiring woman. The part that really hit me is that it’s never to late to start something new. Since a young age I have always had the goals of owning land and starting a homestead. I turned 30 this year and it brought me massive anxiety that I was getting to old and still don’t feel as close to that dream as I had hoped to be by now. I know 30 is not that old, but for me it really felt like a milestone and that I was behind in my life plans and losing time.
    Hearing that Anne didn’t even start with roses until age 60, and still had 37 years of experience after that (longer than I have even been alive) put things in perspective.
    I am still anxious to achieve my goals and own a homestead, but am going to try harder to enjoy the ride and accept that it might take longer than my young self would have hoped. There is still plenty of time!

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  149. Lorna Burley on

    Flowers truly connect people. My grandfather, upon retiring from owning a family auto machanic business, turned his hands from repairing engines to growing dinnernplate dahlias and a lush rose gardens. Anne’s words are so true, when you are determined, you can learn to do many things. I’ve been adding roses over the last several years to my existing gardens and dove into cut flower farming more seriously last year at 56 years of age. It’s inspiring to hear Anne started at 60, so I need to stop wishing I started younger and move forward with learning all I can to continue on this extraordinary adventure. Thanks Erin and team Floret!

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  150. Jennifer Doyel on

    I love when she mentioned “the fence”. This term shows how many of us are restricted in our lives. She showed us how to climb over that fence and recreate ourselves into productive people!

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  151. Kelly Doetsch on

    I am planning a garden to share the experience of connection and peace I feel when in the garden. I’m inspired by Anne’s work ethic and advice to grow by learning. I have a rambling rose cutting that came in the mail from a friend. I put it in the ground in sunshine and it’s taken over the fence. I am encouraged that sharing flowers connects all of us

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  152. Ingrid Thornton on

    What an amazing woman, so powerful in her quiet and determined way of being, and so wise and inspiring. I love the story of her frequent escapes to the sea shore as a young child, definitely a premonotion of her life to come. And her ability to make her ideas and desires real, despite whatever the challenges. She seems to have had the ability to simply and calmly ‘just do it’. What a rewarding and satisfying life she has lived!

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  153. Mellanie Tuttle on

    I have been caring for my mother and then my mother-in-law for fourteen years. They have both passed on and now at the age of 69 I find myself needing to recreate myself and figure out what I want to do for the next 14, 24, 34 years!

    The quotes from Anne’s book and then her next comment really struck a cord. Figure out what I want to do and then go for it. Maybe even grow roses! I always thought they took up so much time, but now I have the time!

    Thank you for all you do. I am enjoying your newsletter so much.

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  154. Karen Mary on

    What an inspiring woman! I think we need to see and read about women like Anne more often (at least I do). I especially enjoyed the photos and like her advice about not underestimating yourself and picking up on something you enjoy, like a hobby. Thanks very much for the wonderful interview!

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  155. Marya Boast on

    Your interview with Anne literally brought me to tears when she added in pearls of wisdom about life in relation to gardening and following dreams. Truly resonated with me. Thanks for sharing cuttings from Anne’s life philosophy garden with us.

    ‘To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy.’

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  156. Patty Swartzbaugh on

    At 60, I bought my farm after 10 years of searching, feeling the magic of the place but seeing mostly waist high weeds. Over the past few years I have had some amazing discoveries. As it turns, out the property had been loved and nurtured by Marshall Crosby, a botanist from the Missouri Botanical Gardens. His wife, I’ve been told, loved roses and there is a rose garden engulfed in blackberries I would love to uncover. The joy you found in Anne’s roses has inspired me to explore this wild blackberry patch.
    As I uncover the special parts of my new world, I am slowly identifying the beautiful plants I have now been entrusted. The most inspiring part of the interview was the when Anne described taking on her dreams at any age. I just need to study, renew what’s here, add, and invite others to join my journey.

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  157. Maureen James on

    The interview and the photo of her in your garden captured her spirit and zeal for life. Her curiosity and willingness to learn are indicators of her passion. The fruit are all the lives she touched along the way.
    I most loved what she said about 60 not being old. We need to hear these words of wisdom and apply them to our lives.
    Thank you.

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  158. Sheila Hlubucek on

    I’m inspired by her commitment to lifelong learning and skill building. I turned 60 this year, and I have so many dreams like Anne did. I’ve been questioning how long I’ll have the strength and stamina to achieve all the goals I have on my nearly three acres. Now I’m feeling bolder about my goals. I just need more tools and tenacity but I’ve got this.

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  159. Amanda on

    I love that she started her rose journey later in life. I have been following Floret for some time, was a participant in the first class series offered, and have been studying all I can to become a flower farmer someday. I have often felt discouraged because I’m not getting any younger (I actually turn 41 next week), and worry that I’ll get to the point where I may be too old to start a farm from scratch. Our current property does not allow for much gardening, let alone farming (HOA rules and all, blech), so I’ve been limited in what I can do right now. But her words and her journey is inspiring and uplifting. I’ll keep studying and planning because it’s really never too late.

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  160. Alexis Penzell on

    I loved learning about Anne’s journey with roses. What a wonderful way to keep and expand friendships through garden invitations and parting gifts of cuttings! I’ve had mixed results with roses, perhaps a function of my being a weekend gardener and more, I suspect, my lack of knowledge about what I should know and do. This sentence resonated with me, “You can’t become a rocket scientist without a great deal of study, and neither can anyone else.” Now my intentions are clearer as I’m so reading for the Rambler and Climbing Roses!!!!

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  161. Jen on

    ” You can’t become a rocket scientist without a great deal of study, and neither can anyone else”. I loved this line. I find I quickly give up if something doesn’t come naturally to me. Having a strong and determined mentor like Mrs. Belovich in my life would have changed my world. What an honour it would have been to meet her. Congrats to all that were able to cross her life path. Thank you to Erin and your team for bringing this soul to light. Without you showing interest, we never would have been able to listen to Mrs. Belovich’s words and outlook in life. She sounded like a really special person that we all could have really been inspired by.

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  162. Brandy Schwartz on

    I LOVE how Anne wants to do something, she does it! So inspiring. I just starting, this past year, creating gardens at our new home and also learning some new construction/building skills as we are renovating our home! An encouraging interview.

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  163. Denise on

    It’s funny I’ve never been one to like roses, saying that brings back a memory from a rose my mother had in her garden that as a child I would walk outside just to smell that pink rose when they were in bloom. I never did know the name of it, but the memory of that smell always brings me back when I read great articles like these. Thanks for the Rose Story. May have to find me a Ramlin Rose to start in my gardens at 65…LOL

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  164. Darlene Lonnay on

    She is an inspiration…. To think she started her rose journey at 60 ….loved how she expressed her goals …and yes we can do anything a man can do ! Thank you for the journey

    DLonnay

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  165. Catherine Duarte on

    I enjoyed this so much. Especially when she mentions that she started after 60. I am 55 and I love how that has made me feel. So many things to try and grow. Such a lovely ( rose) story to read in the dead of winter. Thank you.

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  166. Bess B on

    “However, inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy.” In a society that is bent on individual consumption, Anne knew that generosity and community are the much richer options. That’s incredibly inspiring and arresting.

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  167. Jayne Elisa on

    This was such a great read. Now I want to go out and plant a rambler to climb a tree as soon as possible. I know the perfect tree too.

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  168. Christa Kiessel on

    I love how much she enjoyed sharing her beautiful roses and how this resulted in many friendships. I live on the farm my great grandparents started and have the joy of nurturing some of the old roses they planted. My soul is connected with this place that has been handed down the maternal line of flower guardians for three generations. Anne’s story is incredibly inspiring as I start my 51st year. A historian wrote about our farm…”It was said by neighbors that going to the farm was always an occasion with good food, laughter, and fun.” My hope is that I can create a permaculture on our farm filled with trees, flowers and roses to share with neighbors, just like the old days. I will no longer worry that I’m too old to see this vision become reality.

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  169. Maretta Wight on

    I will be 50 this year and my mother passed away at 68, so I often find myself thinking I have may have less than 20 more years to live.
    I am most inspired by her advice to those who feel they are too old to follow their dreams.

    “My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.
    In fact, I am about to launch my own website and blog. I’ve always wanted my own website and I don’t think it’s too late to do this. I bought my own domain last week.”

    This past July I completed a degree in Web Design & Development and I was especially tickled to see she was launching a blog at 96. What a truly remarkable and inspiring woman.

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  170. CG on

    Invite people in and share. “Don’t be stingy!”

    Sage Advice, and not just for gardening.

    I admire and appreciate the women who have freely & selflessly shared knowledge with me, and aspire to be that way myself. Too many times women are pitted against one another–it can feel powerful to withhold information from others! I’ll carry Anne’s advice and build strength through cooperative sharing and receiving.

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  171. Shelly Lehto on

    I turn 60 this year and found it truly inspirational that she started her rose journey at my current age.

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  172. Anne Haley on

    I love the fact that Anne Belovich had a full life after fifty!

    I also love that she contributed beauty (and joy) to the visual world through her love of roses!

    It was her Homeric sail boat journey however that most inspired me–her courage, determination and willingness to learn are palpable and help me stay my perilous course!

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  173. Linda Montgomery on

    Thank you Erin, for writing and sharing such a wonderful post in Anne’s legacy about her Roses and books and her amazing life ! She is so inspiring despite her hard ships! It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams.

    “My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development”

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  174. Susie Bates on

    I was very intrigued by her life’s journey, but what is most inspiring is her generosity! Her advice to share your love of gardening and the flowers you grow with others is advice I will adhere to. I will also be adding more roses into my life because of this wonderful series! Thanks to Anne and to the Floret Team.

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  175. susan on

    Thank you Erin for sharing Annes interview! It was so inspiring to note her “new” career growing roses and gardening started at age 60 and she was able to continue for over 1/3 of her life. The many interests she cultivated and her advice on staying engaged was so motivating. I loved this series on roses and look forward to starting my version of a rose garden this spring.

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  176. Amanda Beatty on

    What a wonderful and inspiring woman! I have to say I am most inspired by her encouragement of sharing your garden. Hospitality and friendship are two things that every human understands. The last two years have been difficult to everyone, and I know that I myself have become somewhat rusty on sharing something as simple has a glass of tea and the beauty of a garden with friends. I have a lovely, sunny spot in my backyard that I have been laboring over what to plant…Mrs. Belovich has inspired me to plant roses! Thank you, Floret for sharing this beautiful interview with a very special woman.

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  177. Brittany on

    What a wonderful and inspiring series to follow. Thank you for sharing your team’s and Anne’s experiences with us. I love that she passionately reiterates gardening’s social nature. It makes me so excited to share my garden with friends again this year!

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  178. Mary on

    Living Anne’s advice leads to a well-rounded life filled with love, friends, accomplishments and fulfillment. Growing and sharing roses (or any flowers!) brings the joy that we all need. This was a lovely interview and series. Thank you, Erin!

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  179. Melissa Espinoza on

    What a great story. An amazing women who lived a full life. I’m inspired. I want to go out now and buy all her books. Hahaha. I loved her advice on , “don’t let being a woman stop you from doing what is traditionally seen as a man’s job”. I tell my young girls constantly never to be afraid of doing something that is generally seen as a “man’s job”. I remind them that there is no such thing.

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  180. Sally on

    This interview gives me inspiration to keep going, work hard. I can still have beautiful gardens in my 70s! Come on Spring, hurry up.

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  181. Susan G on

    What an amazing Woman! Thanks Erin for sharing her story and for continuing to inspire and guide gardeners all over the world! YOU are amazing! Thank you!!

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  182. Michelle Brown on

    So much life lived and lived well! To remember to always continue learning and trying new things; how inspiring to hear of all the paths her life took.

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  183. Terry on

    When Anne speaks to her approach for life, engagement, always learning and looking towards the next thing. So positive and inspiring!

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  184. Tiff Drong on

    How inspiring! The most inspiring thing in her interview is how to keep her legacy going: “Keep them watered, fertilized, and in a place with lots of sunshine.” “Don’t be stingy.” I think this applies in all aspects of life for humans. Keep hydrated, fed for energy and sunshine for vitamin D. We are too like roses, no one is the same but we all require those main ingredients to be successful. Don’t be stingy in your relationships. Surround yourself with like minded people that encourage you and make you feel good. Thanks Anne for your inspiration.

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  185. Margery Sherrill on

    Two things in particular: you are never too old to follow a dream and be generous with your knowledge and time.

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  186. Laura Baker on

    Laura, January 17
    Wow, just wow! We recently moved back to our home state of SD to retire. We are 57 and very deep into renovations inside and out. We have some extraordinary new outdoor raised beds where I’d like to include a rose garden, but don’t know where to start as far as varieties. I’ve had roses before, but not a discerning skill for choosing.
    I’m a retired teacher and am inspired by the idea of this next phase of my life. I’m happy to read this story, and yours, Erin, to see what might be next for me…now that I have time and space on our acreage to plan grow!!

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  187. Aisling Flower Farm (Leah) on

    What a wonderful, fascinating individual?! I admire her dedication to being a life-long learner! She also reminds us to share our passions with others. A lovely lady….the world needs more people of her character! Thanks for sharing her story!

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  188. Ashley Izsak on

    This interview is so inspiring! I’m almost 40 and can’t believe how quickly time has flown. It is so soul filling to read about how she grew her passions for so many years after 60! I also love the fact that she bought house framing books and built homes.

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  189. Kaylee on

    I loved this interview!!! My absolute favorite part is when Anne talks about the best thing you can do is share. It sounds like she was a generous lady who loved to share her passion with people far and wide. What an inspiration!

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  190. Gae Morris on

    What an amazing legacy! And what a blessing for her to share so willingly!
    And thank you for sharing as well.
    Everyone who reads through this article will surely be inspired to continue to share with others.
    God bless you. And Anne’s continued work through you and others.

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  191. Kris Zingone on

    For me it was the interview, for sure! The fact that Anne didn’t get “into” roses until her 60’s , inspired me! I am 54 and purchased my first rose just last year. To be honest it didn’t go that well. A friend gifted me another and I am hopeful for this coming season. I loved when Anne said looking back from 97, 60 didn’t seem that old ☺️So true! Thank you Erin for sharing this wonderful interview. RIP Anne x

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  192. Brenda Miller on

    Building houses and sailing alone – she certainly was accomplished and thought big! I consider myself somewhat independent – I raised sheep, grew a vegetable garden and started flower beds on my own five acres….. I wanted to be a farmer’s wife like my mother but I wasn’t going to wait for someone to give me that lifestyle – I created it myself. Then I finally marry at age 45, and a break from a country lifestyle has been luxuriously restful and allowed for travel. Not sure what the next chapter of my life will be as I settle into a new permanent life with my husband and I’m ready to take up care again of my little hobby farm….maybe a miniature oxen team? Build a life for yourself, and it all falls into place. That’s been my philosophy, and no doubt the way Anne lived too!

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  193. Anna Steinle on

    Propagating! You have totally inspired me to try this!
    On a side note, I agree that gardens in general were just meant to be shared, whether by touring, book writing, picture sharing, clippings, or simply talking about them…❤️ Gardening creates fascinating memories..and you need several lifetimes to learn it all💐

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  194. Ashley on

    This interview was so inspiring—thank you for sharing! What inspired me most was how varied her pursuits and interests were. As someone with various unrelated interests, it can feel difficult at times to feel confident about moving forward with one pursuit, worried about burnout or becoming stuck and not being able to pursue something else. But her life sounds so rich and full pursuing her interests regardless—for me it just helps to see that someone has done this, that it is doable. And that it’s never “too late” or you aren’t “too old” to try something new, even if that would require more school/learning. She’s a shining example of a life well-lived. Thank you so much for interviewing Anne.

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  195. Sylvia Nichelle on

    Such an inspiring article! I love her thoughts on staying out of the bed and engaging with friends. Never stop learning and growing! So powerful and true!

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  196. Cherrelle on

    Loved this quote, “… inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy.”
    So very true! I love being involved in these truly special interchanges!

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  197. Kimberly on

    How inspiring! I love that she says to keep learning, wonderful advice.

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  198. Debbie Ridpath on

    As a 55 year old woman who is entering a new phase in life, I find this article and her words inspiring on many levels. Thank you.

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  199. Danielle L. on

    Excellent series! I love her advice to keep moving and learning, and that she started her rose journey in her 60s. So much inspiration packed into this interview, thank you.

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  200. Susan Stanton on

    Great interview with such an inspiring women! Loved that she had not only one career/passion but several! I will be 60 in a few years so it’s inspiring to read about her buying her first rose bush at that age and going on to create her incredible garden! We need hear about more women like her!

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  201. Kim on

    Love her generosity and how she loved to share her space and knowledge, “Don’t be stingy.”

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  202. Kate on

    Wow. Such a blessing for you both to connect and reconnect over the years. Thank you for interviewing her and preserving her legacy. This hit home for me (it was something that you had quoted), as it relates to my newfound passion for gardening, cultivating, and cut flowers.

    “A passion for a particular hobby might be an indication of a special talent that could be pursued and turned into a rewarding career. Then, be willing to spend some time and energy preparing for what you want to do.”

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  203. Susan Rich on

    I love how she said something to the affect: just because your a woman, doesn’t mean you cant do it! I went to work at UPS when I was 36 (thinking it was just a man’s job) 22 years later I just retired from there! Now to play in my gardens :)

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  204. Toni Burnett on

    Thank you so much for sharing this amazing woman’s story, along with your own. I have always loved roses. When my hubs and I moved into our home some 21+ years ago, our front yard was a blank slate. I filled it with at least 15 different varieties of roses based on their individual beauty. Little did I know at the time that I had chosen 2 heirloom roses, unfortunately I do not know their names but they are my absolute favorites. Every spring we get people stopping to view and smell the explosion of color and glorious scents. I even had a lady and her daughter ask if they could use them as a backdrop for her senior photo. I love that I can brighten someone’s day with something as simple as a rose. I love to cut small bouquets and share with my wonderful neighbors. It does the soul some good. Please Erin, continue sharing your story and flowers as I have finally found a renewed passion of my love of flowers. (PS. So excited, I just got my seed order from you yesterday! Can’t wait to start planting!!!)

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  205. Deborah Burns on

    Such an inspiration! I am so happy to have “met” Anne in your interview ;nd learn about her life, thank you Erin.

    Anne’s story is another extended hand that will help me recover from so many traumatic set backs from these past 2+ years. At 62 (63 in February) I am having to start over again…. I am finding my footing but confidence has been unsteady. Anne’s example of beginning her rose gardens at 60 and website at 97 (!!!) is truly inspirational!

    “Anne: I remember when I turned 60. I thought 60 was so old. That was almost 37 years ago, well over one-third of my lifetime so far.

    At almost 97 years old, it doesn’t seem that my passion for roses started all that late in life. It’s been over 30 years since I began this journey—longer than the careers of many. I pursued many dreams after turning 60…It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams.

    My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.

    In fact, I am about to launch my own website and blog. I’ve always wanted my own website and I don’t think it’s too late to do this. I bought my own domain last week.” – Anne Belovich

    Anne’s website is lovely and I am very glad her family will continue it and share more of Anne with the world!
    I am going to re-read Anne’s words below over and over while I work on my recovery and grow into my new and best life.

    Thank you Erin, Floret Team and Anne!

    Reply
  206. C K Singley on

    What an amazing woman and an amazing garden! I’m love that she came to her hobbies/passions later in life and returned to one then as well. I definitely need to pick up A Voyage of Determination. The discussion of roses also reminds me of my grandfather who planted his first rose bushes in chilly Montana close to the end of his life. I’ve always wanted to figure out what variety they were and barring that grow as many close to the color as possible. Grandpas roses are gone now, but a personal garden in his honor lives in my imagination. It’ll happen. 💕

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  207. Jenny Sterling on

    These lovely books will need to be make their way to my bookshelf and gifted to friends who I know have many beautiful gifts and need to hear it’s never too late to chase dreams, to learn, to pursue with all your heart. I also adore her attitude of using her rose garden as an opportunity for community building and extending kindness to others. Thank you for sharing her inspiring story!

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  208. Mary Hofacker on

    I enjoyed the whole interview. I was most impressed that Anne did not give up after her husband passed away. Anne chose to keep living and enjoying life; not letting being a woman stop her. I too am a widow, for almost ten years now. I moved from the home that my husband and I shared together in the country, to a new, older home, in the city. It is in this new home that my gardening took off. I love my gardens and each year, I expand them. My neighbors watch to see what is in store each year. They say I work too hard; but, it is not hard work. It is what I call doing my “beautiful”. Even as I carry each stepping stone (over 500 pounds of them) into place. I finished what I called the winding path garden this past spring. This garden created a natural blind to my small garden in the back of my house. This year I have plans to enlarge a few garden areas and create a waxing moon crescent garden that is designed along the natural contours of my property. I have so many roses that I need to plant. Thank you to you and Anne for being an inspiration to many.

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  209. Paula Dinius on

    I was very inspired by Anne! I too am a Botanist, educator, and started a cut flower farm when I was 60 years old here in Leavenworth, WA. It’s been a wonderful new chapter in my life and I look forward to enjoying it for many years to come. I like Anne also sailed from the west coast of the U.S. to New Zealand around 25 years ago. The South Pacific is such a wonderful place to explore – the amazing marine and plant life. Crossing oceans is definitely a character builder and opens doors to worlds unimaginable. After surviving the ‘Queen’s Birthday Storm’ and coming back to the States I once again started playing in the dirt. Here is the link to the documentary about the ‘Storm’ and the great adventure of a handful of amazing people. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Aa7KxGtUlAA
    One thing I know – plants will always be a part of my life!

    Reply
  210. Cyndi Nylander on

    Greetings from a snowy mountain in the wilderness in N.E.Washington…….Your Rose stories were so beautiful and i am so inspired! Anne has inspired me more than anything i have read in years..and i will be adding to my old rose collection as soon as the snow is gone. What beauty and what a life lived! I have walked in many homestead gardens since a young girl and then back in time as a young child in my grandmothers and the gardens of my great aunt. Old Rambling rose bushes, Hollyhocks and Foxgloves, Sweet Peas of such vibrant colors that would take your breath away, Pansies with their jolly faces dancing in the breeze………….Always chasing butterflies and listening to the hum of the bees…….Living in Portland years ago visiting the Rose Gardens , riding the train from the zoo and anticipating the beauty of the roses when we arrived. Yes, Roses do captivate your heart! We have many life lessons to learn from our elders……….Thank you for Anne’s interview and story. You are amazing too Erin. I have followed Floret from the beginning and it is one of my favorite blogs and when you are in magazines i get so excited for you. Congratulations on Florets success and you are wonderful to carry on Anne’s legacy and for all the beauty you bring to this earth.

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  211. Susan Jurkatis on

    I’m so inspired by this beautiful woman! I love that she didn’t even starting growing roses until she was 60. At 58, I am going to begin my first adventure with cut flowers in my garden. I have spent all summer and fall 2021 researching and prepping my tiny little space in my backyard to make this dream happen. I would love to learn from such a rosarian expert as I have learned from you this year, Erin, and others. Thank you for sharing these blog posts. The world definitely needs more flowers and more people like Erin and Anne!!!

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  212. Bekki Jamison on

    After reading this fourth article, I moved to tears. I’m reminded of my own grandmother, who grew wonderful flowers, including roses. One of which I still have today.
    Last year, I was lucky enough to get six very old roses from a property, from Craigslist! They survived all summer and are flourishing!

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  213. Lori on

    “inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important” this touched my heart. It’s so true in life…we can all inspire and introduce others to things we love and to enjoy what nature brings. Perhaps taking time to smell the roses and enjoy the beauty around us and share the love of flowers. What a legacy Anne is leaving behind!

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  214. Joanne on

    It’s the journey isn’t it? Wow, wonderful to learn about this amazing woman. Thank you for the inspiration and private moments from a precious person. Erin, your continued generosity to invest so much of your time energy and accumulation of roses has lead so many of us to the World of Roses Erin. Here we now know of the treasure Anne has created and how we can know her and roses through our lifetime. A living museum of roses is growing around us in North America and it is just so wonderful to see a glimpse of her journey. A rose is a friend for life. I am imagining Anne walking as I now do down my pathways watching them. I would cherish and use this collection of books on my journey with roses.

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  215. Abbie on

    What an inspiring, can-do woman. Anne’s passion for learning really resonates with me as I jump all into my long-awaited first ever veg/ cut flower project (largely instigated by Floret’s wealth of accessible information), whilst embarking on a career change from corporate advertising towards a more connected, authentic life, crafting interests into a career at 28yrs old.
    I seem to think ‘I should have worked things out by now’ but Anne’s full varied life and empowering attitude irrespective of age has spurred me on to keep searching and learning, forget comparing myself or wondering if I’m ‘doing the right thing’.
    Thank you Erin and team for being so generous with all your information, learnings, and stories. I always look forward to checking in whenever there’s a video course or update.

    Reply
  216. Rosalia on

    Old -Rare-Unusual Roses- The history of the rose is an old and almost as complicated as the human race. Types and classes have flourished, scattered and interbred. There are bigger gaps in roses history….longer silences….but roses and man have travelled along they history on the same broad paths of changes, decline and fall. Great men and women have lived and died and recorded themselves in history. What an interesting world it would be if the greatest were still with us, alive and representative of their era….Alas they are gone forever, but the rose, in its infinite variety, still survives, identically as it grew and flowered even before the Christian Era…..Will Tillotson

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  217. Kathy Ploeger on

    Your interview with Anne Belovich was delightful and her “formula” for accomplishing one’s goals an inspiration we all could learn from. Don’t let prejudice stop you from living your dreams. Know yourself enough to believe in what you’re capable of and finally, be willing to put in the time and effort to prepare and reach your goals.
    It’s never too late!

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  218. Melissa Mailer-Howat on

    A beautiful interview sent to me by my youngest daughter. She is helping me create a new garden in a new home having been widowed last year and a year off 60. Anne’s words have resonated on so many levels. Her love of roses and sharing that passion being the most obvious, but the fact that she neither let her age or gender hold her back in her dreams is a reminder to me when at times it might seem my chances have passed. Having read her words I’m now wondering whether creating a new garden is just the beginning and maybe I too might pursue some dreams and learn. Working in the garden is a great place to contemplate life and the magic of watching what you grow come alive is both inspiring and something to share with others. How wonderful that even in her passing Anne is changing peoples’ lives and perceptions through her roses and her words.

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  219. Hannah Blackwell on

    “Commit yourself to lifelong learning and skill development”. Love this blog ♥️

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  220. Sarah B on

    Her giving philosophy is inspiring. I love how the ideas we see the Floret goals to inspire and share with others was also a part of Anne’s view. I love her quote: ” inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy.”

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  221. Samantha on

    Thank you for doing this series. The part that I have found the most moving is Anne’s philosophy of sharing. “Don’t be stingy” is such important advice to emphasize, even when compared alongside key details such as feeding and pruning techniques. Roses have a way of bringing people together that is deeply rooted in the heart. The way Anne touched yours and how you both continue to touch all of ours through your generosity of both plant and spirit. Thank you to Anne (and you) for the reminder that it’s never to late to stop and smell the roses, but to share them as well.

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  222. Kasey on

    I was inspired by her combination of romance and realism. It was an uplifting read as a k-12 educator looking for joy and encouragement. I took away from this interview that we can either keep daydreaming, or, dig in (ha!) to the know-how and bring this beauty to life ourselves. Women are capable, anyone is capable. Get empowered by knowledge and then go undaunted into making beauty happen. Feeling inspired!

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  223. Cj on

    Anne’s passion and perseverance inspired me. She researched, planned, executed, and shared what she loved..ramblers! What a wonderful legacy she leaves to the world!

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  224. Whitney Brown on

    I love this woman now after reading this! My favorite part is where you were discussing how she built her house. She encourages you as a woman, not as a feminist that puts down men, but more of don’t whine about it being hard. Pull up your big girl pants and get to work. Bc whether your a man or a woman life is hard work and full of struggles. She is how I want to be if I am fortunate enough to see old age. She is a great depiction of just being who you are without needing a chip on your shoulder. She seems tough and strong as well as soft and feminine. Thank you for introducing us to such a person! I felt so often in my 20s after having kids that I wouldn’t be able to accomplish anything else in my life. That by the time I was done raising them I’d be too old to start over. Well age comes with some wisdom and now at 34 I now know that I just take the kids with me. I need to show them hard work and starting new things and not quitting bc its hard. Which is why when we aren’t homeschooling I am learning everything I can! And even lots of during our homeschooling. We truly aren’t ever too old to start.

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  225. Antonia VandenAkker on

    Thank you so much for sharing this wonderful interview with Anne Belovich! I am 67 yrs old and am inspired by Anne’s admission that we are never too old to pursue a dream and to keep on learning all of our life. In my endeavor to follow one of my dreams, growing an English garden, I have been reading your books Erin and following your blogs to learn as much as I can. Thanks for your generous wealth of information that you share with your readers!!

    Reply
  226. Amber on

    What a beautiful woman and life! Her resilience is so inspiring. What inspired me most about Anne’s words was when she pointed out that her career in rose started at age 60… which seems late in life but as she pointed out was 37 years ago! I feel the pressure to be who I am and leave the legacy I leave now in my 30’s while raising babies and this was such an encouragement that I have so much life to live still and so much time to DO. 🤍

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  227. Elaine Plude on

    The first thing that jumped out at me. Don’t let being a woman stop you from doing what is traditionally seen as a man’s job. The enthusiasm that comes through her words about her beautiful roses.

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  228. Umm Shams on

    O, thank you so much for sharing this wonderful series. I was just searching for articles/recommendations to add to my painfully sparse collection of roses. I can’t help but be inspired when I read that Anne Belovich’s passion for roses started when she was only 60. Here’s to the successful 60s!

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  229. Alyssa Koehler on

    The timing of this series was quite moving for me. My grandmother passed at the beginning of the week, her middle name was Rose. As her health has been in decline over the past weeks, I had spent time thinking about how I would like to add a rose to my garden in her memory. At her funeral the pastor serendipitously gave the most beautiful service connecting many aspects of her life to that of a rose. She did not live an easy life, she lost her mother as a child, battled decades of health challenges, but still through these challenges she bloomed. This thoughtful interview with Anne demonstrates the inspiring power of plants and flowers to connect us with strangers, loved ones, and our memories as we weave together the beautiful tapestry of life. I have never grown many roses, but really look forward to exploring this group of plants in a way that holds new meaning.

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  230. Alex Mudry-Till on

    I love how simply and directly she states about how to live your life… get up out of bed, spend time with friends, keep learning. Finding passions throughout your life is important and age should not be a limitation.

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  231. Olivia on

    I love her zeal for life and her can do attitude. She really simplifies life down to the basics. If you want to do something, you learn about it and then you do it. Simple as that. You can do whatever you put your mind to. You can be whoever you want to be, and do a lot of good while you are in your way.

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  232. Kathleen Budd on

    What a great interview! I loved parts one thru three and so happy Erin that you and your team were able to spend the time at Anne’s garden and take so many cuttings of her roses. Anne’s story from losing her first husband to starting a blog at 97 is so inspiring. Thank you Erin for taking the time to share your work with all of us.

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  233. Suzanne on

    I was so moved by Anne’s zest for life. She lived without limits and has inspired me to chase my dreams! Her age never deterred her. I love how much she has given and truly offered her best to make the world a better place. She was wise, brave and brilliant. She completely inspires me! Thank you for sharing.

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  234. Sydney on

    Anne was such a spirited woman! I admire the way she was not afraid to try something new and give it her all, regardless of her age or experience level. All too often we put ourselves in a box and never allow ourselves to try something new for fear of failing or not getting it right on the first try. You never know what you’re truly capable of if you never get off the couch!

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  235. Lauren Calderon on

    The part about not worrying about age when learning and staring a new hobby. I’ve quite recently found a love of roses myself. I also love the part about not being stingy. I’m in the process of transforming my backyard into a welcoming and relaxing room, if you will, with hopefully beautiful gardens to be enjoyed by my family and others.

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  236. Stephanie on

    Her determination! I’m floored by her confidence to take on challenges, like learning to build her own home. It’s a great reminder that we’re all capable if we take the time to “study and be an apprentice” in any area we aspire to conquer.

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  237. Brooke on

    I think Anne is a rockstar. Roses are my all time favorite flower. I think what inspires me the most about Anne is her willingness to give. She says “don’t be stingy” and I love that. I know not everyone wants to share, but I believe if you have something beautiful, why not share it with the world. I’m so grateful Anne has chosen to share her roses and her knowledge with all of us!

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  238. Becky F on

    This article has touched my heart. I am 61 and never thought I still have 1/3 of my life to live. Sitting outdoors enjoying my morning coffee before our rain starts, I texted my daughter. I shared with her a video of a bird flying over our pond and these words, “It’s a beautiful Sunday morning. I was just reading a really nice article and realized potentially I still have 1/3 of my life left. I need to do something”.
    Floret, this interview is so inspiring. I have a lot of life left to live and plan to plant a few roses as a thank you And then figure out my next chapter.

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  239. Keressa on

    What an amazing lady! She had so much wisdom to share, but I loved how determined she was to meet her goals despite her age or any obstacles in her path. Such an inspiring woman!

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  240. Janyel Taylor on

    As a woman in horticulture myself, I love her attitude toward not needing the strength of a man to do tasks. Her attitude is truly inspiring. Sometimes I get frustrated that I can’t do something because I’m not strong enough, but she’s right, there’s a way around it! Love this article. Thank you for bringing us in. ❤️

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  241. Stacy Morris on

    I still as much as I love flowers cannot get over the contracting and lifting the walls herself. What an amazing life story of suffering rising to be something that didn’t derail or stop her but inspired her to all and then some more ! Thanks for these posts so inspiring !

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  242. Amy Buchanan on

    I loved Anne’s message about never being too old to pursue your goals and dreams. She certainly lived this philosophy.

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  243. Cindy Browning on

    What an amazing lady with amazing wisdom. I think what she said about needing be willing to be an apprentice to a skill you want to learn is a good reminder that we don’t start out as experts.

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  244. Jennifer Evan on

    It is beyond amazing to hear of her determination and ability, especially after an age most of us consider to ‘slow down’. She started her own construction company! Built houses and framed a wall herself! Her will is awe-inspiring to women all over. As an amateur grower of roses myself, I hope to have a garage backyard garden for friends and family to enjoy, and would love to learn about ramblers.

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  245. Lori Jo Acre on

    I am most inspired by Anne’s thoughts on sharing cuttings; “Don’t be stingy.” Oh my! That made me laugh. And I so agree that sending cuttings of roses is an act of love and friendship, the greatest legacy. How true!

    I created a Victorian garden from scratch around an 1875 cottage. There was a rose nursery in southeast Michigan that specialized in hardy heirloom roses and I filled my garden with many of her hardy roses. Sadly, they have since closed. After 25 years of creating a garden that I shared with friends and one that was filled with plants they shared, I retired and moved. I am starting over now and want so much to create another garden where I can share and receive the “greatest legacy.”

