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Home Blog A Rose Story Part 4: An Interview with Anne Belovich
May 22nd 2023

A Rose Story Part 4: An Interview with Anne Belovich

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I’m thrilled to be able to share an interview with revered rosarian Anne Belovich (pictured below with her husband Max). This interview took place in August of 2021, just months before Anne passed away at the age of 97. 

I am so thankful to have gotten a chance to know her and am so inspired by how fully and generously she lived her life. 

Anne Belovich and her husband max in the rose garden with their dog

You’ve had a very full career and an even fuller life—first as a botanist, then a teacher, then a sailor, a general contractor, and then a rosarian and a writer. Can you tell me a little bit more about your very diverse life path?

I have had a very full life and while much is owed to the length of my life, my longevity, likewise, probably benefited from having a full, diverse life. Life-long learning and growing keeps one engaged. 

It would probably surprise many of your readers to know that I used to consider myself a prisoner in my mother’s garden. We lived in Morro Bay on a high bluff. As a young child of three, maybe four, I used to run away—down the trail, that certainly wasn’t made for children, as fast as I could go down to the water. I’d get down there in the sand and there would be crabs and herons that would be fishing—so many wonderful things to see.

My mother would come screaming down after me, drag me back, and tell me to stay in the garden. The water is where I wanted to be and I managed to sneak out often until my mother put up THE fence.  My mother had a wonderful garden considering those times and her means. It was always about nature though. My appreciation of flowers came later.

My life could have played out very differently if not for losing my first husband in World War II. He was such an amazing man—very handsome, very good to me, and talented. I ran away from home to be with him and get married. He entered the military and became a fighter pilot in the 1st Air Commando group under Colonel Cochran, with the mission of flying behind Japanese lines to supply and evacuate troops and materials as well as provide fire.

My husband completed the ‘Thursday’ mission but died shortly after because of his airplane’s mechanical failure. This left me as a 19-year-old widow and new mother who had to find her own way in life. If not for this tragedy, I would have most likely had more children and settled down into a role very different from the many I’ve had since that time.

One thing that isn’t mentioned above, but is very dear to me, are the numerous volunteer and board positions I’ve held, especially co-creator of NOAH, the Northwest Organization for Animal Help, in Stanwood, Washington, which is dedicated to ending euthanasia of healthy, adoptable, and treatable homeless dogs and cats. Our humble beginnings consisted of volunteering once a week to answer phones and match the people who had lost their animals to those who had found animals on the Island.

As a result of the ever-growing need to save more animals and serve the community, we expanded adoption and a transfer/low-cost spaying and neutering program. In coordination with over 50 other shelters, NOAH transfers animals at risk of euthanasia to continue to work on giving them a second chance. I was on the board until my husband Max needed more care to stay in our home at the end of his life. However, I still donate to this important cause and others that lessen the suffering of animals, both domestic and wild, and work to conserve biodiversity on our planet. Much more work needs to be done in these areas.

Rose arborsIn the introduction to Ramblers & Other Rose Species Hybrids, you say that “fortunate circumstances” led you to start a small rose garden. That small rose garden evolved into 5 acres of nearly 1,000 unique varieties (which eventually became the largest private collection in North America). Can you tell Floret readers a little bit more about this fortunate circumstance? What was it about roses in particular that put you under their spell? 

I just love them so. I’m a very visual person and the beauty that roses bring into my world gives me great joy. The “fortunate circumstances” I referred to in my book on ramblers was that I read an advertisement about a nursery in Oregon that was going out of business and having a big sale.

The ramblers were a really good price, and I came back with a truckload of them which I put on the fences around the property. I also put some into trees by building trellises to help support their growth. There was something wonderfully mysterious about roses growing up the trellises and into the trees to make the tree look as though it was blooming.

Arbors overgrown with rosesYou’ve written five books on roses, but have a deep love of rambling roses. What do you wish others knew about this amazing group of plants and why they should consider growing them in their garden?

Ramblers are easy to grow. Once they are established, they need little care. They grow tall and are excellent for covering fences and arbors, and for growing into trees. They provide a quick and easy way to add color to the garden.   

Roses in bloomYou’ve scoured the globe for rare rose varieties. What are some of your favorite specialty nurseries? And besides your own wonderful books, do you have any other books or resources that you’d recommend for beginning and experienced rose growers?

While I have traveled the world, I like to support local, small business owners as much as possible. Their work is hard, and we have lost many nurseries, especially those that focus on old roses. Vintage Roses used to be the best but went out of business. I enjoy going to Christianson’s Nursery & Greenhouse in Mount Vernon, Washington. Two others are Hortico in Canada and Rogue Valley Roses in Oregon.

As for books, Classic Roses by Peter Beales is a very important reference book if you are serious about roses. Another one that was very helpful to me in the beginning was David Austin’s English Roses by David Austin and Michael Marriott. 

Roses at Anne Belovich's propertyI always hate it when people ask me what my favorite flower is because there are too many treasures to choose from, but if you could only grow five roses in your garden, what would they be? 

I really don’t have a favorite. All of them are so unique and bring something special with them. If I must choose one, I think it would have to be Hybrid R. Moyesii ‘Geranium’. In my book, Ramblers and Other Rose Species Hybrids, I mention that mine had grown to 10 feet (3 meters). That was in 2016. It is now running way up into the trees and spills over in a striking cascade of scarlet red in early summer. It fills the view from my dressing room window.  

Anne Belovich visiting the roses at Floret

Pictured above: Anne visiting our rose garden this past summer

Your passion for roses started much later in life. Do you have any advice for someone who feels like it’s too late to pursue their dreams?

I remember when I turned 60. I thought 60 was so old. That was almost 37 years ago, well over one-third of my lifetime so far.

At almost 97 years old, it doesn’t seem that my passion for roses started all that late in life. It’s been over 30 years since I began this journey—longer than the careers of many. I pursued many dreams after turning 60, including starting my own contracting company and building over 25 (mostly Victorian style) houses, traveling the world, and my study of the older roses. It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams. 

My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.  

In fact, I am about to launch my own website and blog. I’ve always wanted my own website and I don’t think it’s too late to do this. I bought my own domain last week.

Overhead of Anne Belovich's book, A Voyage of Determination surrounded by rose bloomsIn your book, A Voyage of Determination, which chronicles your incredible adventure sailing your beloved boat from New Zealand to California, you share your formula for achieving any difficult goal, which I found incredibly inspiring as a woman who has big dreams. You write: 

“When I was alone I spent much of my time thinking about the fantastic trip I had been privileged to experience. It was of great value to me in a way that was quite separate from getting the boat back. I had learned that I was capable of accomplishing very difficult goals. I was able to face considerable hardships and even extreme danger when it was necessary to achieve those goals. Without being quite aware of it I had developed a formula for greatly improving the chances of achieving any difficult goal. It consisted of three main parts.

First, don’t let being a woman stop you from doing what is traditionally seen as a man’s job unless you really need a constant supply of testosterone to achieve your goal. Ask yourself if the activity requires big biceps and a beard. If not, go ahead with your dreams and fight the prejudice where you find it. Look carefully for the same prejudice in yourself. It could be lurking there without you realizing it and could cause you to not believe in yourself and to restrict you from following a difficult goal. If you are a man you are not apt to encounter prejudice in life’s goals because of your gender, but if you do don’t let it stop you. 

Next, you should try to know yourself, your talents, and limitations, but be careful to not underestimate what you are capable of doing. Becoming a rocket scientist will be a difficult goal if you struggle with math, but maybe some remedial instruction in math would help you overcome the problem. I learned to navigate the old-fashioned way with a sextant even though I didn’t learn my number combinations when I was a child because of constant moving and now I compute manually with difficulty.

On the other hand, you might want to pick something that comes to you more naturally. A passion for a particular hobby might be an indication of a special talent that could be pursued and turned into a rewarding career. Then, be willing to spend some time and energy preparing for what you want to do. I owe much of my success to this one.”

I put some things in the Voyage of Determination, and you have to do all of them. Determine what it is you want to do and then acquire any skills or knowledge that you are going to need, get the books, take the classes. I bought three books when I decided to build the house on Camano Island; how to frame a house, how to wire it, and how to do the plumbing. You need to study and become an apprentice.  

You can do anything a man can do except those things that require a lot of strength…I think I said ‘big biceps’ in there. However, you can even figure out how to use mechanical means to overcome that. For example, I bought and used a wall jack on a house I was building to lift the walls into place all by myself.  

You can meet and exceed your goals if you prepare yourself over time. You can’t become a rocket scientist without a great deal of study, and neither can anyone else. 

Arbors overgrown with roses You have so generously shared what you’ve learned with so many and I would love to know how myself and Floret readers can support your work into the future. How do we ensure that these rare and heirloom rose varieties live on? How can we pick up the torch and help carry your legacy forward?

Keep them watered, fertilized, and in a place with lots of sunshine. Roses, especially the old roses, are very easy to grow. However, inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy.  

Max and I used to have people over all the time to enjoy the property, and many friendships as lovely as the roses developed. I couldn’t do that for a while, but now that my son and his wife are restoring the gardens, we have been able to do this again on a very limited basis (and keeping public health recommendations in mind). It’s such a joy to see old friends again, such as you, Erin. I believe you were a young lady when I first met you. So many memories tie us all together.

I have given many roses away over the years—to individuals, nurseries, and to other special collections and demonstration gardens. Recently I was notified by Claude Graves, curator of the Chambersville rose garden in Texas and the Anne Belovich Rambler Garden there, that the American Rose Center Committee voted to begin the process of replicating my entire rambler collection in Chambersville into a new garden to be constructed at America’s Rose Garden at the ARS Headquarters in Shreveport.

It is a comfort and honor knowing that my rambler collection will be duplicated and conserved in a permanent internationally-acclaimed garden. I am grateful to Dean and Carol Oswald and Claude Graves for their dedication to and hard work on this large project. I am also grateful to my friends who have watered, fertilized, and put one of my rose cuttings in a place with lots of sunshine and continue to share cuttings with their friends, both old and new, and younger family members.

In addition, consider organizing volunteer efforts to help out in rose gardens that need extra hands. What we consider older roses now can be found in many home gardens that were started by people in their younger years. The work of weeding, fertilizing, and pruning can be satisfying but enriched by stories, expertise, cuttings, and new friendships. We will have our first pruning party in February with area-old garden rose enthusiasts and garden clubs. Consider these kinds of events in your local community.

Roses growing along a fenceYou can learn more about Anne on her website, where her family has begun publishing blog posts that she wrote before her passing. 

I had the opportunity to interview Anne’s daughter-in-law Teddie Mower who is now caring for her extensive collection of ramblers alongside her husband Rick, Anne’s son. In the interview, she gives an update on Anne’s roses, information for those interested in visiting the property, and how we can all help carry on Anne’s legacy. 

If Anne’s story has moved you, please consider adding one of her books to your library. Proceeds from the sales of her books will help support the preservation of her rambling rose collection.

Gallica Roses by Anne Belovich

Large-Flowered Climbing Roses by Anne Belovich

The Little Book of Alba Roses by Anne Belovich

Moss Roses by Anne Belovich and Harald Enders

Ramblers and Other Rose Species Hybrids by Anne Belovich

A Voyage of Determination by Anne Belovich

Overhead of Anne Belovich's rose booksI thought it would be fun to give away Anne’s complete library of books to three lucky readers. To enter to win, please share what part of her interview inspired you the most. This giveaway is open to both U.S. and international readers. Winners will be announced here on May 30.

Update: A huge congratulations to our winners: Michelle, Pam Blinten and Carrie K.


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2,909 Comments

  1. Jen on

    I can’t wait to see what happens with all the roses on the Farm. Watching Erin, Nina, and Jill work with the roses is a joy! I hope I can do my part to help preserve all the glorious varieties.

    Reply
  2. Tammy Hawkins on

    I am turning 60 this year in August. My father died from alzheimers last July. As did his mother and sister years before. All getting around 65. I woke up this morning so depressed it was raining out and I have planted over 200 dahlias this year trying to start a cutting garden to sell cut flowers. I’m starting this with my daughter who has a autistic son and needs to be able to be stay at home mom for him. I have spent the past year feeling like I was just getting to old to start a new business venture and missed so many things in life I wanted to mark off my bucket list but was running out of time. Everyday just feeling like my clock was ticking. So just by chance I was back at Floret reading and exploring as I love all the info and the images of beautiful flowers. What a inspiration has this article been to me. Wow. I have a whole new outlook, im not almost 60. Im barely 59 lol. I told myself if I didn’t get a lot of my contract work this spring I wouldn’t worry. I would just know it was God telling me to dive deeper into my floral passion. And this article definitely has me knowing I need to stay on track with my dahlias and keep pushing forward. Someday i will see Floret farms in person in all its beauty. Thank you so much for all you pay forward to the flower community. God has put you on the perfect path. I love what you do and God bless you for caring and sharing.

    Reply
  3. Cara B. on

    I don’t need biceps and a beard to build my dream garden and cultivate flowers and roses. Thank you Floret!

    Reply
  4. Sonja Smith on

    I was so excited to read that at 60 years of age, she started doing so many ambitious things in life!!! I will be turning 60 this year. I’ve had the mindset that I’m becoming old. Today, I’m changing that mindset, and I’ll start trying new things that I love and sound interesting!!! Thank you very, very much!!

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  5. Autumn on

    I just love seeing Anne’s gardens! Her generosity is insipring!

    Reply
  6. Deb Moss on

    I found her comments on how to achieve difficult goals to be very inspiring. I raised twin daughters telling them they can do anything they want. Don’t let anyone tell you, you can’t do that because you’re a girl. They have both grown into very independent women.

    Reply
  7. Dianne Jardine on

    Like a lot of other comments I found it to be great advice to say that it’s never too late to start something. Life-long learning, staying engaged and active very important however, I most liked her talk about “big biceps” I’ve been in male dominated industries for two careers… computer programming (when I started it was very male dominated) and plumbing. I’m not a plumber but I run a plumbing shop and can’t tell you how many times I’ve had people ask to talk to my boss!. Anne is simply inspiring all the way around! From the age is just a number, women can do it too, biodiversity, animal care and welfare… all of her careers. Absolutely remarkable… a truly amazing women. She is the epitome of “Girl Power!” and I will have my grand-daughter read this interview.

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  8. Stacy on

    I loved reading this interview back when it was first published and I still often think of Anne. She decided to make roses her work and it didn’t matter her age. She was interested in roses and therefore dove right in. I just love that.

    Reply
  9. Gail Tryon on

    So much can be accomplished after others think you are too old…we love roses on our farm as well.

    Reply
  10. Megan Pressley on

    I love that age is really just a number and if you want to do something in your life, you shouldn’t let that be a factor to stop you. The fact that she accomplished so many things amazes me. Her passion for always wanting to keep learning really spoke to me. I think I resonate more with the age statement because often I feel discouraged and think that I got a late start and I won’t be able to accomplish my dreams. That’s just more motivation for me to keep pushing and to keep learning so I can better accomplish what I have sat out to do.
    So thankful that a person recommended floret in a group that I’m in. Ever since discovering it, it’s gave me hope. Everytime I watch your episodes it always pulls on my heart strings. Thank you for sharing your story with us. I hope there is a season 3!

    Reply
  11. Kim Klonowski on

    The sentiment that age doesn’t matter resonates so much with me.

    Reply
  12. Blaire Andrews on

    I just love that you are never too old to start a new project! Age is just an idea :)

    Reply
  13. Jill H on

    I loved the inspiration this interview gave me for my own gardens, as well as all the information and background Anne gave about her journey!

    Reply
  14. Leigh Schroenn on

    I loved her comment about age – ‘I thought 60 was so old . . . I pursued many dreams after I turned 60’. I turned 50 last year and thought that was so old. Thanks to Anne, I have realised I could be only half way through my life now. I have had 3 rose gardens in my life and have just made my fourth (I start a new one each time we move house). Thanks to Erin, Floret and Anne, I realise now that there is much more to a rose garden than just enjoying one’s favourite varieties. Now I want to be part of preserving the old roses. Thank you!

    Reply
  15. Julia Hall on

    Of all of your extraordinary flower stories, this one hit home the most. I recognized some of Anne’s roses as close to the ones in my Mother’s scrappy gardens in Colorado. The harsh weather and soil made many of her gardens fail, but she did everything she could to save her wild rose plants. I never realized what her efforts meant until now and want to carry on her legacy and Anne’s. Graceful grit prevails. At 67, I am also embarking on a new career in construction and Anne’s ageless tenacity for female ingenuity in male spaces has inspired me beyond words. I am so grateful for your passion and sharing legacies Erin. The adventure begins!

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  16. Starlene walker on

    I love reading this.my favorite part was, dont let anything stop you from going for your dreams, and to believe in yourself. thank you for sharing.

    Reply
  17. Lara M on

    Don’t underestimate what you are capable of doing. This resonates with me in many ways, particularly as I navigate following my own floral dreams and battle the self-doubt we all stumble upon from time to time. In many ways it is easy to cast aside dreams and aspirations as far too lofty or unattainable, but if it is something you truly desire and want then it is completely within the realm of possibility to acquire the knowledge necessary to make those dreams a reality. Something magnificent and beautiful is not built overnight, but instead takes time and patience and nurturing.

    Reply
  18. Mira Hsu on

    Thank you for this interview. It encourages me that it is never too late!

    Reply
  19. Jennifer on

    Thank you for sharing. I particularly enjoyed her “late in life” advice…that if she had stopped at 60 when she thought she was “old” she would’ve lost 37 years.

    Reply
  20. Carina on

    That is beautiful! Thank you for sharing.

    Reply
  21. Carina on

    Wow, thank you Floret (and Ann) for this interview. It’s incredibly inspiring to hear from a woman who rose to meet such significant challenges and turned that into growing and giving so much to others. “You can meet and exceed your goals if you prepare yourself over time.” So much wisdom in this. I’ve been struggling with long COVID for about 9 months—trying to parent and garden and stay connected with people has been challenging in this season. For my next garden task, I’m going to plant a rambling rose to keep this fresh in my mind. And I will definitely be thinking of Ann. Thank you for this.

    Reply
  22. Mel on

    Anne’s comments on her age – on 60 not seeming so old anymore and everything she’s done looking back – really resonated with me. I feel so scared of aging so much of the time. Her words in this regard were comforting!

    Reply
  23. Terry on

    My favorite part of Anne’s interview is when she said “inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy.” I’ve been doing this for quite a while now and really enjoy it. Friends come over and I give them tours of my garden and my property and when they have an interest in a plant, whether it’s an edible or flower, I explain what I know about it and send them home with cuttings or plants I’ve propagated. I am by no means an expert, but as my knowledge of plants has grown I enjoy sharing what I know. Time I spend with my plants relaxes and renews me :-)

    Reply
  24. Sherry Shuler on

    I have been trying to garden with a limiting disability since 2014 without really any success. There have been some breakthroughs this last year that make me hopeful for the future. The formula Anne laid out in “Voyage of Determination” is highly inspirational as well as motivational for overcoming self imposed limitations.

    Reply
  25. Shelleen Arendt on

    My favorite part of this interview if I have to choose is that, “It’s never too late, don’t isolate, be a part of life and continue growing, evolving and learning!

    I am beyond blessed to be a part of this group and to learn so much over such a small amount of time.

    Watching you, reading your posts, blogs brings a serenity that is much needed in my life ❤️🙏🏻👍🏻

    Thank you!

    Reply
  26. Kathryn Johnson on

    Anne spoke of friendships that expand the knowledge and legacy of roses simply by the gesture of sharing both visually and by giving others her plants. This reminds me of how my grandmother used to encourage me to take the opportunity of a cutting from her garden to grow my own and feel the satisfaction of a beautiful flower or vegetable grown to maturity .

    Reply
  27. Camryn C. on

    Anne sounds like a lovely woman. I’m sad she’s passed now and her wisdom is no longer with us, but her books and her gardens are a consolation that some of her will live on in this world. I loved when she talked about her multiple careers. It gives me hope that I can be all the different things I would love to be in life. A mother, a gardener, an author, an adventurer. Two of her quotes stuck out to me: “It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams.” And, “You can meet and exceed your goals if you prepare yourself over time.” If Anne can do it, we can do it too!

    Reply
  28. Jerri on

    The most inspiring part of her story is her determination and excitement for life. She only saw opportunities to learn and grow. Her story is a personification of her beloved rambling roses. Her strength, hardiness, and passion to grow and experience new heights – a rambling rose – Anne Belovich.

    Reply
  29. Kat Fitchett on

    Wow! Anne really is so inspiring! I love when she said, “…you should try to know yourself, your talents, and limitations, but be careful to not underestimate what you are capable of doing.”

    Reply
  30. Connie on

    the most inspiring thing is how late in life she came to roses, and what is being done to preserve her collection now. what an amazing life!

    Reply
  31. Celeste Alfes on

    Such an inspiration! Thank you for sharing! Just returned from Monet’s Garden in Giverny and he planted LOTS of beautiful pink, purple, and white roses! Keep the stories coming!

    Reply
  32. Lisa Will on

    I appreciated her stating that I am not too old, even now at 66 to begin new things. The ramblers are beautiful so is her story. It fascinated me immensely. So much so, that I went out and bought a rose that I hope is a rambler. It’s good to know roses are not difficult and they need three things we as people need too: water, food, and sunshine. I can do that. The most exciting part is that then I can share roses through cuttings. I love that! What a wonderful, beautiful way to make a difference in another person’s day. Thanks for sharing.

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  33. Kimberly L on

    Sharing with others and to inspire. What an amazing lady and legacy.

    Reply
  34. Antoinette Lowery on

    I love that Anne started so many things after turning 60. I turned 60 last November and I look forward to starting new things and new businesses and pursue new adventures. She inspires me to go for it and live.

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  35. Katie on

    I love that her legacy is being told and she can be remembered for bringing so much beauty into the world through flowers!

    Reply
  36. Stacey Baskette on

    “I remember when I turned 60. I thought 60 was so old.” Anne was a rambler like her favorite roses and she has inspired me to start rambling – thru life – thru the garden – thru books. Thank you for sharing this beautiful interview.

    Reply
  37. Danielle Migliore on

    This entire interview is an inspiration to me! I love how Anne always wanted to continue to learn and grow . One thing Anne said which inspired me the most is that you can meet and exceed your goals if you prepare yourself over time. I can really feel Anne’s positivity and encouragement through her words and although I’ve always loved flowers, and specifically admired roses, I only recently began growing roses in my garden. When Anne said that I can exceed my goal if I prepare myself over time, I resonated with that message knowing that it will take time to get where I want to be and for my rose garden to as well, and that’s ok! Both Erin and Anne continue to inspire me to become the gardener I’ve always wanted to be. I am so blessed to get to keep learning about and growing flowers. Reading and watching other people’s love for growing flowers and having beautiful gardens gives me happiness and makes me inspired.

    Reply
  38. Carla Wisdom on

    Oh my goodness, I adore her! I wish I had someone close to me to inspire me that way! I am 41. Five/six years ago, my husband cheated on me with a high school girl. Before that, he had cheated on me with a 20 something year old. After the divorce, I was left feeling completely grateful to be free of his manipulating, narcissitic ways, but there was much trauma and I was left shattered. My liberation was accompanied with feeling like I was looking at all these shattered pieces of myself and not knowing how to mend them. The pessismistic feelings overwhelmed my thought processes and it has shown in the life I have lived since then. It’s as if there has been a delay in my life as I try to overcome my mindset of hopelessness. With the help of a inner healing minister, I am regrouping and starting to do the things I should have done in my 20s….figure out who I am, pursue my dreams, acquire the skills that go along with those dreams, build a life I can be proud of. These are things Anne did and therefore your article on her has touched me to the core! She never saw herself as too old or considered that it was too late! Although I don’t have a woman in my life who inspires me to the level that Anne does, I want to be that inspiring woman for my 9 year old daughter. And for others in my midst. One of the things I know I want is an astounding garden of beauty. My daughter and I have lived with my mother since the divorce. I don’t even have my own property yet. lol But I’ve been soaking up all the info in your Cut Flower Garden Book and with your online resources to start a cut flower garden here at my mother’s house. It’s been a dream of mine since high school that I’ve never tried to realize. My mom’s house is home for now, and I want to fill it with beauty. I don’t want to wait until I own my own property. I need the inspiration now. I have a big fascination with flowers that one doesn’t normally come across in local nurseries. Everyone has the same plants out here in West Texas, it seems, and they leave me feeling bored. But I ordered many seeds for plants I have not seen in people’s yards out here to see if I can grow them. Adding some roses would be a dream come true! I especially love the idea of having an arch overflowing with rambling roses! I loved the idea of a Secret Garden as a child and to me that is the perfect symbol of happiness …. sitting in a beautiful garden, away from the troubles of the world, inspired by all the beauty around you. Thank you for sharing her story! And Erin, you are quite the inspiration as well! I’ve been following you for a few years now and tears just stream down my face when I watch your show. It just moves me so much! It makes me so happy! Thank you so much!

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  39. Kennedy on

    The tenacity with which she approached life! I love how she chased her passions into her older years. I also loved the part where she said to keep moving, stay out of bed, and never stop learning. Such a good reminder to live life to the full and not become apathetic.

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  40. Keisha Samarco on

    That it’s never too late to start anything and to keep moving. She also said to not be stingy, which is part of being a good human.

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  41. Holly H. on

    Anne herself inspires me, her attitude and determination, her life long quest for constant learning, her love of adventure and of course, her passion for roses which is also my passion as well…in fact, all of the above are passions of mine.
    I hope to continue to devote much of my time to the world of roses and gardening.

    Reply
  42. Carrie Saia on

    Her whole story inspires me, thank you so much for sharing. But what really stands out is her determination as a woman to encourage others to develop their passion; study and learn how to achieve what drives them. As a woman and leader in a business world her love for life long learning and giving back as she has so unselfishly done for decades is amazing. I want to share her story with others!

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  43. Brittney on

    I love that she encourages you to be a life-long learner. Such an inspiration.

    Reply
  44. Lynn M on

    There was a lot of inspiration in the interview but what really spoke to me was the part where she said “I pursued many dreams after turning 60, including starting my own contracting company and building over 25 (mostly Victorian style) houses, traveling the world, and my study of the older roses. It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams.” So many times I think of what I would like to do, but then think at my age, it is not reasonable. She certainly is an illustration of how “not reasonable” is not an option if it is something you truly want to experience.

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  45. Meg on

    Nearing the age of seventy myself, I was very inspired by her words of encouragement about continuing to learn and take on challenging projects. I don’t feel like 69 and I’ve been a mad gardener all my life and hope I have lots left in me to do all the projects in my head and my heart! Also someone just gave me a start of “R. Moyesii “Geranium” and I will be thrilled to live to see it grow into the trees.

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  46. Anne on

    Sharing what you know and sharing what yo have.

    Reply
  47. Reka Darring on

    Truly inspiring story! It’s never too late to start something new with a good cause. It was also cool to recognize her son, he was my favorite professor at Indiana University. Not surprised he was raised by such an inspiring woman.

    Reply
  48. Jenn Christensen on

    She is so inspiring! I love that she encourages you to just keep going after your dreams and interests and to be a life long learner.

    Reply
  49. Christina Serrano on

    I love that Anne said you’re never too old to stop learning. I love the idea of rescuing these heirloom beauties. I am inspired to continue to grow a collection of my own!

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  50. Esther on

    Anne’s words, “It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams” resonated with me. The last two years have been filled with days of wondering if maybe it’s just too late for me to pursue my passion, and it’s especially discouraging when I see people younger than me who have already been doing what they love for many years. I feel like I don’t have what it takes: time or the skill set. Her words remind me to not give up hope.

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  51. Michelle on

    WHEW. So much inspiration! As I age, I really feel what she mentioned about both making sure not to isolate yourself and always be open to new ideas! Want to start something new or learn a new skill? You are breathing today, get busy, there’s always time for collecting knowledge, friends and experiences!

    Reply
  52. Lisa on

    I admire her perseverance, her love of learning, roses and animals in need. Also that she advocates for shopping local nurseries.

    Reply
  53. Jo mclean on

    I love roses and Anne’s collection of rambling roses is inspirational 🌸😍

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  54. Allee Shrum on

    I love her thoughts about sharing your garden and love of it with everyone 💗

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  55. Dianna Brubacker on

    I love how she had such a passion in continuing all her amazing roses! It is such an inspiration!

    Reply
  56. Jill Armstrong on

    I’m not sure what made me feel so emotional hearing and watching Erin tell Anns story in season 2 Growing Floret but I sat in awe of her accomplishments, maybe it was the fact that as I approach the age in which she started businesses snd and her roses..Im like hell ya…im not going to let that number stol me from digging in z plant tree rose heck maybe try a new job!!!! Thanks Floret for always moving our 💕 hearts. Big hugs. Im going to search for s rambler rose somewhere here in Ontario Canada..si inspired.

    Reply
  57. Kim Moss on

    I was inspired by Anne’s comment
    “I remember when I turned 60. I thought 60 was so old. That was almost 37 years ago, well over one-third of my lifetime so far.
    At almost 97 years old, it doesn’t seem that my passion for roses started all that late in life. It’s been over 30 years since I began this journey—longer than the careers of many. I pursued many dreams after turning 60, including starting my own contracting company and building over 25 (mostly Victorian style) houses, traveling the world, and my study of the older roses. It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams.
    My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.”
    At almost 60, I too, am beggining my rose journey!

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  58. Chandrea Burch on

    It is amazing to see what all she has accomplished and continued to explore more in later in life. So many are willing to call it quits after 60. I love roses and would benefit of having this collection to learn more about the different varieties of roses and caring for the ones I currently have in my own garden.

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  59. Julie on

    I love that Anne tells us to ask ourselves if a dream requires big biceps and a beard. It is empowering to be reminded that I can do anything I put my mind to.

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  60. Bobbie on

    What an inspiration! I can relate to begining a new project at a stage of life when many are retiring and slowing down. We have started a flower farm in our 60’s, it keeps us active and engaged doing something that we love!

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  61. Tina Roy on

    I love that she started really expanding I hee care of roses in her 60’s and that it’s never too late. I’ve started my rose garden in my 50’s and feel that it’s made me younger and more curious to explore, acquire and grow my own roses and see the beauty they provide for me and my community where I have the opportunity to share them.

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  62. Tanya on

    The most inspiring part of her story is that she started at an older age! I can’t wait to nurture my garden for years to come. Truly inspiring!

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  63. Carolyn on

    “It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams.”

    Very inspiring lady

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  64. Michelle Koch on

    Wonderful – required reading for me in its entirety every few months to keep on track with challenges, and goals. Most importantly to dare and truly live all the delight and awesome adventure life invites us to explore.

    Reply
  65. Laurie C. on

    “You can meet and exceed your goals if you prepare yourself over time.” In today’s world so much happens so quickly. Anne reminded me that my flower dreams are worth the wait, and that it is never too late to begin again. Thank you Erin for sharing Anne and the roses.

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  66. Connie on

    I loved when she stated she thought 60 was so old.

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  67. Kathy on

    What a wonderful blog. I’m grateful that her story is shared. What an honor for you Erin. Her work ethic is amazing. We need to learn from her. Stay young, stay fit and keep growing.

    Reply
  68. Britt McIntosh on

    It feels like I am trying to choose a favorite flower when asked what part of the interview inspires me the most … each paragraph seemed to offer a floret of inspiration.
    1. The recognition that the loss she experienced set her on the path of the life she got to live
    2. Co-creator of NOAH
    3. That flowers and her calling found her “later in life” … it’s never too late to try new things!
    4. To shop and support local
    5. That we are capable of accomplishing incredibly challenging tasks
    6. To find the gratitude
    7. That when you love and care about something for the sake of loving and caring for something … it can have a lasting impact and legacy.
    BUT MOST OF ALL … when you LOVE something … SHARE it!

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  69. Samantha Le Blanc on

    Anne’s comment about the 3 things on determination is both pragmatic and gentle advice to us all. It can be applied to most facets of life, gardening or office life.

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  70. Amanda Murphy on

    I loved the fact that she never stopped because of her age. If she had something she wanted to try, she did. Even in her 90s she was working on her own website. She had more life to live no matter what age she was. That’s inspiring!

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  71. Georgia Mohr on

    I am 62 and started my journey with roses 4 years ago. I am inspired that Anne started her journey at 60, but I was also inspired that she became a contractor. I am also passionate about historic homes. Perhaps, though recently retired, there are many more chapters in life. Anne gave great advice such as get out of bed and stay up on current events. Inspiring.