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  246. Laura Adams on

    I loved reading this and getting a feel for this remarkable woman. I love when she shared the importance of sharing your garden with friends. What a celebration!

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  247. Abby Ostler on

    Wonderful and inspiring… to “start” at 60 gives me even more confidence to dig into gardening with passion. And I promise not to be stingy and share everything!!!

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  248. Stacy on

    Her determination, starting at 60 year of age really inspired me, I am approaching 60 and keep telling myself your to old to start this. She was so full of life, so I’m going to get started. Thank you for sharing her story!❤️🌸

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  249. Tracy marino on

    There are many areas of this interview that I loved but I giggled when she spoke about being able to do anything a man can do, and if the muscles aren’t there you can figure out how to get past that! I am always dragging,,pulling and maneuvering my way through projects and that comment really spoke to me. She is so inspiring not only as a gardener but as a woman who overcomes, and that speaks to all of us ❤️

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  250. Delinda on

    When I turned 60 I thought that was old, but now 37 years later…it was less than 2/3’s
    (I paraphrased)
    I am so glad I read about Anne. My mother had two old rose bushes at my childhood home. I loved them even as a kid. My goal is to try and root. A cutting from the one that remains for my home.

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  251. Lorna Dotolo on

    I love everything about your interview with Anne. The poignancy of her interview for me at 64, inspires me to eagerly anticipate a full life into my 60’s and beyond. Her words,”I had learned I was capable of accomplishing very difficult goals. I was capable of facing incredible hardships and even considerable danger in order to achieve these goals.” Thank you for this lovely interview with such an amazing woman.

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  252. Amanda Robertson on

    ‘It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams.’ I love her passion for life and her bravery to seek her goals and dreams. What an amazing lady.

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  253. Louise on

    “You can do anything a man can do except those things that require a lot of strength… I think I said ‘big biceps’ in there. However, you can even figure out how to use mechanical means to overcome that.” To hear this from a woman who pursued her dreams and did everything she wanted, is very inspiring. I think that this part is very inspiring for a lot of girls and women. As women, we can do anything we want and pursue every dream we have!

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  254. Kim Bowling on

    Anne: “ My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development. “

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  255. Tawnya Northen on

    Erin….
    In your interview with Anne, the part that most resonated with me is her words of one to continue learning and develop skills.

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  256. Dora Varo-Hernandez on

    I am closing in on 60 so it’s inspiring to me that Anne started so much at that age! I find courage in her story to start learning about roses, one of my favorite flowers, and to go after my passions. I have so many ideas that include gardening, I have no excuses!

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  257. Carrie on

    I love that she discovered her passion at 60 and at 97, she’s still doing what she loves! I don’t feel like I’ve quite discovered my passion yet but at 44, I’ve got plenty of time. What an inspiration!

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  258. Kate Harrison on

    My heart clenched and my eyes teared up when Anne said the most import part is to share your garden with others and that the friendships you make there are more (just as) important than the roses. Such a beautiful soul.

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  259. Sam Brooks on

    What a woman! When she asked whether it would take big biceps and beard, I couldn’t help but laugh. Then she added that even the biceps issue could be overcome with mechanics. Such a great way to view your challenges!

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  260. Nora Chamberlain on

    Thank you for sharing Anne’s story! I was SO inspired by Anne’s accomplishments later in life, especially her pursuit of and passion for roses! I’m 54, recently retired RN, and am now pursing a career in flowers. As Anne demonstrated in her life, the Best is yet to come!

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  261. Mindy Ganze on

    SO inspiring!! Thank you for sharing this beautiful interview. My favorite part, was her advice, keep moving, stay out of bed, visit your friends and family, don’t isolate yourself, read and stay up with current events. I’m just in awe of someone that has such a vibrancy for life, and shows others that it’s possible to achieve your dreams. It’s never to late to start!

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  262. Johanna on

    I love the idea of gardens being a way to connect with people. Time to share some yard work with some neighbors!

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  263. Lacey Tucker on

    Wow what an amazing women!! I’m so blessed and excited to have read this interview and to hear about Anne! I was instant sucked into the interview and her story. I will definitely be reading all of her books. My favorite part of the interview was when she said: My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go
    out to lunch and visit with friends and family
    (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date
    with current events, be open to new ideas, and
    commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.

    I’m going to remember this always. I love that she started this at 60 it makes me feel at 40 it’s not too late to start a passion and grow it. Life can be a wonderful adventure if we let it. She has inspired me so much and lite a fire in me to get out there and learn and develop the skills I have and learn new ones.

    Thank you so much Erin for sharing this interview and letting us into her world!! This rose series has been fantastic! You are such an inspiration to me and so many people across the world.

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  264. Marysia on

    „A passion for a particular hobby might be an indication of a special talent that could be pursued and turned into a rewarding career.” – This should be said to all when growing up. Repeated all the time. Now, in our weird times so many struggle silently. Most people chase something.. I’m sure that when asked, “What is is you want to achieve in life” most of us wouldn’t be able to say what precisely just “a carrier”, “money”, “happiness” etc. Yeah sure, but what is hidden underneath these words? We all struggle at some point in our life’s. I struggled, I didn’t know what I was chasing until 3 years ago when I came across a book “Cut flower garden”, that changed my life for ever. Every one has their own life path, some will find their passion which will lead to a rewarding career, some won’t. Im sure that being encouraged at the youngest years of life to find your passion (whatever it might be) surely would give us more dreamers, inspiring people than we have now. Believe in yourself and your dreams, life is too short and the best way to spend it is by doing something you are truly passionate about and love.
    Who would have thought that flower farming would be a thing!

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  265. Gina D'Apolito on

    “be careful not to underestimate what you are capable of doing….” words to live by ! Amazing that a nursery going out of business started a new passion and new knowledge. thanks so much!

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  266. ELLEN ATKINS on

    What an incredibly interesting and inspiring story. I think was impressed me the most was her strength, fortitude and belief in herself that she could accomplish anything she wanted to do. Many times we look at ourselves and what we think or believe are our own limitations. Ann showed the world what a force of nature she was and taught us that if she could accomplish her dreams, anyone could. Since my husband passed, I have felt like half of a person. We both loved gardening which has become my therapy and makes me feel closer to my hubby. I especially adore growing flowers. My Ed used to surprise me with all kinds and varieties because he knew how much I love them. I hope he is looking down on me and is proud of my efforts. I miss him so much.

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  267. Heather on

    I love in her late nineties she wanted to start a blog and have her own website! She is such a source of inspiration to not be afraid of trying something new!

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  268. Michelle on

    What strikes me most is that she was 60 when she started studying roses, less than 2/3rds of the way through her life! What a necessary, good reminder that it is never too late to learn something new or to become a master of that skill. I love learning and there are so many things I want to learn. It’s easy to feel like there is a time limit on learning but I want to be like Anne, learning until the very end!

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  269. McKennae on

    Wow, what a great read! I didn’t intend on reading the whole thing but got sucked into her beautiful story. I really enjoyed learning that she was in her 60s when she started to pursue her dreams. It really is inspiring to know you can still accomplish so much at an older age. I also loved her enthusiasm about being a woman and going for what you want without society telling you that you can’t. Thank you for sharing this wonderful story! I will now be heading over to her website to read her blogs. ❤️

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  270. Rhonda on

    Inspiring lady!💜

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  271. Charlotte Book on

    As a young person (I just turned 20 this month) I find her words on living a diverse life so beautiful. I am currently a college student at an Ivy League university and constantly feel this immense pressure to have a set path and to have everything figured out. Anne is an amazing role model because of her message that it was her diverse life endeavors that made life so rewarding. Her words really helped me change my mindset about life goals and success.

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  272. Brooke James on

    I love that she said she didn’t consider herself too old when she started growing roses at 60. Absolutely amazing and inspiring, especially for us older growers.

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  273. Darline Mitchell on

    Oh how I wish she had wrote a book about her life, I found this so full of adventure. The best part was her encouragement to do things, not just to dream about them but to actually do the things no matter the obstacles. I know it has lifted my expectations for myself. Thank you for sharing.

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  274. Samantha B on

    It’s always so heartening to hear it’s not too late to start something new. The fact that Anne started so many new things at 60 is so inspiring. It’s so easy to feel like you’ve missed the window or it’s too late to learn or achieve. To have someone provide such vigorous reassurance that you can accomplish just about anything you set your mind to whenever the passion takes you, it’s comforting to say the least.

    Reply
  275. Ana on

    I’m so glad I took the time to read the whole interview. My favorite take away was about how she credited her rich life of many different vocations to the tragedy of losing her first husband (and longevity). While in the thick of things we are told everything happens for a reason and it’s hard to believe. But seeing proof and someone who has truly overcome and lived vibrantly was amazing. Thank you.

    Reply
  276. Marsha Barr on

    I loved that she was older when she started her collection!! It gives me such hope!!

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  277. Patty Ovington on

    Hearing her talk about never being too old was so encouraging! I am 63 and just bought a beautiful 6 acre piece of land where I hope to plant my dream garden (which includes roses). Floret has been a constant source of encouragement for me in this endeavor! Thank you!

    Reply
  278. Stacy on

    I’m most inspired by the fact that’s her rose journey started when she was 60! It really puts into perspective the idea that you really have no idea how long you have, whether many more years or not, to pursue your dreams and goals. So while many people might have thought 60 was too old to take up a new hobby, Anne didn’t and she got almost 40 years of learning and loving roses.

    Reply
  279. Chelsea Willis on

    How to choose one thing that struck me most! Such a beautiful interview, at the moment what really stood out was her memory of having people over to admire her garden, and now to be experiencing that (safely) again. I think especially right now the idea of sharing space with people in a beautiful setting like a garden or flower farm is heart medicine. It’s what I love most about flower farming and appreciate her sentiments around it.

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  280. Brenda Harvey on

    “Fortunate Circumstances”

    From a truckload of “going out of business ramblers”
    to nearly 1,000 unique varieties, to the largest private collection in North America.

    As a child of the Depression Era, Anne knew a “really good” deal & opportunity when she saw it.

    What an incredible legacy Anne left. Never underestimate the power of perseverance.

    Reply
  281. Dorothy on

    I ‘ve always loved roses.she has a beautiful garden.her books are wonderful.Those Rose’s gave her lots of joy and beauty for many many years.love to have those books.

    Reply
  282. Robin Fortenberry on

    What a wonderful life she built for herself. All of her experiences are inspirational. The part that resonated with me is the push to share the roses not be stingy. Inviting people to the garden and building friendships through sharing cuttings of the beauties to keep them growing into the future of many gardens.

    Reply
  283. Alicia Richards on

    ‘Don’t be Stingy.’ With roses. With company. With your knowledge. I absolutely love that.

    Reply
  284. Linda R on

    For me, being 49 and close to the milestone of 50 is scary. While I know if “never too late to be what you might have been,” hearing her example is inspirational. Also, the last few years, flowers have been calling me. Perhaps time to listen to that siren song.

    Reply
  285. Michelle on

    Wow makes me think a little in depth about myself. I’m 55 this March and just started the growing of my garden this past year. I’ve wanted to start a venture with flowers for awhile but wondered if it was a task to take on considering my age. She’s truely an inspiration to me. I cannot wait to read her books! I love how she says bring people into your garden and share beauty and your knowledge something this world needs more of. I’m super excited to start growing in all aspects.

    Reply
  286. Isabella on

    My favorite part was how she put the age question into perspective. I’ve had the blessing of knowing two of my great grandparents well, and they are (and were) two of the most lively people I’ve ever known! My mom always laughs when she talks about my great grandpa, who at ninety would drop his cane and strut around, saying “Look, I can walk like I’m seventy!” I’m only in college, and this kind of a thing reminds me that even though it feels like I’m locked into the life I’m planning forever, I have many years ahead of me to explore and learn.
    I’m a very random person, someone who would pick up a hobby at 60, 70, 80, just because it was there. Anne’s story in the interview encourages me to continue chasing all of my dreams, no matter what.

    Reply
  287. Lacey on

    Sending a cutting is an act of love..of friendship. This is the greatest legacy. ❤️

    Reply
  288. Grace on

    I love Anne’s reminder that it is never too late to chase a dream. This whole interview is beautiful… suddenly I want to plant a rose garden!

    Reply
  289. Jeanne McCabe on

    She did so much in her life! I live that at 97 she decided to blog, that is do fabulous. She inspires me to start those projects I dream of doing instead of just dreaming about them.

    Reply
  290. Robin Corwin on

    I enjoyed that she doesn’t have one favorite. I can relate! I have many favorites and I think my favorite changes daily! Wonderful article. She is such an inspirational woman!

    Reply
  291. Katie T on

    There are so many nuggets of wisdom here. Thank you for sharing the interview with us! My favorite thing she said was this: “ My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.”
    I’m going to post it on my fridge.

    Reply
  292. Mary on

    I love how she bought a domain name at the age of 97, and on the first blog post she says, yes, I’m writing another book. The woman never stopped and must have been the ultimate optimist. Inspiring!

    Reply
  293. Jill [email protected] Sweet Life Garden on

    Best quote, “Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy”. This is so true! It is important to share the beauty that surrounds you in a rose garden. I have had many women ask if they could just come to visit my garden to sit and meditate and pray. It is such an honor to share the beauty of roses with others. Thank you for sharing this interview with all of us! What a legacy Anne has left for the world!

    Reply
  294. Diana Griffin on

    “You can meet and exceed your goals if you prepare yourself over time. You can’t become a rocket scientist without a great deal of study, and neither can anyone else. “

    – become a life long learner!

    Reply
  295. davia mcnamara on

    i just love how inspiring she is and how she never let her age, gender or really anything in her way stop her. i will always keep her words about never giving up on your dream no matter your age in mind as i continue to grow my farm…what an amazing interview

    Reply
  296. KELLEY on

    A woman I can certainly resonate with! I’ve been struggling to find my “right” path (at 56) I feel as though I don’t fit in where I am. I remember how much I loved my grandmothers flowers and have been planning to replicate them from memory, and she had many roses, yo this day I can still remember the perfumed air of her gardens.

    Reply
  297. Laura Baughman on

    The whole interview is inspiring to me, however this part from the excerpt of A Voyage of Determination really struck me. “Look carefully for the same prejudice in yourself. It could be lurking there without you realizing it and could cause you to not believe in yourself and to restrict you from following a difficult goal.”

    I practice ‘getting out of my own way’ daily if not hourly, and these words remind me that I’m not alone.

    Reply
  298. Deborah Cline on

    Such a beautiful story of a woman who could and did. I have similar things in common. Being a widow, being alone, and trying to find my sense of purpose at almost 60 years old. As I was reading this I was in bed, lol, I got up and started moving. My flowers and roses I truly love, I just moved to Florida and starting my rose garden all over is rewarding but as we know can be expensive. So planting one rose at a time but reading her story gives me hope. Hope for tomorrow, and a beautiful cottage garden…

    Reply
  299. Theresa Biggs on

    “However, inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy.”

    Inspiring others and sharing is a prefect act of love and friendship indeed.

    Reply
  300. Mary Dunn on

    It is inspiring to hear Anne’s views on not accepting limits when you wish to pursue big dreams. To prepare and educate yourself for each step, to learn from others to help you gain knowledge and the confidence to believe in your success. Such an amazing lady who is still sharing her dreams and encouraging others. It is an honor to be introduced to her through your interview

    Reply
  301. Theresa on

    “There was something wonderfully mysterious about roses growing up the trellises and into the trees to make the tree look as though it was blooming.”

    what a beautiful thought ❣️ thank you Floret for
    this story

    Reply
  302. Wendy on

    I love that Anne is a dog and rose lover. I too am a dog and rose lover. I volunteer with Pets With A Mission where Lucky or my late dog Jasmine (a rescue) and I would help students read. With our recent purchase of a ranch, my husband and I are creating a garden where I hope to add roses. Recently I gave “Crawfish Étouffée” rose plants to a close friend since she always gives me étouffée casseroles.

    Reply
  303. Sue C on

    “It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams.” What an amazing woman…..

    Reply
  304. Gwendolyn Valcourt on

    Her advice to keep moving and stay engaged with people and the world around you speaks to me. It’s been difficult to do these past 2 years but it’s been so helpful to learn new things and keep my brain and body active. She was a wise woman and seems very kind hearted, thank you for introducing us to her!

    Reply
  305. Chelsea on

    I love that she says you are never to old to follow your dreams! At the age of 60 and she started growing roses and lead a life she always dreamed about! She had such a wonderful accomplished life that is so inspiring and wonderful to read about!

    Reply
  306. Deborah S Nelson on

    I love that she was 60 when she started her love affair with roses. I’m 67 and keep remembering this when I think that I’m too old to accomplish anything new!

    Reply
  307. Karen on

    There’s an old saying that goes, ‘where there’s a will, there’s a way.’ Annes story is truly inspiring. I’m looking forward to adding roses in my garden this spring.

    Reply
  308. Ann on

    Pursue your passion, whatever that may be. You will have many throughout your life, but that enriches you.

    Reply
  309. Kathy Farr on

    Her words to not be stingy. Also her humility in that she gave part of credit for what she had accomplished to her long life . She wanted to share what she loved. Truly amazing woman.

    Reply
  310. Lori Dodson on

    You know sometimes you pray to God for visible confirmation, soon as I reading those words , “ it’s never to late to act on your goals and dreams” , was my confirmation . Starting new adventures at 60 is amazing and with me being 40 ,it set a flame 🔥 in me to continue to pursue my passion of flowers no matter my age. She is right keeping moving is key to longevity !

    Reply
  311. Shelly on

    I was inspired by her advice to not let one’s age or gender discourage them from pursuing a passion. I will be 60 soon, I don’t have abundant sunshine on the plot I live on and I’ve never grown a rambling rose. This will be the year I try.

    Reply
  312. Julie Woodhead on

    “Be careful not to underestimate what you are capable of doing.” Amen.

    Reply
  313. Jackie Wilkinson on

    This would make a wonderful birthday present for myself since tomorrow I turn 61. And of course I love roses.

    Reply
  314. Ainsley Owens on

    Anne’s story is such an inspirational one! I’m very inspired by this advice she shares, “You should try to know yourself, your talents, and limitations, but be careful to not underestimate what you’re capable of doing.”

    Reply
  315. Shannon on

    I love how she encourages everyone to not underestimate themselves! What an example.

    Reply
  316. Lisa King on

    I turn 60 tomorrow. Anne has inspired me to get doing the things I would love to do. A flower garden perhaps? I do have rose plants that came with my house. I wonder what kind they are. Also, stay out of bed. A nasty habit I have picked up.

    Growing Floret was also a inspiration to me. I remember some girlfriends of mine putting in beautiful gardens and I thought, I could never. You see, it was outdoors with bugs and bees (allergic). I have always loved other peoples gardens. After watching Growing Floret, I want to put in a flower garden (keeping the Benadryl and EpiPen handy). I have an area on the side of the house that would be perfect. Everything is mapped out on grid paper. Can’t wait to get started. It is an exciting time as I start this new chapter.

    Reply
  317. Jess Little on

    To succeed is to give freely, don’t be stingy… that will stick with me. Share the garden, it’s beauty, and to make friends through it. To follow her passion and begin at age 60 is so inspiring as well. What an amazing woman. May her legacy live on!

    Reply
  318. Mary Beth Hunt on

    “Stay out of Bed”
    I looooove getting back in bed….skipping lunch out…….and talking to friends.
    Maybe I need to change my ways……..

    Reply
  319. Liz on

    “Ask yourself if the task requires big biceps and beard” 😂 I adore how frank and to the point she was! Pursuing passion isn’t really something we are raught to carve into our lives to bring joy anymore, I appreciate her advice and perspective on how to realistically achieve that!
    She sounds like such an enlightening woman to have known, I would love the opportunity to read her books!

    Reply
  320. Susan McKenna on

    I just turned 60 this year and am feeling “old”. I love knowing that she started a whole career at 60. What a kind generous spirit! I wish I could have known her. Her giving attitude will spread joy and roses throughout the whole world!

    Reply
  321. Tracy Sellers on

    I just joined a seed swap al over the country and one of things I felt in sharing with so many people was the Legacy. Anne talks about how to keep hers going, by sharing , having other people grow what you grow. I love that. I shared seeds of a flower that I planted in memory of my Dad. Now those seeds are traveling to gardens across America and I feel like apart of him will always live on. I don’t have much in this life, but I have a garden to share, always. I would love to be a part of Anne’s Legacy.

    Reply
  322. Tina Gamache on

    I gave never tried to grow roses – reading this makes me want to run out and start right now! What a treat to get to hear from this amazing woman.

    Reply
  323. Barbara Ryan on

    Going on 67, I like hearing her talk about never giving up on your dreams, no matter your age. Like her, I’m hoping to accomplish a lot between 67 and 97:-)

    Reply
  324. Holly Laway on

    I love that she started later in life with roses. We all tend to believe we have to be on that journey by 30. It’s just not true and I feel inspired to start my she shed to photograph my cut flowers. A passion I realized I have just last year.

    Reply
  325. Kristin on

    The best part … for me … was her words on following your dreams no matter your age! Very inspiring and encouraging to find and follow your passion. Would love to read her books!

    Reply
  326. Ann Jackson on

    “Don’t be stingy.” As true for gardening as it is in other areas of life. What an amazing woman.

    Reply
  327. Dania on

    I love that she emphasizes that the only way to succeed in preservation is to give freely. To share cuttings, invite people to the garden, and let people experience the beauty. To share is to succeed. I’m so profoundly inspired by that message. ❤️

    Reply
  328. Cindy on

    I loved her talking about when she turned 60 and started something new, not knowing 30+ years later she would still be teaching about roses and still growing them! I turn 60 next month and she has inspired me tenfold!! Thank you for sharing her with the world, what a special person. ❤️

    Reply
  329. Sandra on

    Your gender should not stop you pursuing your dreams.

    Reply
  330. Kathleen Koehrsen on

    Anne’s legacy that you just keep living and doing – start the thing that interests you next and keep going. Roses always in all forms make my heart bigger but it’s that act of caring and growing and learning that’s the true reward. Sounds cheesy but it’s so true.

    Reply
  331. Amy Claborn on

    It’s never to late to act on your dreams and goals!

    Reply
  332. Erin on

    An awesome adventurer! Her earnest approach to life and looking back on all experiences as propelling her towards the next leaves me inspired. I live in a rental house and will plant a rambling rose on the property for the next family to enjoy.

    Reply
  333. Kate H on

    “It is never to late to act on your goals and dreams”-Anne Belovich

    Reply
  334. Lindsay wilkinson on

    The entire interview is wonderful. What a beautiful story. Anne was amazing and I love that she started so late in life. Can’t wait to order her books and learn more about roses. Thank you for this series!!

    Reply
  335. Annette on

    I am 58 years young and have just finished a year of quite brutal treatment for cancer. What an inspirational and wonderful lady Anne is. I have just began to remodel my garden with my first rose garden part of my plans. What inspires me most – you are never too old and you need to just get on with it. I will get out of bed each day, I will plan and grow my garden and be generous in sharing my experiences and joy of gardening. It is also good advice to be social and to keep learning. I will also continue to find novel ways to replace biceps and beards for the hard parts. Thank you for introducing me to this wonderful lady. Whilst I cannot meet her personally, your interview has made me feel like I have met Anne. And I like and admire her.

    Reply
  336. Laurie on

    It’s inspiring how she was so intentional with her life. She didn’t sit back and casually live with what fell into her lap, rather, she pursued so many different things and reaped the benefits of that. It makes me think that I could do similar things. There is so much out there in life to experience and do; one just needs to be intentional about it and try!

    Reply
  337. Sheri Larkin on

    Inviting people into your garden and sharing. That’s really what gardening is about. This has made for such an uplifting part of my snowy Saturday

    Reply
  338. Catherine on

    I love how she was generous with her roses and enjoyment of them and encouraged others to send cuttings of roses into other home gardens as an act of love and friendship. I also am inspired by the life and adventures she lived through her roses. This was a beautiful interview!

    Reply
  339. Veronica D'Arcy on

    Thank you for sharing such a lovely interview. It warmed my heart to see Anne urging readers to be generous with flowers and plants, reminding us it’s an act of love to share flowers and their beauty along with our generosity can spread much that is good. I believe the giver receives as many of those blessings as the receiver.
    (It was also very encouraging to be urged to continue to be brave with our dreams beyond 60 … especially relevant for me as my 64th birthday is only weeks away.)

    Reply
  340. Jami J on

    I just turned 51 and love that she looked back on 60 as not being old and wasn’t daunted by anything in life. The fact that she sailed to New Zealand was particularly inspiring to me. I love that her favorite roses are ramblers, as they are mine too. I was heartbroken when my parents ‘updated’ our front porch when I was a child by cutting down our rose.

    Reply
  341. Kate Songhurst on

    I love her insight on life, work ethic and how to stay connected to your higher vision for your life. She’s so inspiring! I love that she shared, “You can meet and exceed your goals if you prepare yourself over time. “ I think it’s so important that a life well lived is developed over hardship and struggle and transformed into wisdom and something more…truly the lessons learned is the beauty.

    Reply
  342. Anna S on

    I love how she shared her roses with so many – her love of roses led to loving people well ❤️

    Reply
  343. Rebecca on

    What I found to be most inspiring was this paragraph “My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.”. It sounds like such little, simple things, but for me, with the hustle and bustle of life with 2 little kids and work, it’s hard to remember to take time for those things. Anne sounds like such an amazing lady, and I’m so glad I stumbled upon your blog to read about her life. Thanks for sharing!

    Reply
  344. Gia on

    Anne’s courage and determination to tackle new adventures in life at any age is my favourite thing. The positive that shines through from her words. And a very generous admirable lady. I like that she is pleased/honoured to be recognised in an international garden and saying she is grateful to her friends and the people she has donated roses to and who have continued to plant and look after them, so sweet. I also love and find inspiring that she sailed and built a house on her own without needing big biceps.

    Reply
  345. Jill on

    I laughed out loud about the testosterone as I’ve been known to seek out some “testosterone ” to help me in my small garden. The entire interview was inspiring and it was so wonderful to hear her speak of sharing which you do, Erin, so magnificently:)Thank you.

    Reply
  346. Jen Koym on

    I was truly inspired by Anne’s view that age is nothing but a number. I had my first child late in life and feel like I found my purpose late in life. But Anne has a great outlook….that it might not be that late in life. Go for your dreams! Very inspiring.

    Reply
  347. Allyson Boop on

    I just love how she didn’t let age stop her from pursuing a dream. ❤️ Her advice about living a full life is just amazing. So glad you shared her story, thank you!

    Reply
  348. Kathy Astin on

    What an inspirational lady! I will be turning 55 this year and have recently found a love in gardening. Joy in all things nature really! And this past summer, I discovered Dahlia’s all because of Erin’s instagram posts and her inspirational story on the Discovery channel!
    I think since turning 50, I’ve been feeling a little down, thinking how all the exciting big moments of my life were behind me. I reflected back on the decade between 1990 -2000 and was shocked at how much I had lived in those 10 short years. Some of it was ugly & painful but most was beautiful! Just like flowers! I divorced my first husband, delivered a baby (while also raising twin toddlers) went back to school to get an advanced degree, married and divorced again, started what would now be a 20 year career in the prevention of child abuse & neglect and married the love of my life in 2000. Now married 22 years this summer, it’s just remarkable to think how much one can do in ten short years. Anne’s words & life bring a renewed energy for me and I’m going to remind myself often of her words to keep dreaming and pursue them with a passion and her advice ” to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development”. This is exactly what I needed to read today! A boost to recognize that I got a lot more to do in this next 50 years!! Thank you for sharing this beautiful story and the inspiration!

    Reply
  349. Kellsie H on

    It’s absolutely inspiring that this interview was with Anne in her late 90’s! What a sharp cookie. Reminds me of my grandma great. The biggest inspiration I got from the interview was Anne’s willingness and determination to try new things, age and gender limitations be damned, haha. This was an amazing read. Thank you!

    Reply
  350. Margaret Schelde on

    I’m almost 60 and new to growing roses. I’ve never heard of a Rambler. I’m getting one. Loved Anne’s story.

    Reply
  351. Michelle on

    I’m 52 years old and literally just bought my first roses in Dec of last year to start a cut flower garden for the first time. Never to old to start

    Reply
  352. Mel Himelright on

    I’m about to turn 50 and this article and in particular Anne inspired me to keep learning. I loved what her advice was. I now want to do a deep dive into climbers and ramblers, in addition to the Forest farming I’m in love with already. Beauty is all around and the sharing of it is SO key. I just love her ideas!

    Reply
  353. Kari Parks on

    This resonated with me.
    “My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.”
    This clear & simple advice spoke volumes to me. It’s a reminder to keep investing in myself.
    Erin, what an incredible opportunity to interview Anne. Thank you for sharing her inspiring story.

    Reply
  354. Sarah Montgomery on

    As a soon to be 43 year old preparing to make a complete career shift from attorney to a farmer florist, Anne’s perspective on aging and following your passions at any age was just the message I needed at the moment I needed it. Thank you Floret and Anne’s family for sharing this interview, her inspiring story, and these beautiful roses.

    Reply
  355. Julie on

    What an inspiring story. I have loved gardening all my life but just started growing roses last year at the age of 60. I love a story that shows us we should never be limited by our age and that we can always learn and grow and to challenge ourselves. It gives me so much inspiration for the next 40 years!! I love to give people the flowers I grow – it’s a gift to be able to do something you love that you can share with others. Thank you for sharing this story and for your commitment to continual learning and teaching. We gardeners certainly love it!!

    Reply
  356. Tanya on

    Reading your interview with Anne was very inspiring to think that at 60 she took on such a challenge and excelled.

    If anyone has been a female in a work place and allowed their hair to grey they will know that you become invisible in the eyes of colleague’s particularly those with only a few years experience.
    To read Anne say”don’t let being a woman stop you from doing what is traditionally seen as a man’s job unless you really need a constant supply of testosterone to achieve your goal. Ask yourself if the activity requires big biceps and a beard. If not, go ahead with your dreams and fight the prejudice where you find it. Look carefully for the same prejudice in yourself. It could be lurking there without you realizing it and could cause you to not believe in yourself and to restrict you from following a difficult goal.”
    This is empowering to remember that with adjustments I can do anything as a female… and that I need to quiet that voice in my head when it doubts me!
    Thank you for bringing us Annes story and sharing her legacy.

    Reply
  357. Ginger on

    When my mother died over thirty years ago and my daughter had just gotten married , I needed something totally different to lose myself in. So I found a book on old roses and read everything I could find on their history. This story reminded me so much of that time when immersing myself in roses got me through a difficult time in my life and added beauty when I needed it most.

    Reply
  358. Heidi Hower on

    What a wonderful trailblazer Anne Belovich was, and she left a legacy for us all to enjoy!
    This interview spoke to me on so many levels. One, because I too have a love for old roses, especially rambling roses. I Love when she said,” the beauty roses bring gives me great joy. ”
    I also love her wonderful advice that we could all use after the last two years.
    “My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.” It’s just so important to take these words to heart and apply them in our lives. What a change the world would be!
    Lastly, her accomplishments after 60 are truly unimaginable. Most people don’t accomplish what she accomplished after 60, in a lifetime!! This struck a cord with me as I am approaching 60 and I’m feeling very old. There are things I haven’t done in my life that I wished I had. Anne has given me a new hope that it’s never too late to accomplish your dreams.
    I have to say, when I saw how long the interview was I thought there was no way I had the time to complete it. I sure am glad I did! What a wonderful woman. I wish I would have had the pleasure of meeting her.

    Reply
  359. Karen Bailey on

    As someone who turns 60 this year, this comment was important to me.
    ‘I remember when I turned 60. I thought 60 was so old. That was almost 37 years ago, well over one-third of my lifetime so far.’
    Karen Australia

    Reply
  360. Ashley on

    “Determine what it is you want to do and then acquire any skills or knowledge that you are going to need, get the books, take the classes. I bought three books when I decided to build the house on Camano Island; how to frame a house, how to wire it, and how to do the plumbing. You need to study and become an apprentice.”

    “You can meet and exceed your goals if you prepare yourself over time. You can’t become a rocket scientist without a great deal of study, and neither can anyone else.”

    This rings so true for me. I took a huge leap of faith by choosing to pursue a career in medicine and worked my butt off. Now I’m in my second year of medical school despite the odds. Each step of the way so far has been filled with doubts about my ability to succeed. And each step has required me to think just like Anne. You have to have some fundamental belief that you CAN and if you have that and truly want it, there is nothing stopping you. Thank you for sharing Anne’s story. She is such an inspiration. I hope to be like her throughout my life and never shy away from a dream, no matter how intimidating it seems. (My non-career related dream is to have a beautiful, successful garden so I’m on a quest for knowledge and hopefully, when I’m finally in one spot for awhile, I’ll be ready to pour my heart and knowledge into it).

    Reply
  361. Meghan Hahn on

    Anne inspires me to keep learning. We started homeschooling our kids this year and flowers have been a way that we have connected with beauty. Anne mentioned that she is a visual person and that roses brought her joy. We planted milkweed to be able to watch a caterpillar turn in to a Monarch. It was so fascinating and the kids loved it and it brought us joy to see the kids get super excited every time we had a new caterpillar arrive and then turn in to a chrysalis. I would love to grow roses this year as a way to keep learning about the joy that they can bring to us and maybe our neighbors.

    Reply
  362. Julie Gosen on

    I just “retired” after 40 years as a nurse practitioner in Newborn Intensive Care. I have always been a gardener. I was really worried about retirement. It was not 100% my choice but more the choice of my back. I had 2 spinal fusions 12 months apart.
    I thought to myself, “you are NOT going to sit around and become morose and sedentary!” I gave myself your current Flower course for Christmas and I have been diving in and reading ever since.
    Anne’s story is ringing true for me. I do not in any way feel that I am “over” yet. I’m taking a landscape design course and am converting my back and side yard into a pollinator friendly flower growing haven. I have 1/4 acre to play with. I have helped friends with garden design already. This is only the beginning for me. I cannot wait to get going.
    Thank you for sharing Anne’s story. She and I would
    have gotten along famously❤️

    Reply
  363. Minerva Sanchez on

    I think the most inspiring part of the Anne’ life story is that is never too late to pursuit your dreams, and more than that, as a young woman I think is very inspiring to have such a role model to achieve things tipically carried by men. Rest in peace Anne!

    Reply
  364. Holly on

    “Inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy.”

    I’m so inspired to invite people to enjoy my garden and flowers. Also, the idea that it’s never too late in life to pursue a passion is very encouraging to me.

    Reply
  365. Kimberley Goodey on

    My favourite part of the interview.

    You can do anything a man can do except those things that require a lot of strength…I think I said ‘big biceps’ in there and to acquire skills to do what you want to do. Read the books and attend the classes.

    A very inspiring lady and her words have really hit home and moved me. I’m going to read her blog now. Thank you for sharing this.

    Reply
  366. Kristina Anderson on

    I was most inspired by how she never stopped, buying a domain name in her 90s!

    Reply
  367. Coleen on

    I just turned 60! So much left to do! She’s the inspiration!

    Reply
  368. Danielle Doby on

    After navigating some serious health challenges, I made the decision this year to follow a childhood dream of mine and begin a flower farm. A tiny fear pops in every now and then that reminds me I’m 36 and completely starting over again — while there is so much possibility in this, the fear is still there and it feels real. Reading this interview reminded me that it’s a miracle in itself that we all have the opportunity to change and keep changing. To stop, start, or begin again, any time we want to.

    Reply
  369. Erin Persinger on

    The whole interview! I’m approaching 40, and totally shifting with “what I want to do”, and I panic sometimes because I feel like I missed out on so much time already. Fear is dumb like that LOL! Going to do it anyways!!

    Reply
  370. Marya Gjorgiev on

    I agree with Anne that sharing your garden and flowers with others is a wonderful part of gardening. I

    Reply
  371. Destiny Conner on

    What a treasure to read and learn so much from such a special woman! I love how she explained going through hardships can help give us the courage to lead us through our goals or dreams! Also how she talked about knowing yourself and believing in yourself. These are truly things we hear often from the older generations that I think we take for granted those special words of wisdom. I know I needed to read/hear that again and remind myself that it’s okay to dream big, to trust myself and go for the goals I hope to one day achieve!

    Reply
  372. Rachel on

    I was so inspired how after the age of 60 she continued to fulfill her dreams and goals! Love her perspective on keep moving and going forward! I love to garden and still have so much to learn, I’m not quite 50 so I have many years left to learn and grow

    Reply
  373. Nina Hawkins on

    Wow!!! How inspiring…. after reading her beautiful words over and over so they can stay with me forever I believe I can follow my dream of completing my grandmothers garden. I though I was getting too old and tired to accomplish this dream.she brought my faith back…. It will take me a while but I feel strong now to reach my goal…..thank you so much💕

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  374. Ara Holmes on

    It’s so inspiring how she wanted to share her roses and her knowledge with so many people!

    Reply
  375. Jennifer Johnson on

    I was inspired that she started at 50(I’m 51) .. the fact that she just educated herself and built houses, this is something I’ve always felt and currently working through this process. You really can do anything if you work for it! What a wonderful human she was.. Also I’m afraid of growing roses and I really don’t want to be😂

    Reply
  376. Brandi Besand on

    Wow!! I love her comment about age and gender not mattering. I’m 44 and I’m ready for a change in my career. It’s hard to think about change when you have worked in the same career field for 20 years. And age and gender definitely weighted down my thoughts. Her words inspire me to keep dreaming. Wow!!

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  377. Jessica on

    Not a specific quote, but the overall amazingness of her. No excuses, I can do anything I want attitude regardless of my gender or age. I have read and reread her interview and the voice in my head keeps enabling me to do all my gazillion projects I keep thinking of

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  378. Kerry on

    That you can meet your goals if you prepare over time. 💖

    Reply
  379. Tiffany Turner on

    I absolutely love when Anne said, “Determine what it is you want to do and then acquire any skills or knowledge that you are going to need, get the books, take the classes.” As a new flower grower, I can become very overwhelmed with all I need to do, but I’m learning to focus on my goal by learning and reaching out to other growers. Taking time to learn is the best thing I can do for myself and my farm!

    Reply
  380. Sheila on

    It is never too late to act on your dreams…..and keep moving, stay out of bed….
    She is an inspiration. I have two neighbors in their 80s, just like this. They are wonderful examples of what can get done if you aren’t lazy and keep moving.

    Reply
  381. Ramona Cramer on

    I was delighted to learn that Anne’s garden is continuing with plans for the future. So many wonderful nurseries and gardens have been lost. Her advice on how to keep moving forward productively into the future is my take away as I plan to start something completely different for me at sixty one. Thank you for sharing such a delight.

    Reply
  382. Johnna on

    Thank you for sharing this interview with Anne. I realize that at age 53, I still have decades of productivity and time to reach so many people, in many different ways. Flowers will open those doors.

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  383. Denise Rice on

    How fortunate you are to be able to take snips from Anne’s garden. The joyous light in her eyes matches yours when you talk about flowers. It makes me smile every time. Thank you for sharing a great story/interview.

    Reply
  384. Nancy on

    I am retiring soon and love her inspiration. I always did what I could by myself because I knew I could do it. My husband also died and I turned my grief into my gardens. She has inspired me to build a rose garden of old species of roses!

    Reply
  385. Dian Deimler on

    I’m fast approaching 60 and an avid gardener/farmer who always wants to try growing something new. Reading your interview with Anne further inspired me to add more roses to my property and most importantly to continue my path of learning something new every day! Thank you for sharing this with all of us.

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  386. Eileen on

    Thank you Erin, thank you for this wonderful series on roses. I’ve always wanted a rose cutting garden. Somewhere to go on an early summer morning, and walk thru the rose bushes, admiring them, smelling them, deciding which flowers to clip and bring inside or share with friends.

    And then I look out onto my back yard in NY and see the deer; the deer that walk thru my yard everyday, the deer that sleep in my backwoods, the deer that eat my cosmos, and my phlox and my tulips and I think nope… not this year. I’ll wait until next year and figure out the best way to have a cutting garden that the deer can’t get into.

    But your series has inspired me. Inspired me to take the next few weeks/months are start figuring and planning out how I’m going to do this. Taking the time to figure how big of a garden do I want, will it be in-ground or raised beds, how much fencing am I going to need, how many plant do I want, which type of roses, colors, fragrances, etc.

    So, thank you again, I have my work cut out for me, but I’m looking forward to getting started.

    Reply
  387. Caroline Meza on

    My favorite part of the interview was when Anne was sharing her late start to her passion for roses. Her pursuing her passion at 60 years old shows that it’s never too late to do what you want. It showed me that when you really love something, it’s never too late to make it happen. Anne is truly an awe inspiring person 🤍.

    Reply
  388. Chelsie Solie on

    I loved hearing about everything she accomplished after 60. What an amazing woman! I definitely want to get going on my garden!!

    Reply
  389. Lise on

    I loved when Anne said “ Next, you should try to know yourself, your talents, and limitations, but be careful to not underestimate what you are capable of doing. ”. That really resonated with me. I am in awe that she started this when she was 60. She showed me that at 63 life does not have to slow down, but become richer when we explore new passions! Thanks Erin for introducing us to Anne! ❤️

    Reply
  390. Patty Eisenhaur on

    Such a wonderful story, and Erin what better person to share it! Inspiring me as I approach 60 that I can follow my dreams!

    Reply
  391. Melissa McKay on

    I loved reading about all the dreams she pursued after she turned 60 and that she doesn’t consider 60 to be late in life. I’m trying to get my first book published at the age of 47. Most days I feel so late to the game. But Anne had her first website in the works at age 97! Reading this interview made me feel like a youngster. What an inspiration she is to “seasoned” women everywhere.

    Reply
  392. Sabrina on

    I’m turning 45 soon and I feel like I’ve yet to accomplish my dreams. But I was so inspired by Anne and her outlook on life. She thought she was old at 60, but then went on to have a beautiful life, accomplishing so many things.
    She really gave me a lot of hope! I’m now embracing middle age, knowing that I’m only getting started!

    Reply
  393. Jennifer Davis on

    What a delightful read! I loved her formula for getting difficult things done: Don’t let being a woman stop you, know yourself and your talents, be willing to spend time and energy preparing for what you want to do. What an inspiring lady! I’m off to order some rose bushes!

    Reply
  394. Debbie Guy on

    Thank you for sharing this inspiring story and interview with Anne. I am encouraged by her starting different ventures, roses and capentry at 60 since I just turned 60 this year. Also her talking about putting the work in… no matter, man or women things can be done but you have to put in the work and ingenuity. Fascinating woman on so many levels!

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  395. Lavdi on

    Such an amazing lady! Thank you, Erin, for interviewing her and sharing her wisdom. I loved all she said, but her desire to learn inspired me the most. At 97 years old, she thought of starting her website. It is something you don’t hear every day. Also, her advice to keep moving and stay out of bed made me laugh because I was in bed while I was reading her interview. The idea of reading and staying up with current events and her call to commit ourselves to life-long learning and skill development made me think one more time about what I want to accomplish in my life!
    It is never too late! You are never too old to start to learn and do new things!

    Reply
  396. Jenny Barnes on

    Don’t let being a woman stop you from doing what is traditionally seen as a man’s job unless you really need a constant supply of testosterone to achieve your goal.

    This is so relevant to my career as a gardener so far…I was turned down for a job in my favourite gardener because I wasn’t a man, they thought I wasn’t ‘physically able’, I went away and found another job. 3 months later, I received a phone call asking if I was still interested, it hasn’t worked out with the man they’d employed. I accepted the job and worked my derrière off to prove I could do it. 3 years later I’d progressed from under gardener to head gardener with a team under me!

    Reply
  397. Melissa Reed on

    I love the following quote from her interview:
    “To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy.” I’m glad to hear that her son is continuing her legacy.

    Reply
  398. Mary Cait on

    This was a wonderful read and was full of some great advice. My favorite part was her advice to keep moving, to get out of bed, and keep learning. I think this is advice that can help anyone out through difficult times in life.

    Reply
  399. Anila Nair on

    What she said about how it’s never too late to pursue your dreams is something we all need to hear especially since it came from someone who practiced what she preached. The advice from Anne that resonated with me the most is…” My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development”.

    Reply
  400. Linda Baptista on

    Oh what an awesome interview. Mine was that at 60 she still had so much to accomplish with 37 years of learning , & and her love of knowledge. Also stay out of the bed 😊

    Reply
  401. Susan Smith on

    What an inspiring, uplifting woman. I liked the reminder about sharing; I love sharing my flowers and veg – it brings me as much pleasure as the growing part. I also liked her sense of adventure and inquisitiveness; as long as you cultivate that I think that is why you end up having a lovely long life.

    Reply
  402. Jill Kline on

    I can not tell you how happy this journey of yours makes me! Over 30 years ago I was a newlywed working in a Stanwood physical therapy clinic. One of our patients was Max Belovich. I remember the conversations of how he had built a house for his wife and was starting on her rose garden. He adored her! He also encouraged me to plant some roses of my own. I knew she had “quite a few” roses from his stories but so appreciate seeing your pictures. I never got to see it in person, only through the eyes of Max. Thank you to you and your team for all your hard work. We all appreciate you!

    Reply
  403. Kerin on

    Love this part Keep them watered, fertilized, and in a place with lots of sunshine. Roses, especially the old roses, are very easy to grow. However, inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy.

    Reply
  404. Heather on

    I love that she took the tragedy of losing her husband at age 19 and built a path that she loved that took her to 97 years old.

    Reply
  405. Kimberly Zimmer on

    I am so inspired by so many parts of this interview and saving it to read every New Years. I was especially inspired how much she achieved after 60. Her suggestions to us all and continuing to learn.
    I really want to also read her more about her sailing journey. since those time of silence you do learn the greatest lessons are the most inspired have have also learned myself earlier this year. Either way, to be gifted this incredible library of hers or buying them. I want to learn more from her and share was she teaches to others. RIP Anne🌹The love of gardening will keep your works moving forward.

    Reply
  406. KimberlyRummelAshlock on

    I am inspired by how many adventures she has had over her life and how even tragedy was cited by her as a catalyst for her positive life experiences. I live the attitude that you’re never to old to grow flowers as well as yourself. Such an amazing lady, I am so glad her legacy of passion for life and flowers lives on.

    Reply
  407. Tawny Fazio on

    “However, inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy.” I love that Mrs. Anne legacy will live on through her roses! That’s inspiring to me, I hope one day my kids and grandkids can have a rose I started in my garden in theirs and can have many conversations about the passion I had for gardening and hopefully inspire with positive story or feeling with it.

    Reply
  408. Amie Mares on

    I love hearing about her life, her story, all of her achievements. What an inspiration and what a beautiful life to celebrate! Thank you for sharing her story!

    Reply
  409. Kate on

    I am so stunned by her ability to see herself without reference to age. Not, my life is defined by what happens in my twenties and thirties, but here I am at sixty and eager to start new things. I’m only 42. And after reading that bit of the interview, the word ‘only’ seems entirely appropriate. Here’s to a lifetime of beauty ahead!

    Reply
  410. Janet on

    I loved that she didn’t start her amazing rose collection until she was 60, and amazed at everything else she did after that too. Basically don’t let society decide you’re too old to pursue new interests and dreams. Her generosity is inspiring.

    Reply
  411. Sobihia on

    Anne’s story has really touched my heart. From reading this interview,I can see what a kind and generous lady she was. I think the main thing I have taken from her amazing story is to never be afraid of starting something new and never let age be a factor that hinders you. Anne’s interview was very reassuring, especially at this time in the world where COVID-19 has caused so much heart break and uncertainty. However, Anne’s words of wisdom are the perfect encouragement to follow your dreams and enjoy your creativity but to also share that beauty with others around you because “it’s an act of love… of friendship” to do so. I absolutely love gardening and will definitely take Anne’s advice on board and do my best to share that beauty with those around me. Thank you so much Erin for this beautiful interview. P.S the photo’s in this blog are so inspiring.

    Reply
  412. Rebecca on

    Bless her for saying “You can do anything a man can do …”
    You better believe it!!! ❤️

    Reply
  413. Mev Clark on

    I’m 25 and already find myself feeling “too old” for many things, like going back to college or changing careers or taking risks. Anne’s life and words soothe that worry, and she is both an encouragement and a challenge, to truly enjoy every moment of life, to also be aware that life is fluid, and change for the better is always possible.

    Reply
  414. Amy Christianson on

    This woman sounded like a real lifer superhero. What an amazing life! So much of this was inspirational to me – overcoming the loss of her first husband with a small child, building her own home, starting an animal rescue, the amount of love you can feel coming through this interview for those dear to her, and the fact that she openly shared her collection to everyone without wanting anything in return. But, I think the most inspirational thing to me was her belief that you are never to old to learn new things or start something new. It would be easy to say that they do not make women like her anymore, but instead I think I will just try to become a woman like Anne Belovich.

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  415. Philomena Menta on

    I am obsessed with the fact that she started later in life on roses. It’s such an inspiration when I realize I am NOT too old to start something or to create a new passion in life. Life isn’t over until it’s over.

    Reply
  416. Joanne on

    I continue to be thankful that gardens and garden relationships serve to secure historical paths of art and botanicals including roses. Erin and Anne thank you. I would be curious if you know any resources of the rose garden of Josephine wife of Napoleon. I have been doing some reading and wish to visit.

    Reply
  417. Millie on

    “My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.” So much wisdom in these simple words. As a nurse and especially after working through these past two years, this is advice I plan to take to heart for my own life as I continue to care for others. Such inspiration!

    Reply
  418. Madeline Given on

    I was floored when I read that she became a general contractor at 60! And built a myriad of houses! It is truly inspiring and gives those of us who already feel too old SO much hope.

    Reply
  419. Brittney Rarig on

    “You can do anything a man can do except those things that require a lot of strength…I think I said ‘big biceps’ in there. However, you can even figure out how to use mechanical means to overcome that. For example, I bought and used a wall jack on a house I was building to lift the walls into place all by myself”

    This paragraph spoke to me! I have worked on a few different farms and was usually the only female. I knew I didn’t have the strength of my co workers, but hated asking for help. So I would find ways to get things done without using brute force.

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  420. Jenny on

    She was an inspiration! I really like how she viewed her work in the context of her whole life. It wasn’t about putting in the years until retirement, it was more about pursuing a passion and enjoying life and work.

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  421. Jenny on

    That was the perfect inspiration for a sloe Saturday morning.
    Out of all of that, the reminder to check if you ar holding yourself back was my favorite piece of advice.

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  422. Sarah Rose Harrison-McKiver on

    Roses have always held a special place in my heart, I have a small garden with just about 7. I am planning on adding more(just ordered The Pilgrim from Heirloom). My middle name is “Rose”. This was such and inspiring blog post and I would love reading her books! Thanks for introducing me to Anne!

    Reply
  423. Erin Bing on

    Wow! Anne’s story is so inspiring and something I really needed right now. It really opens your eyes to believe that it’s never to late at any age to create, learn and follow new dreams and passions. Her belief to never underestimate what is inside you and what you may be capable of if you put the effort and care into it. The scale, whatever the size, of what can be achieved with love, attention and care is nothing but spectacular. Thank you so much for sharing and I look forward to rereading and visiting this blog post over and over. How special it must be to have known and been friends with such an extraordinary women!

    Reply
  424. Penny Jameson on

    I am so inspired that this lovely woman started at age 60. I’m 58 right now but I have be been hesitant to start a flower garden. I love roses, I have loved them my whole life. With some guidance I think I can do it. I’m beyond excited!!

    Reply
  425. Jenn Hall on

    Amazing woman. Thank you for sharing her story. One of my dearest friends and plant lover lives in Cambria. I’ve been to Morro Bay. There aren’t many things that will get me out of the garden. That bay would. They have a mermaid parade there. I could not pick a favorite flower. I could not pick the sea over flowers or flowers over the sea. Luckily, we don’t have to. Such hope and gumption in widows who plant and refuse to give up. Need Ramblers now…..and more books.

    Reply
  426. Lauren on

    What a treasure! I absolutely loved her advice on how to meet your goals and follow your dreams!

    Reply
  427. Christine on

    What an inspiring life Anne led!!! My take away from Anne is to do all the things. Hard things, simple things, the things we are passionate about and to continue learning and finding our joy everyday!!! Thank you for sharing Anne with all of us Erin.

    Reply
  428. Galicia V on

    I’m inspired! Her advice is gold! Don’t stop moving, learning, and doing.

    I recently built our own home with my two hands. It was such a rewarding journey. I love how she talks about doing hard things in order to reach your goals. And sometimes you have no choice but to do the work to surpass what you though was your limit.

    What an amazing woman!

    Reply
  429. Charlie on

    I’ve done the same job for 15 years, I now feel ready to start another. If she can do that at 60 then we all need to take Anne’s philosophy. What wise words from an extraordinary woman! She speaks so much sense and I love reading about her approach to life. So inspiring – an amazing read!

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  430. Cassy on

    Wow, she is an incredible lady and very inspiring. I loved her advice about life long learning. Set a goal and then learn all about it and then take the steps necessary to accomplish it. Educating ourselves constantly sound like the key to success in our goals and making them more attainable. Very lovely read thanks so much for sharing that with us all.

    Reply
  431. Lori Birchfield on

    What an amazing story of an amazingly accomplished human being. Her passion in life and at the age of 60 is remarkable. She tried to make a difference no matter what she was doing. Her story gives me hope. I’m in my early 50’s and it reminds that I’m not too old to still dream and have big dreams and that I can accomplish those dreams no matter how big or small. Thank you for sharing her story with the rest of us.

    Reply
  432. Kathleen P on

    What an inspiring woman! As someone who is easily intimidated when i don’t know how to do something her words really resonated and felt like the pep talk i needed!!

    Reply
  433. angela on

    Sailing to New Zealand, lifting the walls on a house independently with a wall jack, buying three books to start a journey on building houses. These are things I didn’t know about her but I am truly inspired by. What an incredible interview.

    Reply
  434. Dianne on

    This is such a beautiful and inspiring piece, thank you! “Be careful not to underestimate what you are capable of doing” really resonates for me. We bought and are restoring a beautiful little piece of paradise, planting trees, wild flower fields, and lots of roses! It’s a challenging high mountain environment, so far a dozen roses are surviving! Yay!
    Thank you for bringing so much beauty to the world.

    Reply
  435. Katrina on

    Don’t wait to pursue a dream! Just learn what you need to, get your supplies, and go for it! You can start something new at any age!

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  436. Ashley on

    I love that she said it’s never too late to start!

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  437. Ashlee Schnell on

    I loved reading that it’s never to late to start and to stay out of bed. I’m a young 37 but struggle with a genetic collagen disorder that slows me down greatly and makes it a struggle to even get out of bed. Being in my garden among my plants and silly chickens has brought me great joy and the energy to move more.

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  438. Kate Hollander on

    This section really spoke to me
    “Next, you should try to know yourself, your talents, and limitations, but be careful to not underestimate what you are capable of doing. Becoming a rocket scientist will be a difficult goal if you struggle with math, but maybe some remedial instruction in math would help you overcome the problem. I learned to navigate the old-fashioned way with a sextant even though I didn’t learn my number combinations when I was a child because of constant moving and now I compute manually with difficulty.”
    At 64 I am now trying to recreate a Makers career and very much value her encouragement.

    Reply
  439. Kathaleen Moore on

    WOW! What an inspiring woman! I loved how she shared just because you’re a woman – don’t let that block your dreams – figure out a way. She also shared to educate yourself before you pursue- read etc know what you’re getting into. And i love how her age didn’t hinder her! I look forward to reading her books!

    Reply
  440. Claire on

    “Look carefully for the same prejudice in yourself. It could be lurking there without you realizing it and could cause you to not believe in yourself and to restrict you from following a difficult goal.” I connect so deeply with this entire interview, but this quote really struck me. And I am in awe at all of the things Anne learned and accomplished throughout the many stages of her life. Building houses? I left my career recently and am exploring life and new interests and am truly inspired after reading this. Thank you for sharing, Erin.

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  441. Tabitha Hathcock on

    I loved the part when she was a little girl running to the ocean and how she didn’t appreciate the garden at the time and how eventually she did develop an appreciation of flowers. Sometimes I feel like we don’t realize how something does impact us and how we don’t always have a passion for something from day one. But eventually it can develop and how we shouldn’t feel guilty for not having felt that was all along.

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  442. Shauna on

    Such a wonderful woman! Her determination resonates with me. You can do anything once you acquire the tools!!

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  443. dee on

    “I pursued many dreams after turning 60” – What an inspirational woman with thoughts and ideas well beyond her time!

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  444. Ellen on

    My favorite quote is: commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development. Yesss!
    I love easy care roses, especially for the environment.

    Reply
  445. Clare Greener on

    Such an awesome interview, thank you for sharing. As I start my own life again, I will reread and keep her three messages on how to succeed despite the storm, close to heart.

    Reply
  446. Rosa Veldkamp on

    This is what spoke to me most :

    “When I was alone I spent much of my time thinking about the fantastic trip I had been privileged to experience. It was of great value to me in a way that was quite separate from getting the boat back. I had learned that I was capable of accomplishing very difficult goals. I was able to face considerable hardships and even extreme danger when it was necessary to achieve those goals.

    I’ve found that so true for me during hard times.

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  447. Elizabeth McKenzie on

    I was very inspired by her point about starting when she was 60. I just turned 60 and have always wanted to grow roses. Also I share in her love for ramblers and love the roses driving into the trees and come out into the sun in celebration of bloom.

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  448. Nicole on

    This interview is so incredibly special. It inspired me and ignited a light in me that I hope never goes out. Thank you so much for sharing this with us. Her positivity and determination really spoke to me. I love her outlook on education and how you can truly achieve what you want if you just reach out and really try.

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  449. Stephanie P. on

    Approaching 60 myself and developing a new passion for florals and painting, Anne’s sharing of all of the NEW passions that she pursued after 60 was most inspiring!! I’ve been feeling pretty worn down lately and her comments have fueled the fire for me!! There is still PLENTY of time to start new things! Thanks for sharing this!!!

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  450. Laura G on

    “I thought 60 was so old.” ~ I turn 56 on January 17th and have been stewing about this number. Anne started her rose passion at 60; a passion that continued until 97! Get up and get moving, the pandemic will end at some point! Her energy, passion and curiosity are a source of tremendous inspiration. Thank you for sharing her story and for shattering the societal myths of ageism.

    Reply
  451. Rachel on

    I love how she shared how ‘late’ she started in life and yet it didn’t feel as if she missed out. It’s never too late to pursue your passion and never too late to enjoy it!

    Reply
  452. Maryjo on

    Her trip from New Zealand to California!

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  453. Carlie Brooks on

    I really loved the advice to evaluate what your own prejudices are. I don’t think I ever would’ve thought to evaluate that internally, and see how my personal prejudices might be preventing me from doing more of what I want and can accomplish. I think sometimes I’m afraid of how wonderful life could be because it could be something grand and that is sometimes intimidating. But it’s also beautiful advice and has an element of grace when pursuing your dreams.

    Reply
  454. Kelly on

    I love her life outlook and determination. I read this article to my 10 year old son who has ADHD and dyslexia and my 6 year old daughter who has dyslexia to inspire them. It’s great to read an article that supports what’s important when life gets tough.

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  455. Chelsea on

    My favorite part of this interview is her sweet quote below:

    My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.

    How beautiful and lovely that her late interest in roses didn’t deter her and continue to have 30 years in cultivating and searching for what she loved most. Anyone can take that advice nowadays and it’s some thing I really took away from reading this!

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  456. Jeni on

    Love her message that it’s never too late to start!

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  457. Amanda on

    I am so inspired by the different paths she explored in life. As someone who is intrigued by so many possible paths in life, this is giving me hope that I can explore and be so many things throughout my life. What an absolute gem you have shared here. Thank you for taking the time to share her story and her beautiful flowers. I think I need to add some ramblers to my garden now. ❤

    Reply
  458. Jennifer Porter on

    The entire interview was very inspirational. I especially liked her statement that you can do anything that a man can do, except for things that require a lot of strength.

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  459. Michelle on

    “Don’t let being a woman stop you from doing what is traditionally seen as a man’s job.” This is gold. What an inspirational interview. It’s never to late to start. I also love how she mentioned accommodations. If you aren’t strong enough maybe a machine can help. So many give up because of a small challenge.

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  460. Robyn Garner on

    Anne’s story gave me hope and inspiration! The best part was Anne saying she shared it! I wanted to study horticulture since high school but pursued another path because counselors said I would have a hard time finding a job. Now in my mid 40’s I’m hopeful that life can evolve and I can take a 360 in anyway to pursue interest and new goals And not to let FEAR hold me back. She left a lifelong message in her legacy!

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  461. AmyM on

    I love that her long life is such an inspiring example of how natural it can be to evolve from one area of focus to another. We can spend years working, learning on a subject, and that can lead to another that we devote lengths of time to. That can lead to such a rich life~one that inspires others to explore life in their own way. Thanks for sharing her story!

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  462. Beth Schultz on

    Reading your latest blog and interview with Anne is a wonderful source for great encouragement and inspiration. I ‘m in my fifties and have blindly jumped into the business of growing and selling flowers because I want to do something that feeds my soul. The fact that Anne didn’t start her rose garden till she was sixty gives me great hope. Anne followed her passions, worked hard, but did what was fulfilling for her mind, body, and soul. So thankful that you had the opportunity to know her and pass her inspiration on to the rest of us.

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  463. Wendi O on

    I was inspired with how open she was with her garden. Don’t be stingy, invite people over to enjoy the old fashioned roses. I’m jealous of her garden but I hope I can create something as beautiful one day.

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  464. Nicholas Hodgins on

    What a great interview, and such a triumph of a human being. I think what touched me the most is that it’s never too late to try something new, to start a new path in life, to fins happiness. I’m often overwhelmed by the fear of “running out of time”, this story comforts and inspires me more than I can put to words. It’s never too late! I love that so much. Thank you for sharing.

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  465. Wendy Knudson on

    I was amazed at how much she accomplished later in life. Kind of a wake up call for me. Retirement is nice but there’s no reason not to find something exciting to do now that I finally have the time!

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  466. Lori Jordan on

    I like how she stated, a woman can do anything a man can do, just may need to improvise. My husband builds our homes and I have helped lift walls and they are HEAVY. It is amazing she did that many times on her own. Thank you for sharing her life story.

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  467. Rachel Hardy on

    Wow. I think what has inspired me most about this interview is her sheer determination, drive and energy to accomplish the goals she set out to do! What an amazing lady!

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  468. Maria P. on

    My takes aways are, “keep moving, stay out of bed, go out for lunch”, also that she worked for what she wanted. Read, learn and try! There is no reason for us not to try at something we love.

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  469. Nicole Krygsheld on

    I was inspired by her many career paths and that she bought a domain for a website at almost 97 years old. What an amazing lady!

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  470. Ashley Turnage on

    That it is never too late to start a rose garden! Age should not deter you from following a dream.

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  471. Tricia Boutelle on

    Honestly, I think the most touching and inspiring part of this story has been Anne’s desire to share. To share cuttings, to share knowledge, to share passion and encouragement. Thank you so much for sharing Anne and her life’s work with us. What a gift!

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  472. Sara on

    There are so many parts of this interview to love. Her spirit, tenacity, love of life, determination, and how genuine she feels. I particularly enjoyed her discussion of overcoming gender bias and how important it is to make sure you don’t harbor any of those biases within yourself. As someone with disabilities, this is such an important lesson that needs to be learned and relearned all the time. Thank you for sharing her incredible story with us.

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  473. Janelle W. on

    Thank you for this series & especially the interview with Anne. Her relentless learning and exploring new experiences in life casts her as a role model alone. Yet, her 3 main rules for achieving your goals was very inspiring. Her wit and honesty are timeless.
    It’s wonderful knowing that her efforts & legacy will continue for decades to come!

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  474. Rebecca on

    The importance of doing what you love brings beauty and joy to the world, but so important is being generous, sharing it all and give what you can away :) Creating from your heart and sharing it is the greatest gift!

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  475. Lisa Kelly on

    There is so much in this interview to be impressed with and inspired by. I am 62 and I too took up creating a rose garden at 60. I have always always loved roses and am so thrilled to discover Anne Belovich. I had the most beautiful large print rose wall paper with pink roses in my bedroom growing up. My late mother and I picked it out and we put it up. Well, mostly she did. But she taught me how. A great memory. I am most impressed with Anne’s ability to continue to go after her dreams, no mater her age or gender. I cannot believe she sailed from New Zealand to California. Pure bravery, in my opinion. I know I could not do that. Can’t wait to read her books.

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  476. Sonyia on

    Her age when she started is SO INSPIRING!!

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  477. Gina Flint on

    I love her message of hard work and study to achieve your goals. As a teacher, that is a message I share with my students. What an inspiring woman and story! Thank you for sharing!

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  478. Kristin Greener on

    Beautifully inspiring ! Reminding us not to complicate our future goals with feelings of doubt. See it, believe it, work for it!

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  479. Winnie on

    She is inspiring, on many levels. Her desire to continue to be a lifelong learner stirs me to pursue more of my passions. What a great interview!

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  480. Megan Hover on

    “My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.”

    I love this. It is truly inspirational that she accomplished so much after the age of 60. This past year I’ve been feeling like I am getting old! Some of that came with fighting breast cancer and not feeling well and body, but this encouraged me that there’s a lot of life left to be lived. In the past year + A little I have started growing flowers, and can’t wait to enjoy the fruits of the labor this summer. Also, I love that you are digging deeply into roses right now. I know your great grandma and her sweet peas Influenced you… My grandfather was a prize winning rose grower in his suburban home in Wisconsin. He doesn’t grow as many varieties anymore because he’s in his 90s but I would love to gift some of these books to him.

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  481. Kim Johnson on

    Such an inspiring woman! I loved that she said that it was never too late to follow your dreams ♥️

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  482. Elma on

    Wow what a blessing for you to be able to meet her and learn so much. Oh the words your never to old to start really makes me excited to learn more about roses and to grow them myself. I only have about 20 and I am excited to find more. Thanks for sharing her with us..🌹🌹

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  483. Denise Fairbank on

    Beautiful interview 💗 and inspiring. To think of her rose beginnings at 60! Her advice here resonated with me and serves as a reminder to keep learning…..

    “My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.”

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  484. Tammy Ringeisen on

    What a wonderful women! I loved when she talked about being able to do anything, fulfilling a dream with determination, knowing your talents, learning all you can, and not get discouraged with limitations. I also love her zest for life regardless of age. Wonderful interview with so much to take away from it. Thank you for sharing and how fortunate we are to read her words.

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  485. Denise Williams on

    Anne embodies the spirit of adventure, from the age of four she had such an adventurous rambling tug within her, that she never stopped chasing her entire life. She is a true, beautiful, original, Rambling Rose and her strength and beauty, just like the Rambling Rose, are such an inspiration.

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  486. Peggy on

    It is eye-opening to think of pursuing a new passion at 60 (I am 56.) It is tempting to think I am running out of time, but Anne’s words make me question that. The possibility of 30+ years ahead makes me wonder what I should fill that time with. Certainly flowers are high on my list. Thank you for sharing the beautiful fruit of Anne’s life.

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  487. Shauna C on

    Wow, what an amazing story! Such an inspiring life! I have no roses currently, but I’m adding new things every year, I’ve been looking into roses for a few years and I think I’ll take the plunge this year!

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  488. Hannah on

    Like choosing a favorite flower I just don’t know that I can pick one favorite part of her interview! What a remarkable person. I would say I especially loved her advice for growing up and aging- what a treasure.

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  489. Leah on

    What an inspiration. I too am in my 60’s and beginning to learn more about flowers in my yard. I love that Anne said that all women can do anything they desire and at any age if they work, are creative and resourceful.

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  490. Beth snively on

    Wow! What an inspiration to start doing what youngish no matter what the age!

    Reply
  491. Jerri W on

    Starting something in one’s 60’s and accomplished such achievement is truly amazing – her life story is assuring us nothing starts too late. ‘Lifelong learning and growing keeps me engaged’ – I think she probably gave away the secret of lifelong happiness as well.

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  492. Kyle J on

    At 22 I began breeding my own roses and at 24 (now) have been worrying that I won’t have enough time to create the series of roses I envision. However learning that Anne only started at 60 and has been able to contribute so much to the world of roses (and by the sounds of it the world in general) has given me renewed hope and vigour to achieve my goal. Also her thoughts on sharing, learning and experiencing life with friends, neighbours and strangers is exactly how we create and maintain healthy and vibrant communities. Roses can play a major part in that.

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  493. Glenys Gallagher on

    The whole interview inspired me, what an amazing woman and what a privilege to have known her.

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  494. Amalia Groh on

    I loved the comment that unless the job needs “big biceps and a beard” that women can do it. Love this, what an inspiring woman.

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  495. Julia on

    How inspiring! As I push towards 60 her comments have made me feel as though I’m just getting started! Loved the interview.

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  496. Janet Hedrick on

    The sentence “ It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams. ” really resonated with me. I will be 63 the day of the giveaway and in the last three years I have worked harder to achieve my goals than all the years before. The silver lining of Covid is that I’ve had many online opportunities to learn about gardening and have found so much inspiration, Floret Flowers included, of course! Learning never ends and keeps one young!