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  72. April Wilson on

    Wow..what an amazing and inspiring woman. Pursuing a hobby and turning into a rewarding career! Thank you Floret, for sharing another blessing. :)

    Reply
  73. Shirley Barth on

    Anne is such an inspiration! Loved the first episode of Growing Floret and enjoyed this interview. My favorite take away is that you can do anything you want to at any age!

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  74. Jenna on

    I want to build a pergola over our patio that overlooks our garden and I think I might just have to add a rambler rose to climb up it after seeing all of Anne’s amazing roses. The hard part is going to be choosing just one… or maybe two… or three…

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  75. Brooke James on

    I love that Anne didn’t consider herself old at age 60 when she began her journey with roses. As a 52 year old flower farmer, I am inspired by that attitude for sure!

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  76. Marilee Shiner on

    I love how she didn’t find roses until she was 60! That is inspiring to know that as adults we keep learning and growing.

    Reply
  77. April Thomas on

    I think everyone needs to have known an ‘Anne’ in their life. She seems like she was such an amazing woman. I absolutely draw inspiration from her chasing her dreams at 60. I’m 45 and so often feel like it’s too late to follow my dreams. I need to be more like Anne.

    Reply
  78. Leigh Ziemczonek on

    I am so inspired how Anne didn’t slow down as she got older, and that she looked forward to turning 100. I’m 47 and sometimes wonder if I am too old to start a new hobby or project, but Anne showed me that I could still have 20, 30 or more years to do new things. I am so glad her roses are being preserved so her legacy can live on. Thank you Anne for sharing your gifts with us all 💕

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  79. Martha Brogdon on

    As a relatively new gardener in my 60’s I find Anne’s story so inspiring . It gives me hope that it’s never too late to begin learning more about roses and gardening in general. I loved her comment… “My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development. ”
    Thanks to Anne and you, Erin, for encouraging us all in enjoying the beauty of flowers!

    Reply
  80. Sue Carbaugh on

    “I pursued many dreams after turning 60…It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams. ” At 61, this is inspiring to me on so many levels. Inviting people into the garden and sharing what you know and what you grow – yes, yes, yes!

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  81. Dawn Whitehead on

    Anne seemed like an amazing woman (as we all are) who never let the worlds obstacles stop her. Her tenacity and spirit shows throughout her life which helped her accomplish all that she wanted in life. Even with the road blocks and setbacks, she turned her “lemons” into lemonade and set out to live life on her terms accomplishing her goals through her love of animals and roses (just to name a few). A truly extraordinary woman and life lived to the fullest!

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  82. Carly on

    What inspired me the most about Anne’s interview, is how personal the roses are to her.
    I really connected to the part she spoke on being a new 19ye old mother with a recently deceased husband. I think that intertwines her so much to her journey with roses.
    I also am personally relating to this, as a new mother being abandoned by her fiancé. My son is 2 and I recently bought a house, work full time, and starting my new cut flower garden this year.
    There is something of nurturing the flowers that brings such gratitude and satisfaction to one with hands full.

    Reply
  83. Melodie on

    What a wonder! From traumatic experience at 19 to 97 years of experience. I really resonated with her perspective on what happened when she was younger and how she moved past it. How she said that at 60 she felt old but got to grow roses for 37 more years! I want that perspective on life. I also loved how she said sharing the cuttings is an act of love. I think so too. Share the flowers as much as you can.

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  84. Meredith Brown on

    I just love how the most important part of carrying on the rose legacy is to invite people into your garden and share the roses! That generosity & sharing are key completely melted my heart!

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  85. Jc on

    What a delight! There were so many takeaways, finding life and joy after 60, in adversity, and not being fearful, hit home for me. I especially loved that she talks about not letting prejudice get in the way and looking inward to prejudice within one’s self. Anne’s outlook on life is so refreshing, honest, and elegant in its simplicity. It is an honor to get to know her through your interview.

    Thank Erin.

    Reply
  86. Naomi on

    Having known some people seeing age as a reason to slow and refuse to learn new things, I am encouraged by stories like Anne’s always willing to learn and grow. I love to find new skills and feel achievement, and hope to continue taking on challenges all through life like Anne!

    Reply
  87. Linda Hovgaard on

    Ann Belovich is such an inspiration on so many levels! I love the passage you shared from her book A Voyage of Determination and her advice on how to conquer your dreams and aspirations, especially if you are a woman. To receive a collection of her books would be an honor! Since I want to start my own heirloom rose garden I would pour through the pages of invaluable information and soak it up with delight!

    Reply
  88. Akacia Rose on

    This is such an inspiring story and Anne was such passion-follower. Many traits to be admired in this woman. My middle name is Rose. One of my very first formed memories was of a very precious bottle of rose essential oil that was gifted to me by my father for my 5th birthday. I coveted that bottle all the way into college where, somehow, sadly, I lost it. I used to open that bottle and smell it just to be transported back to my childhood. So powerful. As I continue to come closer to who I truly am in this life, I realize that the rose truly is intimately intertwined with my life purpose. Names are so powerful. I recently had the blessing to purchase my first home and plan to bring this 2.5 acre property to life. I have been deeply inspired by the process of design that you showed us in season one and plan to put all of myself into creating the most beautiful ecosystem here based on preservation of less known and endangered plants, including all sorts of flowers, and animals. When I found out that you were jump starting a rose project based around preservation, my heart sang! I would be beyond the moon to be involved in this movement in any way I can and would gratefully accept this gift with open arms and a big smile. So exciting! Thank you for all you do and I support the legacy that you are leaving behind!

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  89. Olivia Behrendt on

    Roses and wonderful memories with my Mom are tied together. In 1980 something she and I started a small collection of heritage roses. The collection started a spark that had me seeing in the beauty around us. Diving in deeper into gardening, the arts and eventually Photography. Fast forward to today, 2023 where I have only the memories to look back on, since my Mom passed 11 years ago. I chose a career, as a professional photographer. This interview with Anne Belovich got me to thinking about career paths. At 46 I have had a successful business for 18 years. While I am happy and enjoy many aspects about my career, its never too late to start something new. I enjoy the excerpts from the book: A Voyage of Determination, where Anne explains the ideas of limitations as a woman. “Does this job require testosterone, or a beard?” If not then go for it. Learn a new direction that you’re interested in, do the deep dive and become an expert. My next adventure, start a rambling rose garden, to honor my Mom, and remember the best memories. In essence go back to where my passions began!

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  90. Jessie on

    Inspirational is an understatement. Starting my first rose garden only 2 years ago at age 50, this interview is rose gold. I am most inspired considering her rose venture has spanned more than many careers starting at age 60 & her message to keep sharing. Her journey that became a legacy can start at any age.

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  91. Erin M Sullivan on

    Her perseverance! I am intimidated by growing roses, but we shall overcome, what a voice of determination.

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  92. Melissa Jander on

    Thank you for sharing your interview with Ann, wow, how inspiring. I am an artist who also gardens. A friend of mine connected with Teddy in 2021 and we were able to visit the Belovich garden to paint there one morning. What a beautiful experience. It’s so great that you are taking up the cause to help preserve these rare beauties. Cheering you on! And congratulations on a new season of episodes on Magnolia Network, really wonderful to watch. Okay , back to your question, the part I loved most about the interview with Ann, is her bravery and determination, along with a generous heart to want to share roses with everyone. I’m on a new journey of collecting old roses and finding creative ideas on fencing to keep them as safe as possible from deer.

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  93. Beverly Chesney on

    Just starting my rose garden, I love how she loves to share. I’m that way with my flowers and garden, when people walk by I love to talk and let them know where I buy my seeds from or give them some seeds I have extra of. My goal is to have my whole block look like a garden oasis.

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  94. Alexandra Ellis on

    When Anne mentioned that most things in life are obstacles that can be overcome, it really inspired me to think about what obstacles, real or imagined, I have placed in the way of my goals, and how taking a different approach could make these goals achievable.

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  95. Violet on

    I have a hard time getting my roses to thrive, this was very inspiring and a great interview. Love roses and think they are so beautiful

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  96. Janet Vainikka on

    I am most inspired by her (and your) generosity to share flowers! I love that she stresses the importance of inviting friends into your garden.

    It’s also very inspiring that she never stopped learning and growing. She was working on creating her own website up until she passed away. I love that about her!!

    Thank you once again Erin and Floret for sharing!!

    Reply
  97. Jenny Sterling on

    I think it’s incredibly beautiful that her thirst for continued learning, sharing, cultivating self growth and growing community saw no slowing down even near the very end of her life. Her age and her increasingly closeness to passing away never gave her a reason to slow down, but instead she thrived on and took joy in accomplishing something new that she hadn’t done before. What a beautiful soul and inspiration to the rest of us. Her legacy is the spirit she’s instilled in so many and even now continues to do so.

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  98. Brenda Veinotte on

    I was inspired by learning of Anne’s newly discovered passion for roses at age 60. It is never to late to start growing roses and do what you love to do.

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  99. Amie on

    This part of Anne’s interview is really empowering, “… be careful to not underestimate what you are capable of doing.”. It’s easy to stop yourself from exploring new interests when 1) a challenge presents itself and 2) when others say “oh that’s too hard”. When I think back, my greatest achievements have been persevering through both 1) and 2). Never underestimate yourself!

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  100. Susan on

    What inspired me the most from Anne’s interview was learning of her newly discovered passion for roses at age 60 and then going on to write so many books, sharing her knowledge and love. At 60+ its so exciting to discover a new passion that brings beauty and joy and new information to learn. Life is a bed of roses!

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  101. Marlowe Whyte on

    Thank you, Erin, for sharing all the facets of your passion for flowers. Anne’s words about her life when she turned 60 (and felt like it was ‘so old’) really pricked up my ears, as I am approaching that age and wonder and worry deeply if I will get to complete all my soul’s ‘missions’ in life. Her words remind me of the futility of fretting, as I may very well have another unexpected 37 or so more years ! I have left behind quite a few rose gardens, often with sadness, as I grow so attached to places. But with great joy I have visited one of the cottages where I planted and trained an Alberic Barbier (old french rambler) all across the deck railing. The new owner treasures it and has continued to nurture many of the old roses that I sourced from nurseries in Ontario: Buff Beauty, Souvenir du Dr. Jamain, Albertine. Friends and acquaintances of mine have planted successful cuttings that I’ve taken from all my best roses to many different places in BC, and this is something that still makes me smile.

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  102. Jaime McGuan on

    It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams…I love that! I hope to be able to keep going after my dreams as I get older.

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  103. Lisa Seppanen on

    Anne is an encouragement that we can live a full life. I like when she said “stay out of bed” and “don’t isolate.” Sad that she was a widow at 19 and had a new baby at that time. I really like that she took from the roses she obtained from the nursery in Oregon and placed them on fences around her trees so the trees looked like they were blooming—what a great idea! Anne left a beautiful legacy.

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  104. Heather on

    So much of this interview inspired me. I think what stuck out most was her perseverance and joy.
    She was 60 when she started her interest in roses and at 97 bought her domain name and was trying new things. Her advise to not put yourself into a box or limit yourself is so inspiring.
    Thank you for the opportunity, but I will try to add one or more of her books to my library regardless of the giveaway. Thank you for the introduction!

    Reply
  105. Jenn Kirksey on

    WoW! That was a special treat to read her interview! Very Beautiful soul indeed! Her values and encouragements on find a way to do what makes your soul shine in life. The “Pruning Parties” and sharing your garden with others or volunteer to help others spoke to me! She is right, no matter how old you are never stop moving to enjoy what makes you happy 🌹

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  106. Shaina on

    Her spirit. I can feel it reading the responses that were from her. Telling us in her own way that age, tragic, etc shouldn’t put us to stop anything. If we have any goal, we should go for it. Nothing should prevent us from reaching our goals! I loved watching and hearing her in season two.

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  107. Meg King on

    I just turned 60 and am inspired to start new hobby and projects. My mother is 94 so I hope I have longevity in my genes as well as Anne had. I love roses and am reminded of a tiny house I rented in Kirkland. This cottage had two wild rambling roses that my ex wanted to tame. They grew up into the old apple tree. Anne would have loved them!

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  108. Tamara Wilcox on

    One of the most inspirational women I have ever read about. Thank you so much for bringing her life into the spotlight so that her remarkable spirit may live on and inspire so many!! I love that at the time of the interview, at age 96, she had just bought a domain to launch her own website and blog. She says, “…go ahead with your dreams and fight the prejudice where you find it. Look carefully for the same prejudice in yourself. It could be lurking there without you realizing it and could cause you to not believe in yourself and to restrict you from following a difficult goal….Next, you should try to know yourself, your talents, and limitations, but be careful to not underestimate what you are capable of doing.” Now I will think of Anne when I walk amongst the roses in my own garden :-)

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  109. Rachel Hynd on

    Her unflaggingly indomitable and generous spirit. In a world such as this, that is an amazing thing to maintain. She found a way to ride the waves, with courage and joy, that she also shared. Beautiful. Thanks for the draw and your own generous spirit!

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  110. Korina Talbot on

    I love that she mentioned about passion for particular hobby that can turn into a career, it is a validation for me to continue doing what I love and makes me happy which is gardening and maybe one day it could be a career.

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  111. Sarah Hawkey on

    When I watched the roses episode with Anne, of course I cried pretty much the whole way through, and since then all I see is imaginary old roses around my home. I’m so glad I caught up on my floret emails and read this interview, too. The section from her book you shared is very inspiring, reminding me that at any age I can follow my curiosity and inspiration. It also reminded me that the limiting thoughts of others might very well be thoughts in me as well and must be weeded just like in my garden, and that being a woman – well, I can do anything all myself.

    Last year I bought my home, all by myself, a life long dream fulfilled. I’m very curious about old things – I love older people, old homes, old forests, old music. I’m a professional soprano and even specialize in 17th-century music.

    Anyway, when I started my gardens last year, it turns out I have a gift (or my home does) for roses. As I was practically watering my dahlia patch with my sweat and tears (lots of tears!) my four new rose bushes were thriving, flushing again and again, and I barely lifted a finger for them because I was so focused on the dahlias.

    Now that I know Anne’s old varieties of roses are out there, I’m determined to find some to grow here and share with other rose lovers like me to continue her legacy. Thank you for this wonderful interview. I went to Anne’s blog and can’t wait to finish reading that as well.

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  112. Micayla on

    The fact that she started when she was 60. That’s just amazing! Sometimes I start to think that I’m too old to start new things when most people start those things when they’re younger. But that’s not the case! I can do it no matter the age!! That’s so freeing!

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  113. Alexis Penzell on

    What an inspiration to all of us rose growers and lovers….there’s so much to learn and Anne is a remarkable model for what could be! Thank you for sharing this interview!

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  114. Dennise Wright on

    I appreciated her comments about inviting others to your gardens and sharing your flowers! Showing hospitality and giving to others is what is needed in this world today. These are the acts of kindness that will be remembered. I love the idea of giving people something tangible to take home and enjoy!

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  115. Jennifer Love on

    I love that Anne talks about keeping moving, learning, and doing no matter what age you are in life. I really love that she didn’t start her rose journey or her construction company until after age 60. It give me inspiration for all the things I still want to do in my life while, at the same time, I am approaching a milestone birthday that is really making me contemplate how few years I might have left on this earth – and so many things I still want to do to find more purpose and joy in life. I love her zest for life!

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  116. Lacey Terrill on

    Thank you for sharing this interview! Every part of this was so inspiring but my favorite part was Anne’s response to what her formula is for achieving difficult goals. Her words resonated so deeply and reminded me to keep dreaming and my dreams are achievable but only if I put in the work. Be curious, learn, take action, and “don’t be stingy”! She was quite an amazing woman and there is so much to learn from her and her 97 adventurous years!

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  117. Moe D on

    I was stunned to learn that Anne was a young widow and mother after her first husband died in WWII. That had to be such a horrible tragedy to work through but opened so many doors for her in the end! I am also a very visual person like Anne and I like to photograph my flowers! :) She is so inspiring!!!!!!!

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  118. Alisa Johnson on

    What stood out to me most is her simplicity for describing how to take care of heirloom roses. I think life gets a whole lot easier when we recognize how simple things really are. It might mean we have to step back and look at the challenge to see the simplicity, but it is there.

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  119. Sheri on

    The part that inspired me most was “ You can do anything a man can do except those things that require a lot of strength…” It is so true; I am too often reminded in the garden. And sometimes we just don’t have bicep strength.

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  120. Monika on

    So much beauty and inspiration! Both from the garden AND the gardener!

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  121. Katey Campbell on

    As a young woman who is a landscaper (hardscaper/ plant installer/ designer), floral designer and now general contractor, I have such an appreciation of her words about not stopping if those around might think it’s a “man’s job”. Constant looks and comments haven’t stopped me yet, some days it makes it difficult though.
    You definitely don’t need those big biceps, equipment does help though!
    I’m in a very male dominant landscaping world and I’m thankful I can do the things I do. I also love encouraging young people, to do the hard, physical labor. It always pays off.

    Thank you Floret Crew!

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  122. Susan Schlieve on

    “It’s never too late to act on your goals and dreams.” Priceless advice, and what she started and accomplished after 60 years old is VERY inspiring.

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  123. Tonya on

    Thank you for sharing Anne’s story she is so inspiring, I love how she talks anout inviting others into your garden and building relationships with friends and family.

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  124. Deborah on

    I was inspired when Anne talked about turning sixty (as I recently have) and how that seemed so old- but wasn’t- and went on to pursue her passions the next 30 years! That’s what I intend to do and I’ve always wanted to grow roses; so I’m going to spend the next 30 years doing that! Never too late!

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  125. Mary K Yodzis on

    The end was very moving, when she talked about inviting people over and the “many friendships as lovely as the roses”that developed. She said inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. How often we forget that! What an inspiring lady. Enjoyed the story very much!

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  126. Girlie Delizo-Jasper on

    Thank you for sharing your time with Anne with all of us. My favorite part about her interview is her encouraging gardeners to invite people in our gardens. It’s like she’s telling us to let the roses help us make and keep connections with people.
    It’s her legacy, and I’m inspired to let her legacy live through me.

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  127. Kayla on

    I loved how honest and positive and nonchalant she was about growing roses. Many people (in my area in zone 5 in particular) tend to have grumpy attitudes towards roses but I have found they are a delight to plant and have around. I really connected with her love of these beautiful, wild, unpredictable plants.

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  128. Cam t on

    I just love what she said about it never being too late to pursue a passion or a new career. I’m 54 and only really started studying flower farming and soil science two years ago, trialing flowers and using amendments and suc. I have asked myself many times “am I a fool for starting on such a physically intensive new career path?! After twenty two years of restaurant ownership and being exhausted by that physical labor, am I simply out of my mind to be doing this now?” Her words have definitely swept many of those doubts away because when they love and passion is there, you can do anything you set your mind to. She’s right that there are always work arounds if you love doing something enough to figure it out. Truly an inspiration for us old broads!

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  129. Susan on

    Wow, is she inspiring!!! I love that, in addition to going after what she wanted, she also prioritized giving to others in so many ways!

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  130. Norma on

    I liked when Anne said, “Ask yourself if the activity requires big biceps and a beard.” Thank you for the interview

    Reply
  131. Froukje Spaak on

    Having recently entered my 60’s I was heartened that she started with roses then. It really isn’t the end of my life then but an opportunity to start out with another dream. I have 30 or so roses and may just keep growing more 😁

    Reply
  132. Abril Slate on

    At the age of almost 33 I have started my love of roses. After a battle of deep depression the part where she says keep moving get out of bed really hits home with me, 6 months ago I almost lost my life and now roses are a big part of me getting out of bed staying active and taking in as much beauty as I can. I have much to learn and actually dm floret all the time with questions 🙃 thanks for being so gracious in answering!

    Reply
  133. Sarah Steidinger on

    What a beautiful woman. I love that she was completely satisfied that her work would live on in others after she was gone, by giving away so many cuttings and knowledge. I pray to have the same outlook and impact when I am her age.

    Reply
  134. Sabrina on

    What an inspiration she was! Do what you love and never stop learning and moving! I just Loved this episode so much, really resonated with me. I plan on watching it again! Thank you for sharing! Xo

    Reply
  135. Melanie Martin on

    I am in awe of Anne and equally inspired by her determination as well as your own. 3 years ago we left Arizona and moved to the north shore of Chicago. Covid and a long cold winter had me down. But a trip to the bookstore with my daughter turned things around for me. I picked up your book ‘A Year in Flowers’. It inspired me to work towards becoming a flower farmer with a side trip going back to school to become a landscape designer. If it weren’t for Anne’s inspiring you, and you inspiring me, I’d be in a very different place today. I am continually in awe of the community of people you meet around gardening and Anne is the ultimate expression of what it means to be inclusive and supportive. I loved watching the episode last night and learning about her wonderful gift to all of us gardeners (and beginner rosarians ;) )

    Reply
  136. Cynthia Thompson on

    “It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams. ” My youngest child will be a senior in high school, and I have been working in the direction of my “next chapter”. Ms. Belovich’s story is a wonderful elixir for all my self-doubt.

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  137. Alexandra Larose on

    Everything was inspiring, but I especialy liked when her son says what she responded to people telling her she went into Roses very old and that she didn’t want to stop living at 60!

    Reply
  138. Tanya on

    I enjoyed this episode so much! Definitely a favorite. They all are really. Anne is such an inspiration! Hearing about how she was 60 when she began growing, studying, and writing about roses was just amazing. And the quote about sharing your garden and your passion with others is such an encouragement. She accomplished a lot in her last 40 years. Anne inspires me to keep growing, and learning because you’re never too old to try new things.

    Reply
  139. Wendy Koritnik on

    When I am feeling overwhelmed and at a loss with my little business, I turn on Floret. I can’t even count how many times I have watched season 1 and have already watched season 2 , twice I cry, smile, laugh and find myself feeling inspired once again. Thank you for sharing your story, and Anne’s. You both have made the world a better place to live in!

    Reply
  140. Kim Wakefield on

    Anne’s story is very inspiring to me. The biggest inspiration to me was that she was a life long learner and didn’t let her age or sex interfere with her education, her life or endeavors. I think her story speaks to me because she loved water and nature as a child, and continued that love throughout her life. I have always loved being near water and loving nature.

    Reply
  141. Mette on

    Very inspiring, especially how her life looked like after the age of 60!

    Reply
  142. Daphne Minkin on

    Oh goodness, as I turn 59 next month I am so inspired by her “fresh start” at age 60 and at all of her accomplishments after that. Such a beautiful soul and a sharp mind, she reminds me of Miss Rumphius, the Lupine lady written by Barbara Cooney!

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  143. Mariah on

    It is all so inspiring, don’t hold back from what you want to do is my biggest takeaway. Such an amazing life. Thanks for sharing it all.

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  144. Natalie on

    Both of you are so inspiring! The love and passion you both have for flowers are tangible.

    Reply
  145. Ronda Banner on

    I loved the section on how Anne loved to share her roses – reminds me on my mom who was known as the “Rose Lady” – she had a garden of over 100 bushes that she meticulously care for in the same way as described in Anne’s interview. My mom gave roses to everyone who crossed her path, but was especially loved at the Ronald McDonald house and Winn Dixie Hope Lodge in Gainesville, FL . She delivered vases of her roses to both locations every week for almost 25 years. It was her dose of “rose therapy” to help the families and patients that were housed at both locations have a bit of sunshine and loveliness. The two sound like they were kindred spirits and made my heart happy to read your interview and relive some cherished memories of my mom at the same time!

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  146. chelsea on

    I felt so inspired by her comments on determination, being a constant apprentice and learning everything you need to in order o build the life you want to have. It gave me a burst of new energy to continue learning and growing past the feeling of burnout I’ve been experiencing. There is always time to make your dreams happen, but you have to put the work in and continue to be a student of life. I love her perspective on that.

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  147. Eilis on

    I love that she has shared her roses with so many people and they have made their way out into the world. What a legacy!

    Reply
  148. Shana Tundevold on

    I was most inspired by Anne’s “formula for achieving any difficult goal”. I think that her mindset is similar to mine and it can sometimes make me feel like a very intense person. It is good to hear validation through her formula that there are other women with similar drives and passions that may take a little more perseverance to achieve as it goes against the grain or defies norms. When I am passionate about something, I pursue it full heartedly and relentlessly. Rather than feeling out of place by my way of approaching these things, it is refreshing to hear Anne’s perspective that it is okay to face adversity, but it will also take perseverance to achieve challenging goals.

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  149. Kim Young on

    Where to begin?! I think the most is turning 60. It’s not over. I’m getting up there in age and my enthusiasm sometimes doesn’t match my energy level and it makes me so sad. I want my body to cooperate w my mind. Also, her saying don’t underestimate what you’re capable of. I could cry at that because that is my mantra. She was such a remarkable life force. This interview is such a gift!

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  150. Shellie R. on

    Her generosity inspires me. I have so many violet babies but was afraid to give them away because I thought people would find it strange. I will do better.

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  151. Sharon A. Orlando on

    Your interview with Anne Belovich was a joy to read. Learning her life story and seeing the work you are doing to continue her legacy, I am reminded of the children’s book, Miss Rumphius by Barbara Cooney. As you may know, the book’s main character is inspired by her grandfather to do three things: travel to faraway places, live by the sea, and most importantly, make the world more beautiful. And she accomplishes the third by planting flowers, which becomes her legacy. Thank you for creating and caring for so much beauty and color- you are an artist! Like Anne and Miss Rumphius, you have and are continuing to make the world more beautiful.

    The graceful Eden Climber rose is my garden among others, but each flower is such a unique expression of beauty that it is hard for me to pick a favorite!

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  152. Katie Reinhart on

    I’m struck by the recognition that one of the greatest tragedies of her life (the loss of her first husband) ultimately led to a life-long passion that she otherwise might not have found. I just got laid off mid-way through a divorce and am trying to keep up the hope that the universe is going to find a great place for me, as it did for her.

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  153. Madison Dorman on

    I love the story about how her small rose garden turned into almost 1,000 varieties on five acres, and it inspires me to keep on going with my small garden in hopes that it too may become big and beautiful and give smiles to others.

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  154. Robin Avenmarg on

    I loved reading about her life. I really liked that she just started a new chapter of her life at 60. Since I can relate to that part. The encouraging words about not isolating yourself, staying currant and having friends.
    I just started gardening and incorporating roses into beds. She is quite inspirational, as is Erin.

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  155. Ellen G on

    “Know yourself….A passion for a particular hobby might be an indication of a special talent that can be pursued.” This is inspiring and encourages me to spend some time thinking about my interests and things I have a passion or specific talent for. How can they be used to help and encourage others and add beauty to the world around me?

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  156. Hillary Hunter on

    Wow you guys keep inspiring me to follow my dreams at 40 years old. I’m just beginning to remind myself that flowers are my souls perfect match. Coming from generations of gardeners in my family all with a passion of roses this season really hits home. Love ❤️ what you guys are doing.

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  157. Ashley Van Meter on

    First, don’t let being a woman stop you from doing what is traditionally seen as a man’s job unless you really need a constant supply of testosterone to achieve your goal. Ask yourself if the activity requires big biceps and a beard. If not, go ahead with your dreams and fight the prejudice where you find it. Look carefully for the same prejudice in yourself. It could be lurking there without you realizing it and could cause you to not believe in yourself and to restrict you from following a difficult goal.

    What excellent advice. Some I hope to live by and teach my daughter to live by.

    Reply
  158. Amy Kaufman on

    I love Anne’s perspective on age. Starting at 60 is not too late!

    Reply
  159. Leann Reece on

    I cannot believe how much I wept at the first episode. And it was truly all because of Anne. Her wisdom and fought-for knowledge is a gift that will be given for generations. She understood the most important thing in life: connection. In her interview, she said how friendships started and really grew because of enjoying the roses together. There is such wisdom and beauty in that – taking time to meet people and connect with them; hear their story and bask in the presence of beauty together. She seemed to truly understand and actually live out the saying, “stop and smell the roses.” Smelling roses does nothing other than elicit joy. But I think Anne understood how much more it truly does — it elicits joy because of the sweet aroma, it also breathes deep connection between one’s soul and the garden. The place of growth, beauty and connection. She gets it!! Bless you Anne and THANK YOU Erin and Floret for sharing her story.

    Reply
  160. Jagger on

    Her life of many passions. As someone with an entrepreneurial spirit it can be scary to go against the “social norms” of having a lifelong career. The life she lived shows it’s possible to choose things you enjoy and continue down whatever paths call you, no matter how many there are!

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  161. Karen Adam on

    She inspired me to create something beautiful and reminds me that not matter when and how I can always start with what I have.

    Reply
  162. Ramona on

    My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development. This is such good advise 👏💜🌹

    Reply
  163. Ruth on

    I think the most inspiring part of this interview was her talking about how you’re never too old to pursue something. This is something that I am struggling with as a stay at home mom. It’s been almost a decade of caring for my little people and I am starting to worry/wonder will I ever get to go and do something or is it going to be too late? Anne’s story is such an uplifiting one where she really made the most out of her life!

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  164. Adele Anderson on

    I love her determination and advise on reaching your goals especially in male oriented careers.. and how she started at 60! I’m 47 in my 3rd season of fishing on a lobster boat… hoping to maybe own my own one day! And also trying to start gardening.. started with your seeds Erin! 🌺

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  165. Bobbi on

    Thank you for sharing the beauty of Anne’s work with the world! You are truly inspiring and even inspired me to take on roses last year! They are such a joy and much more hardy than people give them credit for.

    Reply
  166. Donita Schindler on

    I love how she continued her journey of learning till the day she passed. That is very inspirational. Also her talk about climbing roses up through the tree tops where it looks like they’re blooming! So much fun in gardening and I hope to continue always. 🌸💚🌸

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  167. Tobi on

    I think I love the part about her starting roses so late in life. That matched with the fact that she said sharing your garden and flowers is just as important as growing them. That is one of my favorite things to do with the flowers I have now. For years I have said that I wanted to grow roses and this has inspired me!!

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  168. Andrea on

    Her place is so peaceful and beautiful, in an old-homestead and established sort of way. Seeing all of the photos gives me hope that one day my place can have that same feel and beauty. To just have the patience to let it grow to be such. To just keep working and living life as it comes.

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  169. Jodi on

    I love Anne’s passion to preserve and share her roses and all she has learned in her life. She is inspiring in many ways, but especially encouraging to me is to never stop doing and learning no matter your age or situation!

    Reply
  170. Karen Burnett on

    I don’t know why I got so emotional watching the first episode . . . especially the parts when you talked about Anne. Something resonated with me deep inside and I have been thinking since about how I want to do more of what she was doing. I turn 60 in a couple of months and my favorite parts of the episode, and the interview, was about how she didn’t really start in earnest to grow roses until her 60’s . . . what a tremendous encouragement. Sometimes I think that I am the odd one in my suburban neighborhood as I have abundant patches of rambling roses that I love to just let go wild and grow up into the trees – yes, they may only bloom once a year yet it is something I look forward to every Spring. I loved hearing about how she did the same thing. We recently purchased a couple acres on a hillside in the California gold country and my dream to grow roses and dahlias there gets stronger every time I watch your show or read your books. Thank you for your legacy and for honoring Anne.

    Reply
  171. Brandi Van Lee on

    I love that Anne created such a treasure that has been passed along for others to care for and enjoy. Her story is so inspiring and moves me to not shy away from continuing to learn and create with the plants that I love and that I’m never too old to do so.

    Reply
  172. Madison Post on

    I appreciate how Anne noted how good things can still come out of terrible situations. She points out that her life would’ve been likely much different if her first husband didn’t die in WWII. However, she was able to work through such a tragedy and make good from it.

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  173. Alix Hester on

    I am so inspired by Anne encouraging us to not underestimate what we are capable of as well as identifying prejudice in ourselves that would limit our self confidence.
    I find it so incredibly uplifting that she started her Rose journey in her 60s I am 57 and I am just in my fifth year of growing roses, and it has changed my life.
    It brings me such joy to share them!!!

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  174. Judy Meek on

    I love her advice on life. Stay in touch with others, keep up to date on current events (for me – just enough up to date to not stress!), and stay active!

    Reply
  175. Diane Daversa on

    What a wonderful woman! Anne really does inspire me and all women to keep going and never give up. You never know what life has in store for you and flowers always enrich the journey no matter where it takes you.

    Reply
  176. Debbie Gaynor on

    The many things she pursued and accomplished after the age of 60 truly encouraged me . I just turned 60 myself and just planted my very 1st rose bush this spring. I am so excited to learn more about roses and continue to grow my collection! Thank you so much for this inspiring story.

    Reply
  177. Sarah on

    I think it’s really inspiring how she says we can meet any goal as long as we prepare over time. So often we want to jump to the end goal quickly without the hard work and learning, but the learning and growing is the majority of the journey.