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  497. Tiffany on

    Her life is so inspiring. Just keep going, get out of bed, try something new, and continue to learn. It’s never too late.

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  498. Kimberly Zoller on

    Roses and a contracting business! Really teaching us that women can do it all EVEN “later” in life. What a role model.

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  499. Lucy Martin on

    What an interesting, and inspiring story! I was particularly moved by her saying we are never too old to begin a new dream. I love how she said how she first thought 60 was old, but at 97 it didn’t seem like it. Also to get out of bed, to keep learning.
    Thank-you for sharing such an incredible legacy and giving us an opportunity to win her books.

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  500. Hannah on

    “However, inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important”
    Growing up my father always had a large rose garden, and he learned his love for roses from my great grandmother. She would always have a large garden with lots of bird feeders and her gardens were an oasis. Reading her interview reminded me of my Grandmother, and I am now inspired to start growing roses of my own.

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  501. Michelle on

    What an amazing life lived. I’m 38 and lived hearing she found her love of roses when I was only a year old. Life is such a weird blessing. Who knows what will happen next!

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  502. Mary Dondlinger on

    I am very inspired by Anne who really gives the message that it’s never too late to pursue your dreams in life. What an amazing story!!

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  503. Whitney on

    “ It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams.

    My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development. “

    Reply
  504. Julie Lopez on

    That part that hit home with me was that she didn’t start her rose garden till she turned 60.
    I just turned 60 last August and made me realize what amazing things I could do in my garden still and with my life!
    She was truly an AMAZING woman! Thanks for sharing her story!

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  505. Dawn Krusi on

    I love this interview with Anne. I have been growing roses for thirty years and I too love growing the ramblers into trees. I most love how Anne talks about being able to do anything we want with a little determination. I raised my children off grid as a single mom in Northern California, growing more than a hundred roses with a one gallon a minute well, in the middle of the forest, with lots of deer. And I love the pictures of Anne’s garden. So lovely!

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  506. Diana on

    I believe the part that hit home to me the most was the advice to keep moving, stay out of bed, don’t isolate yourself, read and stay up to date on current events , be open to new ideals , and commit yourself to life long learning and skill development.
    This will serve you though out your life no matter what you choose to do.

    Reply
  507. Kim Parker on

    …”you should try to know yourself, your talents, and limitations, but be careful to not underestimate what you are capable of doing.”

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  508. Kathleen Magin on

    This blog series is just wonderful. Truly captivating. You would think that what struck me most about the interview was something specific to roses. Oddly it isnt. It is the following:

    “don’t let being a woman stop you from doing what is traditionally seen as a man’s job unless you really need a constant supply of testosterone to achieve your goal. Ask yourself if the activity requires big biceps and a beard. If not, go ahead with your dreams and fight the prejudice where you find it. Look carefully for the same prejudice in yourself. It could be lurking there without you realizing it and could cause you to not believe in yourself and to restrict you from following a difficult goal.”

    This is a message that so much needs to be shared to females of all ages. Anne is a wonderful example of living by this mindset.

    What a treasure this world has lost.

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  509. Danielle McKinnon on

    The whole interview inspired me. I really appreciate Anne’s encouragement about you are never to old to start something you’re passionate about. She brought tears to my eyes because age as of lately has been a hard subject to swallow and I am grateful for honesty and inspiration!

    Thank you for sharing this post! It’s a true treasure!

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  510. Kari on

    You can meet and exceed your goals if you prepare yourself overtime.

    These words resonated with me. She has such wisdom and is very eloquent when speaking. I’m looking forward to reading her books and having them for my library would be a gift. Thank you for sharing her story!

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  511. Suzanne Anderson on

    “You can meet and exceed your goals if you prepare yourself over time. You can’t become a rocket scientist without a great deal of study, and neither can anyone else.“ loved this quote, especially the end because it reminds me that I’m no different than anyone else who wants to pursue their dreams or just push themselves to try new things.

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  512. Julie C on

    I loved that she wasn’t afraid to take on new things at an age where most people are thinking about settling down.

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  513. Sherry Hebert on

    What a beautiful story of a life well lived! It’s exciting to know that work to preserve Anne’s passion, and achievements is in place. I am left; inspired, filled with hope. This story has delivered on the strong message; never stop dreaming and achieving. When Anne speaks of the greatest legacy “To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship.” I feel this exudes what most of “us” passionate growers/gardeners can relate too; sharing the beauty and joy that flowers and our gardens bring. Something worth sharing, something alive worth connecting about…
    Thank you and you team for sharing!

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  514. Alyson D Gray on

    I am inspired by Anne’s goals in her life! As I am in my 60’s, I have often wondered what I have to continue to give. Anne never stopped and I don’t want to either! Thanks for sharing her story. I want to set some goals in my garden and my life and this 4 part series has given me some incentive :o) Thanks for sharing all of it! I’m going to make my way up to Christianson’s Nursery & Greenhouse in Mount Vernon, Washington soon and find myself some roses!

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  515. Toni Mason on

    I love the idea of a Pruning Party. Collaborating with other passionate gardeners to help maintain rose ( and other) gardens where a little extra assistance is required.
    The idea of pitching in and helping an older gardener to keep their own garden alive and thriving is also a concept that resonates very strongly with me. I plan to take that thought and find a way to make it happen . It must only be a win win situation for us both.
    I am in the South of New Zealand and having been a sailor myself, was intrigued to read of Anne’s adventure and will be keen to read more of her Voyage of determination. I turn 60 in a few weeks and reading her interview has confirmed how much more I need to do! Thank you.

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  516. Pam B on

    Wow, Anne was absolutely amazing! I screenshotted her entire answer about it never being too late in life to pursue your dream. I am in my 30s and I constantly feel like I’m stuck in the path I chose and I’m running out of time to make a career change into horticulture. The fact that she started her own company and co-created a nonprofit after 60 years old is truly inspiring and shows that it’s never too late to try something new!

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  517. Linda on

    Having just turned 60 a few weeks ago, I loved her comments about all she did in the last 1/3 of her life. So many things yet to learn!

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  518. Darla Newcomer on

    I love what she said about her favorite rose being the one she could see out of her dressing room window. Isn’t that what it’s all about? Something to enjoy from the fruits of your labor in the comfort of your home. My grandmother had roses under her living room and bedroom windows, I can still smell them when I think of her. I remember the rose perfume lingering in through the window after a summer rain. She had the old fashioned roses, not sure what variety but at the age of soon to be 60, I am encouraged by Mrs Belovich to study about roses and find out!
    Thank you for introducing her to us. I am so glad she wasn’t stingy with her roses and shared them with you. Many blessings for a successful rose garden!

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  519. Pat on

    I will be 68 this year and hope I can get my garden in good shape after I leave my job in March. I care for my husband and mother who are both disabled but look forward to spending time on my flowers. Anne has helped me see it is possible to still reach for our dreams in later years.

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  520. Elizabeth Cauthorn on

    This whole interview was inspiring but I liked her advice. To keep moving,get out of bed,go out to lunch,visit friends and family,read,stay up to date on current events,being open to new ideas,life long learning,and skill development.

    Reply
  521. Rachel E on

    Oh my gosh, what a QUEEN! I’m currently in the thick of the toddler years, with capacity for little else beyond surviving the day to day, so it’s so inspiring to hear of how she was still following new dreams in her 60s!

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  522. Barbra Yuhas on

    She is very inspiring to me. With all that is going on with covid I seem to find more and more time with my roses. I love reading about Anne and it gives me more inspiration to expand my flower garden. Thank you for sharing.

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  523. Karen Combs on

    I was most inspired by what Anne accomplished after age 60, I’m in the same age group and still dream big dreams and hope to accomplish so much more. One is never too old to keep learning.

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  524. Ann Reimer on

    I love her example of overcoming hardship, continually learning and growing and never thinking that you are too old to start something new; that as long as we have life we can work to accomplish our dreams. I especially love her idea of how gardens are meant for sharing with your friends!

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  525. Kimberly Manning on

    I find Anne’s perseverance most inspiring. It’s very easy to stay stuck in a mental construct that defines what one can and can’t do. I love being inspired by, especially women, who have defied those constructs and pursued what they wanted. She’s wonderful!

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  526. Annetta Gower on

    I love how she says to not be stingy and share! So simple, yet so powerful.

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  527. Roseman Creek Ranch on

    Having done a lot in my life too, but now in my early sixties, it’s amazing to hear about how much she continued to do in that last third of her long life.
    I also love the group pruning idea. I have numerous roses I’ve collected since the eighties here. Approx 250 roses, adding more every year . I’ll be Sharing some this year on my Instagram site Roseman Creek Ranch .

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  528. Shasta Alexander on

    “look carefully for the same prejudice in yourself” Oh that’s a good one. So inspiring. As a 43-year-old woman just starting to think about establishing a beautiful flower garden it’s so inspiring to know that she started her rose journey at 60. I am also currently renovating an old victorian home and doing much of the work by myself. Her words about not needing a beard and big biceps will ring in my ears while I work :)

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  529. Sharon Haster on

    I so enjoyed your articles about roses. I was not familiar with Anne Belovich, but found your interview very enlightening. She must have been a wonderful person to know. I especially found it interesting that she didn’t enter her rose gardening until her 60’s. I have always felt it important to continue learning as we age and was delighted to read Anne’s feelings were the same. I hope her family will be able to continue caring for her roses as much as she did.

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  530. Peggy Dlugos on

    “Keep them watered, fertilized, and in a place with lots of sunshine.”—Anne’s words about caring for her roses. But isn’t this what we all need. And isn’t that what our gardens do for us. As much as we care for our gardens, our gardens are nurturing us. Let’s all stay in the sunshine.

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  531. Gay Dallek on

    I so enjoyed reading your interview with Anne Belovich. What most stood out to me was how many times she came back to reminding us not to let anything get in the way of your dreams and goals regardless of being a woman. Do what you desire. Find the answers and pursue your goals. Don’t let anything get in your way. Find your passion and pursue it. All of blogs in this series were wonderdul but this one with Anne struck a cord.

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  532. Juliet Turner on

    Thank you for sharing Anne Belovich’s story. It is inspiring to see how much she achieved after turning 60, especially as I am in my early 50’s and hesitant about starting up a new career. I will be putting up quotes from her on my walls “Be careful not to underestimate what you are capable of doing”, “My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.”, “It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams. “

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  533. Deborah on

    Three things I found particularly inspirational: 1) inviting people to share the roses — both in your garden and by sharing cuttings with them; 2) it’s never too late to act on your goals and dreams; and 3) don’t let your gender keep you from pursuing your goals and dreams — and perhaps the key insight there: “Look carefully for the same prejudice in yourself. It could be lurking there without you realizing it and could cause you to not believe in yourself and to restrict you…” Thank you so much for this series of blogs, for sharing your interview, and for the work to preserve Anne’s collection.

    Reply
  534. Nadine Parker on

    Thank you, Erin and Floret, for sharing Anne with us all. What a treasure! Picturing her running away down the path to the sea as a wee lass just makes me smile. Her stunning rambling roses are really a metaphor for her life, wild at heart, resilient and generous, and always seeking opportunities to beautifully forge her own path amidst love and loss. Her life and legacy are an inspiration and a gift.

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  535. Mallorie Havener on

    Erin, thank you for your passion and dedication to your trade and not shying back from inviting others in to share in those same passions. This series of postings have been monumental for me. Anne’s life is one of determination, perseverance and the humble approach to learning and acquiring knowledge at all ages of life. I have purchased your online workshop and it is pushing me personally in ways that I did not know that I needed pushed. Already the first module has been difficult as I project defeat before the task and journey has even begun. So I needed Anne’s inspirational outlook on life and time. I am encouraged and honored to follow behind women like Anne Belovich and Erin Benzakein.

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  536. Julie Miedtke on

    “My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development. ”

    THANK YOU ERIN, and I will be purchasing and reading ‘Ramblers’

    ramble on rose

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  537. Panat Cherdchu on

    I am inspired by her passion and that she wants to pass it along to others. It is amazing how she and her husband created a wonderful garden that fills with unique rose varieties. I am glad that her rose collection is being preserved and everybody can be there to appreciate them.

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  538. Sandy McTavish on

    YOU , Erin of @floretflower are the INSPIRATION to us ALL!
    Showcasing beauty and beautiful women , inspiring US around the world to be BETTER!

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  539. Kathryn Casey on

    I’m inspired by what she said about being generous about sharing your garden and roses with others. Especially when everything is marketed these days, it’s a good think to remember.

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  540. Yulia Z on

    Very interesting and inspirational interview! Amazing woman! Thanks for introducing her to the readers like me who never heard of her.

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  541. Dawn Sparkman on

    I think it would be the thought of not being stingy. Giving others the beauty of roses by sending cuttings home with them is an act of love…of friendship. There is truly more happiness in giving than receiving. ❤️

    Reply
  542. Audrey Brown on

    What an inspiring story! I’m forwarding this link to my friends. Thank you so much!

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  543. Judy Ables on

    How can I pick a favorite part of this rose series?! All were invaluable.? But I guess in my heart was your interview with Anne and her words of advise. Especially about how foolish she was to think 60 was old and what she was able to accomplish beyond 60.

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  544. Carol cole on

    What a blessing to come across this story. I absolutely Love roses despite a bit of an allergy to very fragrant long stemmed varieties. My Grandpa used to grow roses along his fence line and over a large arch by the garage. Such a wonderful memory of running into their yard to visit the roses! My own experience has been hit and miss. I’ve had some fairy carpet roses that lasted 25 years and a Blaze rose I’ve been trying to eliminate for years from the trellis in front. (It only blooms every other year and red no longer works in front.). I had a beautiful New Dawn climber that sadly disappeared. I’m still trying with a beautiful yellow variety. We’ll see. Your story Erin and that of Anne Belovich is inspiring me to keep at it as long as I’m given to enjoy my gardens!!! Thank you!

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  545. Candace Minster on

    I am blown away by this woman! Her work with roses is extraordinary, but reading this makes me want to know so much more about her. She had me hooked with her tales of running down to the water as a child. Her determination and will is so inspiring. I hope I can have a fraction of her energy when I turn 60, let alone 97!

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  546. Carolyn Shields on

    So inspired that she didn’t even start on her roses until she was 60. That’s amazing because what she did in those years most people couldn’t do in a lifetime. She truly was a special person.

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  547. Whitney on

    I love how Anne started this massive garden at 60. I just got married and inherited a very blank slate of meadows, lawn,and forest paths in my husband’s 7 arces. The land is part of a larger farm that has been passed down for generations in his family. I get so nervous about making garden plans for it. Will the maintenance be too much for us, how will I be able to maintain it when we get old, and will the design be out of place for the area? I loved how Anne just went for it and created something she loved and loved to spend time in. I need to get out of my own head and let myself dream when it comes to my garden. I need to learn to be OK with the temporariness of a garden. It might not be perfect until the day I die but until that day even little parts of it can give me pleasure and provide tiny reminders of cherished memories. Thank you for sharing this story it was inspiring and comforting.

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  548. Mauricia on

    Absolutely a delight to hear more details about Ms Belovich, and so much energy and courage… To start her blog at 97…My goodness! She was fearless! And became a contractor and builder with 25 projects… I have done 4 projects of diferent sizes, I guess I have now a minimum of 21 more projects to go!
    And I guess I will be packing and taking with me all of my plants, especially my roses…
    Many thanks for sharing this interview

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  549. Sheila Walter on

    I am 71 years old, and definitely the most inspiring part of the interview for me was her attitude about age. My husband and I tend to our one-acre garden by ourselves, however we’re constantly being “advised” by friends and family that maybe it’s time to move on to a smaller property. I feel like I’m just getting started, and Anne’s experience has provided me with new inspiration!

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  550. Holly Hagy on

    I love this lady’s life and story! She is amazing and so inspiring! I am an old rose grower and just turned 62 and her comments made me realize, I still have a whole life ahead of me…! I have always wanted to build my own house and now, after reading this story, I think I might just do that! And I can’t wait to get some ramblers to add to me roses collection! I do hope you write a rose book!!! Thank you for sharing your rose journey!

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  551. Kelsey on

    I think it’s amazing she has so many goals and never thought once that age or gender could stop her. It’s inspiring to that she never felt too old for things. I want to put that into practice.

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  552. Johnelle on

    What an amazing lady! I bet it was an honor interviewing her! I guess the best thing about her interview was how she courageously took on a different career path of building houses!

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  553. Eri on

    I love her dive into it attitude! And being up for so many different things. She lived a full life.

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  554. Leslie Shrage on

    I am an artist and a gardener. I spent my early adulthood cultivating a creative life that was very fulfilling. I married late, and it has been my joy to have the privilege to stay home and raise my children for the last 19 years. As I get close to 60, and to my youngest’s journey to college, I have been avidly anticipating and planning a return to the creative journey that has been mostly on hold. It was incredibly inspiring to read of all that Anne has accomplished since turning 60. I have taken to heart her words of encouragement, and I endeavor to build as interesting a life in this next chapter as I possibly can!

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  555. Ramon Fenollosa on

    Las palabras de Anne son todo una inspiración y más en los tiempos que vivimos tan desesperanzadores. La energia y visión de la vida que tenia Anne hace de esta entrevista una fuerza de motivación por la jardineria, las rosas y la vida en general.
    Un abrazo desde España.

    Reply
  556. Ellen on

    I love, “ get the books, take the classes”. Sometimes a new idea/project seems overwhelming to me, Anne is such an inspiration. Thank you for sharing her with me.

    Reply
  557. Laura Temple on

    What an amazing woman! I’m inspired by the fact that she didn’t start growing roses until she was 60. I’m 58 and just beginning my flower-growing journey after discovering Erin’s Cut Flower Garden book. Now I want to learn about vintage and rambling roses. My fantasy retirement property will have enough acreage for me to grow lots of flowers! I envision selling bouquets at a roadside “honor system” flower stand–not for the money, but to offer the joy of a beautiful bouquet to whichever community I end up joining. There will be a sign that says, “If you are unable to pay, but could use a bouquet for yourself or someone else, please take one.” There will be a crate for people to return vases for future bouquets. My vision of my future with flowers makes me very happy to think about!

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  558. Barbara on

    Her overall outlook on life was most inspiring. Even at the end of her life she was looking towards the next thing she was going to do, not just laying down and waiting for the time to pass. You never know when your last day is. I also loved the line ‘You can meet and exceed your goals if you prepare yourself over time.‘. I’m going to have to put that one on my fridge to remind myself daily.

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  559. Leanne on

    I found the whole interview (and the other three blog posts) super inspiring, especially being an older woman just starting out on my own rose journey, such a lovely timely message that I haven’t come too late to the party! I also loved her attitude toward generosity and not being stingy. Thanks so much for introducing us to Anne.

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  560. Leah Casady on

    I love that she said she started her new journeys at the age of 60. That 60s not too old to begin any new adventure and to keep learning and growing and giving. I think giving is a huge part of her success. Her generosity to others hopefully lead to them being generous as well. She is definitely a role model for all of us. I have so many ideas and plans and it is encouraging to me that I can continue forward with all the creative ideas I have if I will just believe in myself.

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  561. Kori on

    Love her boldness in throwing herself into new things and living life to the fullest. So inspiring…. I currently have a few roses in my yard but now I’m determined to learn all I can and to plant the rose garden I’ve been dreaming about.

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  562. Kamille Scellick on

    One is that she shared about her first husband and how his death changed her trajectory. This grief & loss seeded and became a life lived like her acres of roses. She said don’t isolate yourself. She knew living life alone, not being generous and not working hard mattered. I love this.

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  563. Norma on

    I love that in retrospect, Anne didn’t feel that 60 was all that old. I’m encouraged as I creep up to that age and am falling head over heals in love with flowers. I plan on taking her advice of constantly learning, meeting with people, and giving generously. Thanks for publishing the interview.

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  564. Margaret L McNamee on

    I can tell by this interview that Anne Belovich was an encourager; she started by encouraging herself. She was also a reflective person, figuring out the mental processes that were the driving force in her life, giving her the inner strength and stamina to bring to fruition such a wide variety of accomplishments. The part I appreciated the most was her reflection on age. I have always thought it silly that some people, especially women, are uncomfortable telling their age or even hiding their age. I think a person should be proud of their age and especially happy to have the privilege of bigger numbers! I hope to turn 70 this year and I think of it as starting a new decade. Anne’s attitude of not holding back starting a new project or area of knowledge is a great encouragement for me. I have plans for revamping my perennial garden, I would love to use the garden as inspiration for watercolor painting. We unfortunately lost 2 oak trees in the past 2 years, but it will greatly increase the amount of sunlight in the garden. My mother grew tea roses. I love the more fragrant older roses and I would love to learn by reading Anne’s books.

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  565. Judy Suzuki on

    I love how she started her rose love at 60. She thought it was old but 37 years later …. Amazing how wonderful for you all to meet her.

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  566. Cathy C Reineke on

    WOW! Such inspiration to live life to the fullest and not let age keep you from following your heart and leaving a legacy!
    Thank you Erin for sharing Anne with us! You are amazing also! Thanks for sharing your life with us and your generosity is greatly appreciated! Blessings to all!

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  567. Jodena on

    It’s never to late to start!

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  568. Gloria W on

    I appreciate her sharing that you may or may not have a natural inclination toward something, but either way you have to put in the work to fully prepare yourself to embark on something new and do it well. And not to self-limit based on your gender, or fear. What a courageous woman she was!

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  569. Christie Jo Thomas on

    The entire interview was so sweet and inspiring and I just loved hearing about how she took so many chances and believed in herself and most of all encouraging and reminding us (especially women) that we ca do anything we work hard enough at. Mostly though, I love this advice, especially during the time that we are living through: advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development. It’s a good reminder to not just live, but thrive. I’m reminded of that quote that I found on a little painted rock on one of my early walks during the height of the pandemic. Thank you for sharing :)

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  570. Sonia O on

    Amazing and so inspiring: to start something new and exciting at age 97! Sound advice on so many layers. Most importantly live life to the fullest. What a lovely story and beautiful legacy Anne left us.

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  571. Tanya on

    Overall what inspired me was that Anne was determined and she didn’t let anything stop her. She went for it! I love how Anne shared her story, her roses and kindness with Erin and the Floret team. Then Anne and her family let us get a glimpse of it all. I am inspired, encouraged and grateful for this opportunity and want to go buy roses for my soon to be garden. I didn’t realize how many varieties of roses there are! I feel a lack of confidence at times but these moments give me hope!

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  572. Sonia O on

    Amazing and so inspiring: to start something new and exciting at age 97! Sound advice on so many layers. Most importantly love life to the fullest. What a lovely story and beautiful legacy Anne left us.

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  573. Nova on

    Thank you for sharing the interview with Anne. What inspired me most is her gratefulness for life and call to generosity. The interview hit a heart string at the end when she said, “however, inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy.”

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  574. Shelby r on

    At first I thought it would be about her ramblers… but I’m still not sure the difference between those and climbers: For me, the most inspiring part of the interview was her grit… sailing across the ocean and building houses.

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  575. Peter Jones on

    Honestly what part of the interview wasn’t inspiring. I had already sent the link to my daughter but after reading Anne’s advice on not letting being a women stop you from finding and doing something you love I copied and pasted it so she wouldn’t miss it. The wall Jack was great too I can almost see her building that house the world needs more Anne’s.

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  576. Cilia Lalonde on

    A story of inspiration and strong words! A life filded with neverending projets is a great life! My goal is to never have my wishlist of things I want to accomplish get down to zero! What an incredible journey, her passion is contagious, her words are powerful! I got quite moved just by reading this post!
    Thanks so much for sharing!
    Cilia

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  577. Deanna on

    What inspires me is her attitude and belief that she can do hard things. I so often don’t do things for fear of failure. With that mindset, I am only cheating myself. I’m trying more every day to put myself out there. No matter what happens, I am going to learn!

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  578. Malealyn on

    “Ask yourself if the activity requires big biceps and a beard. If not, go ahead with your dreams!” That is going on the wall!

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  579. Anne on

    What inspires me the most is how many different things she did over her lifetime. Didn’t start with roses till 60 and amassed such a large collection and became such an authority. Just an amazing woman with so much great advice.

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  580. Jennifer EC on

    What a wonderful woman Anne must have been. It’s amazing that at 97 she was setting out to learn to build her website and become a blogger! Having big plans through to the very end is inspiring and reminds me of my own sweet grandmother who passed with tickets pinned on her bulletin board for theater shows she planned to attend as well as plane tickets to travel from Japan to Switzerland for a big hiking trip. They both remind me that instead of worrying about the future you can choose to create your own beautiful path and live life to the fullest.

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  581. Autumn Roberts on

    I am inspired by her to follow my dream. I will be 60 this year and have started to worry it is too late. But her words touched me because I began my love of flowers at 58 and I hope it is just the beginning. Thank you for putting this together and sharing Anne with us.

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  582. Tynja Lofgran on

    My favorite part about this interview is how old she was when she began her journey with roses. I have 5 small kids, and getting out in my tiny back yard to weed seems quite daunting since there has always been a baby to be held. Knowing that i have time after the kids are a little older allows me to enjoy the moment.

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  583. Betsy Walbridge on

    It’s really difficult for me to pick just one part of this interview as most inspirational when frankly her entire life and philosophy are inspirational. For mean, at 63, it’s probably hearing her talk about her life after 60 and all she accomplished. I to a new home (after 33 years in the suburbs) and have been learning how to grow a cutting garden, a rose garden and be a floral designer. It’s awesome to hear her not let her age or the fact she is a woman, get in the way of her dreams!

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  584. Mendy Pelster on

    Hi Erin,
    What an amazing tribute to your friend! This story is so precious and I loved every bit of it. So often, I feel my own life has been so many lives and it was refreshing to hear another woman who has a an unusual life and is happy with the varied parts of her inspiring journey. I just loved her encouragement for women without any disdain for men. What a beautiful soul. Thank you so much for sharing her wisdom, beauty and courage with everyone!

    Mendy

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  585. Keith Benitez on

    Such an incredible inspiration. It is evident that she was full of life and wonder. Sleep well and I hope to meet you in the resurrection.

    Reply
  586. Alyssa K. on

    I so appreciated her words about bearing down and investing the time and energy (and potentially funds) to learn well about what you want to do. We should all pursue excellence in whatever we put our hands to, from hobbies and passions to jobs and necessary tasks. Thank you, Floret, for this lovely interview!

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  587. Alexandra on

    What struck me about this interview was just how fearless, optimistic, and caring Mrs. Belovich is. I was inspired to not only care for roses but to share them too. Her words “To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy” stuck out to me, because they describe roses as something that’s bigger than itself, bigger than all of us.

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  588. John McCullough on

    I love her determination- not only to learn and reach her goals but just to get the job done! She reminds me on many of the women in my life. Often they didn’t have help and faced a lot of opposition, but they found a way! It’s a lesson I had to learn myself in my career. I was also inspired by all her accomplishments after 60. So often I dream of where I could have been if I made different career choices. But at the same time I don’t regret the sacrifices I made. It gives me hope that maybe one day I will be able to experience those other careers when the time is right.

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  589. Olivia Hilario Day on

    What an inspiring woman! I love that she was so giving. From volunteering to sharing her roses. It’s people like her that bring hope to the world.

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  590. Lori Ternes on

    Anne’s beautiful spirit and love of life shone brightly and will continue through all those who had been fortunate enough to be in her presence and those who wii read her books and visit the gardens.

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  591. Jo Cubelo on

    I just love this whole story! I am 58 and just retired and moved to a very empty garden. Roses are a must for me. I am planning on moving my moms roses from her house so I can care for them and enjoy them now that she is gone.

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  592. Sandra Karina Tun on

    “Don’t let being a woman stop you from doing what is traditionally seen as a man’s job unless you really need a constant supply of testosterone to achieve your goal.”
    I think this needs to go on a t-shirt!

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  593. Carmen Raterman on

    I was touched by the fact that she started her collection in her 60’s. I am 51 years old and just started my small flower farm with the help of my daughter. There is so much I don’t know and at times I question myself if this is a crazy idea. I am learning to ride horses, take care of cattle and also grow flowers. All of it totally out of my comfort zone. Thank you Erin for sharing Ann’s roses and her words with me.

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  594. Rebecca Buchanan on

    “So many memories tie us all together.”
    What a remarkable, inspiring, and generous woman. Thank you so much Erin for revisiting your friendship with Anne, and then sharing it with all of us. I have been touched beyond words.

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  595. Rcohelle on

    Sooooo much to love and be inspired by in this interview. I especially love that she came to roses at 60 years, so inspired by this.
    Also this!!!! “You can meet and exceed your goals if you prepare yourself over time. You can’t become a rocket scientist without a great deal of study, and neither can anyone else.”
    What an absolute legend!

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  596. Anna on

    I loved her formula for achieving a goal. Some dreams seem so out of reach, but it’s true: “You can’t become a rocket scientist without a great deal of study, and neither can anyone else.” If you don’t work toward it, you’ll never get there.

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  597. Kelly on

    Anne said “ …inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship.” What a beautiful thing to do. I love sharing from my garden! There’s more joy in giving than in receiving.

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  598. Julie Hardcastle on

    “It’s never too late to act on your goals and dreams.” This is such an important statement and code to live by. I love the example of sharing her garden visually, intellectually, and physically. I never feel like my garden is “nice” enough to share with others. Because of this, I am losing out on friendships. Anne’s story is one that I’ll take to heart and learn from and I am already planning ways to share my small, incomplete garden with others in my community.

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  599. Barbara on

    I enjoyed the common sense attitude; find something you are interested in, study and learn all you can, become an apprentice and go for it.

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  600. Louise Thomassin on

    Thank you for sharing the passion of Life and roses with your dearfull friend Anne. Such a wonderfull moment reading these stories from you. Thank you so much.

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  601. Elaine Elmore on

    He spirit is so inspiring and her joy of sharing the beauty whilst growing friendships as her legacy is so impressed through how she interacts with you! She was a gift! She has inspired! Hoping to continue to grow a garden that I can share in her honor and my grandmothers honor. Love this!

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  602. Tiffany Charles on

    I’m most inspired by her willingness to keep pursuing and learning new talents no matter her age. There have been moments in my own life where I have struggled to believe it’s not too late for a new career….and I’m nearly 39! Anne’s words are so encouraging for a aspiring flower farmer like myself.

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  603. Janice Marie on

    I loved her quote to get moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with family and friends..commit yourself to life-long learning. I also like that she never even grew a rose before she was 60. That challenges me that I can still have a full life ahead even though I am 58.

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  604. Kira DeRito on

    What most inspired me was her age when she began her journey with roses. I sometimes get caught feeling like I’m ‘old’ at 47 years now that my daughter has moved on to college. How silly!

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  605. Beverly Mouw on

    I love the visual of the roses blooming outside of her window. What a glorious thought on this dreary winter day in Michigan.

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  606. Kerry Rhodes on

    i love that she speaks of generosity and handing on knowledge freely and to seek knowledge . Gardeners that do this create gardeners , when i was very young ,barely speaking the lady next door would show me around her garden and to me it was a wonderland still is

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  607. Tawny Fremont on

    It amazes me the treasures our elders have and they are truly waiting for someone to ask to share it with. I wonder how much of our past gets lost from not seeing, talking and sharing with an elderly neighbour or a senior with similar hobbies.
    Your story moved me. I am so glad you were able to be part of Anne’s world and to introduce her inspiring story, garden and roses to all of us who didn’t know her.
    Thank you

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  608. Lisa on

    As a person entering the empty nest stage of life, it inspires me that Anne did so much in her later years. I also am just having time and funds to get going on my garden dreams.

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  609. staci derenne on

    I loved that she just kept learning, also to share what you have with others. I’m new to gardening so this would mean so much to someone trying to learn.
    Loved this interview

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  610. Mary Hill on

    I so enjoyed reading Anne’s story. What an amazing human. Having recently retired some days I feel “lost” and without a purpose, although I know that is not true. Anne’s below advise is a reminder there is so much more life to be lived. Thanks for sharing about this incredible woman.

    My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.

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  611. Donna on

    I am inspired by the fact Anne never backed down from a challenge. She met each one with a fierce tenacity. I am inspired by the fact that we as women can do hard things. Her love of life and gardening provides a perfect escape to connect with God’s bounty and richness.

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  612. Nelz Nunez on

    her dedication and passion for roses at her age was the most inspiring to me. wow, what a legacy! i can’t wait to learn more from the gift she’s given us.

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  613. Kirsten on

    Her comments about her age and that she spent over 1/3 of her life with her roses was so eye opening. Most of us do think about 60 as late in life, but it truly does not have to be. What an inspiration Anne is to all of us, women especially!

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  614. Kylie Massengale on

    I love how she never stopped learning. I can’t imagine building an entire house and she built several! That takes so much courage and determination and I admire her for that.

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  615. Anna Swenson on

    So much of what Anne spoke about inspired me….. mostly her comment on not needing a steady stream of testosterone, big biceps, or a beard!! I laughed and then thought of the things that probably hold me back with similar thinking… If she can do it then so can I.

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  616. Bev Walker on

    I will be turning 60 next year, so her comments about all she accomplished after that age are incredibly inspiring!

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  617. Alicia on

    I am so inspired by her story. I think my biggest takeaway is understanding that when you’re starting it can be difficult at times to see the end-view. It is easy to want to rush the process and hurry along to get to the garden you can stroll through and enjoy. But in reality it’s more about the process of creating something that is filled with what you believe to be beautiful. Supporting local growers along the way and sharing the beautiful you’ve cultivated and the knowledge you’ve gained with those around you.

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  618. Joanna on

    What a beautiful series, Erin. Thank you so much for sharing Anne’s story, her insights and perspective on life. It makes me happy to know her rose legacy will live on through so many who share her passion!

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  619. Samiha Mohammad Sharif on

    This is such a moving story, and I specifically enjoyed Anne saying: “Determine what it is you want to do and then acquire any skills or knowledge that you are going to need, get the books, take the classes.” As a college professor and beginner gardener this resonates with me deeply, as it’s a message I first and foremost strive to engrave on my own heart, and then also share with my students. Thankful for all the beauty you both bring into this world.

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  620. Elisheva on

    I was inspired by what Anne was able to accomplish after her sixties and even now, buying her domain. It made me reconsider some of the limitations I put on myself. Her words and her world view are so encouraging and inspiring. I’ve heard so much about her, but hearing from her is so special. Her interview has really motivated me to garden roses, and to do so without fear.

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  621. Machelle R. Edmiston on

    Anne inspired me to not let my insecurities and fear of unknowns (and lack of huge biceps) keep me from pursuing my dreams. I have dreamt for many years of becoming a teacher, an artist that is set apart in what she creates and puts out into the world. I love beauty and learning and I’m always developing my skill set to be something I’m proud of. I will continuously think of Anne and her unrelenting courage in extreme danger and unknowns at sea to inspire myself to push forward. Here’s to Anne! She and her roses are something to behold. I have 7 different varieties of roses currently and I cannot wait to adopt more of these lovely blooms to add to my collection.