    Reply
  178. Jayme on

    I expected this interview to be a good read but I did not expect just how much it would resonate with me. Thank you so much for posting,l!

    Reply
  179. Erica on

    What an inspirational person! I started off thinking that I would browse this section and ended up being totally glued to it. I’m finding all of your content so interesting and the stories that you choose to tell are really amazing. Thank you!

    Reply
  180. Anita Cairns on

    I absolutely love when she says that you’re never to old to follow your passion! She is an inspiration! Just keep moving! ❤️

    Reply
  181. Christina Young on

    The part that inspired me the most was “ You can do anything a man can do except those things that require a lot of strength…” Women are stronger then they give themselves credit for.

    I love the idea of roses but have always been told they are HARD to grow! Would love to add these books to my reference library as I start my flower farm.

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  182. Kathleen Rozelle on

    I love that Anne just wanted to share her knowledge & love of roses & the roses themselves. If nobody sees them or they just disappear from existence then the beauty is lost forever! She reminds me of Erin in her passion, generosity & problem solving!

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  183. Kathy on

    I loved Anne’s spirit seed she sent to the world…don’t be stingy…share 💕 Gardening (especially farming it) is actually therapeutic, and yet, it quickly lends itself to (sometimes raw) isolation … it is important to share the natural beauty …outward… it is as though an honour…an exchange…like a gift of powerful medicine…received/earnestly honoured/addedto/ and passed on… 💕 There in…lies the sparkly…beauty…the magic of life. I really wish she could of made 100! Your paths crossed … you honoured…you continued you shared…absolutely…for a reason 💕 keep shining the light 💡🫶 What a treat…gobbled up…season Two 👍

    Reply
  184. Celina on

    What an amazing women. I love the 3 main components she lives by, Do not let being a woman stop you from doing what you want to do, get to know yourself and find a passion and learn all you can. Every woman needs to read this interview.

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  185. Bernard Arreaga on

    It was so nice seeing Anne story being told. You and your team working in her garden was so magical.

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  186. Andrea K on

    The passion she has for the work is amazing.

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  187. Jelena on

    “Don’t let being a woman stop you from doing what is traditionally seen as a mans job”
    I resonate with this in my work of managing a 20 acre wedding venue. Love her! What a legacy!!

    Reply
  188. Nicole on

    I love how she shared her gardens & her rose cuttings with so many others. Gardening is often a solitary activity, but inviting others to share in the beauty or let them take a piece of that home is a true gift.

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  189. Kate on

    I just started growing flowers in my garden and it’s been my greatest joy. I’d love to win this!

    Reply
  190. Rebecca Byrne on

    I’m inspired by her advice to know yourself, your talents, and limitations, but don’t underestimate what you are capable of doing.

    Such sound thinking and very encouraging to me, having recently retired from working in anatomic pathology and wanting to tend a garden and cultivate beauty.

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  191. Vera Soroka on

    Wow, what a legacy she has left behind. A remarkable woman. You were so lucky to know her 💕

    Reply
  192. Nan Siler on

    “Inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important” reminds us all that sharing our love for roses, flowers, and gardens of any kind is all about sharing. Giving cuttings to friends, taking them bouquets, all of these are amazing gifts that come from the heart.

    Reply
  193. Katie Ollier on

    Gardening is about friendship, don’t be stingy. I absolutely love that! In a world with so much division, anger, and sorrow, you can always depend on gardeners to have the perfect outlook and to send their love and care into the world.

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  194. Tara M on

    Just a lovely and inspiring women! I love that she started her rose journey at 60. And now has over 30 years of knowledge. That’s an inspiration to me as I’m 53. Don’t slow down! Keep going for what you love.

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  195. Maryrose on

    In our youth obsessed culture, it’s fantastic to read a story about a women who started a new career at 60!! It’s so inspiring! Everyone has a story and her life’s story is fascinating! Thanks for sharing Anne’s life with us!

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  196. Tracey Sherman on

    Anne’s interview reinforces that no matter our age, we can still make our dreams come true. This is meaningful to me because, 1. just this week, I passed 62 years, 4 months, the exact age as my mother the day she passed away, and 2. my husband and I have lived in 38 homes in 43 years of marriage and are still living temporarily in an apartment as his career goals have required frequent moves. It’s a very good life, but goodness, do I look forward to settling and expanding my little balcony potted garden to something more permanent! Anne also inspires me with her spirit of generosity–the importance of sharing our life blessings and dedicating time and energy to making our world a better place. Thank you, Floret, for introducing us to this most remarkable woman.

    Reply
  197. Jane Powell on

    I love that if Anne set her mind on something, she did it! She even built a house!!! What’s not to admire, inspire and leave you in awe???

    Reply
  198. Lori Wyatt on

    “My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.”

    ^ That is my favorite part ^. This was basically my motto during our homeschooling years. Each kid had interests and I tried to make it possible for them to let their interests lead them as far as we could afford. The best days!

    Reply
  199. Kathy Gieser on

    So much to choose from! But I must say her “advice” at 97 struck me the most…how she pursued her love of roses at age 60 while also starting a contracting business and just recently was launching her own website and blog. Determination, education & the pursuit of following dreams wholeheartedly. Truly very inspiring!

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  200. Celine on

    What an inspiring and interesting woman! Thank you for giving us a glimpse into Anne’s life and for this beautiful interview.

    Reply
  201. Tamara Kizer on

    As a 63 year young passionate spirit to all the joys and disappointments, the planning, process and journey of gardening , I was emotional and became teary eyed hearing and seeing Anne’s story. The determination, her open sharing of all her knowledge, love, dedication and the journey that she began in her 60s .
    I always question whether pursuing this passion is doable at 63 years old and annes story brought me a sense of possibility hopeful confirmation for my future and my place in the growing world.
    I am fulfilled and energized when teaching , encouraging and sharing, and supporting several younger gardeners (40’s) discovering their passion in the gardening world. They are the future of gardening and knowledge and We all can learn from Anne’s generosity to the world and her commitment to rambling roses, her purpose Thank you for sharing Anne’s story , an unknown but beautiful story, it meant so much to me and I am sure many others.

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  202. Ashlyn H. on

    I’ve been considering starting a small patch of roses in my own garden but have been overwhelmed with trying to do it “right.” But Anne’s simplicity is encouraging: water, fertilize, lots of sunshine. That I can work with. I also love that she was a woman who worked with her hands and didn’t let her gender stop her from doing really anything. As I tackle my own garden, I’m inspired to ask for help when necessary, but first try to do the work myself.

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  203. Pam de Ruiter on

    Get out of bed and do !!
    Age has nothing to do with your passion , as Anne said she started her rose journey after 60 and look what she’s accomplished!

    Reply
  204. Ashley on

    I’m 37, often already feel that I’m too late to the world of flowers, and wonder how we’ll ever manage to buy our own land for growing. I so love her can-do attitude, her reflections on her age, and how she continually pushed forward with her interests. What a legacy!

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  205. Marissa on

    Both the ideas that you are never too old to learn something new plus the fact that doing great things requires study and hard work. As a teacher and a dreamer I felt proud, validated, and inspired.

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  206. Michelle on

    What an amazing woman! To be so diverse in so many different fields and have done them all so well. I was very impressed with her desire to have her own website at 97! Wow!

    Reply
  207. Bethany on

    I love that she said don’t be stingy. Share your passion with others and maybe they can learn too. You can grow friendships by being generous. Love that. It’s so important in a world that seems more isolated and self centered to be generous.

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  208. Sandy on

    An amazing woman! She is inspirational and I was touched by many things she spoke about during her interview, but especially when telling you to set your goals and then go about gathering the knowledge and skills to reach those goals. Often you will exceed those goals. And as a woman, you can do anything a man can do. Where you lack the strength, you can find mechanical means to overcome this! My father also taught me this!

    Reply
  209. Catherine Duvall on

    What a beautiful lady! I just loved reading this article. My favorite part was that her relationships because of the roses because as beautiful as the roses and the parallels there.

    Reply
  210. Darcy Conatser-Pacheco on

    What a treasure of a human. I am so inspired by her sailing journey and her advice on following your dreams. Incredible and uplifting wisdom. I am bookmarking this page and plan to visit her website as well. Thank you for sharing this Floret!

    Reply
  211. Penny Griffith on

    … what she said – about having the expectation to live to 100 fascinated me!
    She needed all that time to do all the things that she accomplished!
    I’m starting my bucket list now.

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  212. Paige Beck on

    She was so tough! She kept learning and doing and got the most out of her whole life 😂

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  213. Michelle on

    I am now 69 years old and I totally believe what Anne said in her interview about sharing with others. I absolutely believe her advice to keep moving, keep seeing friends. Start new projects! It’s a beautiful day!

    Reply
  214. Emily Krause on

    What hit me the most was Anne’s advice to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.
    In today’s society, especially the younger generations, everyone is hooked to their devices. I constantly have to encourage my daughter to read a book, go outside, try something new. It just goes to show how fast life passes you by and if you spend you time looking at other people’s accomplishments you are going to miss the opportunity for yours.

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  215. Maggie MacDonell on

    I love that she didn’t let her age stop her from perusing dreams! Age is only a number and she proved that!

    Reply
  216. Jennifer on

    She was an amazing lady and I loved that she didn’t let age stop her from learning new things. My husband and I built our house ourselves and I really admire her for learning to build houses. And to track down so many rose varieties from far away places…we owe it to her to keep her rose legacy alive. I also loved that she placed a lot of value on investing in local nurseries. So much wisdom in this interview. Thank you for sharing!

    Reply
  217. Donna on

    The part that inspired me the most was the things she did in her sixties. She lived her life to the full until the day she died. I am in my mid 60s and I want to follow her example. I want to create beauty for myself and others, always!

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  218. Katie on

    “However, inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy. ” Wow, what a wonderful quote and philosophy. Since beginning to grow dahlias on my own property, this has become my own philosophy. Nothing brings me more happiness than sharing a bouquet (or a tuber) with a friend or family member and seeing their faces light up. What an inspiring woman!

    Reply
  219. Morgan Gilbert on

    It’s hard to pick just one thing about Anne that inspired me. I feel like we shared many interests and passions. I love her interests in nature and animal welfare. I also love her mindset about sharing.
    “Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy.”

    Reply
  220. Darlene at Fieldstone Hill Design on

    I was most inspired by Anne’s late start!!! And her advice to stay out of bed. I am a later-starting rose gardener and this was encouraging to me!!! What a life beautifully lived.

    Reply
  221. Michelle Fatovic on

    Her passions resonate with my own, flower gardening, victorian houses, never being afraid to do what you can dream of. I am nearing my retirement years and my dream is to build a beautiful garden to be enjoyed by all, the birds, the butterflies and the people that visit me. Years ago I had a flower shop and I had a sign made to put in the garden I would have many years later. It was a statement from a magazine article I once read. It reads, “I’m out on my porch every morning and evening. Sometimes I’m alone. Sometimes friends come by. But always I’m enjoying my garden, and the wonderful flowers there that remind me of the people who gave them to me.” by Lucy McKenzie. Bless you Anne for sharing your joy of roses.

    Reply
  222. Mary Dorcey on

    Wonderful story…..she even looks like my Mom! What a wonderful life she led, surrounded by so much beauty!

    Reply
  223. Amanda Cook on

    I’m not sure you could ever receive better advice than this “My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.”

    I turn 39 in a few weeks, I’m a mother, wife, friend, and gardener. I decided a year ago to take a pottery class at the local community college, so I now claim to also be a potter. And, now I’ve been so inspired by this story I’d like to start a small rose garden. I look for inspiration frequently, I work in IT as a young woman without a formal technical education. I’m always up for a challenge and I can relate so much to this interview, your first episode, and the desire to live a driven full life. I too believe that I can do anything if I do my research, study, and gain the knowledge to complete the task.

    Thank you for sharing Anne’s story and for sharing yours.

    Reply
  224. Susan on

    Nothing is impossible! I loved that Anne was such a force of nature. What an amazing legacy she has given us. There is so much to learn and enjoy in life. Never let anything stop you from living your dreams. I just turned 60 this year and to hear Anne say that she thought that was old and then lived another 37years doing amazing things was such an inspiration to me.
    Live, dream, love, and give!

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  225. Emily on

    I’ve had some opportunities come up to grow a business, but I’ve always been scared of failing. Ann’s interview encouraged menot to be afraid.

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  226. Vicky Thompson on

    At 72 yrs old and growing rambling and other antique roses, some now 20 years old I’m inspired by Ann’s advise to stay out of bed and keep gardening. It’s what keeps me going and keeps me young at heart.

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  227. Shalon on

    All the amazing things she did. She was not afraid of making mistakes. She just read studied and researched then and just went for it! I liked when she said to share the roses. Invite friends in and enjoy the property. I always worry about how things look, that they need to be perfect to have someone over, but she is right that, many friendships as lovely as the roses will be developed. I also will keep in mind her advice of “To keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.”
    Thank you!

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  228. Lindsey on

    I had a neighbor like her once who always was so giving and generous. She began my love for flowers as she handed me a pair of shears and told me to go pick a bouquet for myself. I love how Anne was a giver. Because of her generosity, we can enjoy her roses that live on. Giving is what starts a legacy and I want to follow that path as well. 🌹

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  229. Elaine Farrand on

    Her comment about not letting age get in the way of pursuing your dreams resonates with me. I’m in my early 60s starting a cut flower business, and always searching for new and better ways to utilize my land and be a better flower farmer!

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  230. Julie VanAgtmael on

    So much to give inspiration. What a remarkable woman. The most inspiring part for me was her mindset to start such amazing journeys at 60. I am 63 and have wondered if I should stop buying plants for my garden. This story has reassured me that I can keep going and enjoying and loving my garden. In particular my roses. It seems I can never get enough of them. Winning her library of books would truly be a blessing.

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  231. Aubrey H. on

    “You need to study and become an apprentice.” Maybe because I’m a mom of littles and feel my brain is mush some days, but I find the act of researching, strategizing, and applying gardening techniques I’ve learned as satisfying as the blooms themselves. Anne’s passion is incredibly inspiring and I love her willingness to share her knowledge and the fruits of her labors. What a treasure of a friend to have had!

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  232. Lisa Traynor on

    What inspires me the most about Anne is her passion for these roses and the desire to share them. And all this after age 60! As I’m closing in on the end of my 40s, I find her refreshing and I see hope for myself in her! I can’t wait to read her books!

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  233. Emily Filowiat on

    What an inspiring person! I love how she spoke of turning 60 as just another quarter of her life. Seeing someone achieve such lofty things no matter her age is truly inspiring. I really enjoyed reading the entire interview and learning more about her in episode 1 so far. I was moved to tears. Thank you for sharing.

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  234. Christy Winter on

    I did not know roses came in so many shapes and sizes until I watched the first episode of growing floret. I first learned if dahlias in a similar way and I have been obsessed with them ever since. Last year I purchased dahlia seeds from floret and I was amazed how many different flowers came from one seed packet. I learned how to save the tubers and seeds from Erin’s book and this year I have planted 88 dahlias from seeds and tubers I saved. Anne’s story makes me want to try my hand at ramblers. I have always avoided rises because of their thorns. And I never thought they had a pleasant aroma but maybe that’s because I was experiencing then from a market where they were breed for mass production.

    The part of Anne’s interview that stuck out to me was to “get out of bed” and enjoy life. I had a back injury two years ago that left me with a disability and it really limits the things I am able to do. I still have dreams to do big things and in the end I do get them done, it just takes a lot longer than it has in the past. I think this tear I am going to plant a rambler to help remind me to keep my head up and keep moving forward.

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  235. Ginny Talbert on

    I love Anne’s formula for achieving a difficult goal. What an amazing and special woman! This is a very lovely interview, Erin, that you were fortunate to do.

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  236. Kelly Ann Myers on

    Love love love this story of roses – want to learn more!!!!

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  237. Karina Tun on

    TRUE WISDOM;
    “However, inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy. “

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  238. Paige Patterson on

    I love the 3 part formula she shared. I’m in the midst of contemplating making some massive changes and was letting my brain (and my age — going to be 61) trip me up. Was heading towards futility but found this article to be a lovely nudge to the left of where I could have been heading. Brilliant. Onwards.

    Reply
  239. Julie Munro on

    I love that flowers bring people together, in the most nostalgic and meaningful way. I’m fairly certain most of our first memories of gardening is with our mom, grandma or someone else meaningful that helped instill the love in us! Love learning about Anne’s beautiful and rose filled life!

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  240. Christina Lentz on

    Enjoying this season of Growing Floret. The legacy of Anne’s roses brought me to tears, reminding me of my Grandmother and her roses she had when I was a little girl. Making me wish I had them today. I enjoyed this interview and look forward to reading Anne’s blog. My favourite is when asked how to continue on her legacy, Anne replied “Keep them watered, fertilized, in a place with lots of sunshine and to share them. Don’t be stingy”. Flowers really do have a way of bringing people together.

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  241. Susie Armstrong on

    Anne is truly inspiring. I am 62 years old and when I read that she sought goals starting at 60 it made me think. I will now be pondering the things that I have disregarded as achievable this late in my life and recalculate what I am missing to reach those goals. Thank you Anne.
    I have many flowers in my cutting garden and now multiple gardens of different types but I have to say a rambling rose that grew on the old open ended garage with my 1949 cape in Ashland, Virginia has always been my child. The garage was torn down but I made sure to protect this little rambling rose. I have looked it up may time trying to find out what type it is but have been unsuccessful. It is so sweet and my favorite flower that I have. Its blooms are clustered and a beautiful shade of red with hints of pink. I know Anne would have treasured it too probably.

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  242. Jackie Wilkinson on

    What an incredible story. Maybe there is still hope that I can grow roses in my 60’s!

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  243. Sarah on

    Wow, she accomplished so much! I think building a house is super impressive m and even starting her own website a 97 years old is his a testament to never stop learning and growing!

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  244. Mary on

    I love Anne’s words, “to inspire… is an act of love”. Thank you for sharing her legacy❤️

    Reply
  245. Carolynn Manners on

    I am in awe of this one woman’s tenacity and grit to teach herself skills and to learn about roses, but more than this I’m in awe of Annes generous spirit and gratitude to those who grow her roses and share them to the gardening community. Many of us started our first gardens with clips and cuttings from other generous gardeners who were wiser than us, people like Anne who encouraged our efforts and taught us what they had learned. Thank you Anne for sharing your story.

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  246. Traci Clemens on

    What an inspiring woman! I too am a visual person, and the pictures were extraordinary. Also inspiring for my own garden as it grows. I have felt that I was too late to start anew, but after reading how Anne started at 60 and is now 97 (and still going!), that encourages me to get off my tuchus and start living. The advice to “get out of bed” and “stop isolating” hit home. I fall into that trap and inhibit myself. Thank you for the encouragement that is much needed. I also will be taking back ideas to my own garden from pictures in the article. Love the trellised roses. I will start doing my homework to take care of the one rose I have so far and had planted with my 5-year-old niece. We call our rose “Enee’s Rose” – Enslee is my niece’s name and she does love roses! Additions are in the works :) Especially now with all the visuals above and a niece who wants to learn!!!

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  247. Carolynn Manners on

    I am in awe of this woman’s tenacity and grit to teach herself skills but more than this I am in awe of Annies generous spirit and gratitude to those who own and tend her roses, many of us started our gardens with cuttings and slips of plants from other gardeners, this generousity lives on in our hearts and gardens. Annie has been a

    Reply
  248. Amanda on

    I loved that when asked her favorite she chose a red rambler, I had just ordered on set to arrive Friday and it’s all I can think of. Lovely Interview.

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  249. Marta on

    What a role model for today in so many ways! For me, hearing about what Anne achieved in her life after the age of 60 was such a powerful motivation and reminder to push through the barriers we come up against in society. At 52, I have just been made redundant at a job I worked for 20 years. It can feel like opportunities are there for the youth alone but reading through your interview with this wonderful lady’ has given me much needed determination and insight. Share, visit with friends, don’t shut yourself off, lifelong learning, big and small goals , animals and plants nourish us,….she built houses….!!! I can live, I can work, I can learn, I can grow and I too will share my gifts. Thank you Anne and Erin, for sowing these seeds in my heart and I imagine, in the hearts of countless others.

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  250. Rosa Veldkamp on

    I just turned 58. That she started this amazing journey at 60 is incredibly inspiring.

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  251. Apfia on

    Wow what an inspiring woman. Her comment about never being too old to begin something hits home. Becoming a female contractor after 60 🤯 mind blowing.

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  252. Maureen on

    Just beautiful…and as far as inspiration, yes.

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  253. Shihan on

    What an inspiring lady. I can remember when you and your team went to visit Anne.

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  254. Robyn on

    I didn’t know about Anne’s Garden … and I am so thankful for you bringing her into my world. I have been a Landscape Designer since 2000 when I was diagnosed with Ovarian Cancer. After going thru the treatments I realized how precious life was and immediately enrolled into the certification program for landscape design at university. I’ve been designing gardens ever since … until 2 years ago when I got too advanced with my MS. Now I’m home most days … fighting a full-time wheelchair but absolutely loving all of my gardening books … especially those on flowers such as roses, peonies, irises, and your books too … especially the one on Dalia’s … I’d love to get Anne’s rose books … even if I can order them … I will definitely try too. Thank you for bringing so much flower education into my life. Your shows and your books and your daily posts have taught me so much more than the whole 3 year landscape program I took at university. I hope this makes you smile … you’re doing such important work, Erin and team! 💜💜💜

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  255. Jennita on

    the sharing part inspires me the most. So much beauty to share. Thank you both ❤️

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  256. Robin on

    Such A Beautiful Lady! I remember when you and Chris went to visit her and how packed your Van Was with Rose’s!

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  257. Kosuke on

    I read this interview from Japan. I was so shocked to know Anne’s first husband passed away in the ww2. Then I also impressed with Anne’s lest life was phenomenal and spectacular and adventurous. My wife and I also growing rose here and dreaming to beautiful rose garden like her.

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  258. Cassidy on

    My goodness, where do I begin! Such a remarkable lady, I wish I had the honor of meeting her, but I am so grateful you gifted us with some of her wise words!

    I think her overarching attitude of determination and ability to do the work to achieve her vision and goal is the most inspiring part for me! As someone who has many ideas, I really appreciate this! She has definitely inspired me to put in the work and education to accomplish my dreams! Thank you for the motivation and incredible wisdom!

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  259. Lauren on

    The thing that moved me the most I think was everything she accomplished in her life, from a sailor, a botanist, a teacher , a contractor and a rosarian. Wow

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  260. Annamarie Witcher on

    I am so excited to see more beautiful roses . Roses are my favorite there smell is just the best. I would love to learn more about roses. I want to have at least one of every rose. Thank you for this blog post it so inspiring.

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  261. DianeS on

    What a strong, amazing woman. I love that she wanted to share her knowledge and her roses with others that shared her passion for roses. Loved S2 E1. Can’t wait to view the other episodes.

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  262. Danalynn Vanstone on

    I LOVE her advice….stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family. I couldn’t agree more!

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  263. Mamta Shankar on

    ‘My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development. ‘ This was the most moving part of the entire interview for me. As someone who also got into gardening late, I can relate. But roses make such wonderful partners in life. With every passing year mine bring more and more and more joy.

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  264. Mary Lenker on

    I was impressed with Anne’s formula for achieving difficult tasks! I believe where there is a will there is a way! Many times I have had to figure out a way to complete a task that I didn’t have the knowledge or the strength to accomplish. It is empowering to hear other women share their accomplishments. Anne is a wonderful role model for girls and women.

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  265. Nelz on

    Her desire to do something so grand in her later years is very inspiring! She was so determined and motivated. I’m very inspired.

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  266. Cyndee Carvalho on

    I loved reading about this amazing woman. I spent the morning in a beautiful garden used for cut flowers where they make arrangements to give away to the seniors, hospital bound, widows, and low income members of our community. All of this is run by an eighty -year -young seed gardener. Woman like these make me proud and honored. Thanks for sharing this interview. Cyndee

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  267. Kim on

    she has amazing determination! very inspiring.

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  268. Maggie on

    Love your continuing the old varieties, telling the stories, and enriching our flower world. I love old roses. I’ve got some of my grandmother’s from the 1940’s …..Ann’s books would be a beloved treasure!

    Reply
  269. Zac on

    I was inspired by Ann not letting her age be a reason not to do something. I was encouraged by this and it was a wonderful reminder to embrace each day we have and live it to the fullest. The first episode of the show really gave me a new perspective on preserving plants, something I hadn’t thought of before.

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  270. Marti on

    I don’t know how to explain how serendipitous the timing of this is. One thing that stopped me dead in my tracks in reading this interview was the fact she built her house on Camano…where we’ve literally JUST moved to…and today, the same day you post this, the day after season 2 launch, we learn we are officially able to move forward to start building our house. How she started her next chapter at 60…and I’m starting mine at 40. How her love for the garden came later in life, which mine did as well. I know the likelihood of me winning is slim, but if there’s any way to be able to help with her gardens, and propagate roses from her gardens so her legacy lives on at my new acreage and so I can share them with my family & neighbors, and my loved ones in other states, I’d really love the opportunity. What a win it would be to be able to help Anne’s living heirlooms live on everywhere for generations to come.

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  271. Nancy on

    I love Anne’s philosophy on sharing with others and not being stingy. My grandmother believed the more you gave away the better your garden would grow.

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  272. Debra B on

    Reading how Anne encouraged the sharing of rose cuttings and considered it as acts of love and friendship made me think about my rose journey. When my husband and I started our gardens, we looked for rose gardens and found very friendly people who were willing to talk to us about old growth roses and some offered to share cuttings along with their knowledge. My garden favorite is my Sweet Brier whose leaves smell like fresh green apples and has small delicate pink flowers.

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  273. Tammy Makoul on

    I was so intrigued by the fact she started her rose passion and collection at 60! My word, she built her own home, sailed, I don’t think there’s anything she couldn’t do! She knew how to live life. God bless her and her legacy lives on! 🤍✨

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  274. Veronika Shliazh on

    I am the most inspired by the part that she started her collection at 60. You never know how long you will leave, but some people give up and don’t want to do anything. Im inspired that Anne didn’t think of that and continued living and engaging her life by growing roses!

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  275. Alicia on

    I love that she didn’t let being a woman in her generation hold her back from taking the reigns of her own story and creating for herself the life of beauty she envisioned. She literally built and grew the beauty around her on her own.

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  276. Susan O'Halloran on

    The fact that Anne took on her rose garden in her 60’s. This gives me encouragement to undertake new garden adventures even though I just turned 72.

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  277. Dearborn McHaley on

    What an incredible woman! Reading about her various adventures and paths she took in life is incredibly inspiring to me. At 43, I have also already taken several interesting paths in life, most of them in male dominated professions, without caring whether I “had a beard or the biceps.” I wanted to do it, and I simply made it work. What she said about the key to longevity consisting of life-long learning and growing really strikes a cord with me. That is the philosophy I also follow in life. I’ve been a teacher, a paramedic, a nurse, and now a horticulturist and farmer-florist. My dreams and passion for learning and evolving haven’t slowed down one bit. I hope I am as lucky as Ms. Belovich to live a long, full, and varied life.

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  278. Missy on

    “It’s never too late to act on your goals and dreams.” And “commit yourself to lifelong learning and skill development” so so good!

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  279. Pam on

    I was very inspired by her comment that she thought 60 was old, and then lived a whole second life. So many people retire and think life it over. I am thinking of it as a another chapter. I became a master gardener last year looking forward to new opportunities in my next chapter when I retire! Anne didn’t set out to change the world, but has had a great impact. We never know where the road will take us, but if we don’t have our eye’s open for the next opportunity in our next chapter, we might miss it! Here’s to many more chapters when I retire!

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  280. Michelle on

    Learning from such a place of passion.

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  281. Heather on

    I have been feeling down lately because of back issues that are preventing me from doing any gardening this summer. Being inspired that I have many more years ahead of me to catch up was so inspiring.

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  282. Jayme Viglas on

    Wow! Anne’s life story and personality are beautiful in so many ways but the way she was able to make her ideas come to life by preparing, educating, and putting no limits on her abilities is what is truly inspiring.

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  283. Cheryl Jardine on

    A wonderful life story – the comment that inspired me the most was keep moving, stay out of bed, meet with friends and have lunch – she accomplished so much after age 60 that it truly is an inspiration for someone my age to do just as she has said. Learn new things, spend the time learning a hobby or particular talent you might develop so that life is full – there will be times when you can’t devote all your time but keep at it and that talent will develop into an enjoyable time and inspire younger family members and friends to carry on the same zest for life.

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  284. Courtney Ross on

    What a sweet wealth of knowledge. So inspiring to hear her way of staying young. To stay out of bed, keep learning, we can do anything we set out to do if we put in the effort. Such an inspiring woman thank you for sharing.

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  285. Alison Hall on

    Life-long learning! Anne mentioned this in the interview but clearly her life is an example of how learning keeps you young and engaged with the world. Love this and will aspire to it.

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  286. marlae lee on

    “Be careful not to underestimate what you are capable of doing”. I LOVE this!!!!

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  287. Debbie on

    I just retired at 62 and I am so incredibly inspired by what she achieved after 60s, starting her own construction company even wow!
    I recently bought roses last year after reading this article originally because it it’s inspired me that I can do anything after 60 like she did!

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  288. Carol Sammons on

    What an inspiring woman! I love that her passion for roses started when she was 60 years old. I just turned 60 this year and am so excited about my new garden. I will be planting some old rambling roses! Thank you Erin for sharing Anne with your followers.

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  289. Morgan Anderson on

    Anne’s story is so inspiring! I probably would never have heard it without Floret making it known, which is kind of scary. Thank you for making her story known.

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  290. Kathy Dublinski on

    I read about ramblers and how they add color to the garden.
    I love roses and would to see these ramblers in my garden!

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  291. Lisa on

    Loved “Don’t be stingy”. Anne’s beloved roses have a better chance for survival because she shared. A remarkable lady. Thanks for sharing her story and her wise words.

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  292. Mariah on

    “Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy.”

    I hope my garden, my roses, can help create the kind of generosity I see in Anne!

    Reply
  293. Jenna Street on

    This episode brought me to tears. It was beautifully inspiring!

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  294. Kendra N on

    “However, inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy.”
    This made me tear up actually, because my mom and grandma loved roses a lot and summers around my grandma’s porch smelled of roses. It also reminds me, what legacy do I want to leave behind? What do I want my kids to remember me most by? What will they love most about me, when I have passed on.

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  295. Meloney on

    Anne’s whole life was inspiring with all the things she had done over the course of her life. The roses really touched me.

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  296. Leda Bower on

    I feel the comment that touches my heart is when she says you are never too old to carry on with your passion, I believe and hope that is when the best work is done….

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  297. Alyssa on

    The part where she lifts up the wall all by herself with a wall jack! And that she did so many things in life, with her whole heart, and her passion for roses didn’t start till her 60’s and she still pursued it!!

    Reply
  298. Geetha Raghunathan on

    I loved the fact she was a feminist survivor who could rise above all odds to fulfill her aspirations! You go Anna!!!!

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  299. Catherine Stewart on

    Wow, what an incredible human. I’m turning 60 next year and I am so inspired and excited about the future. Anne’s words make me realize that it’s okay to be starting something totally new at my age. I’m intrigued by all the things you learned and accomplished throughout her life. I love that she did not see any limits being a female and that she felt she could do anything a man could do. I love this way of thinking and will remember her words whenever I am thinking I can’t accomplish something. Thank you Erin and Anne for sharing such a powerful life story.

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  300. Carolynn plowden on

    Everything about Anne is inspiring and I admire her strength, love of animals and beautiful flowers. I love how she doesn’t have a favorite flower because how can you choose like that?

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  301. Maureen Mosher on

    Wow, what an incredible life she had and an even more incredible legacy she leaves behind for us all. It’s hard to pick just one thing that was inspiring about her story, it was all incredibly moving. I’m so thankful you shared her story, and her roses 🌹

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  302. Laura on

    The comment she made, “It’s s never too late to act on your goals and dreams” is so amazing and encouraging. She truly was an amazing woman!

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  303. Amy on

    I am in tears thinking of the full and wonderful life that lead to having a wonderful passion for roses. I can see myself in her childhood, feeling trapped and wanting to escape to a calm and quiet world filled with the mysteries of nature. It is so wonderful to see the way that life ebbs and flows and follows the path that it was meant to take. I feel so inspired to follow what life brings and see where life takes me. 🥰

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  304. katy Giffault on

    Erin you are so special to bring to us Anne’s story and save cuttings from her vast collection ! I am inspired by both of you
    and your steadfast, fierce focus on learning and sharing. It just dawned on me tonight that these two qualities you both have in spades, is your gift to all of us!