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  622. Gretchen Honeyman on

    I admire her for her courage to start so many new journeys after age 60. It helped give me a little boost to continue with the planting of my 25 feet by 50 feet flower garden at age 76. It has more meaning since I grew up on Camano Island. Thanks Anne!

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  623. Jennifer on

    Anne is so inspiring! I thought at 52 that my chances for living out a dream were over! Reading her story makes me rethink that attitude! I also want to be a life-long learner! I think that it keeps your mind sharp and gives you a reason for going on. I’d love to read her book about her sailing adventures and her books on roses. Who knows what ideas might get planted in my mind from reading her story?! What an amazing life she led! Thank you for telling her story and for propagating her roses so her dreams carry on!

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  624. Carlee Schaefer on

    It was so inspiring to see again and again how
    Anne would be considered to have “started over”. In her career and interests, she constantly reinvented herself for nearly 100 years. As a young women in my early thirties, I find this challenges the pressure I feel that I must know what I am going to do for the rest of my life to be an adult. It’s never too late to try new things and become something more than I ever thought I could be become.

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  625. Stina Tillotson on

    What an amazing woman. I loved this quote: “Ask yourself if the activity requires big biceps and a beard. If not, go ahead with your dreams and fight the prejudice where you find it.”

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  626. Abbey on

    Just as it’s hard to pick a single favorite flower, it’s hard to isolate any one part of this interview. Connection stands out to me. There’s an immense sense of connection. To the flowers and nature, to each other, to ourselves. This connection heeds all senses of sharing, generosity, and beauty. Things that evoke the dreamer in all of us, things that go beyond what we can imagine. These values need to be cared for, cultivated, shared, and conserved as much as the roses themselves. It was a pleasure reading this and being introduced to Anne and her work. Thank you! ⚘️

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  627. Julie Wise on

    “inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship.”
    This is what did it for me🥺

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  628. Lily on

    I love hearing that she has inhabited so many different roles. It’s wonderful to remember and be reminded that we keep growing and changing.

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  629. Frances Vortman on

    What an inspired and amazing woman!. She lived such a full life and much of what she’s known for happened after the age of 60! Her story is much like that of Ruth Bancroft here in Walnut Creek, California. Ruth started collecting succulents late in life, also in her sixties like Anne, she began creating her beautiful legacy – The Ruth Bancroft Garden, where hundreds of succulents and cactus of all varieties can be enjoyed by the public. I love the empowering statements Anne made about women and how you’re never too old to do or create something wonderful. God bless her and all women like her – their light will always shine brightly and continue to motivate and inspire.

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  630. Larissa on

    A beautiful article about a beautiful person. It’s so inspriing to read about Anne’s life and all the amazing things she did, and to know that it’s not too late to follow my dream. One day I hope I can be even half as inspiring and accomplished in life as she was.
    Thanks for sharing this amazing interview!

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  631. Ruth Rossow on

    I am amazed at this woman! When she said a woman can do anything a man can do given the knowledge and finding a way to use equipment to provide strength, it hit a cord with me. I’m seventy years old this year and was feeling afraid I was becoming limited in what I can do at this age! Your story of Anne has inspired me to get with it and start something new. I’m going to start with a rambling rose that will remind me of her and inspire me every time I see it! Thank you Erin for your interesting story.

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  632. Debbie M on

    Mrs Belovich sounds like she has personally went through a lot of trials and tribulations throughout her adulthood but used them well to her advantage. There are things that we all can learn through our circumstances and bring fourth the beauty that we can support through sharing our lives and knowledge to others that come into our paths and just share time with one another. This is a wonderful gift that Mrs Belovich learned and is willing to pass on. A wonderful gift of time. Very touching.

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  633. Ida Maria on

    The story of Anne Belovich is moving and encouraging
    So many details , like constantly trying to learn , never give up, learning to handle your talents , keeping the movements ,
    Hopefully helps me to get my dreams through , even not being the youngest one 75 , My husband and me started
    To built a Garden near Rome 30 years ago , but there are still
    So many projects , when I see these rambler roses , I would love to plant them besides the once we have already

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  634. Mary on

    Wow – she is incredibly inspiring. I loved that her whole life was really about pushing the boundaries. I think personally in my current season of life, her quote: “You need to study and become an apprentice”, has been a powerful reminder as I enter into my chosen career at 44 years old, that I have the ability to do incredible things DESPITE starting at this point in my life. I want her determined, “why not?” perspective! Thank you for sharing Erin

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  635. Kjerstine Vachter on

    What an inspiring woman, all around. Love her can do attitude, but also recognizing she had to put in the work to learn the craft. Thank you for sharing!

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  636. Naomi on

    I love that she said 60 years of age in retrospect was less than 2/3s of her life. There was so much wonder and beauty yet to come for her because she didn’t stop, she kept going and enjoyed life! “Our times are in God’s hands…”

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  637. Marcie on

    I pursed many dreams after turning 60…This dear lady is an inspiration. So sorry to hear she passed. Turning 56 this year and needing some new direction. My favorite place to be is outside looking at the flowers and the wonders of this beautiful world. SoThankful to come across this interview today. Maybe it’s time to become a master Gardner. Flowers, my camera and the sunshine… I love when she says my advice is to stay out of bed, keep moving, go out to lunch. I’m buying her determination book today…

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  638. Cynthia M on

    Very inspiring woman! My favorite part: “go ahead with your dreams and fight the prejudice where you find it. Look carefully for the same prejudice in yourself”. I think sometimes we can become are worst enemy. Overcoming our old patterns or ways of thinking might just be the only barrier to make our dreams a possibility!

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  639. Meghan on

    I love her advice to find your talent but, “Then, be willing to spend some time and energy preparing for what you want to do.” This has been my journey with flowers thus far. They come naturally and being around them just feels right, yet I spend countless hours reading, learning, and observing. A good reminder for this time of year, particularly as I plan the coming season’s garden, to slow down and put in the work to bring it to success.

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  640. Caitlin Rush on

    At the very start, this line struck me: “My life could have played out very differently if not for losing my husband in World War 2.” A young, widowed mother—how very heartbreaking! No one is spared adversity, but if we keep moving and working in its wake, we can bring cascading, rambling, prolific beauty and the happiness into the world in ways we never saw coming.

    Reply
  641. Jean on

    “My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development. ”
    This was the most inspiring advice to me!

    Reply
  642. Kimberly C on

    As we work towards building a tiny Cabin on our property, I was amazed that Anne managed to build a complete house, alone. It gave me inspiration to do so much more of the building when the time comes, rather than helping out from the sidelines while my husband does the hard work. He may have the ‘beard and big biceps,’ but that doesn’t mean I can’t do more too!

    Reply
  643. Laurelle Guillet on

    I was really encouraged by her starting her rose collection at the age of 60. I’m 61 and purchased my first David Austin rose last year. I always dreamed of a secret garden as well. I have felt that I’m getting too old to start having bigger flower gardens. After reading this post , she has encouraged me to believe it’s never too late. I still have time 😊

    Reply
  644. Almetra Weaver on

    “I pursued many dreams after turning 60…..it is never too late to act on your goals and dreams.” I only started gardening one year ago at 44 years of age and have enormous dreams of a beautiful English Garden. I celebrate my 45th birthday on January 19th and am encouraged that it’s never too late to start.

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  645. Alix Hester on

    As someone who is about to turn 56, I am so inspired by Anne’s new endeavors at 60!
    This is so moving to me!!!
    “At almost 97 years old, it doesn’t seem that my passion for roses started all that late in life. It’s been over 30 years since I began this journey—longer than the careers of many. I pursued many dreams after turning 60”

    Reply
  646. Isabel on

    “Next, you should try to know yourself, your talents, and limitations, but be careful not to underestimate what you are capable of doing.” In my 40s and just starting to learn about flower gardening, this interview has been so inspiring. Thank you for sharing!

    Reply
  647. Carrie on

    So inspirational, I would have loved to have met Anne and walked her garden with her. Your interview was wonderful, I’m so happy you shared it with everyone.

    Reply
  648. Jennie Miller on

    I love that she lists how she feels you can achieve a long life, continue learning, stay out of bed, lunch with friends and family, such great advice!

    Reply
  649. Antje on

    I loved everything about this interview! Thank you so much for sharing. I found it especially inspiring that her passion for roses started in her 60s. I am in my 40s and just stared my cut flower garden last year and sometimes feel that I am late to the game … but love Anne’s advice to “commit yourself to life-long learning & skill development.”

    Reply
  650. Laurie Jarmer on

    You can’t become a rocket scientist without a great deal of study, and neither can anyone else.

    Reply
  651. Tammy Bosshardt on

    The interview with Anne was delightful to read. What a lovely lady she must have been. I think we could all benefit from her wisdom; Keep Moving and Committing Ourselves to Life-Long Learning and Skill Development. I am very impressed by how much she accomplished after the age of 60, when most people are slowing down, she was busy writing books to share her knowledge so it wouldn’t be lost. What an inspiration she is!

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  652. Wilma on

    “Commit yourself to lifelong learning and skill development”

    Reply
  653. Hillane Lambert on

    I was impressed that she didn’t start her career as a rosarian until she was 60. I connected with that because I’ve started my career as a flower farmer at 65! I love her attitude that a woman can do anything a man can do and it takes perseverance and willingness to study to reach your goals. I’m completely inspired by her life and so appreciate your sharing this with us

    Reply
  654. Francesca Luppino on

    I’m inspired by the sheer magnitude of what Anne accomplished, as well as her humility evidenced in the simple advice she provides us – to not let being a woman keep me from doing something and to truly dedicate myself to study. As I reflect on this advice, I realize that I’ve had success in my first couple years of gardening due to doing these things, and I feel encouraged to continue down this path. Wow, I can’t wait to learn more about Anne and roses! Thank you so much for sharing her story here.

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  655. sharyn on

    Beautiful interview! I am so inspired by the variety of interests and Anne’s interest/willingness/ability to develop the expertise(s) for each. But what brought me to tears is Anne’s face in the picture of her visit. Her face simply glows with all that she is! Breathtaking! Thank you, Erin, for bringing her into my life.

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  656. Lisa Bryan on

    Lovely! Despite the losses and challenges Anne faced in her life, she remained motivated and curious. That inspires me! Everyone has challenges, it’s what we do about it that matters. With a full heart, Anne created beauty in her lifetime 🌹

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  657. Catherine on

    How wonderful. Life long learning is a phrase we hear a lot. I think it’s easier say than to practice. I’m inspired by Anne’s curiosity and resilience.

    Reply
  658. India on

    Her comment to “look carefully for the same prejudice in yourself”…
    I work in a male dominated, backward facing industry where I keep finding myself guilty of subscribing to the same mentality. If I keep believing that some jobs are “men’s jobs” then how can I ever expect to change the perceptions of other people?
    We are all capable of the same jobs… and if some of them take biceps and a full beard to “complete” then I want to challenge that and say they take biceps, testosterone and a beard to complete “quickly”… but I’ll get the job done in a similar time frame with grit, hard work and a plan that allows for future growth and expansion – I just have to challenge my own mindset!
    Anne is absolutely an inspiration, and I’m excited for land to grown my own rose garden (coming May 2022!)

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  659. Vickie Murray Elkins on

    Mostly that you can do anything at any age as along as you’re determined and willing to learn. Also you gotta get up and get moving on it and it doesn’t matter what gender you are.

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  660. Diana Leguizamon on

    Often times we put ourselves in categories; too old, too young, too late, but my gender, etc. Anne shows us what happens if we decide to not let ourselves be limited by these things and decide to let our passions drive us forward. Anne’s zest for life, adventure and the pursuit of knowledge is what inspires me the most, and, how she centers community and friendship as the foundation of it all. A purpose outside of ourselves and sharing with others can do wonders for the world. What a legacy.

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  661. Lavi on

    Probably the best interview I’ve ever read. My favorite: “ probably benefited from having a full, diverse life. Life-long learning and growing keeps one engaged.” May God give her many more years so she can reach many more with her wisdom and grace.

    Reply
  662. Kristen Smyth on

    “My life could have played out differently, if it weren’t for losing my husband in WW2.” She didn’t say better, or worse, just differently. I found that most inspiring.

    Reply
  663. Bianca baldizon on

    Every inspiring word of this interview was special. A great interview to start the new year off on the right foot. How utterly inspiring- I want to be just like her!

    Reply
  664. Paula Bolash on

    Anne’s formula for achieving any goal inspired me.Being 60 myself, and having ordered my first roses, I can see with determination and lots of learning, my skills will grow.Thank you for sharing this lovely interview.

    Reply
  665. Mariana Edwards on

    What most inspired me was how Anne explains how anything is possible no matter when you start in life. How amazing it was to read that validation for me. As many woman I carry so many rolls In my life and I have always longed for finding that thing that defined me. Gardening is something that I have seen in me that defines me. It makes me feel so good to have the soil on my hands and the ability to grow something. My love for it scares me only because like Anne says we limit ourselves. In the back of my mind I’m my own worst enemy but I need to let it go so that I can grow a beautiful garden and maybe have the courage to turn it into something bigger that I can share with anyone. I want to inspire my children so they can see that you can achieve success in anything, at any age no matter your gender or lack of resources. It is possible, and that’s what You helped Anne convey to a lot of us dreamers. Thank you Erin for such an amazing gift.

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  666. Sharon Weaver on

    The fact that she had this idea of creating her own website and blog at 97 years old!!! A clear sign not to let your age define you!!! Such a sweet lady and I can’t wait to get my hands on some of her books!

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  667. janet hall on

    Everything! Just so inspiring and a life well lived.

    Reply
  668. A'lyce on

    As a woman who is currently remodeling her own home with the help of my husband when he is not working and available, I was so inspired by Anne’s determination to not allow her gender to stop her from achieving what she wanted. She found ways to get something done like using the wall Jack to hoist the walls into place. Her dreams and goals were so wildly different, too, and I absolutely love that she was unwilling to let her age deter her from starting new goals. What a wonderful lady, indeed. I’m so grateful to her for her generous outlook on life and all that she and her husband have shared with the world and those around her.

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  669. Laura on

    I was most inspired by what she achieved since the age of 60 and her dedication to passion. Lovely story, thank you!

    Reply
  670. Stacey Diehl on

    Not letting gender prejudice you may have about yourself was an inspiring thought. How many times have I said, I can’t do that, I am a woman, or I have never done that before. This has changed the way I think!

    Reply
  671. Bryan Benner on

    Starting a new chapter of life at 60 is so inspiring!
    She was an amazing person.

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  672. Anne on

    I love the advice to continue lifelong learning.
    Such an inspirational interview.
    Just what I needed to hear in this time of Covid.

    Reply
  673. Gail Riffle on

    Wow! She reminds me of my grandmother Onnie, who lived to be 100 years old. Full of life, spunk, and intelligence. I really connected with her advice when she spoke of ” It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams. 

    My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development. “

    Reply
  674. Theresa on

    Anne’s story certainly moved me so much that my heart’s pitter-patter feel more intense with inspiration to pursue life-long dreams, with a vengeance. Her message about going after one’s dreams, no matter your age, hit home with me. I, too, began this journey with flowers late in life, in addition, hoping to fulfill a very long ‘bucket list of ‘to dos,’ but feeling like I am too old to pursue and realize all the experiences and opportunities that I’ve dreamed of. Anne has reminded me to remain a life-long learner, “stay out of bed,” and never give up. Erin, thank you so much for your kindness. I would imagine this interview has benefitted so many.

    All the best,
    Theresa

    Reply
  675. Cindy D on

    Thank you so much for sharing this interview with us! There are so many inspiring thoughts. Her encouragement “to get out of bed” and really follow your dreams. spoke to me. I am especially inspired to” let people in” and “to share,” I believe she said “not to be stingy” I love that and will allow that to guide me. Again thank you Erin.

    Reply
  676. Alexys Romo on

    I love that she shares cuttings and her knowledge with many, and refers to them as friends. There is truly something wonderful about how roses and flowers can be common ground for anyone, anywhere. After these very hard couple of years, it can be hard to tell friend from foe, and I love that Anne has a welcoming and kind spirit. It encourages and inspires me to be open to more flower friends, and to share with others.

    Reply
  677. Debbie Piper on

    Wow, what a beautiful lady Anne was. I loved it when she said, “Determine what it is you want to do and then acquire any skills or knowledge that you are going to need, get the books, take the classes.” My dad says nearly the same thing to me whenever I say, “I wish I knew how to _____. ” The overall impression that we are never too old to achieve what we set out minds to, is inspiring to me as well. Thank you Erin for sharing Anne’s story with us.

    Reply
  678. Kimberlyn Parks on

    I took a photo and highlighted these quotes so I don’t forget them. “ You can’t become a rocket scientist with out a great deal of study and neither can anyone else.” -I love that, she really leveled the playing field with that bit of truth. And
    “Sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens is an act of love… of friendship” “inviting people into you gardens and sharing is perhaps most important.” Both of these quotes for me sum up why to grow flowers in the first place. The language of flowers is benevolence.

    Reply
  679. Wendy on

    There is SO much to be inspired by in that interview. She sounds like such an amazing and kind and generous woman. What inspired me most was her starting something new at 60 and that whole attitude, which I share, of the great benefits of lifelong learning and challenging yourself with new skills for a long, rich and fulfilling life. And a varied life! That, and her work with animal nonprofits.

    Reply
  680. Ann on

    I was brought to tears reading this. I was so inspired to learn that she didn’t start her rose collection until she was 60s… really gave me much needed perspective. Thank you so much for sharing Anne’s story with us.

    Reply
  681. Katie Garretson on

    Anne seems like a gal I should have been best friends.
    Bada** woman who is funny, inspiring, and very serious about ‘keeping them watered, fertilized, and in a place with lots of sunshine’. I love her empowerment call to woman to follow our goals with her splash of humor, ‘unless you need a constant supply of testosterone to achieve your goal. I hope I grow up to be like Anne one day. We need more Annes in the world. Thanks for sharing Erin. Because of Anne, I bought 2 roses today!

    Reply
  682. Elizabeth Scharback on

    Never stop learning, stay out of bed, go out to lunch. Do the all the things. What a beautiful life

    Reply
  683. Jinah Kim on

    I loved all her stories. Especially about starting rose gardening at 60… made me tear up. It put hope in my heart that I can accomplish these things too. I loved that she lived a full life to 97 years and she enjoyed people, was generous, accomplished much, and was always learning to do new things. ❤️

    Reply
  684. Elena Cardwell on

    I was so inspired by her age of 60 and starting her rose garden. Here I am 61 and just getting into the swing of flower gardening. My mom was an avid rose gardener with over 80 rose bushes on her 1/2 acre lot. I was single for many years and lived in many places with no place to agrden and now I am married with a beautiful 15 year old daughter and my husband and I bought a house in 2017, the first for both of us. It is just a quarter acre but we are having so much fun turning it into a beautiful flower and vegetable garden!

    Reply
  685. Meg McGinnis on

    I loved her comment to share, fertilize and grow old roses. Our first home we planted Rambling roses by some popular trees. Paul’s Himalayan Musk and Van Fleet. Today they go up 30-40 ft and are a shower of small pink and white roses. Just breath takingly beautiful.

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  686. Pam Smedley on

    Well, Anne’s life is inspiring, but her accomplishments after age 60 give us all something to aspire to. Learning, taking on new passions, and sharing your garden with others! I live in a community with 2 acre parcels surrounding 140 acres with two ponds. My neighbors often come by and I share my new enthusiam for cut flowers and roses. We’ve discussed having garden parties, and I think Anne is right! In her memory, I will host a garden party this spring! Thank you Anne, and thank you Erin and crew for sharing your work, and so many resources.

    Reply
  687. JENNIFER HARLEY on

    Starting life at 60. I just turned 60 and I will admit I do to much dreaming and not enough doing. It might sound simple but going out and buying a book on learning a skill, wow . I think so many of us sit and look at videos and tutorials and get overwhelmed at the skills a person has We have forgotten the value of a well written book.

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  688. Charmaine Anthony on

    Having just turned 64, Anne’s view on starting her passion at 60 was not too late. Even at 20 I was lead to believe I was too old for nursing school, at 40 too old to be a dog trainer, the later I ignored. Anne’s rare beauty was not only her roses but her willingness to share with the world her knowledge.

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  689. Sue on

    I loved that Anne planted roses to grow up in trees!

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  690. Rikki on

    How amazing a woman! I felt moved to tears reading that at 60, an age she once felt was old, was over a third of life ago compared to the age she was at that time. That no matter who you are, how old, or where in life, you can do anything. I feel this deeply to my core. I’ve done a lot, but I also know there’s an infinite amount of life left waiting for me and I’ve never felt so encouraged to do so as I do now. What a gift it must have been to know Anne.

    Reply
  691. Kc Jochim on

    Such an inspiring woman with a beautiful story. She makes me feel validated at 55 that yes I can start on a new journey. But what inspires me the most about Anne is generosity of her flowers and her knowledge. She truly must of been a beautiful rare gem herself. Beautiful series!

    Reply
  692. Sara on

    “I pursued many dreams after turning 60, including starting my own contracting company and building over 25 (mostly Victorian style) houses, traveling the world, and my study of the older roses. It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams.” – what an inspiration and what a life full of accomplishments…many after 60, where some never complete in a lifetime. Never stop growing and chasing your dreams…what an inspiration! Plus the part about noticing the prejudice in yourself and overcoming it. We are amazing creatures us women, and it’s easy to forget sometimes just how much we can do if we put our minds to it! ;)

    Reply
  693. Joanne Mulloy on

    As someone in my early sixties, I was inspired by the fact that she did so much in that one third of her life after 60. What an amazing story and a reminder that we still have so much to offer and create our own legacy, such as Anne’s. She lived an incredible life of adventure and generosity! It inspires me to follow the threads of my own passions and interests to see where it takes me and maybe I have over 30 more years to realize those dreams. Thank you for sharing this incredible connection with Anne and for preserving an important aspect of her legacy for the world to enjoy.

    Reply
  694. Denise Ahl on

    “My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.” Keep moving…stay out of bed. Really sums it all up. What a life she has led. Truly unstoppable! I keep picturing her trees with roses growing through them and can’t wait to try it at my place! Thanks for the inspiration!

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  695. Olivia on

    I am always blown away by how much fear can limit us. Anne shared that she did not let her gender shrink her life and that’s my take away.
    I hope that in my sixties I can continue to live a full life and fill it with meaningful work and roses.
    ( Grateful to Anne and thanks Erin) !

    Reply
  696. Wanda Vanderveen on

    What a woman! Favorite part was when she said the most important part of your garden is to share it with friends. Brilliant advice.

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  697. Laura Wood on

    This quote from Anne inspired me the most, “To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy.”. How perfect is this! This is exactly what I feel in my soul about all flowers! About filling homes and lives with such touching beauty! That really is the greatest legacy!

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  698. Patricia Loehr on

    Anne’s insistence on sharing inspired me the most. Do not be stingy …love given away grows more love. Sharing one’s time and talents has no down side and is key to a meaningful, robust life.

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  699. K on

    Anne was an AMAZING woman! I am 55 starting this new adventure with flowers. I wonder how much I will be able to accomplish in the next 5 years…really 4 1/2. I too believe we should keep on learning. One of the things I noticed about Anne’s life is how diverse her interests were and how she was SO successful in what she set out to do…with tenacity starting when she was 3 or 4 and racing to the water. That spirit never left her. Such a great reminder to think bigger, learn more, and don’t limit what can be accomplished.

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  700. Rita Guitron on

    What a treasure and how fortunate to have been able to share and be a part of her journey.

    My favorite part was her formula specifically the first part of 3. Just because you’re a woman doesn’t mean there has to be limitations (except biceps and a beard lol). Face and persevere over prejudice and to be sure to look at yourself as well. This can be a metaphor for many things, ultimately, I think for me, it means don’t be afraid to try, put the time and effort into it and you will persevere, you will get past the challenges and learn from them and don’t be your worst enemy and prevent yourself from achieving your goals and/or dreams. At the end when you’ve done the work and have arrived, the reward will be 10-fold. Find your joy ladies. (& gents)

    Looking forward to persevering! thank you, Erin, for sharing Anne with us!

    Reply
  701. Melissa on

    I loved how she started something new at 60! Her comment about staying out of bed, be with people, don’t ever stop learning will keep you young. I just love that and am inspired to keep going, keep looking at the world with wonder.

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  702. Cindy Russell on

    What absolute joy this past hour has been reading all about your love for roses, gardening and people…..and Anne, she is a treasure beyond. Our snow here on Gabriola Island, (in Canada and not so far from you) has just melted and today our gardens show the promise of Spring….tiny fresh new leaves on the honeysuckle! I am retired and have all my days enjoying working in our gardens that grow more lovely as our years pass. You have reminded me of how much we look forward to our days when we live and learn in our gardens….Thank you Erin, I am so glad to have found
    you….Cindy Russell

    Reply
  703. Jamie on

    Anne shared the secret to living in her words:

    “My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.”

    We could not hope for more simple advice!

    Reply
  704. Katie B on

    Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship.

    Anne’s advice elicited an emotional response I did not expect when reading these posts. After being unsuccessful at vegetable gardening (but very successful at feeding local wildlife), I bought Floret Farms book with the intention of starting a cut flower garden this year. I read through each season in the book, envisioning myself preparing for and caring for beautiful blooms. I bought seeds in the January seed sale, with seeds of excitement taking root inside myself. I read these four blogs with the intention of soaking up every piece of advice on how to be successful. What I didn’t expect was to end the article in tears, knowing that the excitement of growing a cut flower garden comes from a place of wanting to share something beautiful with loved ones. Anne perfectly captured the sentiment of growing flowers, sharing them with friends and strangers to bring something lovely in what can be a difficult and isolating time. I look forward to taking the tips in these posts to brighten the days of those around me.

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  705. Ann on

    I am Ann without an “e.” I am 62 years of age. How inspiring to read Anne’s life story and hear her say at 60 years she still had well over 1/3rd of her life to live! What really inspired me was first her passion for her community and helping and giving back freely. Secondly ,with a focus on recognizing what you would like to do and studying and preparing for it, there is just about anything you can do! I have enjoyed roses in the 4 gardens I have lived in and planted over the last 12 years. I am moving again this year sometime and love the idea of always having a blooming garden around me. Perhaps it’s because my middle name is Rofe which is old English for ROSE! A beautiful interview! Thank you! 🌹

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  706. Cynthia Fuller on

    What an inspiring woman.i particularly enjoyed hearing about her early life. She obviously was passionate about what interested her from early childhood. It was inspiring to hear that she started out running away from the garden and then later in life it was her refuge.
    Nature has always inspired me. I grew my first garden at 19. I am now 62, retired and my passion can be my pursuit. In a previous house I had 75 rose bushes and the house I have now sadly does not even have one. I will be remedying that.
    You are both women to gain a great deal of knowledge from. I appreciate both of you for your willingness to inspire and share, truly grateful.

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  707. Kristina on

    “ Anne: Keep them watered, fertilized, and in a place with lots of sunshine. Roses, especially the old roses, are very easy to grow. However, inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy.”

    Wha a beautiful woman , her answers were so humbling , no matter what age you can always live your dream. She is truly inspiring . Thank you for this wonderful read.

    Reply
  708. Winter Cohen on

    Anne’s message and book on determination are so true and inspiring. We so often are self-limiting…
    Now I am looking for Ramblers! Will be sure to gift myself one of her rose books. Thank you again for sharing this story with us.

    Reply
  709. Aki.S on

    I’m so lucky to come across this articles even from Japan!

    The phrase by which I was most inspired is:
    “you should try to know yourself, your talents, and limitations, but be careful to not underestimate what you are capable of doing,” especially the part to know my limitation but not to underestimate my capability.
    I thought that was an important clue to achieve anything when I, living with a chronical disease, should have in mind, and should not let my handicap stop me from what I really love.
    Thank you very much for sharing this interview and the long backstory with us. I’ll come back to this interview whenever feeling tired or small, taking her words as kind of advice from a mentor.

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  710. Megan Allen on

    I loved her willingness to share her knowledge and beautiful garden with others. “ Roses, especially the old roses, are very easy to grow. However, inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy.”

    This reminds me of all you’ve shared, Erin. You’re carrying on her legacy.

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  711. Maureen deTar on

    It seems to me that she has lived many lives in one. I love her suggestion to go to lunch with friends and family. Ultimately through this time in our world, I have come to cherish time spent with others. It feeds my soul and brings new challenges and opportunities to me when I have felt so isolated. Growing roses has always been a passion of mine and I come from a long line of hybridizers. I am determined now to share this talent of propagation with my own grandchildren and pass it to another generation. May we all have dozens of gifted roses in our friend garden by the time we are 97. Oh, and my sixtieth birthday is coming up!

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  712. Nicole T on

    What a glorious life she led & it’s inspiring that she didn’t pursue many of her dreams until she turned 60.

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  713. Ruth on

    Wow I’m so encouraged by this incredible woman

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  714. Karen Lange on

    I love Anne’s resilience and her ability to reinvent herself through the journey we call life. A beautiful soul! ❤️ Thank you for sharing Erin.

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  715. Janet on

    What a wonderful lady! It’s so neat to hear that the roses will continue to live on.
    I was most inspired about her part on caring for roses. Water, fertilizer, etc., but most importantly, invite friends to your garden and share cuttings and pass them along. Don’t be stingy. This is friendship she said.
    Thank you for sharing the interview.

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  716. Lisa Younce on

    Anne is so inspiring, and to a 60 year old that really encouraged me the most! I think looking at my life as only 2/3 over is a great perspective.

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  717. Lisa on

    Such a great interview! I love the part about not underestimating yourself…you can do anything you put your mind, time, and effort into!

    Reply
  718. Desiree on

    I was very inspired with her comments, “don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy”. What a beautiful soul she was!

    Reply
  719. Michele Paciunas on

    Love this interview! Love how she says don’t let being a woman stop you unless you need a constant supply of testosterone, big biceps and a beard! Ha! I am sure it was such a gift to meet this lady. I, too started with roses later in life, and am so thankful for all the inspiration.

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  720. Rachel on

    Very beautiful! I love This story so much! Thank you for sharing with us all ~Rachel

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  721. Jen Worthington on

    Anne’s attitude and confidence allowed her not to be intimidated. Good advice for life or the garden. Anything is possible.

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  722. Katrina on

    As a healthcare worker who exclusively works in geriatrics, I can think of no greater lesson than “you are never too old to follow your dreams”. Love that she developed this passion at 60!!!!

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  723. Kevin L Cook on

    I was most inspired from Anne’s advice of continual education, sharing your garden, and spending time with old and new friends. How fulfilling it will be…and how fulfilled Anne must have been during the last month’s of her life. You can see the happiness in her smile during her visit to your farm. What an inspiration. She has given me hope that my own recent craziness and garden obsession to collect and learn as many and as much as I can about Narcissus at this time in my life…..might actually help me live longer! I know it will bring me great joy but I hadn’t thought about such life benefits. Thank you for sharing Anne and her story with us.

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  724. Nicol on

    I liked the part where she said women can do what men can do except the ‘big biceps’ part. And crazy she raised a wall herself using just a jack. Wow! Inspiring!

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  725. Judy Chandler on

    I find it inspiring that she accomplished so much after the age of 60 including amassing this incredible volume of heritage roses.

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  726. Lynne Resch on

    I was feeling a bit low today…. starting a flower farm at age 68, what am I thinking! Then I read this sweet interview.
    “You can’t become a rocket scientist without a great deal of study, and neither can anyone else.” That made me smile…… perhaps if I follow her example… “Life-long learning and growing keeps one engaged”, I’ll be around another 30 years!

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  727. Audrey Nielsen on

    I just had to copy and paste her amazing, spot on advice
    “ My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.”
    So thankful for this interview and I’m looking forward to getting to know her better as I read her books!

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  728. Ginny Sulya on

    Hi Erin, thank you for sharing this interview with Anne, I so enjoyed Anne’s talking about her legacy and sharing her garden with others. My hopes for my own garden and all that it could be is to share its beauty with others! Just being present in the moment, seeing the delicate blooms, smelling their fragrances and the sounds of the pollinators happily oblivious to anything but their work at hand! These roses all have a history and I hope I can be a part of preserving them for future generations! I truly am inspired to never let my age determine what I can do! In Anne’s timing, I’ve only just begun!

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  729. Rhonda on

    Thank you for sharing her story! I am in awe of her determination and spunk! How wonderful that her roses and her legacy will live on to help and educate others. I have planted several David Austin roses over the last few years along with local nursery roses. I am finding I love the ramblers more each year! Thank you!

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  730. Mia on

    It’s very inspiring for someone like me who just started gardening and had my 1st 6 roses last year. I love roses and just reading about Anne’s passion in life gives you hope and encouragement to do things you have always wanted to do.

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  731. Eilish murtha on

    I’d like to enter this competition not for myself but for my grandmother. We are apart due to covid and because she is going through chemo so it’s been a hard 2 years but we message almost every day, we always end up talking about our gardens, mine is a tiny town garden, hers, the garden that I was raised in, not overly large but definitely bigger than most here in the UK, through the years I’ve come to know every plant it’d ever help, annuals and biennials have been and gone they come and go but roses have always been a constant. Some of her roses are heirlooms in the way that they were once cuttings from her own grandmothers roses. My favourite part of the article is the mentions of cuttings and passing them on. I recently bought my own house and finally have my own little space to grow. When it js safe again to visit my nan and her garden, I shall be taking cuttings and carrying these heirlooms on and this inspires me and fills me with so much joy to think I could potentiallybe growing a plant that my grandmother has grown and so has her mother and her mother’s mother etc. This article really resonated with me and made me remember how precious my connection with my grandmother is and how we bonded over the garden so many years ago. I thibk if I was to win this competition for her she’d adore these books especially now that she’s Cooped up at home and unable to work in the garden as much as she takes time to heal. And then the bonus would be that when it’s safe to visit her again- I can flick through the books too with a nice cup of grandad made tea!

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  732. Amy on

    As someone who went back to college to get my masters degree at age 40 (and started a new career at 44), I love her comments regarding starting to grow roses at age 60. People think that by 35 you can’t change careers or start something new but really, it’s never too late, especially when it’s something you love doing.

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  733. Elizabeth Schraeder on

    I loved that she started her roses at age 60 and that she emphasizes that as a woman you can do much more than you think!

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  734. Bobbi Winniestaffer on

    Thank you to Erin and her amazing team at Floret for helping to spread the amazing story of Anne Belovich!

    I wish my grandmother would have gotten to meet someone like Anne and Erin. We lost her just before Christmas 5 years ago. She had such a small, but beautiful rose garden at every home I remember her living in, and there were a lot. Her love for making others happy through her food and flowers filled her life and has continued through her legacy with us grandkids. I cook, bake, and plant roses at my home for not only myself, but for others to enjoy.