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  305. Nichelle on

    I was so inspired by the fact that Anne started her incredible rose collection and passion when she was in her 60s! We are never to old to learn something new and make a difference in this world!

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  306. Linda Wininger on

    Although I am disabled she made me reevaluate where I am in life and where I have yet to go…or better yet…want to go…. I will be 70 but I am a young 70 and for sure have lots of time to do what ever it is that inspires me.
    I would have loved to have known her too. Thank you for sharing her legacy.

    Reply
  307. Lydia on

    Wow! What an remarkable way of living, having, so many different ways of living. She had many different careers of life, a botanist, a teacher, a sailor, a general contractor, a rosarian, a writer. She even went another path of life at age 60, very inspiring and something that I can learn from, it is never to late to choose another way of living, never to old. You had a great privilege in meeting her and bringing her ways to yours. Thankyou for sharing this interview with us, she was a very impressive woman!

    Reply
  308. Jessa on

    What a beautiful interview! I’m so inspired. By the work that you are doing. My favorite quote was “You can meet and exceed your goals if you prepare yourself over time.” It’s so true!

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  309. Kari Ward on

    Anne’s interview is inspirational to me as I turned 60 this year. She lived a full life after 60. I am inspired to be curious and continue to learn and be open to opportunities in this next part of my life. Thank you for sharing a special conversation with a special person.

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  310. Kelly Martinez on

    “ Life-long learning and growing keeps one engaged.” What a beautiful statement!

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  311. Aleta M on

    The photos inspire me, what a sweet woman!

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  312. Ashlin Wilson on

    This is such a beautiful story. It helps keep this time and season if my life in perspective. One day I hope for my garden to be as lush. Until that time, I’ll keep changing diapers and loving in my little ones.

    Reply
  313. Cheryl Duncan-Molloy on

    This was an amazing interview, what a pleasure to read about Anne! “You can meet and exceed your goals if you prepare yourself over time. You can’t become a rocket scientist without a great deal of study, and neither can anyone else.” <3 this quote, how empowering!

    Reply
  314. Belinda on

    I think the thing about Anne’s story that I find so inspiring is that it is never too late to find your life’s purpose. I love that her legacy began at a point in her life that most people feel is the curtain lowering.

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  315. Michaela Williams on

    Thank you so much for sharing this wonderful interview with Anne. Her story is so inspirational and she teaches us that it’s never too late to dream! ❤️

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  316. Jenni on

    Thank you for sharing this beautiful interview.

    Reply
  317. Danielle Doby on

    I love how she embodies the truth that it’s never too late to dream a new dream and change the direction of your life. What a legacy she left behind – it’s so inspiring!

    Reply
  318. Rebecca Materasso on

    Reading this for the third time and I can’t help but feel like Anne’s story is a part of my story that hasn’t even happened yet, if that makes sense? She left a legacy that is unmeasurable. I finished season 2 of Floret and Erin you have to know that you have already left your mark on this world. You’ve given us all something that can’t be measured by words.

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  319. Betsy Feiden on

    It’s never too late to set a new goal or dream a new dream. 🕊️ ✨ This interview is so incredibly inspiring as well as the first episode of season two. Don’t let anything stop you from doing what you love. You can do anything you set your mind to. Never sell yourself short. Thank you so very much for sharing Anne’s story. 🙏🏽💕 Thank you so much for inspiring us to dream big and bring to life those dreams.

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  320. Sally Poppema on

    You are never too old. Stay out of bed, socialize, go out to lunch and keep learning . Keep going!!!

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  321. Ashley on

    Anne. What an inspiration she is. Nothing stood in her way of her dreams. It’s like she had no obstacles.
    I am so thankful to know a tiny piece of her story. What a gift you have in having met her and to have the opportunity to continue her legacy unto your own.

    Reply
  322. Lindsey Ashcroft on

    I’ve just begun my lifelong dream of becoming a rosarian. I have 13 varieties right now and I love them as much as my 5 children, miss them when I’m away, enjoy their company so much and love gifting them to others. Such a lovely interview!

    Reply
  323. Tammi Goff on

    What an amazing & inspiring woman! “… try to know yourself, your talents, and limitations, but be careful to not underestimate what you are capable of doing.”

    Reply
  324. Joyce on

    This is the part of the interview that most inspired me were her thoughts of using her roses to GROW FRIENDSHIPS! She is truly an inspiration and she brought more beauty into the world.

    “Roses, especially the old roses, are very easy to grow. However, inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy. “

    Reply
  325. Nilou on

    What inspires me is Anne’s determination/drive to do the things she sets her mind to. Something to draw on and apply to in my own life.

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  326. Meghan Marshall on

    Anne’s words of wisdom and advice is something I will carry with me. She is an inspiration to all of us

    Reply
  327. Tracy Ann Sellers on

    What an inspiration. I could live another 50 years and hope to have the wisdom and love for life as Anne. I did not know she was involved with NOAH. We have adopted 2 beloved pets from there over the years. I love her passion for all things living.

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  328. Amanda Cipperly on

    I find so much inspiration in the idea that a flower is a legacy. When she says “ Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy.”…. That answer has so much truth to it!

    Reply
  329. Jordan Henning on

    Anne’s determination inspired me and also the fact that she was able to devote so much time to her work and to writing book to share with others is incredibly inspiring.

    Reply
  330. Cathy Baker on

    So encouraging – ” you can meet or exceed your goals if you prepare yourself over time.” Reminds me a bit of Thomas Edison’s 99% perspiration. And gardeners most certainly do that. I also really like that ramblers, once established, need little care. And I will be planting a rambler or two!

    Reply
  331. Sierra on

    To me, I found her story about starting multiple projects at sixty incredibly inspiring. Knowing that Anne stuck with her passions throughout her life and continued to learn inspires me to keep following my passions no matter what age.

    Reply
  332. Kelsie on

    I think the most inspiring thing to me was that she started new ventures at 60 & noted she got to enjoy those ventures for over a third of her life!

    Reply
  333. Amanda on

    I love the message in her story! You’re never too old to stop learning. So beautiful!

    Reply
  334. Susan Galloway on

    At any age, we can make a difference. Never stop learning. Never stop living. Each day is special. Each day is a gift.

    Reply
  335. April on

    I feel inspired to do more to preserve our past treasures. I love Anne’s love for roses and bringing American roses back. She’s definitely a ray of light and I love that she never slowed down. She always followed through and completed what she put her mind to.

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  336. Jessica Erickson on

    It’s never to late to get something started if it’s a passion. Love this story.

    Reply
  337. Adrienne on

    That she started things at 60! I’m turning 52 this year and feel like I have missed my opportunity for certain things, especially in my career. But now I am inspired! I can make shifts and try new things at any time. And that in her 90’s she just went for it with a website and blog because she always wanted to do it. That is so inspiring.

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  338. Ann Brown on

    Her comments about her dreams vs her age. Just keep going! Plus, stay out of bed…

    Reply
  339. Carly Jordan on

    I love that this is a passion Anne picked up at 60! I’m on a new career path at 40 and sometimes feel like I’m crazy. This reminds me that there’s no time like the present and there is still so much time to live and learn!

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  340. Elaine Carter on

    Ann’s story is so inspiring. I am 71 years old and love to learn more and more about gardening. Her story inspires me keep learning and adding new things to my gardens.

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  341. Heather P on

    What a lovely lady. Thanks for sharing her story and beautiful roses!

    Reply
  342. Jessica on

    The most inspiring part of the interview was her discussing not letting being a woman stop you from achieving your goals. As a young woman who just bought her own house, I often felt and feel the prejudice or opinions about doing so on my own. Love the idea about setting goals and finding the ways to achieve them!

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  343. Marta on

    “Inviting people in and sharing is perhaps the most important”.. so much wisdom!!

    Reply
  344. Sherri Y. on

    I love that Anne did not let her age hold her back….never too late to start going after your dreams!

    Reply
  345. Patty A on

    I too like to invite people in to my garden. To share knowledge, lessons learned, clippings. I like her encouragement to share and to be generous. The world needs more of that, and thank you Erin for helping to promote that kindness.

    Reply
  346. Rebecca Bolton on

    I love how she turned her tragedy … the loss of her husband, into something positive and beautiful.

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  347. edna thackeray on

    Ann advises women to live their best lives as they see fit! We can clearly see Ann lived her life to the fullest!

    Reply
  348. Grace on

    What an amazing life, and the interview is so in depth, which does her justice. Thank you!

    Reply
  349. Kira on

    I love Anne’s advice in this interview, particularly about knowing yourself and your own strengths!

    Reply
  350. Carrie on

    How she first viewed the garden as being imprisoned to inspiring.Beautiful soul.

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  351. Carrie on

    How she first viewed the garden as being imprisoned to inspiring.Beatsoul.

    Reply
  352. Rhonda on

    Anne is so inspiring! She reminds us much can be accomplished at all ages and stages of our lives. Too, I love her spirit of giving and sharing, which will extend her beauty of roses to a restless world! Oh, what beauty in each rose, truly a gift from above. Thank you for tending His gardens so well.

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  353. Betsy on

    Anne is very inspiring and I adore her take on life. Such great reminders that there are no limitations! Her roses are magical and extraordinary! I’m excited to begin my own rose journey!

    Reply
  354. Katherine Horton on

    It was neat that it was not till she was 60 that she began her rose journey. And also it is inspiring that her Mom had to chase her down to get her back in the garden to help! Maybe there is hope for my kids to enjoy gardening one of these days! What an inspiring woman!

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  355. Jodi Fabian on

    I love her perspective on starting her rose collection “later in life.” It’s fascinating that she considered it just the 3rd part of her life and not really “later.”

    Reply
  356. Kimberly on

    “It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams.” As a SAHM to 7 kiddos at 44 years old, who sometimes feels like she has sacrificed the best years of life for her family, I am challenged, encouraged, and inspired by Anne’s never-ending dream chasing. I see me in her and I am excited to see what dream I can pursue next!

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  357. Sally on

    I think the hardest part is finding something about Anne that doesn’t inspire me…Anne you were a force! Many times in my life I have believed things to be as simple as researching an idea and then learn by doin it. And yet, I find myself in the research phase for far too long, often never moving past the fears I develop from outside criticism. It’s been hard for me to admit that while I am loved by my family, we come from a legacy of surviving not thriving and so new ideas are often met with doubt and a certainty for failure. Reading Anne’s interview along with watching episode one of the second season, I felt my heart heal. I felt healed that someone else could take an idea…like building a house or cultivating roses or starting a website in her “later” years and just do it because she believed in herself. She trusted in herself. And darn it Anne, that is a true gift in this era of imposter syndrome and cancel culture. So, I’ll take Anne’s lesson in Self and apply them to my endeavors from here on out.

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  358. Anne Try on

    I love how generous she was with her roses. Instead of treasuring them as an exclusive collector, she shared her joy widely. What an exemplar of a gardener’s spirit!

    Reply
  359. Emily Monk on

    “ It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams. ” WOW, you can tell this beautiful lady was full or curiosity and always eager to learn- no matter what. We often let ourselves get in the way of own self. We need to set it down and walk away from whatever thought or fear that is paralyzing us from pushing forward. Keep learning, it’s never too late, run full speed at those goals/dreams and just START.

    Reply
  360. angela rose white on

    Oh my, Anne was such an amazing person! I have loved roses since my teens and have grown many in the past. I’m inspired to grow and help preserve the old ramblers as well as support NOAH. Thank you for her marvelous interview and photos of her roses!

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  361. Carissa Fleming on

    Society tells us that women of a certain age have no value, but Anne reminds us that the only limits are those we place on ourselves. (Time to get out the wall jack!) I’m so inspired by women such as Anne who take on new challenges in the second half of life. What an incredible legacy, to live one’s life as such a generous act of love.

    Reply
  362. Cara on

    Her drive to do new things and bravery are the most inspiring to me! I love that she was so willing to share her knowledge with you also, and share her roses with friends and loved ones!

    Reply
  363. Lidia Alvarez on

    What inspired me about her story is how encouraging she was she started at 60 and she accomplished many dreams. Sometimes we put our dreams on pause because we are afraid or we think too little of ourselves and we sometimes die without even trying to start our dream. Sometimes we feel like is too late but in reality what does that mean ? Well she said it right “Determine what it is you want to do and then acquire any skills or knowledge that you are going to need, get the books, take the classes share the beauty of roses don’t be stingy. Now on days people don’t really want to share and if they do they want to charge you so much money. I loved her kindness her love for old roses and how at the end she still wanted us to consider volunteering. She accomplish so much !!! Very inspiring and thank you for sharing her story. I know your collection from her garden is going to be amazing. Congratulations you guys did an amazing job telling her story.

    Reply
  364. Sheila on

    I g’night 60 was old. And she still has 37 years of passion. I am set to retire at 61. I starting growing flowers and harvesting seeds at 60 this will be my first true planting and I am inspired because yes!! I am just getting started. Such a great thought and something so great to look forward to in the next hopefully 30 years.

    Reply
  365. Peggy on

    I can’t believe I’m 68! I want to be more like Anne! She has inspired me to ignore the number and keep on planting, learning and sharing my flowers. My time continuum seems altered when I’m in the garden…sometimes it flies by and sometimes it feels suspended but always I’m having the best time! I think Anne proved that nature, magically, keeps us young.

    Reply
  366. Kym on

    Her quote about it never being too late to achieve your dreams and her formula for doing it. What a beautiful inspiration to be a strong woman. Thank you for sharing!!

    Reply
  367. debi weinberg on

    Anne’s comment, about being 60 and starting, resonates with me. I dug back into gardening at 65, after retirement. It is an absolute gift to have the time to dream and plan and then execute (somewhat slowly) new ideas for my yard. Now it seems I have too many seeds and tubers for the existing garden space, and I must, must, increase the gardens. We can continue to grow at any age,

    Reply
  368. Sarah B Lewis on

    My favorite part was: ask yourself if the activity you want to do needs big biceps and a beard, and if not go for it and fight the prejudices!
    That made me laugh, but we truly need the inspiration she exudes. :)
    Thanks for the interesting read-S

    Reply
  369. Carole Holiday on

    I just turned 70 and it’s feeling hard to “keep the old out.” Anne certainly makes fodder of that thinking with her reflections on turning 60. What a powerhouse and what a reminder to seek beauty and adventure, no matter what the age!

    Reply
  370. Amy on

    It’s wonderful to see you are preserving and sharing the beauty of a lost art and legacy. As someone venturing into the world of roses, I feel truly fortunate to have access to this valuable knowledge. Thank you for sharing with others.

    Reply
  371. Karouna Thompson on

    I just love how inspiring her work is. The sheer will todo what ever she put her mind to. What an inspiration and fantastic human.

    Reply
  372. Sara Rickman on

    I love Anne’s advice on accomplishing something. Also that 60 isn’t too old to start new hobbies or a new calling in your life! I’m going to read her book Voyage of determination!

    Reply
  373. Allayne on

    What an incredible inspiration and proof that no dream is too big and you can do anything you but your heart and soul into. Anne’s legacy and beauty she shared is truly something to be celebrated.

    Reply
  374. Torrie on

    Oh, I just loved this so much! I started watching the first episode of Season Two last night, and I remembered reading the four-part blog series you’d done on the experience. Roses have been a tricky crop for us to try and establish on our flower farm, but that doesn’t keep me from trying and trying again! I love how in this interview, Anne talked about the importance of always learning new things and just staying active in your own life rather than letting your own (or others’) expectations around your age get in the way.

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  375. Debbie on

    As a beginner gardener at the ripe age of 68, I am inspired that Anne also began her gardening journey later in life. I live in the North Georgia mountains and have been researching a rose or two for my garden. I am eager to learn about rambling roses.

    Reply
  376. Kathy on

    Oh my gosh! The whole interview inspired me! Her passion to be a life long learner really resonated with me.

    Reply
  377. Hannah on

    Anne inspires me. Beyond her love for flowers and what she contributed specifically with Roses, Anne’s gumption, drive, and ability to chase any goal is a huge inspiration to me. She wasn’t afraid of anything, from crossing the sea, to starting a new career in a typically male dominated arena, to following her passion with roses.
    I am so thankful you were able to interview her, as I’d never heard of her before this series.

    Reply
  378. JC on

    Such a really great interview. Always come back to reread this since it was posted.

    Reply
  379. Thomas Barrett on

    What a example of a strong woman and what can be accomplished when motivated

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  380. Charity Ravn on

    I am so excited to see this as part of Season 2 Growing Floret !

    Reply
  381. Megan on

    Life long learner and to not let being a woman stop you from doing a man’s job. What an inspirational woman to all of us. Thank you for sharing.

    Reply
  382. Lillian McDowell on

    Everything you do and create touches my heart so very deeply, I’m a lover of nature, of our earth and of course all her beauty. I have a small rosé collection mixed into my garden now but I can tell you over time that it will most definitely continue to grow. Your generosity of knowledge already speaks so very loudly to the world as did hers. I would love to own and preserve one of her ramblers as they are my favorite type of roses. I envision one of the blooming high up in one of my trees when I’m old the way they were in her garden. Three years ago I started worrying myself about what would happen to my garden as I aged…who would tend to it? Or would she been taken back by the earth herself as I watch out the window unable to do anything. I wept when I watched you guys free her garden of the blackberry brambles.

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  383. Lisa kelly on

    The part of Anne’s interview that is the most inspiring to me is that she started with Roses in her 60s I greatly admire women who never stop growing and learning

    Reply
  384. Angela Bassett on

    I appreciated her comment to explore our own prejudices. I was raised that I could do anything, but wonder if perhaps I hold myself back, because I’m a woman. Age is another prejudice…. I often feel that it’s “too late” to start something new. But with her perspective, there are still a few decades ahead that could include an entire new career.

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  385. Lynne F. on

    Recently retired and at age 60, Anne’s comment about lifelong learning definitely hit home. My 92 year old father made a similar comment about how much time there can be after retirement to do many things that you want to. I have spent the last year learning new aspects of gardening and have been inspired by so many. This spring, I gave away some of my dahlia tubors to friends after learning from Floret how to successfully split and store overwinter. I was as thrilled to give them as they were to receive them!

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  386. Haley M. on

    As June approaches I can’t help but think how excited I am to see and smell all the roses in bloom. May, here in Central Washington State, the roses are breaking dormancy from the long cold winter. Come June, they will be in full swing, buzzing with pollinators and decorating the landscape. I couldn’t help but think of one day having a large rose garden of my own, where I’d open it to the public while they bloomed. Then I got the email notification of this post today. I am inspired by Anne’s story and the legacy she has left. Guess I best get to creating that rose garden to share with my community!

    Reply
  387. Sandee on

    Anna lived bravely, testing herself at each stage of life. And instead of slowing down in her 60s, she rediscovered gardens and shared this love with her family and friends, literally giving away her rose cuttings. What a beautiful spirit…

    Reply
  388. Amanda on

    Anne is so inspiring! I think people around me think I am crazy for starting a flower farm in my early 40’s. I’ve always said why not? We aren’t promised tomorrow but why waste today. I love that Anne did the same in her 60’s. I love her spirit of learning and wanting to contribute something to the world.

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  389. Thilini on

    My parents are now at an age where they feel too old to do things. This interview was wonderful in many ways, but particularly where Anne points out she thought 60 was old and she has done so much in the almost 37 years since! And also, personally having grown up with the encouragement that women can do anything (and I forget what an advantage that constant encouragement has been), it was a wonderful interview for my mother, to hear from someone older than herself, that being a woman doesn’t need to prevent you from doing something you want, enjoy, or love. Thank you for an uplifting conversation.

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  390. Aly Bundy on

    I found so much inspiration when she said it was never too late to follow your dreams! I am hoping to follow my flower dreams as well! Thanks :)

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  391. Megan on

    What a lovely interview! I loved when she said that it is never too late to pursue your dreams. It is so true but sometimes hard for me to really believe!

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  392. Angela Hicks on

    So inspiring! I am 62, started my flower farm three years ago, and now want to add vintage roses to the mix. Thanks!

    Reply
  393. Christina Olson on

    I love her stance on not needing to be a man to do something – “does it require a bear and big biceps?” – I love this because I’ve struggled with the “men” jobs vs “women jobs” concept in my life!

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  394. Emily Bowker on

    Since becoming a widow for more than six years now, I couldn’t imagine myself living alone, I do a lot of stuff now that I never thought I could do, she’s right “ you can do a lot of things that a man can do except those that requires strength” that statement really resonates with me.

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  395. Stephanie on

    I love that she started new careers after turning 60, but also emphasized sharing and connecting with others. They are fantastic reminders that we are only limiting ourselves, and that nothing can replace spending time and sharing with others.

    Reply
  396. Emily Jones on

    I love how she said it’s never too late to follow your dreams. I felt like a late bloomer coming to gardening at 30! Now I realize it’s just perspective. What a fantastic life filled with flowers!

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  397. Anna on

    I think the notion of never being too late to start sticks with me. I always feel like I have passed the time in which I can do something or I am running out of time, but that isn’t the case. Can always begin at any moment.

    Reply
  398. Carol Bass on

    I turned 60 this past February and retired the year before. It has been an interesting transition, to say the least. I am wonderfully inspired by Anne’s comments about thinking 60 was so old…Yep, I can relate. Hopefully, I too have well over another one-third of my life to keep pursuing dreams. My garden is growing more than ever and I’m still learning. I have repeated Anne’s quotes on that subject over in my head for the last two days. To say it’s been life-changing may sound trite, but truly…it’s pretty close.

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  399. Whitney KS on

    The idea that beauty matters and that love for beauty can be passed down. We are never too old to be kind or make the world more beautiful. So inspirational.

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  400. Kalynne Gray on

    This resonated with me, “…inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy.” I really love this as I begin pursuing my dream career being a flower gardener and florist. I hope I can meet people like Anne, who will show me acts of love and support in this career and not be stingy with their knowledge so I can I pass it along for generations to come.

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  401. Erin Vaughn on

    Anne’s statement, “To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy”. Every word of this statement is uplifting and inspirational. It gives me this gumption of motivation to pick up and continue her legacy in Sweet Home Alabama.

    Reply
  402. Melissa Harwick on

    To think that 60 is old… write! Sometimes I feel like 40 is old! How wonderful to think about potential if one like, Even at 60 years young. Beautiful interview, thank you for sharing!

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  403. Bettie Carol Gorham on

    My favorite was this part (sense I can relate to the age) I remember when I turned 60. I thought 60 was so old. That was almost 37 years ago, well over one-third of my lifetime so far.

    At almost 97 years old, it doesn’t seem that my passion for roses started all that late in life. It’s been over 30 years since I began this journey—longer than the careers of many. I pursued many dreams after turning 60, including starting my own contracting company and building over 25 (mostly Victorian style) houses, traveling the world, and my study of the older roses. It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams.

    My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.

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  404. Allison Royal on

    As a self proclaimed life-long learner & nerd, I was so inspired to read about another kindred spirit out there. I come from a family that lives well into their 90s and I’ve always known I never want to stop learning and working at what I am passionate about. I just loved when Anne said she started so many new adventures after turning 60. Reminders like that help me take a breath from time to time & remember, slow & steady is the life for me. What a wonderful interview & an amazing soul!

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  405. Hannah Piva on

    Floret and Anne’s desire to share knowledge and curate beauty in the landscape and in people is such a powerful mission. Sharing information doesn’t take anything away from the source. This rose series has certainly made me feel the feels. I’m ready to tear out the Ivy on my back fence and plant ramblers!

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  406. Robert on

    What inspired me about her is that even with grief and tragedy she turned the cards she was dealt into something positive and always seemed to be positive about her outlook

    Reply
  407. JoBeth Taylor on

    The simple fact that we can do just about anything we set our minds and hearts on to accomplish. Even at a later age, we can still learn how to make dreams big or small come to life if we just set aside fears and try. What an amazing human!

    Reply
  408. Chelsea Fraser (Hansen) on

    What inspired me most was the excerpt from the voyage of determination which was a reminder that we are capable of anything we put our mind to if we become our own apprentice and teaching ourselves the very things we aspire to be.

    Enjoyed the read.

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  409. LaJuana Oswalt on

    I was inspired by her comments on aging – that 60 isn’t old, keep moving, go out with friends, learn about things, etc. At 65, it is encouragement I have been needing.

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  410. Megan on

    I love her tenacity. Follow your passions no matter what. And enjoy and treasure the beauty and simplicity life offers through water and flowers.

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  411. Leslie Aungst on

    A delightful, inspiring interview.
    I love her telling us to share, just what the world needs right now.

    Reply
  412. Laura Minthorne-Brown on

    I am so inspired by Anne. I like to think I’m a little like her. Since I was little I’d go to the library if I was interested in a topic, check out the books, read them, take notes and make it happen. It is the richest, most rewarding process I’ve ever been a part of. My dad was a contractor while I was growing up and I spent my childhood running through just framed walls and building things out of scrap wood on job sites. Building and researching has never intimidated me and I’ve been able to apply that base knowledge to everything I do in my life. It’s a strong foundation and one that I’ve been able to use for my own rose garden, home, farm, and even career in healthcare. Women are powerfully capable, just break down the problem into manageable steps, become an expert and work hard for the goal. You’ve got this.

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  413. Lena on

    A beautiful & ever so inspiring life story as dear Anne certainly has flourished through out her life & kindly given of her time, garden & knowledge throughout the seasons of her life leaving an everlasting legacy.
    At 53 I am a lady who has come to gardening in my Vintage years as only the other day I crossed paths with an elder lady whose rambling little garden of roses I always admire on my stroll to the village & she kindly offered to share some of her rose cuttings for me to begin my journey into the blooming of hopefully my first rose.
    With gratitude to you Erin & Anne for sharing the beauty of flowers & the stories that weave their way into our lives.

    P.S I loved her caring ways to NOAH,
    how wonderful it would be if there could be a rose in honor of that where proceeds went to helping an organisation that she was so involved with.

    Reply
  414. Robbie Goldman on

    When she shared her three things formula for accomplishing what is. Challenging. She saw such resilience i herself and it is so inspiring.

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  415. trudi or katrina renault on

    Thank you for the wonderful interview, it’s great to hear about her journey in life and how it connects to her roses! Our gardens are ever changing and always welcoming.

    Reply
  416. Jen on

    What an amazing woman. I would love to read her books. I love her “never too late” attitude. I’m 49 and was in a bad marriage for almost 19 years. The last 11 years I’ve been blending a family of six kids, healing and trying to figure out who I am in the mix of it all. With our last child half-way through high school, I find myself trying to figure out my future. I’ve tried a lot of things, learned a lot of skills, grown a lot, but nothing has panned out as a career path. Sometimes I feel like it’s too late. I appreciate Anne’s reminder that it’s never too late. We simply need to make a choice, take action, and believe in ourselves. And if there’s roses surrounding the process, even better :)

    Reply
  417. Christy on

    Oh my! The whole interview was an inspiration! There’s no way to pick a specific part! Thank you for sharing this! My grandmother used to grow roses and I kept thinking of her when I was reading!

    Reply
  418. Anita on

    “Look carefully for the same prejudice in yourself. It could be lurking there without you realizing it” this is so true, sometimes the only limitations in life are the ones we construct ourselves. And fear of loosing is a great inhibitor.
    I will live more going forward I think :)

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  419. keiko leonard on

    What a gift she gives all gardeners! I often feel a lack of confidence in growing roses; not sure why roses seem so daunting to me but they do. After reading her interview I feel empowered to try again! Thank you.

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  420. Alison on

    Thank you for sharing her story. She is truly a inspiration.

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  421. Nataly B on

    Loved this… ‘Next, you should try to know yourself, your talents, and limitations, but be careful to not underestimate what you are capable of doing.’ We are all more capable than we think we are!

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  422. Mona on

    Thank you for sharing Anne with all of us. Every chapter in her life is inspiring. Learning what she accomplished from age 60 on is truly a lesson in living our best selves.

    Reply
  423. Micala G on

    I love her passion for giving things away and sharing. That’s the favorite part of my gardening as small as it is, it’s the sharing. Recently I visited a friend and was greeted by a beautiful bed of Iris and lilacs. It was thrilling to me to see them keep growing elsewhere.

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  424. Sabina K on

    Anne’s approach to her roses just touches my heart. She feels and she does – it is so encouraging for someone like me who has always loved flowers but just at the beginning of growing them. Her confidence gives me confidence.

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  425. Shannon Sullivan on

    While I love that she poured her heart and soul into her roses, I love even more that she makes it about loving people by sharing her love of roses.

    Reply
  426. Maddie on

    “ Keep them watered, fertilized, and in a place with lots of sunshine. Roses, especially the old roses, are very easy to grow. However, inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy.”

    This is so inspiring to me. I have been working on creating a garden in front of our house. Something I hope will bring life and beauty and hope to our neighborhood which has seen some very dark times. And it’s been such an unexpected blessing to me connecting with so many neighbors while I’m out in the garden. The flowers have become an entry point to talking life and I know this is only the beginning of something really wonderful. I look forward to inviting people in and sharing flowers.

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  427. Brittany on

    As a newly single mom of 4, hearing how she lost her husband, and still achieved so much is inspiring.

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  428. Kristen Pushor on

    Love her remarks about how life doesn’t end at 60. All the things she accomplished in the final 37 years of her life past 60 is just remarkable and a beautiful inspiration to us all to continue to chase our dreams , explore , grow and challenge ourselves at any age.

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  429. Nancy G. on

    I liked her advice to always keep learning, no matter how old you are. She lived a very full and interesting life. What an inspiration!

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  430. Ali News on

    You can do it no matter your age how inspiring that is, sometimes I think I started too late, but she proves me wrong

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  431. Cindy H on

    I just can’t stop thinking about how much she accomplished in the gardening world. Similar to her, I’m just now getting into gardening at the age of 40. I have lamented not discovering this passion sooner, but her reminder that we have so many years ahead of us has made me so much more excited!

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  432. Loretta E. on

    I love that she got books to teach herself how to build a house. Too often we think certain skills are out of reach, but nowadays, so many people are generous with their knowledge that anything we want to learn is available!

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  433. Amy Armstrong on

    I’ve been considering a career change as I approach my 40th birthday. I often wonder if the timing is too late. But Anne has inspired me to go for it. I feel more empowered after reading this interview to get this ball rolling.

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  434. Brittney on

    What a woman of wisdom! I especially appreciate that even though she didn’t start this hobby until well into her life, she was never hesitant to try something new. I can learn a lot from her example. I also love to see her passion for the things she invested her time into. She inspires me to keep learning and not to be afraid to try new things!

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  435. Emmy Gran on

    I love Anne’s advice to not be stingy! Gardeners are some of the most generous folks, I know. What an incredible woman. I aspire to have an ounce of her gumption.

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  436. Allison on

    It’s inspiring to not let age stop you from starting something new.

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  437. Kara on

    “This left me as a 19-year-old widow and new mother who had to find her own way in life.” …I don’t know why that made such an impression on me. Maybe because we’re so many decades out now, looking back at all the “finding her own way.” She had no idea at that time – in the trench of heartache and loss; just a young girl, a young mother… but so much life was yet to be. It’s beautiful, really.

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  438. Sarah Holm on

    Anne is an inspiration to me, to think she build a house! As a women of many passions and limited by having young children right now and am so looking forward to seasons later in life when I can pick up new hobbies, and learn to become an expert in things that I have not let learned about. I also love the idea of preserving the past by sharing your passion with others. I would be so honored to have some of Anne’s roses in my garden one day. Or perhaps in the school garden, so many students could enjoy it and take clippings home for their own gardens one day.

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  439. Chessy on

    I’m starting a new stage of my life at 50 and I so admire how she just kept reinventing herself. She was a romantic and a dreamer ( like me!) but did it so pragmatically with planning and intention. I love that. Sometimes our dreams seem so out of reach but if you just break them down, step by step and just take action, they aren’t as impossible as they seem.

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  440. Laura on

    I’m blown away by the passion for roses! Erin, a long time ago you shared Anne’s story on Instagram and I squirreled it away in my brain but forgot the specifics. Thank you for including this in the Season 2 story! I can’t wait to dive into her books to learn more about roses.

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  441. Amy on

    OH my the show was sooo inspiring last night. Brought me to tears. Since I am in animal rescue and passionate about that, I would say that part was inspiring for me to never give up. I never cared for roses much until I saw the episode and read this interview, I may have to change that in my garden now. Truly an amazing woman…..

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  442. Darci Spiker on

    I loved being inspired by this incredible woman! “I remember when I turned 60. I thought 60 was so old. That was 37 years ago…almost 1/3 of my life so far.” Well, that puts it into perspective. The only time you’re too old is when you are. Don’t let the numbers get you down!