    The most inspiring part of Anne’s story for me is that it’s never too late in life to do what you love regardless of age, sex, or education. If you try hard, and want it bad enough, it’s never too late to have a full, rewarding life doing what you love!

    This year I’ll be expanding my rose garden. I’m also starting my seed garden with the advise from Erin’s books and the online workshops.

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  735. Maria Lightner on

    Anne’s life story and her advice on following your passion are both inspiring. I just hope to God that her wonderful home and gardens stay in the family with her son and wife and thrive for generations to come.

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  736. Anna on

    I love that she started this passion later in life. Sometimes I feel like it’s no use setting up something new, even at my young age. But I should just try!

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  737. Jan on

    I loved that she said “don’t be stingy” to give cuttings to people and introduce people to old roses is an act of friendship and love. This is so true.

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  738. Jill Whiteman on

    I was most inspired by her comments about don’t let being a woman stop you from doing what is traditionally seen as a man’s job. As a full grown woman who stands at a whopping 4′ 10 ” tall I have learned to be very creative when tackling physical things that would be much easier for a man to do. Like Anne did with her use of the house jack to put walls up by herself. 2 years ago I bought a used rototiller to till a large area of my back yard for a vegtable and flower garden. My husband got it running for me and I proceded to till the area for the garden. It wasn’t easy hanging on to the tiller but I was determined to get it done and I did. I have always been on the old fashioned side and would love to learn how to grow and care for heirloom roses.

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  739. Beth Jann on

    It impressed me most that she was always running toward her dream. Escaping her mother’s garden to get to the water. Escaping to marry her first husband. And even when roadblocks were placed in her path: the fence in the garden, her first husband’s death when she was so young, she never gave up.

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  740. Michelle on

    This was such an inspiring, lovely series. Thank you all so much for putting this out there for all of us!

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  741. Debra Schwyhart on

    Anne was a woman of action – moving, learning and sharing! What a privilege to tour her garden and of course sharing her knowledge and her collection with Erin. As a result we will all benefit! What an amazing woman and inspiration to keep moving, learning and sharing in these trying times.

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  742. Teresa on

    I love this so much. As someone who’s keeps thinking it is too late for me to start gardening, or too hard, or start another passion… Anne’s message has really resonated with me. It isn’t too late. There is always time for late bloomers.

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  743. Mary Thompson on

    Anne did not start her rose journey until she reached the age of 60! I am 63, and to me, this is the most inspiring part of her interview! I have often felt that I was getting too old to begin growing roses or working with cut flowers. But reading this makes me realize that if you have a passion for something, it doesn’t matter how old you are. I would love to win a set of her books!

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  744. Merrilee Brooks Runyan on

    It’s the generosity that bubbles up throughout the interview. I love it when she says ‘don’t be stingy,’ that sharing roses is an act of love and friendship. It’s that spirit that infuses the entire interview and inspires me to grow more roses so that I can share them widely.

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  745. Denise Reed on

    I found the section on keep moving, don’t isolate yourself, keep learning and stay out of bed. I’m 72 years old and this advice went straight to my heart. She was a wise woman.

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  746. Lauren on

    I loved this series! Anne was an inspiring woman – I even took a screenshot of a quote from the interview for my own future reference:
    “My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.”
    Oh, and ofc her roses are gorgeous!

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  747. Lois Burn on

    The joy of sharing her joy so freely and passing forward the treasures she so carefully gathered was very meaningful to me. As I transition from mother to mentor I will take this memory into the future relationships I cultivate. Garden to Garden.

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  748. Caren on

    Ask yourself if the activity requires big biceps and a beard. If not, go ahead with your dreams and fight the prejudice where you find it.

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  749. Sabrina Cummins on

    Share.Dont be stingy.
    What an important message to carry in every aspect of life.

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  750. Marie Deforge on

    I found her whole interview inspiring, what a fascinating woman to sit with and converse. The most meaningful for me was her zest for life, and tackling your dreams, even the big ones and the seemingly difficult ones. I also enjoyed and will follow her advice on sharing from the garden with others.

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  751. Emily Marabotto on

    Anne’s story is so amazing. Such an inspiration to learn about her life and that at the age of 60 she followed her passions. Anne inspires me to pursue my dreams and believe in myself. Thank you Erin for sharing her legacy, and taking the torch and running with it. I’m in my first week of the Floret Workshop and know this was the right decision! I love all the learning and growth your platform has brought to my life. Now I need to get some rambling roses for my garden and get growing. Thank you ❤️

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  752. Rhonda Kobylski on

    Give, give, and give again. Never stop giving and sharing and inspiring others. Wonderful story and beautiful roses! Thank you.🌹

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  753. Christina N on

    Anne’s legacy advice to invite people into the garden and share the roses is such an inspiration. What a privilege we have to share beauty with one another through having people into the garden and giving generously. There are few things more stunning than a rose, save a welcoming and lavish heart.

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  754. Chloe on

    This was a wonderful interview! I resonated with the sentiment that you’re never too old to start and, particularly, her advice to: “Determine what it is you want to do and then acquire any skills or knowledge that you are going to need, get the books, take the classes… You need to study and become an apprentice.”

    I have been working in finance for 7 years, feeling overwhelming anxiety that this might be the rest of my life’s work – glued to a computer screen, analyzing investments, and feeling generally unfulfilled. I recently turned 30, which is quite young in the grand scheme of life, but was a milestone for me in realizing that I’m getting older, time is passing by faster and faster. Do I want this for the rest of my life? Then, I discovered the world of small-scale organic vegetable and flower farming – I’ve been reading all the books I can, listening to podcasts, watching YouTube videos, etc. And I’m going to pursue it in real life! I will be leaving my finance role in just a few months and my husband and I have accepted a position to begin a new journey as apprentices at an organic vegetable farm this Spring. This was a wonderful inspiration to keep acquiring the skills/knowledge that I need to gain to do what I want to do – and to be a lifelong learner! Loved this interview.

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  755. Rachel on

    An amazing woman! Her story helps rekindle the drive to chase my dreams – it’s never too late to start learning something new.

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  756. Lisa Barber on

    In Anne’s interview, I like that she said woman can do anything. Don’t limit yourself, even if you need biceps. I say that all the time. “ I wish I had biceps.”Anne seems like she was such an inspirational woman. I will definitely enjoy her books!!

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  757. Trish Sullivan on

    What a truly remarkable life! I so enjoyed hearing her inspirational words about continuing to find challenges and new passions after the age of 60, especially I am traveling that through that decade now.

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  758. Shilpa Patel-Singh on

    As a plants person myself I have lived by the philosophy of sharing plants and cuttings, while connecting with others through my garden. I love this quote as there truly is no other way to inspire and be inspired … “However, inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy.”

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  759. Julie Bailey on

    Anne’s interview was very inspiring, and I appreciate Floret publishing it! I am also approaching 60 years old, and I’ve never planted the first rose, so her testimony of starting at age 60 definitely inspired me!

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  760. Michelle Jacobs on

    I was amazed that she started her own contracting company after turning 60 and built 25 houses, she’s sounds like an amazing woman! I would love to win her books, but I will buy them if I don’t!! Loved the 4 posts about roses, I learned a lot, especially about propagating roses! And your flower farm is amazing! Thank you Erin!

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  761. Melissa Longman on

    WOMEN CAN DO ANYTHING! 💪 A statement I truly believe but sometimes need to repeat.

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  762. Leora on

    Its inspirational reading about the joy her garden brings to all, to share her garden and rose collection, that flowers are beautiful and magical and so are the love/friendship/connection they provide!

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  763. Klara Cramer on

    How could I even pick the most inspiring quote? Anne’s three keys of achieving big goals are so simple yet so hard to accomplish. I have always struggled with impatience with myself when it comes to learning new things, but since being faced with a monumental task of creating garden on a pile of construction rubble I will need to engrave her simple advice somewhere on the fence to remind myself that being an apprentice has no time limit on it, because life teaches us every day, mind you we don’t always learn our lessons every day. My mother in law had a beautiful garden, she loved English tea roses. After her death the garden declined rapidly and I didn’t have the time and skills to do anything about it. We now moved our father in law into our new home with us to care for him and I would love to create little English garden for him to enjoy and to honor mom, so I have a monumental task to learn about old English roses. I’m looking for ward to this journey.

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  764. Jordan K Massad on

    “Determine what it is you want to do and then acquire any skills or knowledge that you are going to need, get the books, take the classes.”

    Yes Ma’am Mrs. Anne! I plan to remain a curious student of my newly found and beloved passion of growing beautiful blooms.

    Thank you Erin and Team Floret for encapsulating this wonderful woman’s legacy.

    Reply
  765. Catherine Schuerman on

    What a lovely interview with a delightful lady! I could relate to her starting her study of roses late in life. I have done the same thing with art and hope I live a long life like Ann so I can excel like she did!

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  766. Angie Taylor on

    Anne played a tune on my heart strings! Sometimes us girls, especially over 50 need reminding to be brave and just have a go. Thank you Anne I will remember your love of life and beautiful roses. Thank you Erin for sharing Anne with us.
    Now to add more roses to my garden 💖

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  767. Heidi on

    My takeaway from this interview lies in admiring how she emerged from the ashes of tragedy, to go on to live such a full and beautiful life. This is something I think we all can admire and carry with us in this world <3

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  768. Laura Black on

    I just wrote down her statement about a passion for a hobby might indicate a talent that could become a career.
    I enjoyed seeing her beautiful roses, and i’m amazed at your drive to propogate and grow so many. I enjoyed your ‘Sanctuary’ episode of your show and i would like to see what your farm looks like now. I am sure it will be beautuful.

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  769. Rachel Clark on

    I love that she didn’t start collecting until she was 60 and how she really encourages you to go after your dreams. I also love that at 97 she was working on her first blog and website. I personally want to live until I die and Anne gave us a great example

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  770. Christy on

    “First, don’t let being a woman stop you from doing what is traditionally seen as a man’s job unless you really need a constant supply of testosterone to achieve your goal. Ask yourself if the activity requires big biceps and a beard. If not, go ahead with your dreams and fight the prejudice where you find it. Look carefully for the same prejudice in yourself. It could be lurking there without you realizing it and could cause you to not believe in yourself and to restrict you from following a difficult goal. If you are a man you are not apt to encounter prejudice in life’s goals because of your gender, but if you do don’t let it stop you…. On the other hand, you might want to pick something that comes to you more naturally. A passion for a particular hobby might be an indication of a special talent that could be pursued and turned into a rewarding career. Then, be willing to spend some time and energy preparing for what you want to do. I owe much of my success to this one.”

    Most inspired by how she “kept moving”, regardless of age. How insightful to remind us to dig deep for anything that would cause us to stop believing in ourselves and restrict us from following a difficult goal! This story moved me more than I thought it would. Thanks, Erin and team! And Anne.

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  771. Mari on

    One of my favorite quotes is “ You need to study and become an apprentice. “
    I am a teacher by trade and know how much it takes to accomplish something . To see the struggle and want to help, if you are not determined you’ll need longer or worst case fail. So when I started my flower business I soaked up ever bit I could find. Books, blogs, workshops and then while growing my own business. Now I want to have special cut varieties and I started my own rose garden. There’s so much to learn and at the moment I feel rather overwhelmed but it takes time, patience and committed. And when I see how much Anne has accomplished throughout her life I feel inspired to take on as many challenges as I can take to thrive. And somit begins…!

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  772. Carol Bonsignore at Local Roots Floral Design on

    Such a treasured interview. My favorite part was her starting roses at age 60. I turn 60 this year and after reading this interview, have decide that his Spring I am going to start a rose garden which I have wanted to do for many years. Thanks Erin for saving some of her rose varieties and this wonderful story and inspiring me to get on with it!.

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  773. Brittany Eilert on

    Her love of life, courage and commitment to keep teaching herself anything she put her mind to was especially inspiring. I love that she did not pick up roses until she was 60. This gives such an encouragement to someone with great dreams and goals but who fears their ship has sailed. She kept
    Learning. Such a beautiful example to follow after. Thank you Floret!

    Reply
  774. Janet Coffey on

    I too am inspired by everything Anne has done. I was glad to see she started her rose garden at 60. I just started growing flowers last year at the age of 69!!! We have 10 acres of pasture that my husband says I am ruining!!!! I love what I am doing and Anne has given me the encouragement to continue. I am adding roses to my flower garden this year.

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  775. Rebecca Neilson on

    “inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important.”

    I love that line because that is exactly what got me started with growing flowers. My love of flowers stems from my grandmother, but the inspiration and courage to start to grow flowers started when a friend of mine who loves to garden gave me a tour of her garden and sent me home with a bouquet of flowers and then gave me some seeds the following spring. Her enthusiasm and generosity lit something in my soul!

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  776. Tara Ferrari on

    I am always in awe and somewhat surprised by people who seem to be able to live multiple lives in their lifetime. To hold many and very different jobs. In todays modern culture, generally we think of that as impossible. Over the last couple of years, I have found the joy and fulfillment in gardening that is seen emanating from the flower and farming communities. I often yearn to drop what I’m doing and decided to become something new! While it’s not that easy, Anne re-inspires that passion in me. Hopefully the flower farm i develop one day will be one that would impress the Anne Belovich’s of the world

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  777. Chris on

    The portion of the interview that was inspiring for me was when she said, “First, don’t let being a woman stop you from doing what is traditionally seen as a man’s job unless you really need a constant supply of testosterone to achieve your goal. Ask yourself if the activity requires big biceps and a beard. If not, go ahead with your dreams and fight the prejudice where you find it.” I grew up way up North and although my community recognized traditional roles, I didn’t fell that I was restricted to emulate those roles because when there was work to do on the family farm, everyone pitched in to get the work done. It wasn’t until I was older and started to venture out of my home town community, that I felt the pressure to ‘stay in my lane as a female.’ There was a lot of societal pressure to conform to what was expected of me. I did not fall to those pressures and was faced with harsh opposition when I entered male dominated fields. I know my persistence has served as inspiration for other young women to follow their dreams and not be limited to what others think they should be.

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  778. Mary Jane Landau on

    …be careful not to underestimate what you are capable of doing.

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  779. Deborah on

    Which part? All of it – especially on a day when I was inadvertently forced to see my almost 60 something self through the eyes of a younger person. HECK!!

    Your interview with Anne provides inspiration and an absolute lifeline. I no longer feel ‘too old’ to pursue my flower farming dream. There are things to learn, workshops to attend and books to read. Unexpectedly, it could be one about a Rosarian’s seafaring adventure whilst sitting beneath a canopy of rambling rose blooms, planted last winter to pretty up my neighbour’s lilac tree when its blooms fade. According to Anne, my plan might just work and all our neighbours may just get to share that unexpected beauty – even if it does take a few more decades :D

    Thank you for sharing.

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  780. Deb Halverson on

    It should be a requirement for girls in every school to read her inspiring words! She is truly proof with hard work and believing in yourself you can accomplish anything!

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  781. Laura T on

    I love where she says that you are never too old to try something new. I see you, Erin, and how you started growing flowers as a young mother. I did, too, never to the extent and success you have, but always lacking in self confidence. Now that I am over 50 years old (and I feel the same as I always have!), I see that it is NOT TOO LATE!

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  782. Dawn Schilling on

    Anne didn’t let anything deter her, including her age and gender. She learned the skills she needed to accomplish what she set out to do. What an inspiration! Also, I love her encouragement to continue to have goals and to keep learning, even later in life. It is what keeps you young.

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  783. Erin on

    I am most inspired by her sailing! How amazing!

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  784. Heather on

    “It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams”. I love this!! It seems like we are suppose to have it all figured out in the first half of our life. But really the first half we just fake it til we make it! When I say “make it” at least for me, it’s believing in myself. Allowing my dreams to become a reality, regardless of the options of others. What a beautiful inspiring woman.

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  785. Jane Walker on

    ‘I still donate to this important cause and others that lessen the suffering of animals, both domestic and wild, and work to conserve biodiversity on our planet. Much more work needs to be done in these areas.’

    These words encapsulate Anne’s generosity and her willingness to share and care with all around her. She was a truly remarkable woman.
    It is wonderful that her roses will live on in many gardens. As will her spirit.

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  786. Julia on

    “First, don’t let being a woman stop you from doing what is traditionally seen as a man’s job unless you really need a constant supply of testosterone to achieve your goal… Look carefully for the same prejudice in yourself.”

    Wish I had her wise words to guide me during medical school and residency, grateful to have them now navigating a male dominated career. What a brave, incredibly full life and what an inspiration!

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  787. Brittany Yu on

    This is beautiful! I hope my small new rose bushes will one day grow into a thing of beauty!

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  788. Clarisse on

    I loved how she said to simply share the beauty. To get up everyday and keep moving. 💜it was such an inspiring article to read about her life 💜

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  789. Nina on

    I was inspired by her book explaining her journey; her “determination.” I loved hearing about everything she’s accomplished and about always sharing your roses as a sign of love and friendship and not to be “stingy.” I would love to read her books and also her Voyage of Determination book as well. I think my husband would also enjoy the inspiring nature of the book. Thanks for the wonderful read Erin!

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  790. Abigail on

    I was encouraged by Anne saying, “be willing to spend some time and energy preparing for what you want to do”. How true! And how hard when we often find ourselves in packed schedules & lifestyles. Yet, “Anything worth doing is worth doing well”. That usually equals TIME.
    I remind myself that little bits of time devoted to a project do matter and do add up. For example, spending 30 minutes a day on a project adds up to 3 hours a week, then 12 hours a month.

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  791. Chrisdee on

    I sincerely have read the part “I remember when I turned 60. I thought 60 was so old. That was almost 37 years ago, well over one-third of my lifetime so far.” 4 times. It solidified something in me – you can accomplish anything – doesn’t matter your age. Thank you Anne!

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  792. Mubaraka on

    “My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.”
    Simple and wise words gleaned and distilled from living a life most of us can only dream about! I am in my early fifties and her life and words about all the things achieved after she was 60, gives me strength and hope.
    “We will have our first pruning party in February with area old garden rose enthusiasts and garden clubs. Consider these kinds of events in your local community.”
    And her gardening philosophy of love and share! The world can use this in every facet of our lives.

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  793. Lynn on

    I loved when you asked her how we can carry on her legacy her answers were so simple…keep them watered, fertilized and in lots of sunshine; share the beauty with others; share cuttings! Such a sweet, simple way to ask others to carry on her legacy💕 Thank you Erin for this delightful series.

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  794. Sylvie Manderstrom on

    Such a wonderful interview Erin! My absolute favourite part of this interview is where she speaks about real life. Her formula for achieving any difficult goal really touched my soul as it is an incredible reminder that we are perfectly capable of achieving anything we set our mind to. Such wise words spoken by a wonderful woman who has lived a long filled life.

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  795. Chessy on

    My favourite part of your interview with Anne is just how open and fluid with life she was. She didn’t define herself by one aspect of her life but was a sailor, a teacher, a botanist, a wife and mother, a contractor, a rambling rose expert, and even a blogger! I had never heard of Anne before this interview and I am so inspired so thank you for introducing me to her. I always thought you had to have one passion in life to put everything into, but that never worked for me. Now, hearing Anne’s story I feel like I have permission to be many things and even change and evolve with this precious life. I will definitely be reading the account of her sailing voyage for even more inspiration!

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  796. Alexandra on

    I love the part where she talks about sharing the garden with others being important. I’m slowly but surely building my garden from the ground up and this is the number one focus I have… “How can I create a space that others feel welcome in? A place where the cares of the world and hours melt away?”

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  797. Mary Beth on

    As someone turning 59 soon, it was inspiring to read that she too considered herself old at the time. What if she had continued to believe that? Look at all she accomplished in those 37 years! Thank you, Anne. You are a dear.

    Reply
  798. Vanessa Tentes on

    I am just in awe over Anne and your entire process of documenting her life, her legacy, her adventures and of course, her beautiful roses. What inspired me the most is her fearlessness to conquer anything, regardless of gender, and her words on overcoming prejudice around us and within us. Her words of “biceps and beard” will stay with me, as a a reminder and inspiration that we really are capable of whatever we set our minds too. Thank you for this incredible post, and sharing her with us Erin!

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  799. Allison Villard on

    When Anne talked about inviting people into her garden it inspired me to open a local rose garden that people from everywhere could come and visit. A botanical garden of sorts but just for roses. Her dedication to the old roses and preserving them is very inspiring. I also loved how she talked about getting things done as a woman. The way she made being a woman a strength rather than a weakness was incredible. I am going to take that strength with me through the rest of my life.

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  800. Adriana Anderson on

    One of the things I look forward to the most is having a garden that visitors can experience and escape into. Currently, my husband and I love having people over and entertaining them outside if the day isn’t too hot or cold. Our garden is so young but many people are amazed by the garden each year. I really enjoyed when Anne said, “Keep them watered, fertilized, and in a place with lots of sunshine. Roses, especially the old roses, are very easy to grow. However, inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy. “, because I can definitely agree and relate. I also appreciate this quote because growing roses does intimidate me but she makes it seem simple :)

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  801. Janis Eppensteiner on

    What an amazing lady!! Knowing basically nothing about growing roses, Anne’s story has inspired me to learn. I love that she was co-creator of NOAH since I am an animal lover myself. Also, her advice to stay out of bed, go out to lunch (!), read and be open to new ideas is the perfect motivation for the mid-winter doldrums in Ohio. Beautiful story!

    Reply
  802. Jackie on

    A great reminder to me that I can do whatever I put my mind to. In the past I haven’t let being a female slow me down. Trained to be a meat cutter and took auto shop and wood shop in evening adult school once I graduated high school. (Girls couldn’t take those classes in high school). Pulled an engine out of an old car. Time for me to get going on a new project.

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  803. Erin Clark on

    Anne’s advice to share cuttings and open your home and garden up to develop friendships was so inspiring! And I love the visual of your garden growing as your friendship grows. This was such a lovely interview. Thank you for taking so much time to share and preserve her legacy!

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  804. Marsha on

    What inspired me the most from this interview were the things I need to most remember for myself:

    “have people over all the time to enjoy the property, and many friendships as lovely as the roses developed”

    “It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams. My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.”

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  805. Bryony on

    ‘It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams.’
    And maybe our dreams change and evolve over time! The nostalgia of reinventing a childhood garden, writing books, preserving the best timeless classics. Amazing amazing lady. Words to live by- we only hold ourselves back.

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  806. Sydney on

    What a fantastic interview – I actually teared up a little reading about her life. Her advice to keep learning and keep your mind open and moving really spoke to me, as well as her comments about starting “late” in life. I’m only 30 and sometimes it feels like it’s too late for me to take up something new, so to read about a woman who discovered a new passion at 60, when she still had 1/3 of her life left to live, really made an impact on how I look at life. Thank you for sharing her story!

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  807. Terry on

    Her understanding how we each make Rose gardening, though I do not doubt in any form, most valuable when shared : Anne – Keep them watered, fertilized, and in a place with lots of sunshine. Roses, especially the old roses, are very easy to grow. However, inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy.

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  808. Barbara on

    As I am looking at turning 62 in a couple of weeks, it is so inspiring to know that she was just beginning a wonderful long lived chapter in her life at that age. I love the advice to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.” That is what I plan to do for the next 30 years.
    Thank you for sharing this beautiful interview.

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  809. Kasey Rainey on

    Anne’s advice at the end to volunteer helping to weed and take care of rose gardens is further proof to me that I’m on the right path. I’ve been considering (for years now) starting a branch of the American Rose Society in my area because the closest one is more than 2 hours away. I am going to make it a point to do two things this year: find a place to volunteer regarding rose care and make an action plan to get a chapter of the ARS going in my area! Thank you Erin for this series of posts and thanks to Anne for all her wisdom and good works. :)

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  810. Amber on

    Wow, what an inspiring human and what incredible images of her garden. Just what I needed today.
    It is clear from her own accomplishments that she never let the obstacles stand in her way, and that I find the most inspiring.

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  811. Stephanie Liller on

    Erin, this was fantastic to read, and what an incredible tribute to Anne. I as well as many of us aspiring gardeners, look up to incredible legends like her and yourself. I think what stuck out to me the most was

    “ Determine what it is you want to do and then acquire any skills or knowledge that you are going to need, get the books, take the classes.” – Anne

    This reminds me so much of the content you share with us in your wisdom and books to help those wanting to learn to grow those skills and knowledge. Thank you to determined women like you and Anne, who are making a vast and incredible move in the world to making it a better place.

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  812. Erin McCracken on

    I love that she started her journey with roses later on in her life. I only starting truly loving gardening after I had my kids; I still struggle with it sometimes as well. It just confirms my belief that it doesn’t matter when you do something, so long as you do it and love it, that’s all that matters.

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  813. Whitney Smith on

    I’m so inspired by her passion for learning. I have long been someone who learns from books and then stores the knowledge away. Reading this makes me want to go do something with the knowledge. The part about sharing with others brought tears to my eyes. Lovely.

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  814. Lizzie Swartz on

    I was thinking I was becoming too old to start something new; that I was behind! But her advice to start at any age particularly resonated with me.

    Thanks for such an extraordinary interview of an extraordinary woman.

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  815. Laura on

    The quote from her book about sailing “…be careful not to underestimate what you are capable of doing”. I am closer to the beginning of my life, so to speak, and I have big dreams that could easily seem too big if I let them. Inspiring to read what Anne was capable of doing with the right perspective!

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  816. Bambi Halcomb on

    My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.  
    Such Great Wisdom and Advice, especially for this aging grower that needs to convince her body she can do this on the daily.

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  817. Kirsten F on

    Thank you so much for capturing this and bringing her story to those who would never have other wise found her. What an inspiration for a continual dedication to life long learning and in continuing to try and do things that you otherwise thought you could not. I need more Roses.

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  818. Bethany on

    Erin, thank you so much for sharing this! I am inspired by the thought that I could live to be 97 (my own grandmother is 92!) and that I have plenty of years ahead of me to learn and grow! My family recently moved and bought a few acres of land—I am so excited to continue to learn how to grow things! Last year’s attempt at a cut flower garden was a flop, but my tiny salad garden was a win! I’m so enjoying your content and excited to be planning for this year, learning from last year’s successes and failures!

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  819. Ruby Albert on

    What inspired me the most was the fact she started this rose career when she was 60 and look how far she came!! Her attitude to life is amazing! Her advice to life is amazing. The fact that she was making a website at 97 is amazing!!! I’m an awe of her and I think I need my own collection of roses now but I’ll need to find space haha!!

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  820. Marcia Sharkey on

    I especially enjoyed her commentary on learning new skills. What an absolutely amazing woman. Talented in such a variety of areas. Looking forward to reading her books, especially “A Voyage of Determination “. Thanks for sharing this unique friendship with us!

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  821. Trinity Rinear on

    It is inspiring to be reminded that you truly can do anything if you put your mind to it and put in the work, study, and time. It is a simple statement, but so profoundly true, that “you can’t become a rocket scientist without a great deal of study, and neither can anyone else.”

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  822. Becky on

    Very poignant for me, I’ll be 60 later this year and this is a wonderful reminder that it’s never too late to follow your dreams. :) Thanks for posting this.

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  823. Savannah De martimprey on

    Life really threw her a curve ball, and she caught it. I think that’s the general theme I loved in this article. Also there are different seasons in life, and how they build on each other is beautiful.

    My favorite:
    “My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.”

    My mother in law who is in her 60s, but looks like a 20 year old gives the same advice.

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  824. Beth Mears on

    I was so thankful to read about someone else who loves the Old Fashioned ramblers and climbers and who allowed them to do their wild thing to such a beautiful extent. I was impressed by her amazing foresight in planting these beauties all around her property… imagine bringing home a truckload of roses from a nursery!!! Heaven on earth! Thanks to this wonderful woman, and her amazing tenacity during her lifetime, roses in their most elemental form will continue to thrive and show us that something so unspeakably beautiful is also a thing of strength and endurance.

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  825. Lyka W on

    I love the idea that it’s never too late to start something new. Thirty-seven years is more time than a lot of people spend on one thing. That’s so inspiring.

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  826. Paige Petticrew on

    I love how she state you are never too old to start something new! As a younger person starting a career in horticulture it is exciting to me to know that if I allow myself I can be open to so many opportunities!

    Anne speaks as she was such a giving person, in her share of plants, love for horticulture, and passion for helping others! This is truly a testament of what a fantastic person she really was, as so many people now are not as giving with their knowledge without receiving something in return.

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  827. Angela Kuhl on

    I love her advice on keep learning and keep moving. Do not isolate yourself. Stay out of bed and meet a friend for lunch. I honestly believe that is the key to living such a beautiful long life. One of my favorite aunts, she was 89, recently passed away. Se walked two miles everyday and was sharp as a tack. Thank you for sharing Erin!

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  828. Michelle Richmond on

    It’s incredably eye opening to read about a woman of 97 starting her own website and blog simply because she had always wanted to do it. Letting go of a mindset that limits your options by age is so freeing and now we have the beauty and wisdom of her written posts to look forward to and learn from. It’s never to late to contribute something beautiful to the world.

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  829. Melanie Corey on

    I was so taken by her saying that you can become anything you want! If you struggle with some part of what you want to be, then study to become better! It’s never to late to start your dreams no matter the age. All of her wisdom and livelihood is so encouraging!

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  830. Carlee on

    What I loved about her interview was that she found we women don’t need men to be and feel strong and capable. We just need determination and something we love and are fascinated by so much that we can’t help but go after it. It’s very sad that her first husband died and I’m sure it broke her heart, but she made a beautiful life out of the ashes of grief.

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  831. Melissa Ferrari on

    I was most inspired by her comment that starting her passion for roses at 60 wasn’t late at all considering she had 37 years to devote to them. It’s so important to keep finding new hobbies that you love, give your life meaning and keep you mentally sharp. Thanks for this interview.

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  832. Deborah on

    What inspired me the most was, it’s never too late to start!

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  833. Elie Jeanne Ouellet on

    This article brought me tears. She truly was a beautiful soul! Her Advice to keep moving, read and stay open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development is what stuck with me the most but also how she seemed like a thankful, positive and generous human. She truly is an inspiration and an example of determination and courage.

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  834. Clare Haig on

    What inspired me most from Anne’s interview was to gather a group of old rose lovers together and to help care for precious collections of what we, in New Zealand call heritage roses. I can think of places in private hands that having been built up over the years are now priceless but the owners are becoming too frail to put the work in. But there are also public collections that council staff either don’t know what they’ve got or don’t have the time to look after them – or both. Thank you Erin for sharing such a special interview.

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  835. Hannah on

    Thank you for this interview. Anne’s story and her message are needed by so many and I am grateful for your introduction to her. I can’t wait to get my hands on her books! Her perspective is a life changing one, especially if you have that fire (drive, energy, voice, feeling) inside saying you can do bigger things, yet feel held back, if only by your own mind. I love how she talked about not isolating yourself, another message we’ve needed in the US for decades.

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  836. Kim Bensing on

    I am a 56-year-old floral artist whose formal training is as an Art/Creative Director. I only began floral art & design 5 years ago.
    Therefore this phrase inspired me the most: “My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family.”
    My husband’s grandfather founded a handbell company in Pennsylvania after he retired. He also lived well into his nineties and had the same philosophy about work. It’s so important to not focus on age or perceived limitations. We need to keep learning, try something new every day, look for inspiration everywhere and go to lunch with friends often!!!! It’s so important to stay connected and be passionate.

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  837. Hannah on

    Thank you for this interview. Anne’s story and her message are needed by so many and I am grateful for your introduction to her. I can’t wait to get my hands on her books! Her perspective if a life changing one, especially if you have that fire (drive, energy, voice, feeling) inside that says you can do bigger things but feel held back, if only by your own mind. I love how she talked about not isolating yourself, another message we’ve needed in the US for decades.

    Reply
  838. Haley Burns on

    I loved this entire interview, she is such an inspiration and I hope to continue to live my life and learn new things and follow my passions as she has! ❤️❤️❤️

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  839. Abbi on

    “Keep moving…Spend time with family and friends… Sharing is the most important…”
    Lovely reminders to perpetuate life! A good story & beautiful photos. Thanks for sharing.

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  840. Lisa on

    Anne’s generosity in sharing her roses and her knowledge is such an important example. Seeking education for yourself and passing on what you know to interested people helps link the generations. The last conversation I had with my father was about some wild roses. He harvested hips for me and we had a great chat about roses and propagation. He didn’t make it back to give them to me himself but the roses sprouted and I will keep on the journey with them always thinking of my Dad and his love of learning.

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  841. Iris Saligman on

    My rose garden is one of my joys in life and am excited to plant more old roses and climbing roses. Ann’s advice reminds me of some of the things my mother used to say, “keep moving, stay out of bed, don’t isolate yourself, be social, read and be open to new ideas and commit yourself to lifelong learning.” That is such good advice.

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  842. Janine S. on

    As a woman in a male dominated field every day I go to work I feel like I need to fight. Sometimes this gets daunting, and I get frustrated with myself for not always having the energy to fight. I love this wise lady, as she put it very beautifully, “Ask yourself if the activity requires big biceps and a beard. If not, go ahead with your dreams and fight the prejudice where you find it. ” To know that she, even at 97, had the energy to fight all those years gives me perspective that not only is it the right thing to do, it’s our obligation to keep fighting, especially for the younger generations. She was a beautiful, strong, powerful soul with wisdom that I am so grateful you captured in your interview. I will always remember her words when I feel tired. Keep going until you’re called to heaven.

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  843. Laurel on

    I love when Anne says you can do anything a man, can do except those thing that require strength, but there are other ways around that. A true feminist!

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  844. Arlene Trabona on

    In her book A Voyage to Determination she realizes she is capable of accomplishing very difficult goals. She feels that being a woman should not stop you from going ahead to achieve your goals. If you know yourself, your talents and limitations. If you have the passion then your talents should be pursued. Always be willing to spend your time and energy preparing for what you want to do. She inspires me to go ahead and achieve my goals! She encourages women to believe.

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  845. GregTumidanski on

    What a joy to share ! My inspiration came from…. “A passion of a particular hobby might be an indication for a special talent that could be pursued and turned into a rewarding career”. Those words from Anne encourage any one …. at any age … to follow their passion … to share your passion with others!

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  846. Joy Smith on

    I am most inspired by her encouragement to start new things at 60 yrs of age! I am 61yrs old…and while the wear and tear of dairy farm life is rearing its ugly head…I am encouraged to believe that I dont need to think I should be “slowing down”! I am still young! Thank-you, Erin for sharing het life, roses and inspiration with us!

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  847. Martina Ballard on

    “Ask yourself if the activity requires big biceps and a beard.” This is priceless…I’ll remember it forever!