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  443. Chere Tournet on

    Anne’s generosity is what impresses me. She wants to share the power of roses. Certainly she had the traits of perseverance and vision. And like you, Erin, she had the gumption to set a goal and educate herself toward that end. Thank goodness for you who keep our world growing with beauty.

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  444. Erin on

    My favorite is the part where she talks about how her passion for roses started at 60 and how “It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams.” That part was very inspiring.

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  445. Valerie Mckeehan on

    What a wonderful perspective that it’s never too late to act on your hopes and dreams! That is such an inspiration. I also love the advice she gave: keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development. Such a beautiful legacy!

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  446. Stephanie Greenall on

    Absolutely stunning photos and such a great, informative and insightful interview!

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  447. Jacquelyn D. on

    Anne’s story is incredible. I have so much to learn from her. Thank you for sharing!

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  448. Kim Bowling on

    I love her determination and persistence, and the emphasis on being a life long learner. I too am a very visual person, but had never put the two together; bring a visual person and my love of flowers. What a legacy to leave behind. Thank you for sharing Anne’s story!

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  449. Theresa Harriman on

    I love her comment “Don’t be stingy”. Sharing knowledge, cuttings and also viewings of one’s gardens is a true act of friendship and stewardship. Keeping these roses and their history alive is a gift only a limited number of people continue to do, so that the younger generation can benefit from the joy that these truly beautiful roses add to the world.

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  450. Valerie Fimple on

    To hear someone as special as you and Anne state that there is no way to pick one flower as being your favorite was total music to my heart! Each flower, including those we call weeds, are all beautiful and unique! Thank you for bringing us these amazing stories and the opportunity to learn.

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  451. Dorothy on

    What an amazing woman! Every part of this interview was memorable, but the part that is most meaningful to me is her philosophy on life: “My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.” Following the pandemic, I haven’t gotten back to living life again. Her advice was timely and very needed.

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  452. J on

    Starting at 60!!! What a wonderful inspiration. So many things left to do, and opportunities to impact those around us.

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  453. Eunice Wu on

    I love her determination and her words: “Determine what it is you want to do and then acquire any skills or knowledge that you are going to need, get the books, take the classes…
    You can do anything a man can do except those things that require a lot of strength…You can meet and exceed your goals if you prepare yourself over time.”
    I love the idea of being a lifelong learner and trying new things!

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  454. Carrie K. on

    I appreciated her reminder to share the beauty with others. My husband and I have been very intentional about keeping a section of our garden for cut flowers over the last five years simply so people (especially young children) could come make bouquets and take them home with them when they left. It’s very poetic to think about bringing a little beauty with you wherever you go. I believe that Anne shared this mindset and love for others. It’s very inspirational to keep the tradition alive.

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  455. Kelly C on

    It’s hard to pick just one thing that was inspirational. Her life story is incredible! What an amazing woman!

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  456. Fran Rushing on

    That interview was amazing! What a blessing to have know such a strong woman with such a full life. I am currently entering my 60th year of life and am hoping I can fill the next 30 years with as much beauty as Anne did her own. My husband and I live on 10 acres in Indiana and my only dream is to make this a place of beauty and peace and tranquility that others will want to visit so that I can share it. I was inspired by Anne’s encouragement to invite people in instead of just hoping they want to come. Thank you Anne and thank you Erin.

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  457. Jackie on

    I was greatly moved that she started her journey with roses at 60 years of age. She is an inspiration to everyone that there is no age limit to learning something new and discovering new passions and creating new goals in life. Her generosity in sharing her knowledge, time and roses with us should encourage us to to do the same with our own interests and to inspire the next generation to pursue their own dreams.

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  458. Laura C. on

    When Erin asked, “How do we ensure that these rare and heirloom rose varieties live on? How can we pick up the torch and help carry your legacy forward?”, and Anne responded, “…However, inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy.” That answer reqally resonated to me – grow flowers to enjoy and bring beauty and joy and peace into your life, but also share their beauty with others, in the hope of spreading joy and peace throughout the world.

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  459. Ellen on

    This story was so moving, she had so much hardship throughout her life and still persevered through it all. She is truly an inspiration and gives me hope that me in my 30s, mother of 2 little ones and my 9-5 job right now won’t dictate the rest of my life, I am still trying to figure out who I am and what can further fulfill my life. Thanks for sharing!!!

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  460. kaitlyn on

    Her mission and message of sharing. Sharing blooms, sharing knowledge, sharing the beauty of gardens. I love sharing flowers but have always been intimidated by roses. I have a few now and can’t wait to add more, learn more, and keep sharing! She’s very inspiring! What a legacy.

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  461. Kimberly on

    I love Anne’s story so much! This made me joyful and tearful. I love her advice, accomplishments, and determination. I hope to leave a beautiful legacy like hers. Roses are definitely a favorite and I live by the city of roses. I love to visit the rosé gardens every year. I grew a rose garden in my previous home and and hoping to have one in our current home. Thank you for sharing this Erin

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  462. Nina Hawkins on

    Hi!
    I love her story. I been following her story since the first time you mention her. I’m 55 and I was always afraid to grow roses mostly because I had no luck and I was killing them for some reason. After I began reading about her in your log and hers (last year) , I decided to give a try. I bought 15 English roses (hard to get a hold) from bear roots and to my surprise are doing so wonderful in my garden. They are not producing many roses but the ones I got are so amazing since is the first year or second year I. The ground. I realize what I was doing wrong and follow her advice. I also realize that is never too late to start a project. I’m in love with roses agin and I want to continue growing new ones in the years to come. I have a total of 30 varieties now and i want to keep adding more..thank you for giving me inspiration…..

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  463. Karen Smith on

    It gives me hope that she “started late in life” at 67 years young I am finally at a stage in my life where I have time to do the things that bring me real joy. Gardening and flower growing is at the very top of that list and spending time with my grandchildren.

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  464. Krista Callaway on

    What an inspiring story of an incredible woman! I loved her drive. Just keep going. It is NEVER too late to start pursing your dreams. I am in my mid 40’s and I am searching for the next thing to grab in life. There is something about this story that now makes me want to grow old roses. I have several acres and I too love beauty. To cultivate beauty takes a lot of time and work but oh the reward. This woman has definitely inspired me to get my hands in the dirt and just start planting beautiful roses. I want the roses that smell wonderful surrounding my place. My mind immediately started thinking about where to plant them as I was in the midst of reading this article. It was captivating and encouraging. When you listen to someone speak about their passion it trickles into your soul and lights a fire. Absolutely amazing!

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  465. Carla on

    ” (…) inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy.” The only reason I can find solace in my flowers is because someone once shared their flowers and solace with me. The more you share, the more there is!

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  466. My-Tien Walz on

    I love that Anne says, “don’t be stingy with your garden.” Her message is kind. Over the years, I’ve invited friends and family to my garden to share and inspire them to start gardening. At first, they said, it was impossible. I never gave up on them. Every year, I plant vegetable and flower seedlings and gift them to get started. Now they start their own seeds and we visit and share the amazing growth and sometimes, death of each plant. The gift of being able to garden and share with others is special and should always be shared. Kindness counts.

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  467. Gina on

    What inspires me the most about the interview was her call to action, asking people to consider volunteering in home gardens to help with pruning or other tasks. It reminded me so much of my grandparents, who had huge gardens and a lot of old roses that withered and died because no one was there to help them when they got older. I was far away and was shocked when I returned and found their gardens almost dead and the beloved old roses gone. The relatives that inherited the house just dug everything up because they didn’t consider how special any of it was. That has always haunted me and reading Anne’s words, her call to action to help in these home gardens makes me think that while I wasn’t able to save my grandparent’s gardens, I could help others maintain theirs. I’ll be looking into such activities in my own neighborhood and if need be, starting some. This quote is what inspires me to do better, “The work of weeding, fertilizing, and pruning can be satisfying but enriched by stories, expertise, cuttings, and new friendships.”

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  468. Laura H. on

    I read this interview when it was first posted. Reading it again I found it no less inspirational than before; I think I could read it yearly & find a new, fresh idea each time!

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  469. Beth Pederson on

    “You can meet and exceed your goals if you prepare yourself over time. You can’t become a rocket scientist without a great deal of study, and neither can anyone else.” This is so true of anything we do in life. Especially as I am starting a flower farm and am in the throes of various stages of flower fails :).

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  470. Katie Wolt on

    Anne is truly a renaissance woman and I admire her drive to pursue whatever she wants! This interview is one of my favorite pieces from Floret’s blog.

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  471. Jenni Hulburt on

    I love her wild approach in allowing these rambling roses to integrate into the trees. It’s an inspiring design for my own woodland farm space!

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  472. Zanné on

    Anne shared beauty. She shared what she had in her heart and hands. She shared her love for old roses with rose lovers all over the world. Inspiring!

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  473. Catherine Raven on

    “I have given many roses away over the years—to individuals, nurseries, and to other special collections and demonstration gardens. ” This is what really makes you a gardener–spreading your plants around to friends and other properties

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  474. Rachel on

    What inspired me the most from her interview is that you don’t have to have to stay on the same path in life. It is ok to try new things and take different directions with your career!

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  475. Kim Bailey on

    What inspires me the most is that she doesn’t put herself in a box with social limitations and construct. She doesnt allow being a female or age put out the fires of her passions and desires and ideas. She really lived! My father was the same way.
    I am a very adventurous woman and have way more ideas, interests and projects than i will likely live to finish, but like Anne says, when you stop, you stop living. I’m closing in on 60 and feel like I’m just getting started! It’s inspiring to see other women accomplish amazing things, not just for themselves but for community. I hope that when I leave this earth I will have made some type of worthy contribution. This is a lovely tribute to an amazing woman. I am sharing it with my 23 year daughter Anna for life inspiration.

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  476. Jennifer Nelson on

    I love that she said sharing her garden and the beauty of roses with others was an a act of friendship and love.

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  477. Megan Kim on

    So this isn’t specifically commented on in but no one put limits on her, not her husband in regards to space, or questioning her how many is enough. I love that she had a dream, a passion, and no one gave her sass about it. Result: a wonderful and valuable collection of roses and information that would have been lost if not collected. ❤️🌹

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  478. Cathy Marpasert on

    “You can do anything a man can do except those things that require a lot of strength…I think I said ‘big biceps’ in there”. I loved this! She also mentioned her determination many times. That is what it takes!

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  479. Alex on

    What an amazing thought to consider that her career with roses started after she was 60 and turned out to be a longer career than the things that came before. We all have the choice to age with energy, passion and determination, and what a great model she is for this! She ran her race to the very end. She had such a beautiful and extensive collection but she was not “stingy” with it and in the process, she spread her love and developed and transferred her legacy to those who came after her. Her refusal to be stingy with her knowledge and experiences seems like it has inspired you, Erin, and we are all grateful that you bring us up with you!

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  480. Linda Dalton on

    I love her uplifting message on how to achieve your dreams. It’ll talked work and effort. “Become an apprentice,” she says. I also love how she is a inspiration to always keep reaching to fulfill your dreams. She started her rose project in her 60s. Just amazing!

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  481. Katie Scoggins on

    Such an inspiration! I love her zest for life and her innate value that life is about learning and doesn’t have an expiration date. I actually received her Gallica Roses books for my birthday after I read your original email (or maybe it was on your IG). It’s beautiful and I’m not sure how one decides to choose varieties when I only have a city plot. ;-)

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  482. Kim on

    I didn’t really want to plant roses until this story. Now I’m on it! Roses to be planted soon.

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  483. Joanna Vargas on

    I am inspired at the age she started at. You can do this at any time of your life!

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  484. Sylvia on

    I love how inspirational she was “you can do anything a man can do…”

    She sounds like such a wealth of information and a special spirit to have known- even for a short time.

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  485. Sandra L on

    I am about to turn 54 and this interview has given me so much inspiration! Anne has just reinforced that we should never stop learning and challenging ourselves to do more. Moving and learning help keep us young!

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  486. Laura on

    Amazing! I love that she started at 60 years old. I am in my 50s so I find this so inspiring. Her advice is spot in, to keep making goals for yourself, stay active, stay connected.

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  487. Helen on

    Such an inspiration, from sailing to roses and everything in between. Thank you, thank you for sharing her story.

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  488. Katie Sayre on

    Her steps for accomplishing things inspired me! She persevered to do a lot in the face of adversity. Thank you!!!

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  489. Jennifer on

    What a precious treasure.
    What a fantastic soul.
    What an inspiration!
    The most inspiring and meaningful part, is how she rose up, turned a tragedy into empowerment. She moved forward and thrived. Beautiful.
    Thank you, Erin, a much needed read.
    -Jennifer

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  490. Emily on

    I love this quote “ Life-long learning and growing keeps one engaged.” I have always believed this. With gardening and growing it can be a lifetime experience- this is what I want for myself.

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  491. Andrea Goffin on

    Sharing. Sharing knowledge, beauty, passion. It’s so sleazy to get caught up in the act of growing flowers that you forget that the beauty of them comes truly in sharing them with others.

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  492. Anita Vanberkom on

    Wow, she seems like she was such a strong, motivated, intelligent women. It’s inspiring how she was able to flip the stories of her life that seemed hard to move her forward. She could have gotten stuck on the fact that her husband died so tragically.

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  493. Fina on

    What a inspiring woman Anne was! What a life! If she can start a new life of construction at 60, more than 30 years ago, building homes in a typically ‘big bicep’ industry, there is no stopping us younger women. Very inspiring and just a lovely person to learn about

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  494. Shannon (capergirl) on

    This section resonated with me – First, don’t let being a woman stop you from doing what is traditionally seen as a man’s job unless you really need a constant supply of testosterone to achieve your goal. Ask yourself if the activity requires big biceps and a beard. If not, go ahead with your dreams and fight the prejudice where you find it. Look carefully for the same prejudice in yourself. It could be lurking there without you realizing it and could cause you to not believe in yourself and to restrict you from following a difficult goal. If you are a man you are not apt to encounter prejudice in life’s goals because of your gender, but if you do don’t let it stop you.

    Next, you should try to know yourself, your talents, and limitations, but be careful to not underestimate what you are capable of doing. Becoming a rocket scientist will be a difficult goal if you struggle with math, but maybe some remedial instruction in math would help you overcome the problem. I learned to navigate the old-fashioned way with a sextant even though I didn’t learn my number combinations when I was a child because of constant moving and now I compute manually with difficulty.

    On the other hand, you might want to pick something that comes to you more naturally. A passion for a particular hobby might be an indication of a special talent that could be pursued and turned into a rewarding career. Then, be willing to spend some time and energy preparing for what you want to do. I owe much of my success to this one.”

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  495. Rachel Burgoon on

    Anne as a person is inspiring as are her gardening skills. What I find motivating is her ability to juggle so many paths and passions!

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  496. Ellen W. on

    I love that she admits to starting on her roses late in life. But that didn’t stop her at all. Something I will take to heart and she is a wonderful inspiration to all of us. Thank you for sharing!!!

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  497. Samantha Brockdorf on

    I love Anne’s outlook on life, how it’s never too late to learn new things and begin new paths. I am earlier on in life, and I find inspiration and hope from anyone who begins blazing new trails at later points than “normal.” They help me remember I am not locked into any one career or path, and I probably can’t even imagine where I will be in 10, 25, or 40 years.

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  498. Mary Cait on

    I think the most inspiring part of the interview is that one pets was able to collect so many rambling roses and preserve them for future generations of rosarians to grow. Her idea of sharing the cuttings and the garden itself is so important

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  499. Killian M on

    Her age and determination for everything in life is inspirational. It’s wonderful seeing people just drive forward with the goal to do things wholly and correctly.

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  500. Smi on

    Thank you for sharing Anne’s inspirational story. I really liked her statement which she has proved that ” It’s never too late to try something new” and “inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important.”

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  501. Gretchen Hughey on

    I was very inspired by her comment that her extraordinary life came from being a life-long learner. I think it seems she also took risks as part of that learning. Sometimes it’s discouraging to try new things and not meet immediate success; being a lifelong learner emphasizes growth over outcomes. I would like to grow in that attitude. Additionally, I thought it was interesting how she kept moving forward after her early widowhood. I imagine that was a very difficult season of life but she persevered. That’s a good lesson also.

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  502. Sharon Bare on

    “Inviting people to your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy. ….And sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love…of friendship. This is the greatest legacy.”
    This reminds me of my mother and grandmother. I still have flowers that they shared with me, and in my moves to different homes, I always dig up my flowers and take them with me…drives my husband crazy! I love sharing my flowers with friends and family. I have passed my love of gardening to my youngest son, and he has passed to my grandchildren. I love sharing gardening with him….this is my legacy. ❤️

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  503. Ellen Pollema on

    I’m 70 and instead of thinking about my time being limited, I’m inspired by this: “I remember when I turned 60. I thought 60 was so old. That was almost 37 years ago, well over one-third of my lifetime so far.

    At almost 97 years old, it doesn’t seem that my passion for roses started all that late in life. It’s been over 30 years since I began this journey—longer than the careers of many. I pursued many dreams after turning 60…”

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  504. Desiree on

    Reading your interview with Anne is so inspiring. Love knowing she was a Military wife and her love for animals brought me great joy as I belong in the same category. Being a military wife I never had the chance to start my “permanent” garden until approximately 10 years ago, so now I’m digging in with all my heart. One of the first roses I planted came from my Grandmother’s farm, a rambler (no idea what the name is), but it’s a beautiful soft pink that went from the farm to my Mom’s house and after her passing came to my yard. It’s survived decades of hurricanes and freezes and is still going strong.

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  505. Rachael Gaskill on

    What I found most inspiring is her determination and grit to keep growing and learning. I can only imagine starting an incredible hobby at 60 and then developing this incredible garden for 30 years. People usually close up their life when they reach 60 but she kept opening hers up. Beautiful!

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  506. Laura Fisher on

    She loves roses and animals on top of that, her establishment of Noah, to end euthanasia of healthy animals. Truly a beautiful human being.

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  507. Karine Labbe on

    After reading her remarkable journey, I am inspired and particularly touched by Anne’s precious words: « A passion for a particular hobby might be an indication of a special talent that could be pursued and turned into a rewarding career » and « It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams. ». Mid-forties and in the process of acquiring an acre of land to cultivate flowers of my own, this is exactly where life is leading me.

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  508. Elisa Allen Arias on

    What an inspiring woman! Thank you for sharing her and this interview with us. I found her advice that it’s never too late to try something new to be particularly inspiring. At 38, and as a mother of young twins, I sometimes think that new projects or big undertakings “aren’t worth it” at this stage in my life but that’s such small thinking! Thanks again.

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  509. Mary Dondlinger on

    I love that Anne was a lifelong learner. So long as we are here on this earth, it is never too late. Take a chance, reach for your dreams!!

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  510. Kristie Wray Ralston on

    I adore two things.. One, that there are roses growing out of her trees! I now want to do this! Also, she just bought her first domain. What a treasure she is!

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  511. Stephanie on

    I think it’s amazing and inspiring that she gave away/shared so many roses with others!

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  512. DoLee Spurgeon on

    The thing that struck me most was when she said “You can’t become a rocket scientist without a great deal of study, and neither can anyone else”. How true is that? In order to achieve anything, you have to be determined and willing to put in the work. What a wonderful woman she was.

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  513. Esther LaRoque on

    “Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy”
    So grateful for all the wisdom and experience she has shared with everyone throughout her life. Very inspiring.

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  514. Sandy on

    Wow, what an inspirational story from an incredible woman! My favorite quote is “I pursued many dreams after turning 60, including starting my own contracting company and building over 25 (mostly Victorian style) houses, traveling the world, and my study of the older roses. It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams.”

    Being that I am over 60 and hesitant about jumping headlong into to the flower industry–it would be a radical change for me. But I have developed a passion for flowers and working with them. I have been doing nonprofit wedding work for a few years and love it. Giving brides a dream wedding that they could not afford otherwise. I would love to expand including having some land with a flower garden to chose from, but have been hesitant.

    My grandfather had a wonderful rose garden and my father grew them also, it would be wonderful to carry on that legacy–probably where my love of roses/flowers started! I used to be more bold in my younger years, and had many unique adventures myself, that I can relate so well to Annie. But I have gotten more reserved lately, questioning my abilities–it is not too late!! Thank you for sharing Anne’s story and inspiring me!!

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  515. L French on

    That when she turned 60 she thought she was old. But looking back from 97 she still had 1/3 of her life to live. And that it’s never too late to try something new. Such an inspiration!!

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  516. Julie Mattes on

    Anne’s singular vision and passion for her garden and her conservancy is really a touchstone for me and spoke to my heart completely. It might be that the roses choose you and not that you choose to love roses? Anne’s absolute work ethic and obsession had to have come from passion. I also loved that Jill’s kind words to Anne made it into the episode. Jill really illustrated how the Floret team respected Anne.Ju

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  517. Elizabeth S on

    I love her advice about inviting people into your gardens and sharing your flowers with them! She said it’s an act of love and friendship, and the greatest legacy! I find that to be so true because the majority of my perennials came from my grandmothers and family friends who loved flowers so much that they just wanted to share them with everyone! ❤️

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  518. Karen Yurkovich on

    The paragraph from the interview inspired me the most
    where she says keep moving, stay out of bed, go out for lunch, stay in touch with friends and family, stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas and life long learning
    This is how I try and live my life but have never seen it written down so it’s a really good inspiration and reminder! I find roses and flowers are part of life long learning as I am always researching and learning more about growing flowers and vegetables too!
    This year one of my projects is to grow roses from cuttings
    I have been gardening since I was 4 ( 62 years of gardening) and absolutely love it! I think it’s important to share your knowledge as Anne did and share your flowers too if you can!
    Thankyou Erin for sharing so much of your knowledge!

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  519. Varner on

    Her passion for roses and knowledge she shares with others! She is amazing and still so dedicated to educating others!

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  520. Lauren Schafer on

    So many things from this interview bring tears to my eyes.
    ” It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams. ”
    “, you should try to know yourself, your talents, and limitations, but be careful to not underestimate what you are capable of doing. Becoming a rocket scientist will be a difficult goal if you struggle with math, but maybe some remedial instruction in math would help you overcome the problem”

    One thing is common in every section of this post… Never stop growing and never stop pursuing your dream. As someone who just left a comfortable life on the beach to start a homestead in the mountains, this rings so true and is so encouraging and just makes my heart sing. “what is too late, anyway?”

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  521. sarah hill on

    My favorite part of Anne’s interview is the sailing. Such a great role model for flower farmers and women everywhere!

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  522. susan hubbard on

    For those of us considered “old” by many, her words are like a shot of vitamins for the soul. Not one of us feels old “in our heads” and it’s high time we just got on with the business of learning, living and loving. So grateful for these words and the lovely television program. My “rose garden” is now in containers on a patio, but they are loved and appreciated just the same.

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  523. Alana on

    Her generosity in sharing her knowledge is so inspiring!

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  524. Jon on

    Anne’s search for truth & beauty which led her to become a “Rose Guardian” is both poignant & inspiring.

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  525. Lynn Minerich on

    Thank you for this wonderful interview. Everything about Anne is inspiring, but perhaps most is how she just continued to live and learn, not letting growing older stop her. I did love the part where she says don’t be stingy, but to share your roses by cuttings, etc. It is how the legacy continues.

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  526. Sarah on

    I like her formula for achieving any difficult goal and the way she embraced life and adventure!

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  527. Akina on

    She taught herself how to build her own home reading books and doing. Love that can-do nature! Wow🤩

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  528. Erin Dippold on

    Wow, what an inspiring woman & what a gift to be able to read your interview with her! Thank you so much for sharing. I loved what she said about starting a goal or dream “later in life.” I am currently a stay-at-home mom to two little children & sometimes feel that I’m missing opportunities to pursue things I’m passionate about because of the time & work it takes to fill this role I have chosen. I always appreciate reminders from women who are older/more experienced than me that there is still plenty of opportunity as you age to pursue passions.

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  529. Julie Carroll on

    I was most interested in her starting in her 60s.
    I’m starting in my 60s too!
    Maybe it really isn’t too late.

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  530. Elena on

    Her passion is so incredibly inspring.

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  531. Laura Wenrich on

    “Look carefully for the same prejudice in yourself” – that’s so good!

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  532. Oriana on

    I loved reading about her legacy overall, and the efforts to duplicate her collection and preserve it, which will extend her inspiring legacy.

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  533. Erin M. on

    I only just started growing roses a few years ago, but I adore them. Their scent and beauty always brings me joy when I see them. I had to have knee surgery a month ago, and it’s killing me that I can’t walk around and care for my roses! Looking forward to healing and being able to care for my roses again.

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  534. Val Boergesson on

    I remember being so inspired from her last time you posted about her that I spent hours reading about her. What an incredible woman, and when her roses bloom in your garden, I am sure it is one of your greatest treasures. I have flowers from my mom’s garden and every year they come up, it’s such a gift.

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  535. Emily Barnett on

    I loved how she talked about inviting people into your gardens. Don’t be stingy, give people cuttings, and share with others your gardens. So sweet and inspiring. A small way to make the world a better place..

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  536. Casey Thomas on

    What an incredible story! I love that she picked up this passion for roses later in life and through a happy coincidence of a sale at a local nursery — my obsession with dahlias started in a similar way. The fact that she built Victorian houses in her 60s+ is incredible, and I love the feminist confidence!

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  537. Kathy Parish on

    What a joy to read Anne’s story. I love when she said, “It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams” and her love of animals is very heartwarming. What an incrediable inspiring lady she was and still is by spreading beauty and love into our world.

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  538. Amy VanSlembrouck on

    The fact that she overcame losing her husband and being a single mother at only 19 years old shows the drive she has for life…..I was really impressed with her whole story. This would be fantastic to win on the 30th for my 40th birthday!

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  539. Jan on

    I loved that she would go to classes or read up on how to do things, like build ! Such a wonderful, inspiring lady

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  540. maureen sullivan on

    As a 60 year old woman I was inspired by Anne’s statements around aging. There is more time, there are more wonderful opportunities. She embraced the aging process and navigated it with tremendous elegance.

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  541. Julie on

    Anne is indeed an inspiration! I think our culture puts limits on aging but Anne redefines what growing older means. It’s never too late to learn a new skill or venture down a new path. What a role model Anne’s life and legacy gives to a new generation willing to redefine the “senior” years.

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  542. Tara DeMaris on

    How very beautiful her life was and the legacy she left. I especially like how she says not to let being a woman stop you. I have some very big God-sized dreams. I want to grow all of the things. I live in a very cold climate place, but I have this dream of growing food and flowers year round using many methods of growing. Greenhouses, hoop houses, hydroponics and whatever else helps. Anne’s word inspire and keep my heart longing for the dream to upscale to more space, but I will keep growing all I can in the space I have, even in my parlour. Thank you for sharing Anne with us all.

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  543. Joanne Crouch on

    Sharing your garden through visitations as well as sharing bits and pieces is a wonderful way to continue a legacy and it says so much about Anne’s way of thinking. I’m 71 and I hope I am lucky enough to have 26 more years of gardening and sharing in me!

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  544. Joce on

    Such a beautiful story! Her legacy will continue to bring light into this world for years and likely generations to come. She left her mark in the form of flowers, what’s more beautiful then that? 💕💕💕

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  545. Mary Beth Hunt on

    She let me know you can do ANYthing at any age! Her whole story is inspiring and Erin, you are now part of that story!

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  546. Jess on

    I’m so inspired by how she discusses starting her rose journey “later in life” and then realizing just how much more time she had to develop it. And I love it when you recommend books – such a great resource and opportunity for my kids to stumble on at home and discover a new passion.

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  547. Helena on

    I love Anne’s instruction to invite people into your garden and to share plants, inspiration, friendship, memories. That resonated with me because gardens of the present are so much about a sense of place. At once they ground us in the present and transport us to the plants, places and people of our past. By sharing our gardens, we gift present beauty and future memories to others.

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  548. Colton on

    The entire interview was just awe-inspiring. Watching the first episode really struck something in me with how the Old Roses are being lost, and once they’re gone, they’re forever gone. Her life, and the legacy that she had was incredible, and I really love how during her life time she never thought she was “Too Old” or “Not enough time left.”
    Her outlook has changed my perspective a bit, and I am excited about the opportunity to learn more about these incredible wild plants.

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  549. Anne on

    Thank you for this! I would never have found her on my own. Having reached “middle age” and confronted with a necessary exit from my life long career and focus, I have felt pretty lost. Reading how Anne started most of her big dreams and successes in her 60s is SO inspiring and gives so much hope.

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  550. Taylor Sievers on

    “Determine what it is you want to do then acquire the skills and knowledge you need, buy the books and take the classes”— THIS. 5 years ago I started a flower farm. I knew absolutely nothing despite having a degree in agronomy. I read and read and read and memorized the pictures in seed catalogs. Made my own Excel spreadsheet to organize all the info I was accruing. I’m now “the plant lady” in my community and I laugh when I think about where I was 5 years ago. How much more will I laugh when I’m 97 years old? I hope my garden makes an impact for others like hers has. I dream of that!

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  551. Amy Noonan on

    What an inspiration and treasure! I was so moved by her story of determination and not being afraid to try something new. Building her own house just wowed me as well as her age! I immediately sent it to my mom, who is retired but still wants to change the world and leave a legacy! Which is one thing I learned by watching her episode, leaving a legacy is more about sharing than actually doing something concrete. That really resonated with me because if everyone was like you and Anne..this world would be in a much better place. Thanks again for sharing all you do!!

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  552. Cessie on

    Her love and heart for friendship, generosity and legacy are as beautiful as the roses she cared for. Thank you for sharing her with us through this interview!

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  553. Janet K on

    Oooh I just loved reading about Anne’s story. What sticks out for me is her spirit. Her reaching to accomplish her dreams. I will read this over and over again. So much inspiration. As a rose lover, I will gradually add all her books to my garden library.

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  554. Janis W on

    Amazing lady ~ I was so touched by her thought that ‘friendships as lovely as the roses developed’. That means so much to me.

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  555. Jessica A on

    Wow, she’s such an aspiration as to who I want to be when I grow up. Never giving up on my dream, no matter the age. I’ve never heard of Anne’s roses program or her books, even if I don’t win, I will obtain her books ♥️

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  556. Elizabeyta on

    I read this interview when it came out. I planted a bed of 18 roses this year and I have to admit this interview helped prod me in that direction. I have started to collect bouquets every week and the scent! Also, the time in the garden is lovely for me.

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  557. Sabrina Koebel on

    Oh! I love that she was part of NOAH!
    But my favorite part was “Don’t be stingy.” Sharing part of our gardens is definitely a great way to inspire our friends and families to carry on gardening and keeping old plants alive.

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  558. Angela Webster on

    The most inspiring part to me was that she thought 60 wasn’t old when she still lived another 37 years. 37 years is a long time to create something new. I’m 43 and feel like I’m over the hill yet at 60 years old she was continuing to create new career paths and seems like life really became her own at that point. She is inspiring to me because even though we never know when our last day will be that I can still pursue my dreams and create new dreams even at an older age.

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  559. Anna Steinle on

    What I always find amazing when reading stories/interviews like this one, is when someone sets out to create their own happiness and it inadvertently creates happiness for someone else and the next thing you know, they’ve left a legacy…all from creating something for themselves. The lesson is, find something that makes you happy with no care to the eye rollers or critics. You’ll be surprised how much others will find joy and inspiration.♥️

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  560. Sonia Covarrubias on

    “”” Without being quite aware of it I had developed a formula for greatly improving the chances of achieving any difficult goal.”””” this sentence hit me gloriously, I think I have developed something similar and I didn’t know until I read this , thanks so much for sharing this fabulous interview with us !!!!

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  561. Kate on

    I thought that Anne reminding us that you have to meet and exceed your goals over time was very helpful. Also her sharing that she didn’t start her rose journey until she was 60 was helpful; when it could have been considered “too late”. I often dream, but then don’t follow through due to the business of life with babies. Our time is coming, though, and it will be a worthwhile and rewarding activity to share together as a family.

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  562. Kayla on

    I was so inspired to read what Anne had to say about following dreams later in life. What an amazing lady. And her rose gardens are beautiful! I am a beginning but passionate gardener, learning as I go while wrangling children. I now want to try growing some of these gorgeous roses!

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  563. Kirsten on

    “It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams. ” Making a career shift at the moment and I needed this reminder!

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  564. Molly Feider on

    Anne’s determination and love of life long learning are a true inspiration. She found ways to make her dreams happen, even later in life. Building her own home and sailing from New Zealand to California? Wow!

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  565. Tom on

    Anne underscores the significance of legacy by safeguarding and disseminating the splendor of ancient roses. She urges individuals to open their gardens to others, exchange cuttings, and foster connections and friendships through the shared affection for roses. Anne’s lasting impact endures through her vast assortment, her literary works, and the endeavors to preserve and recreate her rambler collection in gardens throughout the United States.

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  566. Kailey on

    Anne’s story was so inspiring to me! I love roses and have started growing many around the yard. What really stuck with me was what Anne said about sharing cuttings with others to allow the rose to continue to spread across the world.

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  567. Marie on

    “You can meet and exceed your goals if you prepare yourself over time. You can’t become a rocket scientist without a great deal of study, and neither can anyone else. “

    So encouraging! So true!

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  568. Dawn on

    I love how generous she was with her knowledge and how she didn’t even get started until she was 60! We often feel like it’s too late to start something, and she has inspired me to just do it even though I’m in my 50’s. :)

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  569. Leora on

    What inspired me most is it’s never too late to start your legacy!

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  570. Laura Campbell on

    Anne’s dedication to creating such a beautiful legacy and her generosity is inspiring!

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  571. Ronda on

    Thank you for continuing to share Annes story…I am 60 and retired, her story confirms that you can start bringing more beauty into this world no matter how old you are.

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  572. Melody Richards on

    That inviting and sharing are the most important. I went to college to be a dentist, but took horticulture as an elective. After falling in love with the kindness and generosity of horticulturists, I couldn’t resist pursuing a major among those who wanted to share so much! Now I love paying it forward😊

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  573. Caroline on

    It’s amazing how much she’s given back to her community. I’m also inspired by the fact she didn’t start her rose journey until she was 60. I just turned 53 and started a new hobby keeping houseplants. I finally found a mentor who is helping me learn the art of taking care of these beautiful aroids. People with knowledge who freely share it are a treasure.

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  574. Veronica T. on

    What inspired me the most was the legacy of inviting people into the gardens and giving away roses and sharing them with individuals, nurseries, and gardens. I do this with my own flowers and gardens, including flowers others have shared with me and the ones I have been able to transplant from my mother’s garden. My mother taught me so much from being a master gardener and sharing her love of flowers and plants. The hospitality of sharing any kind of flowers is a passion of mine! I am just now getting into learning more about roses and growing them.

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  575. Megan on

    I’ve just started growing roses and it would be great to have more resources so that I don’t kill them!

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  576. Deanna Hill on

    I love her young spirit! It’s so easy to think I am past the point or I’m out of time in a certain season of life. What a bold, strong, inspiring woman!

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  577. Ashley jensen on

    Anne, what an amazing feat to have collected nearly 1000 roses! What a legacy to leave behind to share with the world in so many ways. Roses have become a passion of mine next to dahlias the last few years. Diving deep into the Rose world has opens my eyes to the possibilities in roses theirs long lineages to unique species, the divine smells that each rose has. Anne’s rose collection is an a testament look to her hard work this and attention to detail, and ultimately her love for roses. I know that many roses are not an easy task to do each season brings its challenges, and she took it on at her age. Thank you floret team for the amazing work you do and letting Anne tell her amazing story. The roses will live on to tell her storie.

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  578. Tara Rodden on

    I actually took a snapshot of one of her answers because it was a kick in my rear! I’ve been frequently slowed down and even put of of commission with a bad knee lately. Prior to that, I had become isolated during Covid for 3 years because we have an immune suppressed child. I started reading and learning about flowers this year and simultaneously, began my lifelong dream of growing. I’m still isolated a lot- but the dirt, the seedlings, the flowers- they are bringing me back from the funk. I am afraid about many things so much of the time, and I loathe feeling fearful. Flowers lift my soul.
    So, when I read Anne’s words,” My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself, read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.“
    It felt like she was reaching from beyond and talking just to me! Her life accomplishments are a bit intimidating, but inspirational. When I was 17 and graduating high school, I begged my parents to not make me go to college yet because I wanted to be a florist more than anything. They gave me a hard pass. Four years later, I was a floundering young adult with a useless degree. I married by the time I was 23 and had a child by the time I was 24. Lots of life later, I’m 51 and FINALLY starting to learn and do what I always wanted.
    I was feeling that maybe it was fool-hearted to begin later in life, but after reading Anne Belovich’s words this morning, I think doing this just might save and prolong my life.
    Thanks for finding her and helping to carry the torch. God bless her and her roses!!

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  579. Melinda on

    It’s never to late to get started – take the risk!

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  580. Doris Platis on

    Gardening has always been a challenge for me! I referred to my style as “dig a hole and throw the money in”, but after reading about Anne’s journey into the world of rose cultivation, I became inspired to see my small rose garden quite differently. Now I carefully, spray, water, fertilize and pick every black spot from my “babies”.
    I have been rewarded with the indescribable beauty and variety of this flower. In some small way I understand and share her dedication and delight with the Rose. Thank you, Anne.

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  581. Jen on

    I really liked Anne’s comment “inviting others into your garden and sharing is perhaps the most important. Don’t be stingy.” One of my favorite things is sending friends and family home with a bouquet of freshly cut flowers, starts or divisions of something growing on my property that they love!
    Roses have always intimidated me a bit so I would LOVE to read Anne’s collection of books to build my confidence in growing healthy plants.

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  582. Sheila on

    I was most inspired that she didn’t start in her rose journey until she was about 60 years old. I’m over 50 and am just starting my rose journey and hope I can contribute to the world through gardening, too!
    Also, I am inspired that she had so much passion and cared so deeply for plants, animals and humans!

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  583. Sam on

    It may sound silly but I’m 27 and sometimes feel like time is running out. I’m a dreamer with many dreams, many goals, many ideas of how to be intentional with the people and places that surround me. Anne has inspired me to prepare for my dreams right now, to pursue them hard and well. As long as I’m breathing I will continue to study, to learn, and most importantly, not be stingy.

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  584. june on

    What an incredible individual. This interview will stay with me for a while, there’s just so much richness in everything she said.

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  585. Diana Jones on

    I love how freely she shared her roses and gave away cuttings. When she said it’s an act of love, friendship.
    That is so very special. Aside from her rose legacy, I believe it’s her generosity that people will remember most.

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  586. Gwendy Haas on

    I think what inspires me is her free spirit and just a show of love for so many things that are amazing in this world. She reminds me a lot of my grandma as she seems to just find a way to get things done and pursue what she loves just like my grandma did. I think that the pioneering spirit is amazing and I hope to forever have the love and openness to share and live life that way. Thank you so much for sharing this story with us. I am a huge fan of roses and have been adding a couple every year to my space and love High Country Roses here in Colorado and am so happy to see them on your resource list. I really have enjoyed your sharing of your journey and appreciate all that you have shared with us.

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  587. Liquet céline on

    When she say we can realise many dreams after turning 60. It is very insping. Because I am 50 😉

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  588. Chloe Hemmerich on

    The part of the interview that inspired me the most was how to know your own limitations while still doing the best job you could.

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  589. Sharon K. on

    I loved how she shared her garden and inspired others. I too love to give away bits of my (nowhere near as inspiring) garden. Just a few days ago I received pictures of peonies thriving in a friend’s garden that I shared many many years ago. Happiness!

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  590. Michelle Koeppe on

    So deeply beautiful! Anne inspired me to not take my time on this earth for granted; make assumptions about an individual’s capabilities or dreams. Thank for sharing Anne’s story! My great uncle was an accomplished rosarian, Charles Vernon Covel. Anne reminded of his grace, generosity, and vitality. He also lived a very long full, zesty life.

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  591. Wendy Jannuzzi on

    I love that she shared her roses a very generous lady . She was also very encouraging to all of us that think trying something new and different is beyond our reach.

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  592. Autumn on

    “You can meet and exceed your goals if you prepare yourself over time.”

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  593. Tara Simons on

    I loved the entire interview, but what really reached out to me was her encouragement to share the beauty of roses with others, particularly by sending people home with cuttings. I do that with my own roses and other flowers I grow. Her words felt like she was squeezing my hand with approval.

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  594. Jill Wittig on

    I love Anne’s involvement with NOAH. I also love knowing that her fortunate circumstances were simply a fantastic sale, a truck and a vision, and that boosted her adventure into roses!

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  595. Xena on

    I really appreciate Annie’s honest reflections on pursuing difficult goals where she shared “… try to know yourself, your talents, and limitations, but be careful to not underestimate what you are capable of doing.” I work to balance these in myself when pursuing unknown big dreams and it was grounding to hear with all her life fruitions, this was a grounding navigational piece for her. Thank you Annie, may you rest peacefully

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  596. Geralyn on

    Anne is so inspring! I love that she started with roses at 60. I have the mindset that you’re never too old to learn something new and try to impart this knowledge to my young nephews. I started violin lessons at 42 and started gardening at 47. Who knows what I’ll get to do at 60?!

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  597. Robyn Anglebrandt on

    Inspiration, perspiration and dedication! My uncle is a rocket scientist and she is correct
    I’m saying a lot of hard work. But everyone’s mind and eyes just love flowers and their scent. Why wouldn’t we want to carry on such beauty in the world. Gods help of course! Thank you for sharing – flowers, talents, and wisdom. In the military I have tried to leave each house better than when I came. Flowers = Power
    Would love to add her roses to our forever home for the legacy it will leave for our 6 children and grandchildren alike.
    [email protected]

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  598. Robyn on

    Her words about all she has done in life are inspiring, but the most inspiring is when she spoke of starting her own rose journey over 30 years ago…so around age 60…this makes me realize at 44, I too can start working towards expanding my knowledge and my own gardens to have my own collection of ramblers. I had sold my larger farm almost 2 years ago which meant my carefully curated gardens were gone. My lilacs which were over 6 feet tall and wide, my small collection of shrub and rambling roses, 300 varieties of daylilies, 10 varieties of clematis, peonies, azaleas, hostas, monarda, etc. It has been hard to start again at my new place which the grounds are much smaller and no previous gardens were here.
    Reading this interview came at the right time…Anne’s words about starting her rose gardens in her 60s were what I needed to hear.

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  599. Robyn Lee on

    What a truly inspiring story! Im amazed how she accomplished so much that she sets her mind to, whether it’s sailing the pacific or rescuing roses. I’m just a few years into my gardening journey myself, having inherited some roses that were already planted on the property we bought. Learning more each season!

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  600. Annjanette DeBellis on

    What an incredible story of Anne! Like everyone we all have the ‘age’ we should be doing something, we should have accomplished something.
    Having kids, married, education, career. Her ability to influence so many people when most would have quit or slow down is inspiring.

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  601. Taylor M. on

    My favorite line was “inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important” because so many people today are starving for beauty in their day to day life and sharing the fruit of nature and nurture, in the form of beautiful roses, is a way to do that.

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  602. Bethany Turner on

    Anne’s story is so good! From what she has been through at such a young age, to continue to grow flowers in her 90s. She mention to always keep moving, I think that is one best advise someone could hear. Once you start to slow down, it is hard to get back up and start doing it again!

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  603. Jocelyn Yard on

    As an avid gardener myself, both as a volunteer in other gardens as well as my own home, I was moved by how much Anne shared her roses and her garden, both with the plants (cuttings) themselves and blooms. With all the hatred and turmoil in the world, it feels wonderful to create sanctuaries for yourself and others to enjoy, to make the world a more beautiful place in your own small way. This joy and beauty is meant to be shared. What a beautiful legacy. I can’t wait to visit her garden next time I am in the area. I also just got my sailing certification so I can now how have adventures on my own, so that struck a chord with me too. I wish I could have met her.

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  604. Heidi Fleshman on

    I found Anne’s comment regarding sharing roses so wonderful “ However, inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy. “

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  605. Rosemary on

    Pursue what you have an interest in and keep learning new things. Wisdom for everyone at any age. I love that.
    I will think of Anne as I plant a new rose bush I recently purchased.

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  606. Cassidee Shinn on

    I’m so inspired by her intrepidness and fortitude! I loved that she when to NZ and sailed home!

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  607. Joyce Winget on

    I love how Anne started her rose collection at the age of 60. I started taking flower classes at the age of 66. And how she said to stay out of bed! I am in my garden from morning until dusk. I get really sore sometimes but I think the work keeps me young: 46 years ago we bought this old home on an acre. I planted a pink rambling rose. Last year I started taking cuttings from the rose. I’m going to give each of my 4 kids a plant for their home. I will have to buy Anne’s book to find the name of this rose. I was so excited to hear how she helped start Noah in Stanwood. I used to bring Noah all our out of date surgical supplies there. She inspires me to start volunteering again. She was an amazing lady.

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  608. Samantha Pecker on

    Anne’s willingness to start a new hobby in her 60s is unusual and inspiring. She knew what she wanted to do with her life and didn’t let anyone stop her. Too often we are told that it is ‘too late’ to change careers or life paths. Anne’s story disproves this falsehood and shows that life is what we make of it.

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  609. Andrea Steele on

    I’m amazed and awed that she started her rose passion at 60. I’m 59 and just started planting roses last year. It’s is so addictive. She had a tough time losing her first husband, but she showed fortitude and grit and made it through. What an amazing woman!

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  610. Colette on

    My heart belongs to ramblers! And Anne’s curiosity, love and inspiration to support and nurture these amazing flowers is truly an inspiration. Her words of wisdom for long learning and to learn something new is exactly what my “mid-life crises” moment needed to hear! Thank you!!

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  611. Melinda Ching on

    I am so blown away by her story! What an adventurous woman! To be starting a new journey at 60 is absolutely inspiring as I hope to be that way as I get older. Thank you for sharing this interview. As someone who is in their 30’s and has a midlife crisis every year (sometimes multiple times a year), it was so affirming to hear her tell her and also demonstrate that you are never too old.

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  612. Rhiannon Le Fay on

    I was really inspired by Anne’s comments about really getting to know yourself and your strengths so you can define a path for yourself that will bring the most happiness, success, and self-actualization. This is so helpful for me, as a new flower farm business owner, to remember – that I don’t have to be good at everything to pursue this, I can figure out and celebrate my strengths and find other resources/support for the necessary work that I’m not skilled at.

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  613. Toni Marie Bucci on

    Just turning 30, I had this sense of doom come over me that it’s too late to start a new career/hobby because I’m getting “older”. When Anne said “It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams.” it hit me so hard. It was the encouraging nudge I needed to remember that I can start working on a new goal/dream at any point. A season of change is coming in my life and I really needed this today. Anne was so inspiring and this interview really made my day. Thank you!

    Reply
  614. Jolene Cetak on

    Anne advises us not to let what we don’t know, hold us back. Study, take classes and practice….and you are never too old! At 64, I intend to follow her advice and have a life full of the beauty I dreamt of all those years at a desk!

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  615. Sarah on

    I love that she gave roses away, showing a true passion to share with the world!

    Reply
  616. Cindy cunningham on

    Anne’s reference to lifelong learning spoke to me. And the fact she could complete ‘big biceps’ tasks after age 60. 39 more years of accomplishments. Love her philosophy. I can relate a little since leaving the MN climate and moving to Camano Island. Learning how to garden here! Clearly after the age of 60!

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  617. Rachel C on

    I’m so inspired that Anne didn’t start her rose adventures until 60. It’s such a good reminder that it’s never too late to start something new!

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  618. Audra on

    I love how she was a life long learner. We preach this to our kids and she was a vivid example. Living life to its fullest is what she embodied! Such an inspiration.

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  619. Hannah M. on

    Life can take on so many journeys and paths. It is so inspirational to see how age and circumstance does not have to stop dreams.

    Reply
  620. Jannah on

    I love her focus on life-long learning and her spirit of determination! What a remarkable lady, she’s very inspiring, especially in her perspective on age, it’s never too late to start. She lived so fully and had so many varied experiences.

    Reply
  621. Anna S. on

    I love that there is no timeline to finding and excelling in new things. It inspires me to lean into things I love and keep trying and learning!

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  622. Sara on

    Love her life advice to keep moving and stay out of bed. She truly is an inspiration and a beautiful reminder that it’s never to late to start something new.

    Reply
  623. Heather Nathaniel on

    I love her perspective on age and going after goals! What a phenomenal life and story!

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  624. Kathryn Costello on

    I appreciated her insight into deciding what it is you’d like to pursue, and then taking the time to actually learn the skills necessary to succeed. What an amazing woman.

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  625. Jennifer on

    “It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams. ” I’m so encouraged by the idea of having ~30 or so years left, maybe. What could I do with that?

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  626. Carol Mac on

    My mother loved roses and grew several different varieties in her garden, and though I loved to pick them and arrange them in vases to enjoy inside or give away, I never really learned how to grow or care for them myself. My mom is gone and I am now in my 60’s and was SO encouraged that Anne only started her rose journey in her 60’s. Most articles I read seem to discourage growing roses, but these posts about Anne and her roses has inspired me to give them a try. I am so grateful for these videos and all the resources on roses and can’t wait to get started!

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  627. Kris on

    I loved reading this interview — and old roses. I bought my first from Roses of Yesterday and Today back in 1991. My first old roses garden. When I moved, I started another rose garden with rugosas and others like Madame Hardy, Rosa Mundi, Blanc Double de Coubert, Frau Dagmar Hastrup — described as “A flower artist’s dream of loveliness”. They are all in full bloom in my hillside garden, a wonder to see and smell. Another, Eddie’s Jewel, is a riot of color, arching over walkways. I hope that I can keep working in my rose garden for years and years to come — still laughing over “I remember when I turned 60. I thought 60 was so old. That was almost 37 years ago, well over one-third of my lifetime so far.” Inspiration for us all!

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  628. Brittany on

    I love that Mrs. Belovich knew her rose collection would be preserved before her passing. That is a wonderful legacy to leave and also an assurance of a life’s work.
    It’s so inspiring to hear her speak as a strong woman, without fear of failure or judgment. Building a house by herself?! How incredible. On a much smaller scale, I was just gifted a battery operated weed eater for my birthday. Now I don’t have to wait for anyone to keep my gardens tidy— just like Anne didn’t need help raising her walls.
    Thank you for sharing her words with us!

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  629. Jacky on

    The sheer amount of time and energy she put into her work is so inspiring. Thank you for sharing this interview.

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  630. Diana W. on

    Beautiful and inspiring! I would love to add ramblers to my garden.

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  631. Barbara on

    Her recommendations on living your life are golden. I especially loved that she remembered thinking she was old at the age of 60. Yet there she was at 97…….37 years later! She is such an inspiration. (I’m 61 😂). Thank you for posting this. It was perfect timing for me.

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  632. Mona on

    I love her joie de vivre. Thanks to both of you for inspiring me to plant roses and other wonderful seeds/plants.

    Reply
  633. Yelena Kushuk on

    She wasn’t hoarding all the roses only to herself. Her generous heart, giving away roses, sharing the beauty inspires me. She is gone, but roses that she gave away will bloom, reminding new owners what a great person they once met.

    Reply
  634. Judy Neely on

    Coming into the garden world in my sixties and now 70’s, I continue to learn so much through experience and study and, of course, other people. What a beautiful interview this is to encourage and motivate one in the days/years ahead. Beautiful.

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  635. Jen Barber on

    Her life story was my favorite part. So inspirational and motivating!

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  636. Lauren on

    I guess my answer is like a lot of others, but that she started this passion later in life. It makes me feel like I still have a chance to have a dream. I’ve been caring for family members for the last decade or so and have put a lot of my life on hold. This makes me truly feel like I still have a chance to have beautiful dreams. I want to long term grow flowers and food hydroponically indoors since I’m in a very urban area. Your newest story, and Anne’s, gives me the warm feeling of hope it’s not too late!

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  637. Anne Marie on

    What I find most inspiring about this interview with Anne is her advice on how to pursue your dreams, however challenging, and to question the barriers we place on ourselves. What sage advice, especially nowadays, when instant gratification is more alluring than perseverance. What I love the most about gardening, how it encourages valuing both presence in the present and investing in the future.
    Knowledge of Roses are a gap of my gardening experience that I am looking to fill. I am inspired to start now by taking a cutting from this most beautiful peach coloured, fragrant rose that grows out front of a friend’s house. Wish me luck!

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  638. Carter Wallinger on

    Her recommendation to know yourself but not to underestimate yourself– it is so easy to underestimate yourself. Anne shows great determination, work ethic, and the commitment to herself to chase what she is truly interested in. What a wonderful role model and example of how full life can be!

    Reply
  639. Kris on

    Her advice to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family. That is so important! What a blessing it is to be alive so we should not be wasting our time here on the earth. To love God is to love what He created. All the beautiful flowers! Just so thankful!

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  640. Kim Masse on

    Not letting age stop you from pursuing what you desire in life is inspiring and admirable! It is never too late to do what makes you happy.

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  641. Makayla on

    Anne brought so much color to this life; not only color with her flowers but with how she lived and loved. Overall, I found Anne starting so many adventures in her life, especially in her later years so inspiring. I am in my later 20’s and feel such a need to have everything figured out. Anne reminds me that it is perfectly okay and natural to start, fail, and try again at anything that catches my interest and never stop learning.

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  642. Abigail on

    I am so inspired by Anne for so many reasons. I think the first reason would be her perspecitve of following your dreams at any age. I feel like I often fall into that feeling of “its too late” to start down another path. Hearing and reading her story and feeling her passion for not only flowers, but animals as well gives me hope that some day soon, I too can really choose what i want my path to be and make it happen.

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  643. Ava Brock on

    Life is a long journey full of adventures. It’s never to I late to embark on a new interest. Follow your passions, learn something new, stay out of bed!!!!

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  644. Kimberlee on

    To find a passion at any age that inspires others to get involved & continue it beyond your vision is an incredible legacy. That what moves me every time I re-read her story!

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  645. Hannah Hewitt on

    I love that Anne didn’t let stereotypical gender roles be a barrier in her adventures and discoveries. Her passion for exploration is inspiring.

    Reply
  646. Kathleen on

    I love her whole spirit. This line stuck out to me, as someone who is just north of 50, “I remember when I turned 60. I thought 60 was so old. That was almost 37 years ago, well over one-third of my lifetime so far.” A very good reminder!

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  647. Melissa Bryan on

    What a lady she was! She reminds me so much of my own grandmother. My father’s family is from Oregon and Washington. She used to tell me that I could do anything that a man could do as well and she did. My grandmother was a force to be reckoned with. When my grandfather told her that she couldn’t pass the exams to be a nurse, at 35 she proved him wrong and led a company and career in nursing. She never let her age stop her either and always encouraged my dreams. At 84, she was still caring for her gardens at the farm. My grandmother was my inspiration and I truly enjoyed reading about someone that reminds me so much of her. I wanted to hear more about Anne’s adventures sailing! Such a treasure she must have been. My heart is forever in the PNW and I always feel home in my blood when I am there. Thank you Floret for bringing us such a beautiful soul to honor in memory.

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  648. Sara on

    I felt inspired by her encouragement not to limit yourself because of your age or other people’s ideas of what you should or shouldn’t be able to do. Just get up and do it!

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  649. Carolyn Brinn on

    Big muscles and a beard are not necessary! I love this!
    My Mom and I took SO MANY cuttings from my Grandmas old, pink climbing rose. Only one made it and I look forward to watching it grow and to be able to share it one day.

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  650. Shelly C on

    Anne was an incredible woman! One part of this interview that is inspiring to me is when Anne says, “inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy.” This reminds me of my mother & her love for the roses in her garden. Over the past 30 years she’s taken many cuttings from her roses & propagate them, so that she could share with family & friends. Like Anne, my mother isn’t “stingy”……. sharing her roses is a generous act of love!

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  651. Theresa Gawthrop on

    I lived the story about how she got started with her ramblers. Next time I come home with a carload of plants I’ll just say it was ” fortune circumstances”!!

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  652. DeAnne on

    I love that Anne started her flower journey at the age of 60 and worked so diligently to hone her love for and collection of roses. What a legacy.

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  653. Candice Eberle on

    Anne lived such a rich life. Mixing her passions with her generosity. The feeling that settles over me is honor and nobility along with delight and wonder. Anne had an open heart and her legacy is one that reflects onto those who have come and will come to know her story. A story of true beauty, the feminine we all long for to exost.

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  654. Christie Tackett on

    ‘You can meet and exceed your goals if you prepare yourself overtime’. While some goals and dreams might feel daunting it just takes a few to look back and see how far you came. What an impressive life to look back and see how much Anne achieved with her take charge of your own life attitude. What an inspiration!

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  655. Ashley Selland on

    Wow what a story! She led quite the life. I think my favorite part was the fact that she wanted to share all the rose cuttings with everyone. This spring I shared strawberry starts with 10 people and that was so fun to me. I hope to be able to share more things as my garden grows.

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  656. Kelly Hering on

    I love that “it’s never to late to start” on a passion. I’m 56 and just getting started with roses. So inspiring!

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  657. Margaret on

    Before I ever doubt myself again, I will now always say out loud ‘does this activity require big biceps and a beard.?’ If the answer is no, then I will move forward. Thank you Anne! Simple wisdom.

    I’ve managed to kill any small potted rose bush ive bought, so to know that there are ‘easy to grow’ varieties is a blessing and removed my fear of growing roses.

    I love the community cleanup and cutback day! I think I’ll try to find one to help with!

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  658. Tracy Duncan on

    I loved her spirit! Staying active and gardening well into my retirement is my main goal. Growing something beautiful and being able to share with others is inspiring.

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  659. Kat on

    I love the fact that Anne Belovich just went for it at 60. “I pursued many dreams after turning 60…It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams.” I feel like now I have permission to stop coasting through life and really go after my dream.

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  660. Rebecca Casagrande on

    I love her views on being a lifelong learner and staying active. Never stop pursuing your interests.

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  661. Leisa on

    I will hold onto what Anne’s mindset about aging. She says,”At almost 97 years old, it doesn’t seem that my passion for roses started all that late in life. It’s been over 30 years since I began this journey—longer than the careers of many. I pursued many dreams after turning 60, including starting my own contracting company and building over 25 (mostly Victorian style) houses, traveling the world, and my study of the older roses. It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams. “
    I’m 64 and I need to adopt Anne’s wisdom about aliveness and learning. Thank you.

    Reply
  662. Viktoria Skillingstad on

    “ Next, you should try to know yourself, your talents, and limitations, but be careful to not underestimate what you are capable of doing.” was very powerful to me.

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  663. Katrina on

    What an amazing life. I have tears in my eyes after reading just this little bit of Anne’s story.
    What impressed me most was how she faced adversity and loss – how she didn’t allow it to crush her, but she kept striving and learning and loving and living. Amazing.

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  664. Deborah on

    Mrs. Belovich comes across as the most amazing lady. I liked that she wasn’t afraid to try anything, especially like contracting to build homes. I found it truly inspiring that some things she didn’t begin to do until she was in her sixties. This gives me hope because I’m 65 years old and am very much interested in roses. My first rose bush was a David Austin. I purchased it because in my book it isn’t a rose unless it has a wonderful aroma. I am interested in vintage or heirloom seeds and flowers of all varieties. I enjoy gardening and am looking forward to doing it full time as soon as I get myself retired from the old 8 to 5 job. The interview with Mrs. Belovich was truly inspiring and it was good to see how she grew in wisdom from the sad times as well as the good and lived her life to the fullest not being afraid to put her hand to anything that she wanted to do. What a testament her life is to doing well whatever your hand finds to do. I’m so thankful for finding your website Floret and look forward to watching and reading all that you have so that I can plant my roses and flowers and share the beauty. May God Bless!

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  665. Christina on

    I am so grateful that I read this interview! The thing that really touched me was what she said about not letting anything stop you from pursuing what you want to do. Too often I make excuses for why I can’t do something. I’m inspired by her courage, persistence and love for whatever she was doing. I want to start being more courageous and run after what uses my gifts and talents and fills my heart while blessing others.

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  666. Kelly on

    I love Anne’s advice to stay active and involved as you age. And to help each other out in our gardens.

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  667. Katie on

    “My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.” What beautiful advice! Forever learning and growing will keep you young at heart and life forever enriching. Anne seems like she was a wonderful lady!

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  668. Kirsten on

    My Gran use to tell stories about how her mother could hear the roses cry when she cut them. My Great Grandmother was also a rosarian, and her legacy was passed along in my Gran’s stories and now the flower garden that my Aunt tends on the very same family property. This new episode of Season 2 really got me thinking about my legacy on the property, now in the family since 1906. My Gran’s dying words were to ‘Take care of Thetis’. She held my hand and looked deep into my eyes, just as she has many many times over the past 20 years. “I promise”, I said. And I do. Her legacy is also my legacy. “I am part of it, and it is part of me.”

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  669. Elizabeth on

    I’m so inspired by Anne. I love roses too and I have worked up to 40 different varieties now, after a few years of work. As a “late bloomer” I always worry I’m too late to anything in life, but as I’m in my 30s, I now feel like I have plenty of time! Thanks for sharing her story and I can’t wait to read her books.

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  670. Nina on

    I love how she said they you’re never to old to pursue a hobby and I would love to know more about all of the things she was into; especially sailing.

    Nina

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  671. Katelynn on

    Anne is so inspiring to me. As someone who has always had ideas that might seem a little out there (one of them being starting a flower farm :P) Anne makes me feel like I can actually do it.

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  672. Renee Gibson on

    I was struck by the lessons that came out of a Voyage of Determination. It is inspiring and can be applied to any life goal be it cultivating and preserving roses or sailing. Thanks for the share!

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  673. Kayla on

    “Invite people into your gardens and share is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy.”
    We’ve lost so much as a culture closing ourselves off and tucking our heads to our own endeavors. Beauty, life, and our homes ( even if uncomfortable) is meant to be shared.

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  674. Gale on

    I like how she said that we can meet and exceed our goals with preparation. Study and learning. I am 69 and still want to learn and stay active like her.

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  675. CJ McDonald on

    Anne’s tenacity to keep on learning no matter your age. I’m inspired by all she accomplished after 60 and her sage wisdom on how to achieve a goal.

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  676. Annie Domenici on

    I’m now fifty and was thinking that it might be too late to start such large projects but she has inspired me that it is never too late to go after your dreams.

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  677. Monica on

    I think the part that inspired me most was that her passion for roses didn’t begin till she was 60, sometimes I feel that I because I got a degree in one thing and have spent the last 10 years working in that field that it is what I have to do for the rest of my life. My interests have changed and that’s ok! Another thing that inspired me was the part about don’t let being a woman stop you, I feel that in my current field, a predominantly male field that this really speaks to me. I really felt inspired by so much of the interview, I’m so many ways

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  678. Randi Pratini on

    My idea of heaven, the thought of a stroll through this abundance makes my heart palpitate, my nose twitch (in the best of ways) and my eyes open wider than I would think possible! A visual and sensory intoxication!

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  679. Stephanie P on

    I love the idea of volunteering at gardens to preserve and share roses! And growing friendships along with roses by sharing roses.

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  680. Michelle L on

    “Invite people into your gardens and share is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy.”
    I find this so true, show off your hard work, share it with those who appreciate the effort and know the hardships and joys. Be prideful.

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  681. Jessica Clifton on

    Anne is such an inspiration! Reminding us that it’s never too late to pivot and follow our dreams.

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  682. Rebecca Leharani on

    I am so inspired by Ann in many ways. I can relate in many ways to her life as mine has been similar in having moved a lot as a child, wandering off to a stream to collect tadpoles when told to stay in the back garden, trying different careers as they posed a difficult challenge, but most of all gardening. As I turn 60 next year, the 15 agricultural acres I recently purchased (to go back to the land) from selling my farm 10 years ago to downsize and live in a condo. It hasn’t been a mistake, it just gave me some time to realize that my 8’x20’ deck cannot house all of the flowers and vegetables I grow, nor the 100 lavender plants that we just planted on the land! And I have more to do. It is hard work but I refer to it more as a labor of love. The building lot on the land where I plan to put a small house is nestled in the wooded area of the property. There is much wildlife and beautiful native weeds and plants that are living there so I don’t plan to remove them, only add more to encourage butterfly’s, bee’s and any other creatures that need a haven for a bio diverse home. However, the area is so large that I have now found the answer to add some grand colour, and with a history, and a future to enhance future generations on my land. That came to me after seeing the roses rambling in the trees of Ann’s garden. I can envision the beauty in seeing roses peeping and peering from the trees and towering over the top reaching for the sun. Really a beautiful life that she created for herself, such a wonderful existence and amazing legacy to leave and pass on.

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  683. Krista on

    Her overall determination that anything is possible. I’m a petite woman and helping my partner start an organic vegetable farm and often feel like there are things I can’t do. Annes ability to build a house and put up walls alone with the help of a tool / machine is very inspiring and beautiful. 💕

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  684. Aimy on

    “My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.” This resonates with me on so many levels. As a new mom, I sometimes feel like I am losing myself, so I appreciate this advice so much.