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  848. Charlene on

    This was a wonderful interview and I was thrilled that you shared it with your followers. When Anne mentioned that 60 years old wasn’t really old and how many accomplishments she had after turning 60, it was so inspiring for me, a gardener at 65! Her words come from a lifetime of experience and are full of wisdom and encouragement for all of us. Thank you for this beautiful post.

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  849. Nicole Schoor on

    I loved when she said “inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy.” This interview was so full of gems Erin, thank you for sharing and for not being ‘stingy’

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  850. Carmen on

    I love that she emphasizes that we can do hard things and that we should stay curious and delight in possibility and lifelong learning. Stag curious and see where it leads.I also loved that Anne encouraged generosity in her pursuits. I really felt inspired by this interview.

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  851. Danielle Gibbs on

    As a mother to young children, I loved the visual of Anne running down the cliffs to the sea and her mother making her come back to the safety of the garden. Sometimes our children run away from us for adventure/independence or whatever. I love how she returned.

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  852. Merideth on

    What a treasure! Thank you for sharing her wisdom and legacy with others. I appreciated so much this part of the interview, “It is never too late to act on your goals …. My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.”

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  853. Vince on

    I am amazed how peoples’ lives are formed from decisions made at an early age as Anne stated how getting married so young formed the rest of her life. And what an amazing, productive life she had. Thank you for sharing.

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  854. Sarah Brunner on

    I just turned 44 and am entering my 6th year of flower farming. When I started I already felt like I was starting late. I have enjoyed pursuing many passions over my life, but lately I have worried that I won’t be able to start many new adventures because of being “too old” to start at the beginning of anything. That is why this part of Anne’s story struck me so deeply;
    “I remember when I turned 60. I thought 60 was so old. That was almost 37 years ago, well over one-third of my lifetime so far.”- Anne
    It’s easy to lose perspective on the potential of life when burrowed down on one’s current circumstances. Anne’s story is a refreshing reminder that it is possible to live and experience even more.

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  855. Carolyn Thompson on

    Firstly, I think this is my favorite interview that you have published. You are very lucky to have met her – I love feisty old ladies. My favorite passage in the interview is. “First, don’t let being a woman stop you from doing what is traditionally seen as a man’s job unless you really need a constant supply of testosterone to achieve your goal. Ask yourself if the activity requires big biceps and a beard. If not, go ahead with your dreams and fight the prejudice where you find it.” – Thank you again for taking the time out to share this – absolutely wonderful.

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  856. Peggy San Roman on

    I had to laugh when I got to the end of this post, asking for my favorite sentiment. While I was reading the post I had to stop, copy a paragraph and email it to a friend before I could resume reading! That paragraph was “My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.” Wise and wonderful words from a truly inspirational woman. Thank you, Erin, for sharing Anne’s beautiful story with us.

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  857. Susan Stevenson on

    She lived her life every day as an opportunity to learn, dream, work and make the world a better place. Simple to say but harder to actually do over a century!

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  858. Mandi on

    I’m most impressed with her starting roses at 60 years old! I often find myself think because I’m 40, it’s too late to begin something new. I’ve already started roses, but I’m more inspired than ever to start the piano and French!

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  859. Mary Irvine on

    I loved Anne’s Steps to Achieving a Goal and her advice to check to see if testosterone is truly required. Anne learned the necessary trades for housebuilding and proceeded to build a number of houses. This is a good example of a limitation that many women would feel, but it can be overcome if one has unexplored aptitudes in that regard. Trying is the only way to find out! I liked that Anne included the possibility that men might face prejudice too, and if they do, that they should rise above it. It is wonderful that Anne’s beautiful and extensive garden will be duplicated and will live on! I hope to travel to see it and to purchase a couple of her Rose books to add to my library. I am very inspired by her life!

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  860. Liz Conner on

    What an inspiration she is!
    I loved when she said, “However, inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy.”. This reminds me of you Erin, and giving away the dahlias, and how wholeheartedly you teach others and help them to grow in their own way. There is far too much fear over competition and giving too much away. I can’t wait to plant my rose garden. My Uncle, whoo lived to be 90 years old had a wonderful rose garden. We will be replicating it on our property in his memory and honor this summer.

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  861. Sherry Donovan on

    “Don’t let being a woman stop you……and look for prejudice in yourself.” Powerful words that are especially relevant in today’s world. This is an amazing interview with questions that allowed Mrs. Belovich the opportunity to pass along wonderful insight from a life well lived.

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  862. Debra Fortney on

    I loved reading your interview with Anne. Her story reminds me a bit of Tasha Tudor another amazing woman who was an amazing gardener and illustrated children’s books, and lived to the ripe old age of 92.

    I am 62 and was inspired to read how she went on to built houses, write books, etc all after age 60! I am an avid gardener and plan to go back and read this article again whenever I feel the need for inspiration.

    Anne’s life was a life well lived. Thanks for sharing her story. I have over 30 rose bushes and my garden is about 1.5 acres. I would love to educate myself further by reading her rose books.

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  863. Brenda on

    I don’t think I could find enough words to say about such an amazing woman. Thank you for sharing her story. I’ve worked in an industry, considered a “man’s job” so I understand that, the depth of her determination to be successful and independent in her work. What a spirit she had, and so important to carry that forward. I loved her advocacy and kindness for the animals. Very inspirational.

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  864. Danielle Studley on

    Wow, this is a keeper! I think I’ll print it out and tuck it somewhere so when I randomly find it again some day it will inspire me some more. I love her theme throughout… she starts the interview with “Life-long learning and growing keeps one engaged. “ And her answer to the question “Your passion for roses started much later in life. Do you have any advice for someone who feels like it’s too late to pursue their dreams?” was so good I copied it and forwarded to several of my friends.

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  865. Melanie on

    What stands out if her ability to love herself and be keenly aware of her value. That is such a challenge for a lot of people. She’s clearly a kind and humble woman, but she knows how special and skilled she is. All of her interview was incredibly touching and inspiring.

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  866. Margaret on

    I wholeheartedly agree with Anne that giving a rose cutting to someone is an act of love and friendship. When I see my roses growing in my friend’s gardens, I feel like a proud grandma.

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  867. Liza Swenn Martin on

    Anne’s encouragement regarding not letting gender limit your dreams and goals was so supportive and inspiring. My mother was such a woman. She molded me in the same way as I have my daughter. At sixty plus years I’ve bought a defunct farm, and with my daughter of forty plus years we are bringing it back to life with Heritage Breed Shetland Sheep and heirloom vegetables. Antique flowers are also part of the plan.

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  868. Meredith Brown on

    I was inspired by her not getting into roses until after she was 60 years old! Her passion about following dreams, and it’s never too late was beautifully inspiring to me!

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  869. Julie Woods on

    I really liked the part of the interview where Anne talked about turning 60 and said she’d thought 60 was so old. I just turned 60 a few weeks ago and was feeling just like Anne. So interesting and inspiring to see all she accomplished! Not to mention the beautiful legacy she has set in place. Love it!

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  870. Mary Pursley on

    I admire her giving spirit and grateful to hear that generosity will live on in another rose garden! The Chambersville Rose Garden in Texas will be sharing her legacy. Well done!

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  871. Mary E Vono on

    I love the interview. Mostly I love when she talks about making sure you look inside yourself to see how you can support the prejudice against women also you only need a man if you need testosterone or if you need “big biceps and a beard”. What a joy!

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  872. Peggy Baker on

    I have re-read your interview with Anne 3 times as I found it so very inspiring! It is difficult for me to pick out one piece of the interview as my favorite, but I suppose I would choose two: “ Then, be willing to spend some time and energy preparing for what you want to do. I owe much of my success to this one.” And , “Next you should try to know yourself, your talents, and limitations, but be careful to not underestimate what you are capable of doing.” I am 68 years old and have worked in the corporate world since I was 16 and I retired last year. My husband and I decided we wanted to do farming in our next adventure in life so purchased 77 acres in our home state of Texas and built our farmhouse and added a small herd of cows.
    Erin, you and Anne have given me such a gift as I have let the thought of my age keep me from pursuing my dream of having a large flower garden. I’m so blessed to have good health and a loving supportive husband of 50 years. Growing up I had the privilege of spending summers with my grandparents and spent much of my time in my grandmother’s flower shop. I have always loved flowers and most especially roses so we are starting to prepare some garden areas. I believe we have the perfect spot to start our rose garden. I am taking Anne’s advice to spend some time and energy preparing for the new gardens and to not limit myself due to age. I’m going to go back and re-read again your entire 4 part series on roses and purchase some books so we know how to best prepare the soil and choose some perfect roses to get started.
    Thank you so very much for sharing your stories, your experiences and expertise and most especially the time spent with Anne—I felt like I was there sitting with you both and hearing her speak. I can’t wait to hear and see more about your newest rose garden and I can’t wait to get started on my own with roses as well as the seeds I’ve ordered from you! Who knows, God may grant me another 30 years and I want to make the most of it to share with family and friends and to leave a legacy for our children and grandchildren.

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  873. Julie on

    “Know yourself, your talents, and limitations, but be careful to not underestimate what you are capable of doing.” I catch myself talking myself out of my big dreams and finding the reasons not to do it, afraid of failure. Love her advice!

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  874. Laura Miner on

    I was in tears reading this post. I decided last year (2020) that I was going to leave my very stressful real estate career and buy a farm. I wanted to surround myself with flowers, chickens, gardens and trees. I wanted a simple life, where my hard work would bring me the joy I’d been missing. I was nervous to go on this new adventure at 66 years old, but I knew in my heart that I had to make the move. Reading about Anne starting at 60 showed me I was right!!! I just had my first garden cut, and the neighbors must be scratching their heads…. a 4000sf garden???? Little do they know that it’s only the first! (HAHA) But when I start bringing them boxes of vegetables, bouquets of flowers and fresh eggs they will understand my dream. I will definitely add Anne’s books to my already growing library on plants, flowers and life. She is my inspiration! Thank You for sharing this wonderful woman with us. Reading this made my day. I’m headed out to the little forest on the property to clear the underbrush to prepare for my shade gardens……

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  875. Martha Coleman on

    Anne was obviously an incredible and driven woman. To be a widowed mother at age 19, seemed to challenge her to be strong, ambitious and determined. My favorite statement of hers in this wonderful rose series, is “To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy.” It is such wonderful news that her roses will be grown and cared for as time marches forward. How wonderful that she continues to share her love (and legacy) with others.

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  876. Tania Pena on

    Really inspirational! Looking forward to learn about it.
    My favorite part was “ My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development” this hit me closer because I’m living with a Family member that has Alzheimer’s Disease

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  877. Billie Marrs on

    First, don’t let being a woman stop you from doing what is traditionally seen as a man’s job. Such a wonderful blog post on her love of roses and life.

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  878. Denise Marks on

    “However, inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship.” Thank you Erin for listening to that little voice that you needed to visit your amazing friend, Anne once again. Her legacy will continue through you and what a wonderful gift to share!

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  879. Jan Ford on

    What a great article. I loved the story of how she started at age 60. Sometimes at 68 I can’t seem to get motivated. This motivated. I’m planning my little rose corner now!

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  880. Christine T. on

    The best part of gardening is giving away what you have grown . “
    “Don’t be stingy” She is 100 % right . It all comes back to you two fold & more !
    THANK YOU ALL for a wonderful read !
    I am inspired to add some roses to my garden .

    Reply
  881. Monae Guercio on

    “Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy.” Such perfect advice for anyone with knowledge to give.

    Reply
  882. Ann on

    I love her go getter attitude. Encouraging us to not worry about age or other “limitations” and get out of bed and accomplish whatever you desire.

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  883. Jacquie on

    I love that she didn’t start til she was 60! I’ve been feeling like I’m too old to start over and to have dreams. She has inspired me to dream again! Thank you for the interview!

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  884. Jennifer Monke on

    Anne embodied the quote by Henry Ford “whether you think you can, or think you can’t, you’re right”

    Anne thought she could, because she knew she could and therefore did! What a fascinating life she lived! Take time to speak with the older folks in your life, you might be surprised to find stories like hers in your own backyard.

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  885. Stephanie on

    My favorite quote was ”You can meet and exceed your goals if you prepare yourself over time.” She is an inspiration.

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  886. Lindsay Myers on

    What an inspiration and treasure and thankful her legacy will live on thru these roses. Her generosity is a great reminder but I can tell she had a fun and fiesty spirit based on her tips. I’m still thinking thru what things require constant testosterone, biceps and a beard! :)

    Reply
  887. Shannon KH on

    I love her three step process for goals, I think I will print that out for my daughters. Talking about building her house by purchasing a wall jack brought mr to tears for some reason, I’m not a crier. What a wonderful person.

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  888. Lisa Osborne on

    Her generosity is most inspiring … ‘inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important’. This is a small act that each of us can engage in.

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  889. Marion Barnes on

    Marion January 12, 2022
    Anne is like a rambling rose herself. She nurtured her own m life as she did her roses and don’t forget those abandoned animals. She was a nurturer at heart. What greater gift to celebrate.

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  890. Katie Meads on

    What a life she lived! Simply, she didn’t let anything intimidate her. She approached every facet of life with voracity, zeal & determination. My favorite quotes “be careful not to underestimate what you are capable of doing” “don’t be stingy” two things we could all do more of in the garden and elsewhere. Thank you Erin, for this great interview, with such an incredible woman.

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  891. Robin on

    Anne and this story is so motivating! I, like many love that she was 60 when she grew her first rose and then had 37 years experience! Although I have been a lifelong gardener I was also around 60 when I planted my first rose bushes and they just happened to be ones I purchased through Heirloom roses!

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  892. Jane Powell on

    Wow, what an amazing woman!!! The entire interview was so inspiring, but since I’m getting close to 60 and still have plans to start another business, that was my favorite part of the interview…it’s never to late to start something new! I’m new to roses with plants shipping to me this Spring…

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  893. Lindsay Rojas on

    There’s so much truth in all of Anne’s advice, but the part that most inspired me is, “you should try to know yourself, your talents, and limitations, but be careful to not underestimate what you are capable of doing.”

    I also loved her advice for someone who thinks it’s too late to pursue their dreams. Indeed, what she said about keeping moving, staying out of bed, and committing to life long learning can apply to anyone considering giving up their pursuit of dreams regardless of the reason.

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  894. Taylor Grandfield on

    What a beautiful interview! I think the most inspiring part was talking about learning yourself, your talents, and limitations without underestimating yourself ❤️

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  895. Virginia Daugherty on

    She sounds like an amazing woman.
    The one thing that keeps coming to my mind from her interview, is to not be stingy. Stingy with my time during flower season, is what I am. With so much work to be done, it is hard to not be stingy. Something I need to work on.
    Thank you for sharing this.

    Reply
  896. Janet H on

    The entire interview was inspiring. What an amazing, eloquent, determined and passionate woman! She approached all of her passions without self imposed or social boundaries interfering. She happily shared her knowledge and success with others to truly make the world a more beautiful place.

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  897. Kathleen on

    Makes you long for roses and adventure – not necessarily in that order.

    Reply
  898. Anita Scheftner on

    When she said, don’t be stingy! What a great attribute! She loved life and her ventures, it was like she decided on something and with a laser focus, it happened. Then on top of that, was generous with her time and experience, expertise and friendship, that’s a great character trait to have. Precious.
    Again, thank you Floret for sharing 💖

    Reply
  899. Donna Brzuskiewicz on

    Oh my, what a beautiful soul Anne is. I love your interview with her Erin. So very glad to hear her daughter is keeping her legacy/blog alive. I loved hearing Anne say that you are never too old…. To accomplish things, just keep learning. Erin,Thank you for sharing, this remarkable lady, your friend Anne.

    Reply
  900. Ali Davies on

    I am recently separated/divorced after a 10yr relationship with someone who could fix and build anything. For me, it is inspiring that it is possible for me to grow, and learn on my own, and that I will become even stronger in doing so. It is eye opening to read about how this spectacular woman, knew what she wanted, read the books, gathered the knowledge, and did so much on her own. In just reading her interview, it has given me so much hope that so can move on and still achieve all that I hope to in my garden and around my home. <3

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  901. Tana Brown on

    How do you choose one part? Her entire story is amazing! I love her ambition and determination. I love her advice for sharing and letting people visit the garden. I love delivering bouquets of my flowers to people! What an incredible inspiration she is!!!

    Reply
  902. Esther Rodriquez on

    Wow!!! What an amazing Person!!!! I very much Love her mentality “it’s never to late”. Thank you for sharing Anne’s story with us. My goal is to adopt her attitude more in my life. There are so many things I would like to do. Anne’s story has motivated me to push forward with my goals. Thank You Anne for your story & your example. I want to be like Anne!!! 💗💗💗

    Reply
  903. Rhonda on

    Thank you so much for this interview! The most inspiring part for me was that I am not only not too old at 55 to pursue my gardens dreams, but I can FLOURISH at my dream!

    Reply
  904. Michele Steen on

    “Don’t let being a woman stop you from doing what is traditionally seen as a man’s job unless you really need a constant supply of testosterone to achieve your goal.” I think this statement sums up the way I live my life, without having put it into words myself. Around our home I am the one who does all the repairs, painting, and minor renovations in addition to all of the landscaping, gardening, etc. I (usually) enjoy the satisfaction achieved from the completed tasks. Similar to Anne, when I get an idea, I research it completely & then dive in! Last year I built myself a hoop house. It wasn’t all that difficult. The reactions I get when people find out I built it myself are surprising to me. “ You can meet and exceed your goals if you prepare yourself over time.” so many words of wisdom from Anne. Thank you for this interview!

    Reply
  905. Julia Ryckman on

    I am most inspired by Anne’s sharing of how much she accomplished and how many new things she started after the age of sixty— seemingly as an autodidact. How inspiring to read that she decided she wanted to build a house, read three books, did it, and then started a general contracting company. Her interview is also a generous reminder that big goals are achieved one step at a time, though constant movement. Finally, I appreciated the acknowledgement of circumstances and/or luck— things that happen in life that alter our course, propel us in a new direction, perhaps one we wouldn’t have otherwise chosen or foreseen. Thanks so much for this.

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  906. Sue Welch on

    “Look carefully at the same prejudice that might be lurking in ourselves.” I’ll be watching myself for any self limiting behavior! Including age limitations. Thank you for the wise words.

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  907. Gail B Wynne on

    I love that she started a log at 97…reminded me of my Dad who kept learning and contributing right to the end.

    Reply
  908. D Martin on

    How lovely! I just read through this post with my two girls. My youngest giggled at ‘big biceps and beards!’ I have started making an annual trip to the Antique Rose Garden in Texas to choose a new rose— I have three. My parents will be giving us a couple of acres, and I look forward to filling it with ALL THE FLOWERING VINES, including roses. With my 13yo’s help. (I am a notorious black thumb, but my three roses are still alive.). She’s successfully grown a ruby moon vine two years in a row. After my two years’ failure to grow loofahs, she took the old seeds and grew a monstrous vine that took over our three vegetable garden beds and a quarter of the back yard!

    I think I was encouraged to hear that it’s not too late— I can work to change my thumb color. And, dv, my daughters will have a priceless experience and inheritance.

    Reply
  909. Brooke Rodgers on

    Very inspiring as I am later in age and find myself gardening in a climate that is challenging for me …..she inspires me to keep at it!! Her contracting business is also inspiring, as a person who has worked developing low income affordable housing….I am ready to start my own business…as a woman!!! Thank you for this wonderful interview…her entire life is proof..women are powerful….

    Reply
  910. Alyssa Tomsheck on

    I most loved the part where she talks about lifelong learning and developing your skills regardless of age. I was very blessed to return home and purchase my 5 generation family farm in my mid 20s and I look forward to improving the property and maintaining my own gardens for the decades to come!

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  911. Leah on

    First, the excerpt from her book had me in tears. Definitely adding it to my reading list. Second, this quote tugged at my heart as well, “To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy.” Thank you so much for sharing this inspiring interview with us.

    Reply
  912. Christina Allen on

    Such a wonderful interview. I especially loved her advice for a long life. Thank you.

    Reply
  913. Stephanie Eberle on

    First I want to thank Erin for introducing Ann to all of us. I’m honestly speechless after reading and re-reading this 4 part series. Honestly the whole interview was so inspiring to me. If I had to choose a certain part to quote it would be, “ don’t let being a woman stop you from doing what is traditionally seen as a man’s job unless you really need a constant supply of testosterone to achieve your goal. Ask yourself if the activity requires big biceps and a beard. If not, go ahead with your dreams and fight the prejudice where you find it. Look carefully for the same prejudice in yourself. It could be lurking there without you realizing it and could cause you to not believe in yourself and to restrict you from following a difficult goal”. This resonates with me so deeply as I’m in this season of life where I feel lost. I find doubt and prejudice in every turn I make. As Ann said, “ go ahead with your dreams and fight the prejudice where you find it.” I can feel my confidence grow slightly and I feel the nudge to just go after my dream. What an inspirational woman, thank you Erin for sharing Ann with us.

    Reply
  914. April Scott on

    How inspiring to read her story. It makes me think of all the people out there with amazing stories that we have never heard and may never hear. Just ordinary people doing extraordinary things. My love for roses began in my late twenties and the older I get the more I have come to love them. My hope is to inspire others to grow them so they too can know the awe inspiring power of nature. I’m over 20 years into growing roses and I still gasp over the beauty of every bloom every season. Thanks to Anne and all the amazing rosarians of the world who make it possible for us humble home gardners to grow fantastic varieties of roses.

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  915. Élisabeth Leroux de Lens on

    I really liked the part where she said to « keep moving… commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development. »
    It really resonated with me and gave me hope that there is still time to accomplish a lot of things in life. It is never too late. You just have to do it.

    Very inspiring ! Thank you !

    Reply
  916. Mojca on

    Oh wow, such an amazing inspiring woman. I’m so glad you made this interwiev, and that you got all those cuttings from her garden. I love that she started her passion so late in her life. That means we all can achive something great despite our age.

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  917. Susan Oxley on

    What an amazing woman. Both my husband and I are facing the challenges of dealing with aging parents right now. All of this interview is inspiring, but this part touched my heart the most: “My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.”

    Reply
  918. Leslie Murray on

    This interview is inspiring in so many ways. I would have to say my biggest take away is her “just do it” attitude. Whatever your goal or dream figure out a way, take the necessary steps, read the books, take the course, talk to whomever you need to move closer to your goal. You can do it. And age really is just a number…

    Reply
  919. Margaret on

    I loved how she said to “go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself).” What a good reminder during these trying times!

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  920. Kristine on

    My favorite part is this:

    “Erin: Your passion for roses started much later in life. Do you have any advice for someone who feels like it’s too late to pursue their dreams?

    Anne: I remember when I turned 60. I thought 60 was so old. That was almost 37 years ago, well over one-third of my lifetime so far.”

    This year I will turn 36 and sometimes think that is already too late to change my life and start my own flower farm. It is truly inspiring that it is never too late to start something completely new in life. She started at 60 and was growing roses for more than all my life. Thank you! I feel sooo young un inspired to continue to make my dream come true!

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  921. Susan Cramer on

    The fact that she generously shared her beautiful roses with others! She sounds like a truly remarkable woman.

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  922. Julie Carll on

    I loved her determination. Her love of life, nature, and roses. Her ability to develop friendships through her gardens. What an amazing and inspirational woman.

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  923. Christy Foster on

    Thank you so much for sharing this interview! So many moments of inspiration there. I love the idea of starting something you are passionate about no matter where you are in life. The fact that she began her collection at 60 along with building homes is incredible! This quote/advice was so inspiring to me “ Next, you should try to know yourself, your talents, and limitations, but be careful to not underestimate what you are capable of doing”. I want to put it somewhere to loom at every day, as I am so prone to second guessing myself and my dreams whenever things get a little bit challenging.

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  924. Ollie on

    That sharing was important!

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  925. Becky Peterson on

    I truly was blessed by Anne’s interview. Thank you, Erin. In the ’60s my widowed Grandfather, who was the love of my life, had a carport next to his simple abode. There was a red rose that scrambled up the side and every Summer you would find me with my nose buried into their warm scent. I would tell my Mom I only liked hot red roses. To this day if I see a red rambler on a warm day, I bury my nose into it.

    Reply
  926. Jennifer Sumner on

    I must say it’s hard to pick what part inspired me the most as her journey as a whole is incredibly inspiring. Her approach towards life and her tenacity is remarkable! I love that she took the road less travel to do what she loved from sailing across the ocean to building homes as a woman to creating her own slice of heaven in her gardens. Such an extraordinary lady!

    Reply
  927. Nina scharpp on

    The section about her book The Voyage of Determination made me feel so inspired and glad to be a woman. Not that women are better than men and vice versa, but that we are all highly capable of learning and building and adding onto our knowledge and expertise as human beings regardless of gender or age. I always have these wild dreams, ideas, plans and sometimes I think to myself, “Am I crazy for wanting to do all this in my lifetime ?” Anne makes me believe I can do it all even as a woman. Thank you Anne.

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  928. Sharon Kegerreis on

    I am inspired by her various paths in her life. I love that she sailed the ocean! I feel that I have reinvented myself several times already and am encouraged by her stories to keep learning and pursuing dreams, regardless of age.

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  929. Diana on

    I NEEDED to read this! I just turned 60, and have had a dream of sharing my love of flowers and growing them in some way forever!!!! I am currently enrolled in the Floret workshop, and because of my age, nasty little thoughts kept creeping in my head saying your too old to start this! I felt like Anne was speaking directly to me!(PS, I too built my own house six years ago, I can lift more then most men, I watch my 5 grandkids 4 days a week, and I am not plump with grey hair,) Thank you Anne!!!!

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  930. Laurie Broome on

    Determine what I want and what do I need to accomplish it. Try to really see myself: what are my strengths and what are my limitations. Be careful not to underestimate myself. I like how she compared being 60 to being in her nineties, and that 60 was only 2/3 of her life. Inspirational!

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  931. Michelle Ellrich on

    I have gardened my whole life. At age 58 She has inspired me to look into making it my career! What an amazing woman! Thank you for sharing her with us!!

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  932. Pam Ellsworth on

    Everything in the interview has inspired me. Especially the recent photo of her looking so happy and content. I turn 60 in a few weeks and just went on the website you posted and bought 3 rose plants! Have never grown roses before, but after reading this article and watching some of Heirloom Roses videos, I am going for it!

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  933. Kathleen on

    Anne seemed determined her whole life…from running down the garden path at 3 or 4; marrying her first husband; determining a path as a 19-year-old widow with a new baby; to all the things she did after. What a great lesson to me…keep learning and accomplishing.

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  934. Katalin Wellmann-Kiss on

    I just loved these:
    “At almost 97 years old, it doesn’t seem that my passion for roses started all that late in life. It’s been over 30 years since I began this journey—longer than the careers of many. I pursued many dreams after turning 60, including starting my own contracting company and building over 25 (mostly Victorian style) houses, traveling the world, and my study of the older roses. It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams.

    My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development. “

    Reply
  935. Kristen Heafield on

    What an amazing women! So accomplished. I love hearing stories of women from her generation who overcame stereotypical norms of her generation. Her sailing journey is just as exciting as her rose journey. Such an inspiration for young women today!

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  936. Claire Hickey on

    I love the idea of pruning parties and of sharing her roses and cuttings. I love getting gifted the magic of a rose cutting and remembering who gave it to me when it develops in my garden. I’m just starting out in my dream of a rose garden but roses were one of the first to be planted on my property. This year the planning starts for a dedicated rose garden, my heart is bursting with joy at the thought, finally creating my dream. Thank you so much for sharing this beautiful interview and series, Claire in Ireland

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  937. Sharon Bengco on

    My favorite part is the last part..knowing she can do many things at her age because of determination.
    She loves roses and so do I especially the ramblers.
    I am just starting to have my rose garden..been buying seeds online but they don’t germinate.😢
    I am so inspired with her..I also admire her generosity in sharing her roses.
    I really, really love roses and at age 63 I believe I can still enjoy having a rose garden.

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  938. Jenny Collins on

    I loved hearing her heart for sharing the beauty of her roses with others and the friendships she made in sharing this beauty.

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  939. Sarah Allen on

    My favorite part of Annes interview is her encouragement to not let age or time stop you from learning more and pursuing your dreams. I am working hard on getting past those obstacles every day! I also loved how she said perhaps the best way to ensure the rare heirloom rose varieties and legacy lives on is by “inviting people into your gardens and sharing most importantly… To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy”. Beautifully said. ♥️

    I agree completely. The simple act of friendship through hands on clipping together & sharing the beauty, wonder, and abundant vigor of life that a hearty old rose possesses is their greatest legacy! They tell a story of simpler times. Do this consistently and it’s life altering for the better.

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  940. Sidonie on

    Don’t be stingy! I love that, the mark of a true gardener. How lovely to inspire and share your garden with others. I also loved the way Anne reminded us not to succumb to stereotypes be it gender or age related or even self imposed ones. For me this is a timely reminder as I approach 60 and have just started a massive rose garden, sometimes wondering if I am mad! Having just read Anne’s words I am now feeling truly inspired what a fabulous lady !

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  941. Loes on

    I expected the interview to be mostly about roses but I have been given a glimpse of a very special live and a very strong, wise and generous personality. Believing in yourself, choosing your goals wisely and then do the work to achieve them. I think she showed us how it’s done. Very inspiring.

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  942. Elizabeth Wright on

    “be careful not to underestimate what you are capable of doing.” How wonderful this idea to just jump in and give it your all!

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  943. Stephanie Branyik on

    Anne’s sharing is a strength that meeds multiplying, as much as roses, all flowers really. This story has reminded me of how much better the world and every species in it fares when we invite one another into our space, our homes, our passions, our stories. How much better we can all be when we realize the power in this rather sacred sharing. It is a learning that matters everything that sustains live in mother nature.

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  944. Heather on

    I thought the part where you quoted her book “ On the other hand, you might want to pick something that comes to you more naturally. A passion for a particular hobby might be an indication of a special talent that could be pursued and turned into a rewarding career.” That really stuck home for me. It makes me feel confident that I’m on my right path 🌸. She seems like an amazing woman that I’m sure you know how blessed you were to have known

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  945. Laura Nicoletti on

    I love how she reinvented herself after age 60, what an amazing woman. I am 56 and I can’t seem to accept the term middle aged. My dream one day is to have my own garden where I can plant my plant collection, which includes few roses, propagated by me or taken from clients who didn’t want them any longer. A pet peeve of mine is that most of the roses I prune in my client’s gardens have lost their tags, so they will be impossible to ID. I also wish one day to see Anne’s collection. Thank you for these four articles.

    Reply
  946. Christie Roberts on

    You are never to old to have adventure, learn new things, start a different hobby or create your own website🌷🌹🌷🌹🌷

    Reply
  947. Kirsten Norstad on

    What inspires me the most is that she sounds just like me, but she has the extra ingredient i’m missing to move forward. Stay out of bed. Keep moving. Can do things without math. This is exactly what i needed to hear. So very timely to read her wisdom!

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  948. Janet K Green on

    So inspired to start at 60 my rose garden that I’ve waited all my life for! Thank you for such an inspirational story!

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  949. Vicci Martin on

    Wow, I’m am totally inspired, at 51 about to make a major move from one continent to another, Anne’s story has given me so much to look forward to.
    I have been following floret farms for 3 years and learning and dabbling with dahlias, zinnias and my Roses.
    I shall follow your formula Anne as I embark on this great new journey and with me I will take my rose cuttings from my Roses I started in my garden 20 years ago to begin a new garden.

    Reply
  950. Sara Dwyer on

    What an amazing lady! Best advice ever, “Don’t be stingy” can be applied to gardening, friendships, life in general. Thank your generosity in sharing Floret, Erin & team.

    Reply
  951. christina koether on

    Full of wisdom and insight, this left me feeling like anything is possible. Yet the most inspiring piece that sticks with me, is somewhat unexpectedly, her favorite rose. Specifically, “It fills the view from my dressing room window.” I can’t help but imagine her looking out on its beauty. To me, it highlights the personal connection we can have with flowers. It signifies the power of connecting the outside to our indoor lives. And finally, that there is no ultimate best flower because every person has an intimate set of reasoning for choosing what’s top on their list. There’s no right answer. Flowers are a personal journey.

    Thank you for sharing this.

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  952. Andrea Winters on

    I’m 54 and just starting my rose gardens and flower farm. The fact that she started with roses later in life was incredibly inspiring! Thank you so much for sharing her with us!

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  953. Shawna Daley on

    I loved reading this; thank you so much for sharing! I loved her energy the most; as a mom of three, I am always impressed by people who can get moving quickly. I also loved her wisdom about how to choose your goals: “Next, you should try to know yourself, your talents, and limitations, but be careful to not underestimate what you are capable of doing.” She was a woman who dreamed honestly. I appreciate that. Now I’ll go get to work!

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  954. Ellen Blumhardt on

    “ It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams.”

    And her beautiful smile! 💚

    Reply
  955. Ashleigh Born on

    I was very moved to read her choice of words ‘keep THEM watered, fertilized…’ she already knew in her heart that her collection was going to be taken care of and treasured. She gave humble, simple care instructions so that anyone would feel empowered to try growing a rose.

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  956. Eva Carpenter on

    So hard to say one thing that was most inspiring, Anne’s life was full of inspiring and amazing accomplishments! I find her passionate dreams and her belief that she could accomplish them, not to let the fact that she was a woman hinder her success!, to be incredibly inspiring’That she set out to build a house on her own and figured out how to get it done! Awesome! I am going to continue to grow my dreams, she gave me so much more courage in a short interview! Thanks for sharing. I would love to learn more about this inspiring woman.

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  957. Rin on

    Thank you for sharing your insightful interview with such a unique, wise woman. In light of all the extreme changes in how we interact now as well as future uncertainties I was most moved by her advice encouraging us to venture out to make new connections and foster current relationships to preserve our communities. As a person who has also experienced prejudice, I was warmed by the excerpt from her book encouraging women to pursue their dreams.
    What a wonderful peek into the mind and world of such an extraordinary human. Thank you Erin!

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  958. Cambrie on

    Anne’s determination to accomplish enormous undertakings on her own impressed me as I, too, value that kind of grit in my own life. I’ve never let being a woman hold me back from accomplishing something; if anything, it put a pigheaded stubbornness in me that drove me on more feverishly. But it’s her value placed on friendships — on fostering, nurturing, and cherishing other people in her life — that inspires me most. A good standard to hold oneself to, and an especially poignant reminder for me, personally, to embrace connections and not dwell in isolation. Thank you for sharing.

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  959. Kathy L. on

    Love her no-fear attitude and that she started her new flower career at 60. That is so inspiring. Thank you for interviewing this amazing woman and sharing the stories. Plus- I could stare at those rose images all day !

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  960. Mary anne on

    Love that she didn’t stop learning and volunteering. What a wonderful soul. Lots of good insights. Thank you Erin and company!