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  685. Sara on

    I think her entire life’s journey is fascinating and inspiring, but what is most inspiring is her perseverance and willingness to forge a path that is uncharted. Bravo!

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  686. Karen Zimmerman on

    Oh my! I will be looking to read more about Anne! Wonderful interview!

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  687. Tracey Twidwell on

    There are so many inspirational takeaways from this lovely article. A standout to me was her comment about not being stingy. Share your garden, invite people in and give them a piece of it to take home. That’s how you give inspiration. The process of inclusion and showing your passion has a ripple effect inspiring others. I’m sure there are many gardeners now cherishing this lovely woman’s gift of a start from her rose collection. She lives on as does her beautiful roses.

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  688. Debbie Alenius on

    What an inspiring woman! I was most inspired by her amazing spirit to live her life to the fullest even when most would have settled to just “retire”. This is what I needed to hear as I am near sixty and moving to a new home and starting to develop my dream garden from scratch. Roses were treasured flower of my grandmother, and my mother who recently passed away. I will be taking cuttings now from my parents house to use in my new garden thanks to the information you have shared with all of us.

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  689. Mary on

    I loved that she didn’t start growing roses until she was 60, and enjoyed 30+ years of learning and growing her passion. I liked her determination and pluck. Makes me want to plant some special roses straight away!

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  690. Jan Fritz on

    ” You can meet and exceed your goals if you prepare yourself over time.” It is the preparation that is so intimidating to people. If you want it, you have to work at it, and that’s not an easy task.
    I have adored flowers my entire life and have been involved with them in one way or another. I was a teacher for 36 years and never was able to join our local garden club because they held their meetings during the day. I enjoyed flowers whenever I could during my busy, busy schedule from early morning till late at night, working with and preparing materials for special needs students, but being among flowers and immersing myself in nature was always my relief from that extremely taxing and very challenging job. When at last I retired, I ventured to the garden club and loved it. Almost immediately, I was asked to hold certain positions which I slowly agreed to, one small step at a time. Though I was asked repeatedly to be president of the club, I felt like I wasn’t prepared. By experiencing these new positions, taking on responsibilities slowly, and finally building up the courage to devote myself to such an all-encompensing job, I agreed. I also hold positions on the district level, and I’m being courted for the state level. I know that the training, the practice, and the small steps gave me the courage and the knowledge to get there. Though I’m still learning and always will be, I am always one who has overprepared for everything, and I know it’s that willingness to devote myself to the learning aspect that has helped me succeed.
    What an amazing woman Anne was, and she is truly a role model for every woman who follows her.

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  691. Jean Parchewsky on

    It is amazing and inspiring that she said figure out what you want to do and don’t stop learning until you can do it.

    “Determine what it is you want to do and then acquire any skills or knowledge that you are going to need, get the books, take the classes. I bought three books when I decided to build the house on Camano Island; how to frame a house, how to wire it, and how to do the plumbing. You need to study and become an apprentice. “

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  692. Christina Melvin on

    The portion of the interview that jumped out at me the most was the portion regarding her age. The fact that she started her dive into roses and preserving them at 60! The age most people are trying to scale back, Anne dove in and started a new passion. In some way I feel I can relate as we started our little flower farm at 41 and are wanting to expand and have this as our full time (meaning I will eventually step away from my full time job). I continually think about my age, 42 now, and keep asking myself if I really want to build a larger flower farm going into my 50’s. This interview was incredibly inspiring and has me yelling YES! I want to expand! I want no NEED to do this as the flowers are my passion. Age is just a number and should not define what and how we do things. Live your life doing what makes you happy, what makes you look forward to each day and try to pass that knowledge down to someone, which Anne did.

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  693. Lilith on

    I think the part about still pressing on with whatever it is you want to do regardless of it’s seen as a “mans” job or if you encounter prejudice, or if you encounter those views inside yourself, it is an important reminder.

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  694. Natalie Lairamore on

    I think it’s amazing that she didn’t let age slow her down. Even at 60 years old, she didn’t stop trying new things. These past couple of years, a new dream of mine has been to have a small farm raising a few animals and growing cut flowers (including roses, of course.) But at almost 44 years old, and no experience with farm animals, I’ve told myself it’s next to impossible. Anne’s story has encouraged me that even at 60 or 70 years of age, it isn’t too late to start something new.

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  695. Iris on

    Her advice: “….to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development. ” That is so very true.

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  696. Anne Haley on

    In my sixth decade, as I realize how ephemeral life is, Anne’s gesture of contributing beauty to life and evoking joy through the gift of old rose cuttings is most inspiring to me.

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  697. Lisa on

    “It’s never too late”. This.

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  698. Lilia Z on

    I loved reading about how her garden evolved! It always seems such a daunting journey when you first get started and it’s nice to read about how other people succeed.

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  699. Courtney Townsend on

    “Lifelong learning and growing keeps one engaged”
    I strive to live this out every single day, and I hope to leave a legacy like Anne.

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  700. Cynthia Boyd on

    I was so impressed with this woman’s overall perseverance for life and intense passion for roses, rose growing, and sharing her knowledge and skills to others…especially, of course, to Floret, without which, many of us would not have known of this incredible rosarian. Now we all have the ability to learn about it through Floret’s interest in sharing her legacy and their desire to preserve and pass along the roses and rose knowledge to all of us… I loved this interview and as usual, Erin (and Floret team), you continue to inspire wide and far…even to a woman who gardens in a little tiny cottage garden off the North Atlantic Ocean in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Canada.

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  701. Cindy on

    I am most inspired by Anne’s giving spirit and her desire to share the beauty of roses with others. I can attest to the joys of sharing an arrangement of fresh flowers or a cutting from a rose bush and how it nurtures the soul of the recipient as well as the soul of the giver. I believe we gardeners are on a shared journey in this life, and sharing our dreams, our goals, and a small piece of ourselves with others unites us and helps us nurture the lives of others as we continue the legacy of the gardeners who have gone before us. She was a true legend of the rambling rose.

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  702. Shasta on

    I’m not sure what was most inspiring. I feel like the entire interview was. “ You can meet and exceed your goals if you prepare yourself over time” I get impatient with my self sometimes, but that is great advise. I love this interview. I will be back to read it again!

    Reply
  703. Nancy on

    What an inspirational person, her words to live by:
    “advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development. ”
    Reading her books would surely be inspiring for me, As newly retired I have time to garden.

    Reply
  704. Sarah on

    Wow! Right off the bat I connected with Anne’s story! I am a biology teacher and one of my favorite classes is one I created myself to teach students about the importance of wildlife, biodiversity and conservation. I just love anyone who takes the time to follow their dreams while still inspiring and leading the next generations. We are keeping our fingers crossed we can move into my husbands grandmothers farm house this summer. 90 acres of beautiful, serene landscape. And around the house is just bursting with floral life. We want to move there and just make it bloom even more and continue her legacy.

    Reply
  705. Stephanie Galarza on

    I loved her thoughts on not being stingy and sharing as a way to inspire other’s love of roses.

    Reply
  706. Judy Brown on

    Two things, really, struck home with me from the interview.
    The first was her attitude about not letting age stop you. She accomplished so much after 60 years of age! I’m 70, and though very active, I do realize I have let age stop me.
    The second is her attitude about being generous with your plants and knowledge. I believe in this, as well. I have both shared and received most of my favorite plants. The provenance of an item stays with you, and when I care for my plants, I always think of the person I got that plant from. They stay alive, to me.

    Reply
  707. Kennedy on

    I watched the first episode of season 2 last night and got choked up several times learning about Anne’s legacy and Floret’s mission to preserve it. Simply put, this is truly what it is all about – not just flower farming, but life! I was most inspired by her constant passion for learning and disregard for age in the process. Her eyes lit up when she saw flowers – I know that feeling too. You have to be willing to put in the work, but it is so inspiring to know it’s never really too late in life to learn and try new things. Stay uncomfortable, fail, and above all – stay curious. What an invaluable daily reminder.

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  708. Kaity Newman on

    She is so inspiring I love how she said not to let being a woman stop you from doing a job. Often we can feel intimidated & hold our own-selves back.

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  709. Lindsay on

    I love how how she taught herself to build her house. What an inspiration and hard worker. She read books and was confident that she could take on a project…that resonated with me.

    Reply
  710. Diedre Jagge on

    The part of Anne’s interview that caught my attention was where she talks about thinking 60 was old, bit that she had started new things at that age and accomplished so much after that. I struggle with thinking “I’m too old to do this now”, so I REALLY appreciate her point of view on aging.

    Reply
  711. Avery Kuhn on

    She is such an inspiration. I love how much she emphasizes that being a woman is not a weakness. The part where she says to look for our own prejudices is eye opening because I think sometimes we hold ourselves back without even knowing it. She is such an encouragement to follow your dreams and do what you love.

    Reply
  712. Micheala on

    Anne’s generosity is what is most inspiring to me about this interview, and about her work with roses. I love that she came to them in her 60s and still had almost 40 years loving and growing roses. I love that she generously shared her knowledge about roses and also offered cuttings to share. What a beautiful legacy!

    Reply
  713. Leslie on

    So much inspiration in this story! I love her advice to try new things and always keep learning, but to make sure you prepare adequately. Thank you for such a great blog post. Now I want to buy a few garden arches and cover them with rambling roses.

    Reply
  714. C T on

    You can do anything a man can do – you must be an apprentice. I love the big biceps concept – Anne is a true lady.

    Reply
  715. Camby on

    The comment about turning 60 felt old, but that was 37 years ago…really put a lot into perspective for me. Even at 40 I feel afraid to jump and change but it helps me realize I have so much more life to live.

    Reply
  716. Lynn on

    Starting a new adventure at 60! I am 56, just bought 5 acres in Arlington, WA and I have such big plans for the garden…she has inspired me to include some ramblers in the garden. What an inspiration she was/is …thank you for sharing her incredible story.

    Reply
  717. Laura Burns on

    She had a “full life.” That is the dream isn’t it? To be able to say you pursued your passions…Enjoyed life and felt it was full. A beautiful example of how to live.

    Reply
  718. Christina Hanson on

    What a life she has led! A widow at 19 to living to 97 with so many adventures in between……I aspire to live a life like that. I love her advice : “My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.” My grandmother lived to be 101 and this generation never ceases to amaze me – tough and fearless. I hope to be that.

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  719. Ashley on

    Her advice “to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.” Is something I really love. I started doing similar to her advice when COVID happened. I was so focused on work, I was missing things around me. My kids growing up, my passions or lack there of. I started gardening, and getting outside. As a child I loved being outside whenever possible and as an adult and parent working, I wasn’t doing that as much anymore. Especially when my kids became teens. I started getting outside and learning more about gardening. I’ve in the last year started learning more about flower gardening, especially cut flowers and it has been amazing. She’s 100% right, it’s never too late. I know it is a common saying, but it so so true. Thank you for sharing about Anne. Her memory will live on, along with her roses.

    Reply
  720. Carlie on

    I especially love the reminder to not be stingy. Sometimes my garden is my retreat, and so I’m not quick to share the space. But I can see how it might be good for me to remember to share the space, and not just the harvest.

    Reply
  721. Margaret LaPlant on

    It’s genuinely hard for me to pick a specific part of her interview that inspires me the most. I love that you are NEVER too old to learn something new and dive in fully.
    My favorite thing about Anne’s interview is that I just thought of my own grandmother. My grandma studied tea roses and had her own nursery in Texas. She would carry all kinds of roses so she could learn more about them.

    Reply
  722. Ashley on

    I love her tenacity! Truly ahead of her time. And I love that her rose collection didn’t start until her 60’s; inspiring to see that it’s never too late to start something you love!

    Reply
  723. Devan Butler on

    I was so inspired by Ann saying “what is late in life, I plan to live to 100” if she can do what she did with her roses at 60+ I just think of what I can do at 35 if I set my heart and mind to it! I really love growing and I can’t think of anything better to have a collection of than varieties of roses that will preserve rare species! I have heard Erin say so many times throughout the show she wants to do some thing that matters and she’s already done so much that matters! She taught me everything I know about starting a small flower farm! All the knowledge she gives is so empowering and I feel like I am doing some thing that matters by growing and sharing with others. I would love to win and book collection, because Erin’s books have changed my life so much I know that somebody as passionate as Ann with her roses would help me take my rose collection to the next level.

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  724. Amy H on

    The portion about it never being too late to start a new journey. Sometimes the thought of a new garden is overwhelming but you just gotta go for it!

    Reply
  725. Kelly Raymond on

    It is inspiring to see another woman with many different passions. She really lived such a full life. Learning about all the careers and hobbies she had reminds me of my recently passed grandmother, who I credit with my love of flowers. Seeing how driven and passionate Anne was… I bet they would have been great friends. With all the volunteering they both did here locally in western Washington, I wonder if their paths ever crossed. I often have a voice in my head who thinks I should have 1 career and set interests and both of these women remind me that I can do it all, and I should.. If that’s what I want. Not everyone has the same interests through every season of their life.

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  726. Nicole on

    Oh my!!! What an amazing lady!! Absolutely incredible!! The entire interview was inspiring! But what spoke to me the most – not being too old to start something new! This is always a concern of mine and she said exactly what I needed to hear! I love her story! 🥲🥰

    Reply
  727. Audrey Long on

    I found her stamina to pursue her life’s dreams no matter how physical or complex they may have been inspiring! She never planned to slow down and that’s exactly why she is such an inspiration.

    Reply
  728. Mary Pursley on

    What a life of determination, even at such an early age in the garden with her mother. She was her own person her entire life. Follow your dreams!

    Reply
  729. gillian on

    I loved her reflections on her age–that turning 60 wasn’t too late.

    Reply
  730. Lisa Higgins on

    I loved her perseverance and the power of leaving a legacy as s
    he truly was an inspirational soul.

    Reply
  731. Evelyn on

    “Be careful not to underestimate what you are capable of doing” This resonates with me as it is something I am working on. I’m finding that one of the best ways to do this is by actually doing the thing I am afraid to do. Taking the first step in the direction I want to go can often feel the most intimidating.

    Reply
  732. Debbie on

    I LOVE that she began her passion for roses at 60, and then went on to pursue other related dreams, and never stopped learning and trying new things. What an inspiration!

    Reply
  733. Erin Kindall on

    Perseverance and a commitment to lifelong learning are messages sprinkled through Anne’s conversation. Inspirational!

    Reply
  734. Rachel Miller on

    I took from the interview her joy for life. I loved that she kept going, kept doing, and kept living! She never limited herself. What an inspiration!

    Reply
  735. Lara Solensky on

    I loved watching the episode last night with my young daughters and seeing the next generation already getting excited about beauty and the concept of leaving a legacy. Every piece of Anne’s interview feels so inspiring!

    Reply
  736. Shaylee Reoch on

    Upon getting your email about the premier of season 2, Growing Floret, I was so excited to hear there was more to be shared about roses. This will be my fourth time reading through A Rose Story parts 1-4 since last year. I obviously love it for more than one reason. It contains history, a scavenger hunt in a secret garden (!!! I could swoon), the preservation of beauty, the passing of wisdom, and a life’s story that tells us it’s never too late to follow a passion AND that you can have many. I’m very easily inspired and passionate and like to go all in and all out, so when I can’t or am limited, I get discouraged. Anne didn’t grow her first rose until the age of 60 and it reminds me that journeys are slow, collections take time, and it’s never too late to keep learning. Her story gives an opportunity to slow down, see beauty, and get dreamy. Even though I can feel bogged down by limitations it encourages me to take the next (likely slow) step in the direction of my flower dreams. I should also share that before reading this story I disregarded roses as being “every woman’s favorite flower” or “common and conventional” I’m so happy that this story proved me wrong and revealed that roses are a timeless, romantic site to behold. In February of this year I purchased my first (and only rose, so far) from David Austin roses- the Olivia Rose Austin. I’m starting with one so I can give it proper attention and care, as I’m also expecting my second baby in a few short weeks. I want to buy 50 roses and all the trellises and towers to go with them, but I’m short on a couple necessities like land and time and money, but as Anne teaches through this story, journeys are slow, they take turns, I can do what I can with what I have and it will never be too late to be a passionate learner.
    Anne’s story has truly been my inspiration for roses and I’ve shared it with the closest women in my life: recommending to read it over an early morning cup of coffee. It is the stuff of dreams, what we should savor in life, and extremely, rarely beautiful.

    Reply
  737. Lori Guilfoyle on

    What resonates with me was when she talked about her sailing trip and 3 parts to setting goals. In the second paragraph she says”be careful to not underestimate what you are capable of doing”

    It is a really beautiful interview.

    Reply
  738. Sheila on

    The interview is perfection. Anne is the ideal role model for us all. She lived 97years, had various differing careers, difficulties, triumphs, and so much wisdom to share. She teaches to learn, to have passion, to have self reliance, to share, to care, her wisdoms go on and on. How lucky this world was to be graced with 97 years of her. I can only imagine the knowledge that is bound in her books. I will read them all at some point in my lifetime. I am 50 years old and began growing cut flowers from seeds 2 years ago and am loving it. This year I added 9 rose bushes to our gardens. I hope to have 30 plus years to continue my passion as she did. Thank you for all your contributions, Anne!

    Reply
  739. Kelsy on

    A true treasure of an interview! Anne left a mark in this world. A reminder we can all add beauty in some fashion.

    Reply
  740. Joni Sauers on

    Her starting so much if her life at 60 totally inspires me, what a lady!!! I will be turning 63 in a couple of months and really needed that inspiration, thank you!!!

    Reply
  741. Nadia Piche on

    I feel most inspired to grow roses now and preserve their history. Their story made me fall in love with them and see their beauty in a new way. Do you know where someone in Canada can access these varieties? Also, what an incredible woman who lived such a full and rich life. She inspires me to live!

    Reply
  742. Tamara Millage on

    I want to be just like her when I “grow up”!

    What impressed me most about Anne is her spunk for life and the passion to seek the best from wherever stage of life you are in. She didn’t confirm to some preconceived notion of being what’s expected. She reminds me of my grandmother, another spunky gardener lady who loved life and left a legacy of positive.

    Reply
  743. Sarah Jo on

    My favorite part about Anne, and what’s most inspiring about her interview, is that she didn’t limit herself or let others limit her. She didn’t limit herself because of her womanhood, she didn’t let others limit her and ‘fought prejudice where you find it’. Her life didn’t just consist of one thing – but many, many passions. From saving dogs and animals, to sailing, to growing, to always learning. She was limitless and that’s so incredibly inspiring.

    Reply
  744. CJ on

    When Anne says, “be willing to spend some time and energy preparing for what you want to do”

    Reply
  745. Alicia on

    I enjoyed the part of overcoming prejudices it’s something that some women do everyday.

    Reply
  746. Emily Albertson on

    I’m inspired by how much she loved roses. I never really considered all of the behind details of roses until now!

    Reply
  747. Melissa Patterson on

    Anne’s perspective on never being to old to dive into something new really inspired me. And how it’s important to get out and do stuff, not to isolate yourself. What a remarkable woman!

    Reply
  748. Sarah Murphy on

    I love the idea of having your community be involved in the process. New enthusiasts can learn from the pros-regardless of age. A pruning party sounds so educational and rewarding!

    Reply
  749. Amy S Long on

    She has such an inspiring story. Owning your too muchness is a favorite. I am someone who has often been referred as too much. It’s nice to hear someone say that’s okay.
    Starting late in life is just a reminder that it’s never too late to live the life you want.

    Reply
  750. Jamie Tanner on

    The fact that Anne continued to not only grow, but start new businesses, well into her late years in life is such an inspiration. During a time in their lives when most people start to slow down, Anne seemed to pick up steam. I hope I can be lucky enough to do the same.

    Reply
  751. Robin Parsons on

    I was inspired by so much of this interview as I am starting to grow roses again. I haven’t had roses since my children were young. I purchased my first DA rose last year, and after planting my dahlia tubers in a new area this year, I now have room for a few more roses.

    Most specifically, I am inspired by her line about never being too old to try something. Our children will both be in college in the fall, and just last night I stepped down from 15 yrs of volunteering for their school district. It’s time to figure out what MY next chapter will be. Ann did so much after 60. I have so much more life to live, and now I get to put my passions first.

    Reply
  752. Jamie Desmond on

    Thank you for sharing a brief glimpse into the life of a remarkable woman.

    Reply
  753. Katie on

    How she followed her dreams at any age and any point in life

    Reply
  754. Kellie Eickmeyer on

    Preserving our horticulture is so important, sharing with others so selfless, a soft voice in the midst of a noisy and chaotic world. I hope to be like Anne with my gardens and community.

    Reply
  755. Audra Baerga on

    I love when she says, “My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.” This is my philosophy especially with gardening.

    A life long spent in learning and gardening is inspiring. Thank you for sharing your story.

    Reply
  756. Faith on

    I really loved the part about her beloved rose varieties being shared and preserved. I really wish I had taken cuttings from my grandmothers roses and other garden treasures before her home was sold after her passing. To keep a piece of history, something that was loved and cared for and help carry it into the future is truly an act of respect and love.

    Reply
  757. Kate on

    The list of what she determined you need to succeed was just what I needed. I love learning but I have put off for too long learning about passions I want to pursue vs learning what I need to earn an income… I want to bring both sides of that coin together. She is fascinating!

    “Determine what it is you want to do and then acquire any skills or knowledge that you are going to need, get the books, take the classes. I bought three books when I decided to build the house on Camano Island; how to frame a house, how to wire it, and how to do the plumbing. You need to study and become an apprentice. “

    Reply
  758. Sue Pettit on

    Her energy pops out on the page-inspirational, clear and determined. To want to start her own blog! At 96?97? How awesome. Living her life to the fullest and to continue to learn, share and push.. It is something we do not see very much any longer. This is what our younger generations need to be exposed to. Just lovely.

    Reply
  759. T on

    What an inspiring interview! I loved the motivating response to the question about starting her rose collection later in life. Her advice to keep moving, stay open and always learning is a good reminder to live each day and enjoy the roses along the way.

    Reply
  760. Stephanie Statnick on

    Water, food, sunshine and don’t be stingy! Will watch this episode again and again. Erin and Anne two inspiring women.

    Reply
  761. Glynda Crunk on

    Become an apprentice: Living, learning, loving is a life’s work. Appreciate the community and camaraderie of others as you travel together on this most precious of journeys, a joy full life.

    Reply
  762. Katy on

    So many things about Anne are inspiring! What a life she lived! And amazing how active and driven she was. Her advice to readers was spot on! I also identify with her story about her moms garden and falling in love with flowers later in life- that was the same for me! I couldn’t fathom why my mom loved her garden so much and now I love it too!

    Reply
  763. Rebecca on

    Here’s what caught my heartstrings and played them: own your “too muchness” and use it. For most of my career and adult life I’ve been told I’m “too much” and Anne, and y’all’s journey with roses is aligned with the expansion going on in my life of continuing to use it and have it serve me well..as well as serve others around me. Keep growing!!! It matters.

    Reply
  764. Karen C. Principio on

    What really caught my eye was Anne saying she started at the age of 60. I’m currently 63 so it resonated with me. I recently found one lone rose bush at the back of my property and was marveling at the beauty and scent of the flowers. My husband was out there with me at the time and he suggested that we plant more of them. Reading Anne’s story has given me hope that it’s not too late for me to start building a collection of roses.

    Reply
  765. Dolly Perry on

    My favorite part was when she talked about her trip back from New Zealand and what she learned. I had breast cancer and in my battle learned many of the same things.

    Reply
  766. Chrisdee on

    What inspires me most is that she did this later in her life. It’s awe inspiring to see!

    Reply
  767. Mary K Murphy on

    Roses have a special place in my heart. My grandmother grew roses in the harshest of conditions in Felton, MN. It is a prairie farm town near the Red River Valley. Winds and severe cold and a very short growing season were some of her challenges. In comparison, my challenges in suburban Minnetonka, are deer and bunnies. But I can use all the help I can get!

    Reply
  768. Kristin on

    It’s difficult for me to pick which part of Anne’s interview inspired me the most. Her perspective on life and her ability to see the positive in even the most difficult circumstances shine through her responses to the questions. I’ve felt so much pressure to have it all figured out at an early age and to find one career and stick with it, but Anne’s interview has reminded me that’s not true. Life can be much more fluid and forgiving than I’ve often believed, I just have to be willing to work for it. Thank you for sharing her interview with the world!

    Reply
  769. Kristine on

    I love how the pursuit of beauty urged her on. Amidst tragedy and war, she kept her eyes open to the beauty right next to her. I have a lot to learn from this. I wish I could also look back at my life and say as Anne did: ” It was a difficult time in the world, but the moments of beauty is what I remember.” (From her blog)

    Reply
  770. Amy Pilgrim on

    I loved it when Anne said that at 60 she felt she still was able to learn new skills. I’m a few years shy of 60, and realizing that 60 is still young, and I still have dreams to fulfill, and learning to do, and places to visit reinvigorates me! I’m looking forward to seeing what I can accomplish in the next 30+ years. I, too, believe in lifelong learning. As long as I’m breathing, I plan to keep learning, and doing, and experimenting. I started my first garden this year, and have 38 dahlias, umpteen zinnias, celosia, xeranthemum, amaranth, and anything else I can stick in the ground, as well as herbs, fruit trees, and vegetables. It has been so exciting to watch it all come up out of the ground and start growing.

    Reply
  771. Stephanie on

    I am putting this on a post-it to see each morning: “My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.” Absolutely loved this interview and this episode and so excited y’all have roses now!

    Reply
  772. Rachel Deem on

    What an amazing inspiring woman. I want to send her book of determination to all of my daughters. I have always loved the old roses myself. They create such a beautiful attraction in the garden and they are easy to care for. I would like to read some of her books to learn more about taking care of the roses I have in my garden. Her garden looks beautiful and I want to go and read her blogs. She reminds me of my Aunt Blanche who lived to 100. Full of energy and always on the move. I would like to learn more about rambler roses as well. I would like learn more on these types of varieties.

    Reply
  773. Ana on

    Anne is an inspiration. How she talks about strength as women are equal to men should serve as inspiration to all women. How she mentions that a person is never too old to follow their dreams is inspirational to all. I find this truly inspiring especially when it comes to agriculture and farming. Lastly, being a life long learner I’d love to learn about roses by receiving her lovely set of books.

    Reply
  774. Bethany on

    Anne’s advice how to follow your dreams was an inspiration to me. And I loved her encouragement to share your flowers with others- generously!

    Reply
  775. Briana on

    I appreciated that she mentioned that she used to try and escape the garden. That, coupled with all the career/life changes she took on over her life, reminds me that we all have different seasons of life. Our tastes, interests, goals, and mindsets can change and that’s not only alright, but incredible. I like the hope it brings that even though maybe there’s something that I’m not particularly good at or fond of right now, that doesn’t mean it’ll be that way in 10 years–or even tomorrow. I can just keep following my current path until I find another one to switch to! [And just like eventually Anne found a stage of life where she loved being in her own garden, maybe there’s a phase of life ahead where I actually am willing to keep up on my laundry?]

    Reply
  776. Mary Combs on

    I really think the most important jewel was Anne’s formula for greatly improving the chances of achieving any difficult goal. I found the three main parts to be enlightening.
    What an inspiration!

    Reply
  777. Christina Johnson on

    My favorite part of Anne’s story is how she has built a beautiful community that will keep growing along with her roses. As we all learn more about them and their unique and wonderful (almost lost) attributes we gain friendships with others as enamored by them. Those who want to share the beauty lost by breeding which has removed the amazing fragrance and lovely habit of rambling roses will have a connection unlike many others.

    Reply
  778. Rebecca Hudson on

    What a powerful and beautiful story. I took so much inspiration from both the story and episode. Thank you for sharing!

    Reply
  779. Erica VG on

    I’ve often dreamed of finding an old overgrown garden full of roses and other plants. To clear things back to find new or extinct specimens. Sounds like Erin has done just that 🌹

    Annes advice to never stop learning and you’re never up old to start something new! Such words of wisdom from experience, which is the best sort of education. Do what you love ❤️ keep moving, experiencing, learning and keep your relationships flourishing.

    Thank you Anne for sharing 💐

    Reply
  780. Pam Blinten on

    I absolutely love that she said that “It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams.” The fact that she pursued her dreams at 60 is amazing and so inspiring. I often wish that I had known my passions before I went to college so that I could’ve gotten an education in horticulture and ended up in a field I loved. It often feels like it’s too late to change paths because I’m so entrenched in the one I’ve taken. I read this interview when it first came out and it motivated me to pursue my dreams. Since then, I have taken the Floret Workshop and opened a farm stand. I’ll be selling cut flowers for the first time this year. We’re even buying a bigger property to have the space to expand. One day, this will be my full-time “job” — and I add the quotation marks because I don’t feel that it will ever be a job, but rather a combination of new daily experiences that will allow me to thrive.

    Reply
  781. Kim on

    Omgosh! I went through a box of Kleenex last night watching. What a stunningly intimate and gorgeous episode. THANK YOU so much for all of this. 💕💕💕

    Reply
  782. Jackie Holman on

    Her lust for life and determination to go after what interested her despite being a certain age or a certain gender resonated with me. We’re so focused on youth in our culture that we forget you don’t stop living and learning after you’ve earned some wrinkles. Hers was a life well lived all the way to the end and I find that inspiring.

    Reply
  783. Jillian Saikia on

    That new passions can be found later in life and learning never stops. It is possible to pursue new callings and those callings can open up a new way to love life. Absolutely beautiful!

    Reply
  784. Kari on

    I loved that she invited people into her gardens and invited people to be generous in sharing!

    Reply
  785. Jane on

    I am turning 65 this year and am so inspired by Anne’s advice to continue learning and taking on new challenges in the last third of our lives! I am planning on starting a farm, learning to keep, raise & milk goats. I want to be able to make my own cheese.

    Reply
  786. Jess on

    I love the idea of using roses as an excuse to have people over to your property, to bloom relationships. What a lovely thought.

    Reply
  787. Denine on

    The fact that she started all of this at 60 amazes me. The thought of not limiting yourself by gender I do most of my projects myself and sometimes it is daunting. This is beyond inspiring.

    Reply
  788. Winnie Black on

    It is never to late to create or share your dreams. Anne is an inspiration to me at 67. I have always been a gardener and aspire to be one at 100. Anne’s energy and drive is so catching. She lives on in her books and roses. Thank you for sharing.

    Reply
  789. Samantha Lipoma on

    I love the parts about sharing her roses and knowledge. How special it would be to have a flower legacy to honor your work and preservation efforts. Thank you for sharing this with the world.

    Reply
  790. Kim Carter on

    I love that she started at 60. Gardening can be so therapeutic and I would imagine it has been wonderful for her and still is.

    Reply
  791. Lauren on

    I’m so inspired by her vigor and dedication, even starting later in life. It helps me to feel that it’s never too late to start something!

    Reply
  792. Laura Davis on

    What a wonderful read…I am inspired by her drive..I recently turned 65 and ti see what she accomplished in her later years moves me. I’m looking forward to reading her books !

    Reply
  793. Maren on

    The bits of her life as a child, a young wife and the different roles she took on. Really inspiring.

    Reply
  794. Diane on

    I loved Anne’s advice to keep moving, stay out of bed , go out to lunch and visit with others, read and stay up to date with the news, be open to new ideas, and continue to learn and grow.

    Reply
  795. Suz P. on

    Two things really stood out to me. One: I never knew I could grow roses up a tree, which would give me so many more places to plant! Two: I love that she started her “career” in roses after the age of 60. I’m turning 40 next year and sometimes it feels old, but this really puts the experience of life into perspective. I have a lot of new things to learn and become!

    Reply
  796. Dana Goodson on

    I enjoyed this episode more than any other! Ever since I read your interview I’ve wanted to know more. I felt emotional so many times and feel drawn to help preserve some of the antique roses! Thank you. Thank you for making me feel like there is someone else out there with a heart like mine for the beautiful things.

    Reply
  797. Theresa Bolton on

    I think what inspired me most about her interview was that she didn’t let her age stop her from trying new things. I loved her recommendations for living a full life, especially being open to learning, staying in touch with friends and family and going out for lunch! Thank you for sharing this interview.

    Reply
  798. DeAnn on

    What a lovely way to develop friendships through the beauty of flowers. I also love her determination. If you want to learn something read and take classes. She would have been someone you would love to meet. So much knowledge, passion, and compassion. What an awesome lady.