    Reply
  961. Katie L Hoyle on

    Anne’s view on what you can do, what a woman can do, even if she’s older, is amazing. Her advice on choosing what you should go after is fantastic. What energy! What love of life! My own mom is 95 and also amazing! She has that same zeal for life!

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  962. Sara on

    I loved her message of lifelong learning – and how special that she just started growing roses at 60years old. I love that she lived fully, and generously

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  963. Caitlin Pruneda on

    I loved reading about how as a child, she would escape out of the garden. It gave me a good chuckle. And then reading that she ran away to get married! It seems like she has always had a determination. It reminds me to go after whatever is interesting me and to also allow my children opportunities to explore their own interests. Learning is life long and a passion for learning is the greatest gift a person can have.

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  964. Caitlin E on

    Be sure to examine myself to make sure I don’t unconsciously hold any of the biases that may keep me from attaining my dreams! So beautiful. What a woman.

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  965. Dina Temp on

    What a beautiful and inspirational interview! My favorite part is when Anne encourages everyone to share the joy of their garden and to give away cuttings to further propagate future gardens.
    It is one thing to love a thing, but, to share it, give it away so that others enjoy it and it outlives you, that truly expresses the love that you have for a thing.
    And that, truly is what Anne has achieved.

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  966. Tori on

    Holy cow. What a gift she was to the world. I am so glad you got to sit down with her and share this moment with us. What a treasure. The whole thing. What an inspiring woman! I feel like ai can see her running down the path as a child, drawn to the ocean. I resonate with that. I also resonate with her mother being worried about her little legs carrying her as fast as they would go and having to put up a fence. Her first husband. Her reflecting on what life might have looked like had he not passed. Her view on life. She was unstoppable, so confident and driven. Her getting back to the water that she was so drawn to as a child before the fence and setting sail. Ugh. Man. The picture of her in her later years. I just want to sit down with her and listen. What a force but also, seems so warm and encouraging. Thank you again for sharing this with us. Such a treat. <3

    Reply
  967. Jolene on

    Her advice on women doing great things hit home for me. I didn’t expect that in an interview with about roses! I’m doing something difficult at work tomorrow – will keep her words with me during the day.

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  968. Lindsay on

    Everything about her is inspiring. But the fact that at 97 she was starting a website, shows how you are never too old to start something. Truly an amazing woman!!

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  969. Michelle on

    I love how Anne talked about being a life-long learner. One of my key strengths (from StrengthsFinder) is being a learner. Whenever I take on something new, I learn and engulf myself completely into the subject. It is inspiring to know Anne did this too, and she did so many times with many different passion projects. I hope I can learn and grow as much has she has.

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  970. Samantha on

    Loved Anne’s perspective on continuing to learn & grow, always.

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  971. Laura on

    I think the most inspirational part of Anne interview is all of it. How she was a woman born well before her time. She took on roles that others (at that time) wouldn’t dream of. Anne didn’t need a man to do the things she wanted yet she had love to share her life with Max, a wonderful balance. The fact that age never slowed her down. Her get up and get at it attitude is something that is very much missing from most of the generations these days, me included. I seem to waste my days off most of the time but the days when I am truly going for it I find most rewarding. I need to do better.

    I wish I had an opportunity to visit her rose gardens. When you were posting stories of taking cutting from her gardens I was equal part envious (that I wasn’t there) and excited for you all. What a fabulous treasure to have be given!

    I enjoyed reading the 4 part story and was upset to read that Anne had passed away. What a legend!

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  972. Irene Hannestad on

    I loved when she said ” I pursued many dreams after turning 60, including starting my own contracting company and building over 25 (mostly Victorian style) houses, traveling the world, and my study of the older roses. It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams. ” That is meaningful to me because I am also 60 and I love to grow roses too!

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  973. Emily L Harper on

    What impressed me most is her sense of groundedness! She’s a total realist about strengths, privileges, and just going out there and learning and not being afraid to try something new and extraordinary. I’m amazed that she decided to up and create a blog in her late 90s. It’s very much her style! I’m so glad its out there. I enjoyed reading her writing and can’t wait to try and find some of her books.

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  974. Valerie Iftikhar on

    What an inspiration. Imagining her building victorian houses on her own – wow! A woman like her definitely makes approaching middle age feel like I’m just getting closer to go the good part. I love to be reminded that sharing cuttings, hosting friends, and connecting with people is so much the point of our gardens. Our gardens keep us rooted into what’s going on in nature, encouraging us to stay involved in the health of our home ecosystems. :) <3

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  975. Leah Adair on

    I was so inspired by this advice: “My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.” She gives me hope and inspiration that I can start anything at any age!

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  976. Jeanne Ambrose on

    What an inspiring story, and inspiring woman! Thank you for sharing.
    There were so many aspects of this story that inspired me, but my favorite was this quote: “Determine what it is you want to do and then acquire any skills or knowledge that you are going to need, get the books, take the classes. “
    I always say we can make our own dreams come true with a whole lot of work!

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  977. Ayadejha Salyers on

    “Look carefully for the prejudice in yourself” That’s and powerful line, and as a young Black woman who struggles almost constantly with self-limiting beliefs, it’s incredibly impactful to me.

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  978. Roberta on

    I love Anne’s advice to keep moving and also how important it was to share cuttings from her beloved roses. I’m so happy for you that you got to know her and were able to accomplish the monumental task of working with her garden! What a privilege!!

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  979. Lindsey Leighton on

    What an amazing woman with so much wisdom and life experience. Anne’s philosophy on life is incredible and all encompassing. This is a quote I will take with me: “ My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.” In all her passions you can feel her zest for people and life. I see her compassion and love for friends and family that is accompanied by curiosity.

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  980. shelli krieg on

    Thank you Erin that entire read was wonderful, so enjoyed it.

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  981. Mary on

    What an inspiration you! I love it when Anne said, “My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family…” I’m 62 yo and a Floret Workshop 2021 alumni. I remember it gave me great pleasure to see for the first time in Spring of last year the blooms of my beautiful pink ranuncs, zinnias of variety of colors, dahlias, sunflowers, and my long time favorite – roses. I enjoy the times when I pick my gorgeous flowers then would give them to my mom, friends, neighbors, my Church, and my family. One time I watched wild green parrots feasting on my sunflowers! My friends are now starting their little backyard garden, another one has incorporated plants that monarch butterflies love, and my sister is now planning to dig up part of her yard to give way for a flower garden! I must say you have to be in motion to be contagious. Flowers do keep me moving and definitely they play a bridge to connect with others.

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  982. D. Levi on

    I love that Anne didn’t let age stop her, pausing to say how old she felt at 60 and reflecting on the many accomplishments following in the 37 years of her life that followed.

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  983. Nancy Dasenbrock on

    I love that she is so generous… giving away her roses and cuttings. Her attitude is indomitable. She is truly an inspiration to all in her determination to do what she loves. Ive known other women who have built their own homes too…an amazing feat! Although i’ll stick to growing roses for as long as i can!

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  984. SD on

    The quote (below) from ‘A Voyage of Determination’ hit home with me along with Anne’s building experience. I work in a very male dominated, good-ole-boys profession; my career has had some high-highs and some low-lows. I hit the glass ceiling so hard this one time, I had to run out of the office building before I’d let myself cry. Eventually I turned around, made a plan and a year later started my own company! There is still some emotional baggage from the experience I’m working through but now I volunteer on a professional committee with the mission to improve the experience for those who come after me. If it weren’t for people like Anne who had come before me, I cannot imagine what kind of experience I would’ve had. I’m thankful for those pioneers and hope I can pay it forward.

    “First, don’t let being a woman stop you from doing what is traditionally seen as a man’s job unless you really need a constant supply of testosterone to achieve your goal. Ask yourself if the activity requires big biceps and a beard. If not, go ahead with your dreams and fight the prejudice where you find it.”

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  985. Hannah S on

    The importance of life-long learning. That clearly kept her inspired and youthful throughout her life, so motivating!

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  986. Brittney on

    I’m so inspired by her spirit! All the different roles she wasn’t afraid to take on, even with the prejudices in some of them, and then starting a new path at age 60. Was there anything this woman couldn’t do?! She amazes me!

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  987. Twila Smucker on

    What inspired me the very most is that you are never too old to pursue your dreams and reach them if you are willing to do the hard work! I am 54 and at a place in life where I am trying to decide what next…should I get deeper into flower growing, get my RN license renewed, become a doula, go work on Mercy ships? This was a HUGE inspiration to me that I can do anything I choose to do even at this age!!

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  988. Marcia Sparling on

    I loved her confidence in pursuing what she cared about deeply and figuring out how to make it work- and her warmth to stay connected to people. Her spirit of going after what fascinated her reminds me of my immigrant grandmother, who figured out how to graft trees, feed herself and her family in zone 3, and create bueauty and humor whiel she did that. May we live to be the women we admire!

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  989. Lisa Edelhuber on

    Most inspiring to me is that you are never to old to go after your dreams! I’m at the age she was when she thought she was old, but went on to accomplish so much more! THAT’S EXCITING to me since my husband & I are just now starting our flower farm! I really was inspired by her formula to accomplish those goals, too. Where there is a will there is definitely a way!

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  990. Joan Kinnischtzke on

    Sharing, sharing, sharing! When I share a cutting or split a perennial to give to a friend, I always tell them – that makes your garden and mine a friendship garden! It makes my heart happy every time as if it is the first time

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  991. Tricia Farrar on

    I was inspired that she was 60 when she started her rose garden. Her collection is awe-inspiring. She is the definition of your never too old to start.
    Also, loved the advice from her. “My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.” It is definitely something to live by.
    Thank you Anne.

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  992. Lisa on

    What an inspiring woman! Absolutely fearless. Great reminder that age doesn’t have to get in the way of your dreams. I am inspired to take back my garden that the blackberries have taken over. I laughed when I read that earlier because I didn’t plant them but there they are multiplying every year. And they are quite persistent!

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  993. Karen on

    I laughed out loud reading her bicep comment but that isn’t what stuck with me.
    “You can’t become a rocket scientist without a great deal of study, and neither can anyone else” reminds us that no one becomes an expert with the wave of a magic wand. Wanting something requires working for it and no one gets a skill handed to her; she has to work for it.

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  994. Sarah F. on

    I loved reading about all of her accomplishments and that one is never too old to try something new. She seemed like an amazing woman and her generosity is very inspiring.

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  995. Allison Capek on

    So many inspirations from this interview. From her beginnings as a young widow and single mom to her views on I can do anything you can do (referring to men), I bet she also believed that if she wanted to she could also grow a beard and built up big biceps. I’m inspired by how she did not let age become a barrier to chasing life’s varied adventures and interests. I also appreciate human beings that advocate for animals that can’t advocate for themselves. I love animals and it inspired me to seek out volunteerism opportunities to spare innocent lives yet to live out their fullest. Thank you for taking the time to share such inspiration and wisdom from a fellow flower admirer and superwoman, may she rest in peace and her spirit live within the rose gardens she inspired people to grow and care for.

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  996. Beccy on

    I loved the varied chapters of her life and how she accomplished a huge challenge that changed the things she thought about afterwards.

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  997. Carol Sammons on

    What a beautiful and inspiring interview! Anne was so generous with her knowledge of roses and her roses themselves. I loved her comment “To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship.” I hope that one day soon I will have a beautiful garden and a little knowledge that I can also share with others.

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  998. Monica Bailey on

    I was inspired most by the part on her book “Voyage of Determination“, it made me feel inspired that I can do anything I dream!!

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  999. Sandra Christiansen on

    As I was reading the interview, I noticed her enthusiasm for learning new things and keeping busy as well as her love of animals. It might be because of the recent death of Betty White, but I saw a lot of similarities in their life stories.

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  1000. Lauren on

    “My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.” and “don’t be stingy”, I tell my husband that all the time! 😂 She is truly inspiring. Gardening is such a huge part of my life and I hope it serves me as well as it has served Anne.

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  1001. Laura on

    What a special lady! Thank you for sharing her with us and this little piece of her story. I was inspired by her rose passion beginning at 60; I am in the midst of my own career change and it often feels like I am too old at 35! But if she were still alive and reading this comment, Anne would probably laugh in my face at that. I’m bookmarking this interview to read again as I come up against one or another obstacle in my career change (and also her website! What fun that she started a blog at 97, well done, Anne!)

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  1002. Isabel on

    I love that she said 60 wasn’t old. I’m 53 and consider myself young too. I hope I live as long as she did with such great appreciation for learning.

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  1003. LavandulaLady on

    “You can’t become a rocket scientist without a great deal of study, and neither can anyone else. “– classic!

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  1004. Kim on

    I was truly inspired by her pursuing her dream at the age of 60 and then accomplishing so much! It makes me hopeful and mindful that age is only a number if you choose to see it that way!

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  1005. Donna Lovatto on

    I am 65 years old and restarting from scratch a flower garden, all the while telling myself I am too old for this. Your interview with Ann struck me right to my heart, so much so that I read parts of it to my husband. 35 years ago I had a flower farm that was pure joy and non stop labor. We made a little flower cart that we sold our crop from weekly in the nearby town. About 15 years into the journey we opened a tiny little flower shop. My journey into floral design was deepened and fine tuned in that shop, but it was so much work to keep up that the gardens at home grew covered in blackberries and black locust. It broke my heart to have two life loves, but one of them abandoned. With the onset of Covid I found it necessary to walk away from the shop for health reasons. How my life has transformed yet again has been a fusion of the two of my loves. I have reopened as a studio, often using materials from my reviving gardens. I do think Ann’s attitude and voice will carry with me giving me the courage to just follow my heart just as far as it wants to go!

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  1006. Heather on

    I am inspired by the idea that it is never too late to do something you are passionate about or that you can always learn something new. As someone who isn’t in the career they thought they would be at this age, it is a hopeful reminder that I can still do all kinds of things.

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  1007. Julia Moore on

    I loved reading about her generosity and encouragement to share what she had. We can all do same in some fashion I’m sure!

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  1008. Corinne on

    I loved reading this interview. I was most moved by how much she loved sharing cuttings from her garden and hearing from the recipients that they are being lovingly tended and shared again from their new homes. I have a plant in my home (not a rose) that is a clipping from one of my mother’s houseplants that she gave me before she died over twenty years ago. I cherish it and the knowledge that it came from her green thumb. xoxo. Should I win these books, I would actually gift them to a dear friend who is starting her own flower garden. Like the flowers, books are wonderful to share, and this would be something so precious to her, especially after reading this interview.

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  1009. Eileen Mcphail on

    This interview so inspired me! I just moved from farm to city lot. I’m trying to make my new place like the yard I once had. I love roses and am looking for a climbing one. I loved how she says MOVE. Get busy and do what you enjoy!! Exactly what my 97 year old mom said to me. I love her giving away what means alot to her like rose cuttings. What an incredible woman.

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  1010. Erica on

    Thank you for this beautiful interview and all the love for old roses! It is wonderful to see Anne Belovich’s work, garden, books and zest for life portrayed with such interest and care. I am especially inspired by her generosity and desire that her rose garden be enjoyed by others. Her quote about sharing is my favorite part of the interview:

    “However, inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy. ”

    My rambling rose garden is currently hidden behind a large hedge and privacy fence. Inspired by Anne’s spirit of sharing, I plan to remove that fence and create more views and access points into my garden while also continuing to grow and propagate my collection of old garden roses to share with my community. It’s just one small step that I can take to ensure that old roses are seen, enjoyed, and continue to be a beloved part of our world!

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  1011. DeAnne on

    I was most inspired by her perseverance. Despite a huge loss when her husband passed away, she pressed forward and embraced life. She survived and thrived through unbelievable heartbreak.
    Another inspiring part of her life story is her love for learning and adventure. The fact that she started her interest in growing roses at the age of 60 is also inspiring.As an older grower myself, I resonate with this. What a legacy.

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  1012. Jessica Missel on

    “It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams.” “Commit yourself to life-long learning and skill developement.” “You can meet and exceed your goals if you prepare yourself over time.”

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  1013. Katherine Sandow on

    I love that Anne was ready to start her own blog. She was clearly a force of nature. Reading this she reminds me of my grandmother who had her own gardens and also was a force to be reconned with. I can’t think of a better legacy to leave than a world more filled with flowers.

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  1014. Natalia Loaiza on

    Loved to hear that it is indeed possible to pursue new dreams, and accomplish so much, starting at 60!

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  1015. Deborah Snyder on

    I enjoyed seeing the photos of Anne and her garden in her younger years and of her more recently. My favorite parts of the interview were her description of being a life-long learner, her guidance to longevity and her examples of generosity and freely sharing with others! She lived and taught by example…something to be emulated!

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  1016. Emily on

    I love how encouraging she is. I also love how she’s quite practical. You want to achieve something—do the work. Take the classes. Make an effort. Gender, age, etc isn’t an excuse, a crutch, or a reason to be a certain way. Whether you’re a manor a woman—do. The. Work.

    Also—I love how she’s so inviting about her flowers. Just because she’s amassed this great amount doesn’t mean she keeps it all to herself. It’s for everyone.

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  1017. Dominika Waclawiak Best on

    This interview brought me to tears. I love how she lived so many different lives within her one. And her three tenets to overcoming big goals was so inspirational. I know how to do many things and want to do them all. Interviews like this make me believe I can. And what a good recipe for a long life!

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  1018. Linda Green on

    What a lovely interview! Your friendship with Anne reminded me of a dear friend of mine who recently passed that I had the pleasure of spending many lunches with – enjoying her company, listening to stories, and learning from her. I think my favorite part of Anne’s legacy is learning the importance of sharing with others one’s abundance. Erin, you have certainly done an incredible job of sharing with us the many successes you have worked so hard to achieve. Thank you for sharing your knowledge!

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  1019. Erin Ardoin on

    When she says ‘don’t let being a woman stop you.’ My day job is incredibly male dominated. It’s taken 20 years to finally start getting the confidence I need to be truly successful. Anne’s story had given me another small piece of motivation to pursue my flower farm as well!

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  1020. Catherine M King on

    Being even older than Anne when she got started, I am inspired by her “can-do” spirit and her really practical and down-to-earth advice. She actually reminded me of Jane Goodall, who I once had the honor of meeting, and who exuded a similar infectious passion for her calling and total dismissal of age and gender-related limitations. And, like Anne, such a generosity of spirit! I also want to know more about that boat trip! Thank you, Erin, for helping us learn more about Anne. Also, there are some old-fashioned roses on the farm where I live that were here before we came – so they are well over fifty years old. They have started to dwindle so I am inspired to regenerate them. They bloom once for a short time in the spring but their aroma and soft, gentle beauty always make me stop as I pass by and literally smell the roses!

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  1021. Mike A on

    I am 57 and retiring. I am hesitant to start large projects such as a private garden, or a cut flower farm. My thinking has been that I am too old to jump into something so big. Yet Anne did not start roses until the age of 60. Wow! 37 years later she was still dreaming big and going strong. So Anne has inspired me to try. I want to grow as many flowers as I can, to give away, and maybe make things better for someone.

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  1022. Elizabeth Crawford on

    I thoroughly enjoyed reading A Rose Story: An interview with Anne Belovich by Erin. I love Quotes and quite often you see some that truly touches your inner being and it doesn’t list the author, the originator who spoke those very words of wisdom … but here in what I just read, Anne has condensed her vast experience into a few simple words and I am forever grateful in learning from her what she shares from her beautiful heart and life’s experiences.
    “Life-long learning and growing keeps one engaged”.
    “It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams”.
    “ Her advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go to lunch and visit friends & family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life long learning and skill development.
    Thank you Erin & Anne!!

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  1023. Stacy Burry on

    This wise and beautiful soul was well ahead of her time. I turned 30 last year and feel like I have only scratched the surface of what my future of gardening will be. I learned to garden as a young girl from my grandfather who had a magical quality about him (causing butterflies to spontaneously land on the tip of his finger) and for this, I am truly grateful. His love of nature and gardening lives through me. This rose series was much more than that- it was in fact the honouring of a rosarian who proved over and over that she was so much more than a gardener. Being a woman never held her back and I will take her sage advice and apply it to my own path in life. We need more heroes like this to look up to. Beautifully written, Erin!

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  1024. Julie on

    Thank you for sharing Anne’s story. What an amazing woman! I was most inspired by her starting a new endeavor at the age of 60. When you asked her about starting her collection late in life she replied that it really was not. She had spent 37 years collecting her roses. That comment made me rethink how I approach getting older.

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  1025. Britta Wade on

    An unforgettable woman!
    I was captured by the photo of her grinning from ear to ear at 97 in front of her roses. My first thought was “I want to be like her!” I want that energy, spark, and excitement for life. I only hope more of us living now can find that authentic energy to share what we love and and love what we do! We could make the world a better place in so many ways.

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  1026. Preethy on

    Loved the part where she says that inviting people over to your garden and sending them with cuttings is an act of love- friendship. My love of roses stem from my neighbor who used to send me with fragrant roses home when I was five years. Coincidentally, she passed away this fall at the age of 97, makes me wonder if the love of roses has something to do with the age.

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  1027. Norma Aguilar on

    That it’s never too late to start something new. To acquire the skills to make your dream come true! Beautiful 🌹

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  1028. Kara Vienne on

    Wow! What part could you not be inspired by! Things I connected with:
    -Keep moving (don’t allow limitations to hold you back. Fnd your way around them)
    -A good chunk of your life could be spent over 60…plan on accomplishing great things then as well as now.
    AND SO MUCH MORE! This seemed like it was such an enjoyable hang out and we all got to be a part of it. Thank you!

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  1029. Brook on

    What a beautiful interview and now a treasure for her family and all who knew and loved her!

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  1030. Janette on

    Many things for me too. Her selflessness: willing to teach and share. Her determination, strength and organization. Her compassion (NOAH). (Erin: In your book, A Voyage of Determination, which chronicles your incredible adventure sailing your beloved boat from New Zealand to California, you share your formula for achieving any difficult goal, which I found incredibly inspiring as a woman who has big dreams.). The “formula” for achieving any goal!! I needed this today!! Thank you!!

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  1031. Helen on

    Anne is such inspiring women. I love her advice in ‘Voyage of Determination’, thank you Erin for including that.

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  1032. Tanya Bednarski on

    For someone who is 61 and thinking deeply about the next third of my life, her wisdom is both inspiring and reassuring. Her words will be cut and pasted into my notes of inspiration for 2022. Thank you for listening to her and sharing her voice with all of us.

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  1033. Colleen Leonard on

    I was inspired by what Anne did after age 60 — starting the rambler rose collection and building houses. I would have loved to have known her.

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  1034. toni murray on

    “I bought my own domain last week.”
    A beautifully succinct declaration of Anne Belovich.

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  1035. Annie Myers on

    What a lovely soul!? I am so happy Erin was able to meet someone for whom she had such admiration and for sharing her with us. Anne said “You can’t become a rocket scientist without a great deal of study, and neither can anyone else.” My sense of Erin and Anne is they both possess a compelling sincerity and earnestness in their love of flowers which is infectious. Now I have caught the bug too! I do not know why I found Floret except that I needed too. I’m so grateful that, in the dead of winter in South Dakota, I have the hope of a garden.

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  1036. Jan Fechter on

    What an amazing life she lead! Inspired doesn’t even begin to describe how I feel reading your interview! Her philosophy for life is truly one I ascribe to! KEEP MOVING keep seeing friends, keep learning as we all inspire each other! Thank you Erin!!!!

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  1037. Toni on

    Simply love her sharing her spirit and life wisdom. Completely inspiring. Many blessings.

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  1038. Erin C. Day on

    “I had learned that I was capable of accomplishing very difficult goals. I was able to face considerable hardships and even extreme danger when it was necessary to achieve those goals. Without being quite aware of it I had developed a formula for greatly improving the chances of achieving any difficult goal.”

    We are so fragile these days. This is the attitude and outlook that started our wonderful country and what we must return to in order for it to thrive for another 250 years! She lived an inspiring life spreading beauty.

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  1039. Gloria on

    I am so inspired by Anne, I am 69 yrs old. I still have interests and want to keep going look how long she lived there are endless possibilities. I showed my husband the pictures of the arbors and said I’d like some of these, he said he could do it. So here we go, so excited for spring.

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  1040. Jane on

    Anne’s determination and spirit is evident in her story of big, life time projects.

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  1041. Rebecca Preman on

    What a beautiful exchange you had with Anne. She sounds like she was an amazing women! I really loved the bit that you quoted from her book, especially where she said “ Next, you should try to know yourself, your talents, and limitations, but be careful to not underestimate what you are capable of doing.” Very helpful and inspiring.

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  1042. Denise Suratt on

    I love her spunk and attitude! She reminds me so much of my Grandma that worked in her vegetable garden until about 95. My Grandma had that same spunk. My Dad would worry about her out there by herself and she always said if we found her out there, she died happy. Miss my Grandma’s wisdom, so happy that you captured some of hers.

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  1043. Rebecca on

    “Look carefully for the same prejudice in yourself. It could be lurking there without you realizing it and could cause you to not believe in yourself and to restrict you from following a difficult goal.” So often we are our own worst enemy. Thank you for sharing this interview. ❤️

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  1044. Jennifer on

    Several things resonate for me.
    One, how she really lived every day of her life, how she challenged herself, age wasn’t a factor. How interested she was in learning new things.
    Where she says, “Next, you should try to know yourself, your talents, and limitations, but be careful to not underestimate what you are capable of doing.” I want to do exactly that.
    I am equally impressed with how she shared her passions, how people were included in the richness of her life. How doing that enlarged and enriched her. I want to do exactly that.

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  1045. Kathy on

    I love that Anne carried on after losing her husband at a young age. And then at age 60 she started anew again with a rose garden, becoming a contractor of Victorian houses and traveling around the world. I’m 70 and wonder if zIve done as much in the last 10 years. Thanks for sharing Anne and your interview with her.

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  1046. Jeanette on

    She is a very inspiring lady. I loved when she said “ To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship” . Sharing her garden was sharing her self.

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  1047. Brooke on

    Wow, what a lady! I loved her message of not letting your supposed limitations limiting you. You can figure out another way to accomplish your goals if you put in the work.

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  1048. Katherine Mata on

    What a lovely interview with Anne, thank you for sharing, she had many pearls of wisdom throughout but as I am experiencing a crossroads in my life now and a possible change of career ahead, this really spoke to me

    “ On the other hand, you might want to pick something that comes to you more naturally. A passion for a particular hobby might be an indication of a special talent that could be pursued and turned into a rewarding career. Then, be willing to spend some time and energy preparing for what you want to do. I owe much of my success to this one.”

    Such inspiring words at just the right time

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  1049. Elaine Senft on

    What a legacy! Of mind, brawn and spirit..I’m 79 now. Just left a wonderful garden of 45 years, mostly Old Garden Roses. My favourite, Madam Alfred Carriere, three of them in back and front gardens. I have always admired this incredible Doyenne of the rose world, read all her books, and the best of all, Ramblers & Other Rose Species’ Hybrids. Her heart and soul, will be with us forever. Thankyou Dear Heart. And, by the by, we come this way but once…it ain’t no dress rehearsal….

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  1050. Mary M. on

    I identify strongly with how she gives the advice to keep learning and to not let gender stop you. I myself have taken up this mantle years ago, and the key is to just keep learning and making moves that others aren’t.

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  1051. Tyne Strickert on

    Thank you for this series.
    I love everything about the interview with Anne. What an inspiring person. Additionally, I love her warm heart and determination.

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  1052. Stacy Hollingsworth-Barnett on

    The power of determination regardless of age or gender. Share generously with others. Most of all follow your dreams.

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  1053. Donna Erkel on

    I have been growing heirloom roses for 30 years and I still feel I have so much to learn. But they have never failed to bring me moments of pure joy and gratitude for being able to receive what they have to offer.

    Anne’s interview was so inspiring; what resonated with me the most was the fact that she was 60 she felt old but as she looked back at 97 , she realized she had had another 1/3 of her life to live. I’ve struggled with age a little because there is still so much I want to do and when I look at the possibility of living another 30 years, I am enervated.

    My favorite is Buff Beauty.

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  1054. Amy Pilgrim on

    As a woman in a male-dominated industry, I cannot describe my excitement when I passed my Florida contractor’s exam (almost 10 years ago, now), and have now been licensed in FOUR states! I think my favorite part of the interview was when Anne talked about facing bias as a woman. I have dealt with it, and have learned to laugh at a man’s face when my boss and I meet a prospective client, “HE’S the engineer, and I’M the contractor.” I get a thrill every time. I also agree with Anne about being a lifelong learner. Never quit learning! Always push yourself farther!

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  1055. Tracey on

    “don’t let being a woman stop you from doing what is traditionally seen as a man’s job unless you really need a constant supply of testosterone to achieve your goal. Ask yourself if the activity requires big biceps and a beard. If not, go ahead with your dreams and fight the prejudice where you find it. Look carefully for the same prejudice in yourself. It could be lurking there without you realizing it and could cause you to not believe in yourself and to restrict you from following a difficult goal. If you are a man you are not apt to encounter prejudice in life’s goals because of your gender, but if you do don’t let it stop you. ”

    There are so many things in this interview that were inspiring. She was a very wise woman with a big and generous heart. Lots to learn from and aspire to be. Thank you Erin for the great questions you asked and the follow up to those answers that eeked out more good stuff Anne had to say. Truly inspiring.

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  1056. Alice on

    I love that the age of 60 didn’t slow her down ! I’m 62 and she reminded me it’s never too late to pursue new adventures!!!

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  1057. Daniela on

    I love this interview and am so inspired by it and by this series about roses (a mystery why our rose bushes reverted to big red single flowers has been solved). My favorite part was Anne’s advice about following your dreams, no matter what one’s age is.

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  1058. Anne Gassner on

    A few things have stuck with me after reading about Anne.

    To accomplish so many things after the age of 60 gives hope to so many women, including me at age 57.

    What energy she must have had to start a general contracting business after 60! My own mother is 95. So, to think this woman, Anne, who is basically the same age as my mom and grew up during the Great Depression, had the determination and the open mind to do any career regardless of gender, is inspiring. Anne was helping pave the road towards feminism.

    Lastly, Anne’s quote about “inviting people to your garden and sharing is perhaps the most important. Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love . . . of friendship. This is the greatest legacy. “This quote actually reminded me of the scene in the “Floret Series” on the Magnolia Network where you, Erin, chose to give away your Dahlia tubers. It was a heartbreaking scene but it was a beautiful scene because you chose to give away something so meaningful to you but what you hoped would be more meaningful to the world.

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  1059. Maryellen Ellis on

    Everything Anne said is inspiring, but what hit home for me is when she talks about her careers after 60. As I look forward to my 65th birthday this summer and retiring from my desk job, I can’t wait to start my new career with flowers. Ever time I say to my husband, “I was thinking about” anything to do in our yard, he just rolls his eyes and shakes his head, “what now?”

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  1060. Mary Miller on

    I will be 63 this year and have been feeling a lot of regret about starting my flower journey so late in life. Not anymore! After reading Anne’s story I feel encouraged to go full force ahead. I will take her advice to read all I can to gain the knowledge needed to create a rose garden. I too love to bless others with flowers. Flowers are the simplest way to bring joy!

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  1061. Laura Heeney on

    Wow! So much to be inspired by! I love that she started new things later in life. My husband works in Shreveport one week a month and I’m going to have to tag along to go see this rose garden. Thank you for sharing her with us, what an incredible lady!

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  1062. Constance Reeder on

    I loved reading all four blog posts of this series Erin – Thank you so much!

    I especially loved that Anne said, “You can do anything a man can do except those things that require a lot of strength…I think I said ‘big biceps’ in there. However, you can even figure out how to use mechanical means to overcome that. For example, I bought and used a wall jack on a house I was building to lift the walls into place all by myself.”

    This gave me such a wonderful visual! I could just see Anne doing this, even at 97! She had a lovely determination even as a young child, determined to get out and beyond her own mother’s beautiful garden.

    Blessings,

    Constance Reeder

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  1063. linda boyer on

    What most inspired me is her no nonsense approach about life in general. If you want to do something then learn the necessary skills and go do it. Love it! She must have been a joy to get to know and a life lesson resource. Thank you for sharing.

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  1064. Kim K on

    I planted some roses this past season. They were more than I bargained for and struggled, but I’m open to learning how to do better. I appreciate Anne’s remark (albeit not in regards to roses for her): “You need to study and become an apprentice.” I’ll work on that. An extraordinary lady and life!

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  1065. katherine patrick on

    I like that she believed in herself and her dreams enough to start new adventures even later in life! I loved her generosity and her encouragement to us all to continue in that tradition.

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  1066. Jared Troyer on

    I enjoyed the part about not letting your gender stop you. I’m a man that has always loved flowers. In 2021 I started flower farming full time. In my area flower farming is a rather new thing and especially for a guy.

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  1067. Kristin on

    My favorite part was when she tells us 60 isn’t too old to try something new – don’t let anything hold you back! This is so inspiring because in life so many times we make excuses for why we shouldn’t do something because we are too old or it’s too late. Thank you for the reminder to follow your dreams no matter what age you are! I love that!

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  1068. Lori Simpson on

    2 things spoke to me in this interview:
    1. It’s never too late. As my last child has just become an adult and I am nearing 50, this was especially meaningful to me because I have been struggling with the thought that perhaps it was too late to finally live out my dreams.
    2. Her message on how to remain young by staying connected to people, getting out, continuing to move, and always learning something new was an important reminder to me. The life altering effects of the pandemic that myself and many others have experienced as a result of being stuck at home have left me feeling more disconnected than ever before,

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  1069. Denise Bollinger on

    It is heart-warming to feel a kindred spirit with Anne, although someone whom I did not have the pleasure to personally meet. This year, I will reach my mid-60s —technically retired from full time PAID employment —and on to what I believe will be the coolest years of my time on Earth. I truly look forward to each day’s adventures on our farm and the lessons that I will learn. While some may be puzzled at the endless energy and unstoppable desire to challenge myself, each day is a blessing and I wouldn’t change this winding path. Anne is such an inspiration, and I am grateful that you shared her story with us.

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  1070. Paula Keeler on

    Thank you Erin for sharing not only your love of roses but your love for this amazing woman! What a gift she is and a mentor to so many. One of the things Anne said that struck a cord in me was “keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit, read and stay up to date, be open to new ideas, life-long learning and skill development.” Her whole approach to life is such an inspiration. Thank you for sharing her heart with us all here, and the great reminders of what can be accomplished when one follows their hearts.

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  1071. Corina Sahlin on

    I’m crying as I read this. What a woman Anne was! I soooo wish I had met her, and maybe I did at Christianson’s Nursery, since I tend to spend a lot of time there.
    What inspired me most in this interview is her spirit of generosity shining through. Don’t be stingy, she says. How beautiful and inspiring, especially considering how I always hold on to my plants so tightly because I love them so much. What Anne says about sharing touched my heart.