    Reply
  799. Marsha Watkins on

    At 58 years old and in only my third season as a flower farmer, I was loving Anne’s attitude that life isn’t over once you are out of your thirties or forties. I friend commented I was jumping into too much when I added a new rose garden to my flower fields, I said “I love to learn new things. I don’t want to sit and stare out the window in my old age.” There IS a lot to learn and I hope to keep my brain cells working by learning all I can just as Anne did.

    Reply
  800. Nancy Norton on

    Ms. Belovich’s zeal for learning is inspiring. A single mother at 19, sailing a long treacherous trip, building houses. The erecting the walls with a wall jack! I love roses and I have noticed through the years those around me have enjoyed the ones I have planted and have grown to really love them also.

    Reply
  801. Karen O. on

    I will be 58 this year and it is so inspiring to see someone do so much later in life. I hope I can accomplish as much in my later years. I like the older roses as they are so much easier to take care of and seem much less finnicky. I am looking forward to adding some ramblers to my garden.

    Reply
  802. Chanda S on

    I love that she started ‘later’ than most. Showing it’s never too later to start something you love.

    Reply
  803. Brittney Aranda on

    What inspired me is Anne’s willingness and desire to share. Not just information, but the roses themselves to multiply them and give others the opportunity to observe, enjoy and share again with others!

    Reply
  804. Kylie Rahmlow on

    All the different things she accomplished in her life no matter her age. Absolutely inspiring.

    Reply
  805. Jeanne on

    I enjoyed the variations she had in her long life. She dove in head first to so many different things and seemed to really achieve a high level of success in all her endeavors. She proved that it is never too late to try something new, just roll up your sleeves and go for it!

    Reply
  806. Angie on

    You’re never to old to learn a new skill!

    Reply
  807. Whitney Steele on

    I think I may have the same comment as everyone else! The “big biceps” excerpt from her book is fantastic, but I love the part afterwards: “Look carefully for the same prejudice in yourself. It could be lurking there without you realizing it and could cause you to not believe in yourself.” Sometimes I think as if everyone else is in my way, when really my biggest obstacle is probably myself. This was a good reminder to root out those prejudices in my own mind so that out prejudices won’t affect me.

    Reply
  808. Hallie on

    I was just thinking not to long ago that 42 was too late to start over but this just showed me it’s never too late to do what you want.

    Reply
  809. Carolyn M. on

    What inspired me most about Anne’s interview was her sheer determination to learn and accomplish. I loved the quote “unless it requires big biceps and a beard…” because it IS true. Women can do most anything with learning and effort, if we’re also willing to put in the time and overcome prejudices. Her story pushes me further on to accomplish my own goal of finishing my education, which I’m doing now and should be done by Spring, God willing. I also am coming later in life to a love of rosses. Here on the East Coast “beach roses” were all over the beaches during my childhood. I hope to grow some Rosa Rugosa in my own yard soon. Thank you, Floret family for inspiring us all. You guys blow me away.

    Reply
  810. Amy Wilson on

    I love that she didn’t start growing roses until she was 60! It’s never to late to pursue something that interest you!! She was so inspiring.

    Reply
  811. April Schluender on

    What an inspiration!!! I love where she says “ You can meet and exceed your goals if you prepare yourself over time. You can’t become a rocket scientist without a great deal of study, and neither can anyone else”. Her life is such an example of what’s possible when you put your mind to it!! Thank you Anne❤️

    Reply
  812. Nikki Mccomsey on

    That she inspires others to pursue their big dreams at any age. It’s so true, life is short.

    Reply
  813. Becky Culbertson on

    As a 65 year old woman, I love that she said you’re never too old to pursue your dreams, and how many things she did after the age of 60! That is so encouraging to me!

    Reply
  814. Chelsea Beutler on

    I love, love, love this comment from her:

    “First, don’t let being a woman stop you from doing what is traditionally seen as a man’s job unless you really need a constant supply of testosterone to achieve your goal. Ask yourself if the activity requires big biceps and a beard. If not, go ahead with your dreams and fight the prejudice where you find it. Look carefully for the same prejudice in yourself. It could be lurking there without you realizing it and could cause you to not believe in yourself and to restrict you from following a difficult goal.”

    As a female entrepreneur in this space, and a mother of 4 boys and 2 daughters trying to raise a family while starting out, I find myself constantly fighting these pre-defined roles of what’s a male responsibility vs a female one. I love the inspiration here to not feel limited- to believe in your own capabilities, and continue to follow your dreams regardless! I also have children who are watching and learning from me and I hope they pick a little if this up.

    Reply
  815. Katherine Sumbler on

    Anne’s story hit home for me. Bootstrapping life and teaching herself how to do “man work” while still maintaining those feminine passions like raising roses. I own a construction company and do “man work” every day. I love coming home to the calm beauty of my garden and unwinding after a long day. I would be filled with gratitude having Anne’s Roses accompany me in my evening strolls through the garden.

    Reply
  816. Alandra Kahl on

    Great advice all around. My favorite part was her spirit of preservation. Thanks for sharing.

    Reply
  817. Becky on

    Sharing is the most important

    Reply
  818. Julie Gosen on

    Anne’s story is motivating to me because she is proof POSITIVE that you are never too old to start something new. And as someone who has rescued a sweet little dog, her heart for these animals also speaker to me. I always say my little dog rescued me. I wonder if Anne might say the same.

    Reply
  819. Jolene on

    It’s never too late to find your multiple callings in life! Thank you for sharing her story and making her known.

    Reply
  820. Alandra Kahl on

    Great advice all around. My favorite part was her spirit of preservation.

    Reply
  821. Carly on

    Very inspiring to keep trying things that you’re interested in and never stop learning

    Reply
  822. Amy Balsbaugh on

    I loved seeing the photos of her flowers and her life. What an amazing woman!

    Reply
  823. Catherina Gailey on

    I love Anne’s advice on finding one’s own path. It is true that sometimes w e underestimate our abilities.

    What beauty words!

    Reply
  824. Natalie A. on

    Such an inspirational interview. There are many aspects that inspire me personally, but the one that gives me the most hope is that she began her rose journey at the age of 60. For her to have started her journey at the age that so many other people are retiring, and to have created and achieved so much in the next 37 years with it, is wonderful. All of her many passions, and her success in each, is amazing.

    Reply
  825. Catherine Bloomwood on

    I enjoyed the mutual love between Erin and Anne. You could feel the caring and respect for each other.

    Reply
  826. Cassandra Atwood on

    What a beautiful interview! I think what inspired be most was the notion of preserving the beauty of roses for future generations. Being able to leave a legacy with flowers is pretty special.

    Reply
  827. Kristin on

    I loved reading Anne’s advice to not accept gender prejudice from others, and to be on the lookout for gender prejudice within ourselves. So true! What a lovely interview to read, thank you for sharing 💗

    Reply
  828. Nena C Williams on

    I am inspired by the entire interview! Her advice on making career choices in line with your interests is very wise indeed! I wish she was still with us! She was one of those unsung heroes we hear about and come to appreciate, especially for her work in preserving the rare rambling roses of yesteryear….

    Reply
  829. Ashly on

    So inspiring to try new things at any age!

    Reply
  830. Vicki Kommes on

    Beautiful interview with a beautiful person. I love how she spoke about it being never too late to pursue your dreams. A true inspiration for me as a 71 year old youngster who never stops dreaming about a secret garden with roses galore!

    Reply
  831. Erin on

    I found it so interesting that Anne’s favorite rose was a David Austin with a very low petal count! I really enjoyed this interview and pledge to do my part when it comes to helping out in gardens and sharing my roses.

    Reply
  832. Samantha on

    Her generosity and her deep desire to share her treasures that took such dedication and work is very moving.

    Reply
  833. Amanda Eastvold on

    I was struck by how the loss of her first husband changed the trajectory of her life. I find many gardeners I talk to have stories of loss. Gardening is a way of creating joy again—as Anne has done her whole life by sharing what is dear to her.

    Reply
  834. Chris G. on

    The idea that it’s not too late in life to set goals and accomplish them really resonated with me.

    Reply
  835. Shelly Pope on

    What an inspiration! Her legacy will live on will live on through generations! I love how she carried out her dreams, that takes such courage!

    Reply
  836. Melissa on

    I was also most inspired by what Anne said about aging “I pursued many dreams after turning 60”. I, too will be turning 65 this year and although I don’t feel my age, I thought it was too late to move to the country and start a destination farm and B&B/wedding venue which has been something I long dreamed of. This really caused a shift in my thinking and hopefully once the real estate market calms down-something I will pursue. What a great role model!

    Reply
  837. Liz Elms on

    I love it that she reminds us that ‘later’ in life is not really late ♥️ It sometimes feels as though if you do not find your passion early in your life, there is no point to try anything. But this is so foolish. She proves that at 60, she could still find and pursue a passion for a very long time. There is no rush. I do not need to feel as though I have already missed my opportunity. Thank you.

    Reply
  838. Shelby Musgraves on

    The entire interview is inspirational! But, while I wouldn’t call myself “old”, I find the most inspiring part to be that she didn’t let her age keep her from starting a new goal, a new dream. I often feel like I’ve wasted half my life why start now… but she looks at it differently. I have half a lifetime left! Such a small but impactful change of perspective. One I feel I will hold on to for some time. And now I can’t wait to add roses to the dream.

    Reply
  839. Sabrena Orr on

    What a charming and lovely lady. Documenting her life is a treasure! Thank you for sharing her inspiring story.

    Reply
  840. Jill Reed on

    I was inspired by her generosity and the sharing of her knowledge, garden and love of beauty.

    Reply
  841. Sarah on

    I love most her attitude that women are just as able-bodied and minded to achieve our dreams as anyone – it’s the determination that determines how far we will go! Thank you both for leading the way as pioneering women!

    Reply
  842. Lauren Torkildsen on

    I just love and feel empowered every time she says she could do anything a man could do. I often feel frustrated that I am not strong enough or don’t know enough about tools and machines to get the job done but I have to remind myself of Anne and just go for it.

    Reply
  843. Terri rogers on

    Her spirit of generosity and that life is meant to be shared. What an amazing person!

    Reply
  844. Jane Glick on

    Anne is an inspiration to us all, to spread the beauty that lies in our garden passed down from generations. Her will to live and live well and long being active and caring out your dreams until the end!

    Reply
  845. Jennifer on

    I treasure reading about the many bends and twists of a gardener’s life. Gardening is such an apt metaphor for life and Anne’s life was an enchanted garden. The continued giving of self and pursuing her passions despite difficulties,
    are what I admire. I would love to see and read more about how that plays out with roses, thorns, and pruning shears.

    Reply
  846. Linda Boyer on

    I have a very large rose garden but it is nothing compared to hers. I think she inspired me most when she said she began to follow her dreams at 60! I am 60 ish LOL and have dreams that I have felt were too late to follow. But seeing all she accomplished after 60 and seeing her amazing roses have brought me hope that there is still time to follow dreams.

    Reply
  847. Bri on

    I loved the idea of her husband Max delivering her roses. Being able to share with others is my favorite part of gardening. Meeting someone like Anne is so rare these days and her story is so inspiring. Thank you for sharing and opening these doors!

    Reply
  848. Mylène on

    What stood out the most for me, from this interview and from what I saw on Growing Floret S.2, was Anne’s incredible focus and determination. From building her own house to pursuing her passion for roses so “late” in her life; she didn’t late age or time keep her from accomplishing anything. I’m in my late thirties with a small and young flower business and was starting to feel pressed for time lately. Hearing and reading her story really uplifted my spirits and helped me tune in to why I started working with plants in the first place: for the love and joy of spending time in nature, for learning, and for sharing beauty with others. And it reminded me that perhaps my best years are ahead of me… :)

    Reply
  849. Lori McCormack on

    I love the later in life encouragement and also the bit about sharing and generosity.

    Reply
  850. Nicole Dunkel on

    I love her fortitude as a woman and ‘doer’. My Mother-in-law, Diane, was much this way. They keep going. This likely contributed to her living a long life of purpose, and the legacy of her roses will go on and on. She was a ‘contributor’, not a spectator (with her work with animals as well). I also liked that at age 60 she began her path of growing roses… of which she was introduced in her very life. A community ‘rose’ from this…through her generosity, a gift she gave to many it seems. Thank you for sharing this.

    Reply
  851. Tammy Ringeisen on

    Such a beautiful interview with Anne. I was struck by her passion not only for roses but everything in her life. Age was truly just a number to her and didn’t stop her to live her life to the fullest. I admire her love for roses and it has has reinvigorated me and brought me back to my own love affair with roses. What a remarkable women! Thank you!

    Reply
  852. Jen on

    Wow!! What an amazing woman. I loved reading about her various passions (a lot align with my own). Its so wonderful when people share their knowledge and expertise with the world like she did. It makes the world a richer and brighter place for all. Thank you so much for sharing your interview with her. I feel inspired.

    Reply
  853. Jace on

    Anne put her mind to what she wanted to do and didn’t let time be a factor of not following her heart. That in itself, is a huge lesson to all of us; to not let time dictate what we can and cannot do. Anne’s more than inspiration, she’s a role model.

    Reply
  854. Elyna Kim on

    I am blown away by all of the amazing things that Anne was able to experience and accomplish in her life. I love that she never let her age or gender keep her from challenging herself and learning new things. Her passion and drive are truly inspirational so thank you for sharing her story! Also couldn’t have come at a better time as I planted my first shrub rose this year :)

    Reply
  855. Lea Kelly on

    Thank you for sharing these words with us. This quote is so stirring to me from Anne: ” … inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy.” It causes me to imagine who might be encouraged as I share my little garden with them.

    Reply
  856. Ari G on

    Wow, Erin… this project is like kisses from angels. In the past year or so I have also developed this profound relationship with roses. It started with a picture of a 50 year old climbing rose that my great grandmother pruned into an arch over their doorway in Albuquerque, NM. My great grandmother was a Jew and Black and also from Europe. She had been taught about roses from our European Jewish ancestors.
    I’ve been studying their medicinal qualities and finding so much inspiration from herbalists of the long old, Avicenna and Trota de Salerno to name a couple with fascinating writings on Rose. I make skincare, and am wanting to explore the diversity of colors compounds in Roses to create different shades of makeup. The idea was born from my identity issues around being multi-racial and how I used to use makeup to hide my diversity.
    Sorry if thats info-dumping, I’m autistic, which brings me back to Anne. I resonate a lot with Erin and Anne and their too-much-ness. I too feel like there was something I was clearly born with and has lead me to collecting, categorizing, and finding solutions to hard problems. Anne didn’t start until her 60s but still did it for a third of her life. She let life guide her to this path, and I am similarly drawn as if these flowers are way to get know myself more.

    Reply
  857. Emily on

    Such an inspiration! I admire her giving spirit! Her passion for roses was so strong, she wanted everyone to love them like she did. Sharing knowledge, or sharing plants, she made the world a better place!

    Reply
  858. Carol Carter on

    What I appreciated most about Anne’s interview was her positivity and that she did not start her life with roses until she was 60. I am about to turn 65 in a few months so it gives me hope that I am able to start my own journey with roses.

    Reply
  859. Jennifer on

    The idea of preserving all those beautiful roses so that others can also enjoy them – Anne is a real inspiration. We are losing so many things in this world, the curators are my heroes.

    Reply
  860. Sarah B. on

    Anne truly lived the principle “that by small and simple things, great things are brought to pass.” I was inspired by her desire to learn to cultivate roses later in life. I felt that she didn’t want her success to be an anomaly, but rather wanted to inspire others to make that the norm to follow your dreams (at any stage in life) and find your success.

    As a young girl I read a retelling of Beauty and the Beast that surprisingly shared tips on growing roses. Simultaneously, I found a dying climbing rose bush beneath a tumble of weeds. Using that book as my guide, I cleared the weeds, built a trellis with my mom, and nursed it back to health. Those first blooms brought me so much joy!

    You’re never to old or young to find your passion.

    Reply
  861. Inge Houghton on

    Her simple advice for a fulfilling life struck me as most inspirational: “keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.”
    A good recipe toward a life well lived. Great words of advice from a woman who’s done just that!

    Reply
  862. Elisabeth on

    Ah, this was so beautiful! I appreciate her generous spirit. I was moved by her intentional direction to share your garden, to invite people in to also enjoy it. Thank you for introducing us to Anne!

    Reply
  863. Julie Ann on

    Many of her dreams were accomplished after age of 60. This inspired me to continue (and not think my dream was foolish) my work of turning our 3 acres of desolate dessert valley land into lush place for respite for our community. After 7 years of plugging away at my dream (there have been set backs) perhaps I too may live a long life like her and see my planting dreams come true.

    Reply
  864. Kate on

    Very inspired by her generous spirit, her determination to pursue all goals and continue learning and growing throughout life, and her willingness to continue to reinvent herself through pursuing passions!

    Reply
  865. k on

    Wow, what an inspiring woman! I loved her approach to life. This quote, in particular, stuck out to me – “You can meet and exceed your goals if you prepare yourself over time.” Thank you, as always, for the generous giveaway!

    Reply
  866. Kimberly on

    Where to begin? I love a rambling rose. The interview with Anne and all the rose posts took me back to my childhood. I used to see climbing roses all over barns, houses, and old building. Now, it seems they have been torn down along with the roses that Anne fought to save. How amazing to read about her path and passion. What is even more amazing is that people like you are working to preserve her legacy. Thank you for honoring the past and those who fought to save our living history in floral and fauna.

    Reply
  867. Mikelle on

    I have found a love for unique roses and have been wanting to learn to grow Bergen. I would love the help of this library and to carry a piece if Anne here with me!

    Reply
  868. Felicia Blair on

    I was most inspired most by two things she said( the whole interview was amazing), it’s never too late to accomplish your dreams, to stay in your dreams as you age. This I such a powerful message. I am 61 and am embarking on building a new business.
    The seas you don’t have to be a man or have a big strong man around to accomplish physical feats of strength. She built a wall on her own!!!! What a conversation you had with her. She is an inspiration, thank you for sharing.
    PS, roses are my favorites!!!

    Reply
  869. Jordan on

    I love that she has shared so many of her roses as well as her knowledge through the books she’s written. What a legacy!

    Reply
  870. Diane Guillebeau on

    I watched in awe of Anne Belovich and her spirit. I’m saddened to think some of her roses could be lost forever. What an amazing person she was and I was moved to tears hearing her speak.

    Reply
  871. Tenille on

    The challenge to follow your dreams. I get intimidated but I love how she did so many things in the time she had.

    Reply
  872. Elizabeth Betlejewski on

    I love ramblers and climbing roses, and I would love to incorporate more into my garden. It’s wonderful that her collection will be preserved.

    Reply
  873. Laura Kendrick on

    What inspires me most about Anne is that her greatest achievement didn’t start until her 60s. Where most people are preparing to slow down she was ramping up. Maybe she holds the true secrete of how to achieve a healthy long life? Strive to continue to hit goals and fulfill yourself with knowledge and beauty at all stages of life. It’s so inspiring to me as someone just begging her flower journey, as I look to transition out of being a manager in healthcare to a life of true beauty. Often society makes us feel we have to have it all figured out and accomplish by our mid 30s, but in reality if we keep the mindset that all stages of life are open for great success, beauty and giving back to the world around us the success can be endless. Truly amazing.

    Reply
  874. Lisa on

    One of my many favorite parts of Anne’s interview was that she began this journey after she turned 60 and continued to have a full career through her beautiful life with roses! As I am now 62, she is a wonderful and encouraging example of how to find a special joy in aging and staying curious and engaged in your later years. I would love learning more about her passion for roses in her library of books. Thank you.

    Reply
  875. Becky J on

    I am touched by her love of not only roses, but the people she’s come to know through them. It was inspiring for me to see her passion spread throughout her yard, from the paths and under archways where the roses climb to off the page. Thank you for sharing. If I have half the green thumb and life she has had, I will be happy.

    Reply
  876. Lindsey on

    My whole life I have spent not knowing what it is I’m meant to do or even what I want to do with my time here. I’ve always thought of myself as someone who could do, be, achieve anything, and that I could do those things on my own. I just haven’t known where to start. I feel so passionately about so many things, but feeling like I can only choose one has made it difficult to commit to something wholeheartedly.

    What really touched me about Anne’s life is she didn’t let anything hold her back, not the death of her husband, not being a young mother, not even THE fence her mother put up. She knew what she wanted and she went after it with the passion and ferocity that I can only hope to possess. This inspires me to stop living to work and start working to live and do those things I’m passionate about regardless of the obstacles that stand in my way, including clearing out the weeds and old plants from my garden and investing time in putting beauty back into this world.

    Thank you for sharing this!

    Reply
  877. Amy Hardin on

    Her quote: “My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.”

    This is exact topic my husband and I have talked about as we watch our parents and their friends age. Those that are the healthiest follow this advice… and it is something that we want to follow too for our physical and mental health.

    Also, I tend to have new favorites (read: obsessions) every few years. Its been dahlias, zinnias, hostas, and daylilies. My while still obsesses with these, my latest obsessions seem to be moving towards irises… and after reading these articles, I may be propagating some roses! Roses are a bit difficult in my area as the Japanese beetles love them as a tasty meal. However, I’d like to try propagating the roses on my grandparents’ farms. What was your overall success rate with your propagating of Anne’s roses?

    Reply
  878. Aubrey Costello on

    I am inspired by her entire life story, a true modern Renaissance woman! So many different adventures and career paths; from building homes to creating a beautiful rose collection. Thank you for bringing her life story and old roses back into our lives; a true inspiration and now something new to start collecting in the garden!

    Reply
  879. Lynn Colcernian on

    I wish I could fill her shoes and continue to keep all old world plants part of our planet, not just roses. It is from them we learn what a wonderful place own backyard can be. She was truly a courageous person with a determination to continue down the path of life long learning , she was a “rambling rose”. It seems that through her passing she was able to share even more of her beloved roses. Thank you Erin for continuing her legacy and now yours, and many others who will continue it,

    Reply
  880. Jessica Defaymoreau on

    Anne!! You are a queen! This was just the sweetest interview to read. Love her passion and determination for all things roses. Her generosity is what keeps this roses alive like old stories being passed down. Anne you are a legend!

    Reply
  881. Emily on

    I am inspired that it’s never to late to start and that she stayed so active into her late 90’s.

    Reply
  882. Sarah Crow on

    She is an inspiration! The beautiful pics and her inspiring story are what inspired me the most.

    Reply
  883. Shannon Parker on

    I’ve just started on my rose collection and would
    LOVE to learn more from Anne and her beautiful books! They would also serve as an inspiration as I’m learning watercolor right now.

    Reply
  884. Anne on

    I love how Anne says don’t be stingy! Her generous spirit, sharing her knowledge ,cuttings & plants with others .
    Such an inspiration

    Reply
  885. Jane Glick on

    I love roses and the more fragrant the more I love them. I have inherited a rose from my great-grandfather in England and of all the clippings started here in the US mine is the one to survive. Now I am dividing and sharing my rambling rose with friends and family to keep it alive for generations to come. I loved the first episode of season 2 and excited to watch more. What a wonderful inheritance! I would love to bring this legacy to the east coast and fill gardens everywhere with the beauty of roses.

    Reply
  886. Eden on

    Everything!!!! She made me believe at almost 60 (which is scary to say & think)🙁 I am capable of still starting a new chapter in my life. I’ve started a flower garden & was afraid it would be too much since I am also a full time caregiver for mother who is 91, but with Anne’s enthusiasm & encouragement I’m realizing not only is it possible but it will make both our lives more joyful. What an inspiration Anne’s life has been & still is. Thank you for sharing it.

    Reply
  887. Lora B. on

    Ah…..roses….brings me back to my Grandma Pearl & Grandpa Heston’s gardens. She had a simple, five petal pink rose bush that smelled light & divine & he went ditch digging on country roads to find the wild Iowa yellow rose. It climbed up the side of his workshop. We now have a 3 acres place where I’ve love to have these. Thank you for sharing all that you know!

    Reply
  888. Whitney Lawrence on

    She sounds like a wonderful woman and a hard worker. I like hearing about other woman who aren’t afraid to do hard things or things a man would do. But she also continued to do new things late in life.

    Reply
  889. Jes Labrecque on

    Anne is an incredible force to be reckoned with. Her entire life is an inspiration. But what really inspired me was talking about the legacy , what do you do -to have your work live on. Her little facts of sharing with others and not keeping things to yourself- that is something I’ll be taking with me. Share knowledge , share love of things, give from your garden. Don’t be stingy.

    Reply
  890. Virginia Selzer on

    Wow! What a wise and beautiful woman. With so many of us beginning anew in our sixties, Anne’s story inspires, encourages and holds our hands as we fearlessly journey into the next phase of our lives. Thank you for sharing her with us.

    Reply
  891. Makayla on

    There is so much great advice Anne has given us new and old gardeners! The 1st is “It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams.” , which sometimes we are our own biggest critic and can hold ourselves back! The next is something I tell myself often, “My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.” I remember a time at the grocery store, and chatting it up with a 92 year old woman, who gave me this exact advice! Thank you for introducing us all to so many great and inspiring people! Sincerely, Makayla

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  892. Jennifer Wingard Hershey on

    “Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy. ”
    I like the concept of sharing plants. I love to do this with my friends and encourage them to have beautiful and productive gardens.

    Reply
  893. Nina on

    I’m most inspired by the idea that being a woman means you can do anything, even that which is typically considered a man’s job.

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  894. Colleen Driedger on

    It’s never to late to start something new. Due to chronic health issues I feel I’ve missed many good years of my life and I’ve been unable to dream big dreams but she reminded me that anytime is a good time to begin new adventures.

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  895. Mariah Henry on

    I was deeply inspired by her perspective on age and passion. As a young beginner flower farmer I felt I was late to the scene. She started 30 yrs and as she mentioned many don’t last that long in a career! It’s very humbly and inspiring to witness this passionate lover affair and outstanding relationship between time , beauty, age, and self- acceptance. God bless ❤️

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  896. Judy HOlland on

    I loved all of the articles. I have a love for roses, but I’ve always been afraid of not being able to take care of them right. My first love of roses occurred when I lived overseas, and I went to a Rosegarden in Germany, I thought it was the most magnificent thing I’ve ever seen, now I have two David Austin roses, Portlandia and Jude the obscure, I have a rose, called ebbtide, a white knockout rose that smells heavenly, and a couple drift roses native to my area. I would love to have more roses around my property, and Aunt inspired me because I am now over 60, but if she can do it, I can do it.

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  897. Deborah Helms on

    As a 54 year old mother of seven children ranging in age from 7-32 years, I have often contemplated what’s next. I found your interview with Anne beautiful and extremely inspiring. The most inspiring part of the interview to me was the part where Anne says that she “pursued many dreams after turning 60, including starting my own contracting company and building over 25 (mostly Victorian style) houses, traveling the world, and my study of the older roses. It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams.”

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  898. Melissa Gardner on

    I fell in love with roses a couple years ago and have been collecting them since. Her journey has inspired me to look for what makes me happy!

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  899. Ellette on

    What a gift you were given Erin in having Anne as a friend and mentor! Loved reading this interview, her words were so inspiring to me as a woman in her 60’s. It’s never too late to start learning something new!

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  900. Heike Carlson on

    I am amazed that she started with her roses when she was 60. I will be 60 in a few months and it is great to see that she was a force at that age!

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  901. Laurie Stoker on

    You can meet and exceed your goals if you prepare yourself over time. You can’t become a rocket scientist without a great deal of study, and neither can anyone else.

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  902. Lauren Smurr on

    Anne’s story inspired me to start growing roses for the first time! It also gave me the confidence to attempt to propagate an old rose from my late grandmother’s home in my own garden :)

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  903. Whitney Brown on

    So much of her life is inspiring. At 35 I often feel like I’ll never get this professional grower thing going, but its nice to be reminded with a name and a face that I need to stop feeling sorry for myself and just do it. I love how she was making ways for herself to accomplish whatever goal it was. Like when she made a jack for the walls! That made me chuckle. That’s hard laborious work. But she used the work smarter not harder method. Just an overall cool lady.

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  904. Brenda Gagne on

    Such a strong and beautiful spirit! Very inspiring. I dream of building a rose garden like that, through the years. To be a collector, and share, there is healing in that space. A lovely way to connect with our inner-selves and others.
    I have not visited the ARS in Shreveport yet, but look forward one day to seeing some of her roses growing there.

    Reply
  905. Barbara Galiunas on

    I love rambling roses and have about ten of them that climb up trees and fences in spectacular right angle turns. It was wonderful to read how much she also lived their glorious displays of colorful blooms

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  906. Stephanie Harper on

    We purchased our forever home with land about a year ago. We remodeled the entire house ourselves and now I have started on the vision I have for the outside space. I have a half acre that I see becoming my own garden oasis. What inspired me most is that Anne started in her 60s. I have had thoughts of this might be more than I should take on but after watching season 2 of Growing Floret and more so the episode on Anne and her roses. I know this is exactly what I want to do. I have planted sunflowers, zinnia, bachelor buttons, and of course dahlias. At our old house I had roses but did not think to propagate them to move them with us but now so wish I would have. Hopefully whomever lives there now finds joy in them as I did. Now to bring roses to our new home.

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  907. Susan F. on

    When Anne stated that looking back from age 97 that she thought that 60 “was old,” I felt very inspired to continue trying new things and exploring all that life has to offer.

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  908. Kayla on

    I’m inspired that she didnt start until she was 60. At 41 I feel like I’m just chasing dreams 10yrs too late to make it work. I need to get over that mind set and turn this place into what I want to.

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  909. Jackie on

    “…you should try to know yourself, your talents, and limitations, but be careful to not underestimate what you are capable of doing”. So much wisdom and encouragement in her words. Sadly, at 62 years of age, I often believe the lie that it is too late to begin a journey that would rob me of discovering/embracing a new passion.

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  910. Sarah on

    I thought it was inspiring how she discussed developing new passions as life goes on!

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  911. Maggie on

    The idea that she attributes the success/catalyst of becoming a rose gardener to the loss of her husband in WWII is so interesting. What was a tragedy she looks back on as a brilliant turning point in her life. It just makes you think, sometimes that horrible thing you experience is making changes that you will come to appreciate one day. Hard to know that in the moment, but a touching sentiment nonetheless.

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  912. Melanie on

    The value of lessons learned over Anne’s lifetime are immeasurable and rare. I think what inspired me most was her speaking of her personal history and how she chose to rise in the face of tragedy, through the use of self teaching. Constantly finding ways to learn and persevere in spite of what challenges she faced is something I can relate to and learn from myself. It’s so inspiring to hear that it’s not too late to change your mind and try something new, and that there’s always a path around an obstacle if you persist and seek knowledge.

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  913. Stephanie on

    Her determination to not only bring more beauty into the world, but truly show that women can do absolutely anything, no matter the situation or age, is truly inspiring.

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  914. Sandy Mitsch on

    “To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy.” To me, this quote from the interview says it all. It’s her love for roses and not just their beauty, but how they touch our lives and bring love into the world that is so moving. That is her legacy.

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  915. Erin Rhyne on

    What an inspiration!
    I think her advice on getting out and visiting friends, continuing to learn and grow is beautiful. It resonates with me.

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  916. Hillary O on

    I love how she inspires me to keep learning, growing, trying no matter my stage of life.

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  917. Sheri Bruun on

    Thank you for sharing this incredible woman with us! Not everyone gets to meet such a force. Thanks for this.

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  918. Cathy Branly on

    I was most impressed by what she said about following new dreams no matter how old you are. I started my garden 6 years ago and am still learning about all aspects of gardening. I love being outside, even if I am only weeding! At 64, I regret not having learned to play the piano; it is time to turn that regret into a new goal.

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  919. Brooke on

    Anne was truly inspiring! Her take on life has given me a new perspective. I am only 29 years old and I feel like I’m starting things late in life for my age, but that’s just it, it’s my perspective. She made me realize that it’s never too late to start something you truly care about or enjoy.

    I’m a flower enthusiast, and one day hope to really start my own flower garden and admire in the beauty. But currently I’m military and move every 3-4 years. Every house I’ve been at. I’ve planted a rose bush, and cant wait to finally have my final homestead to have so many different varieties and colors.

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  920. Vanessa N on

    It’s so inspiring to hear that she didn’t get into roses until the age of 60, but then was able to spend over 3 decades of her life becoming an expert. She is a shining example of how important it is to always keep learning!

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  921. Kali Sbalbi on

    “Ask yourself if the activity requires big biceps and a beard. If not, go ahead with your dreams and fight the prejudice where you find it.”

    These words made me weepy. I think I, along with many other women, have subconscious sexism against myself. I hold back from trying so many things and experiencing so much life because I believe I don’t have it in myself, but wouldn’t hesitate at the thought of any man doing the same task.

    She simplified the solution so well — ask yourself if the activity requires big biceps and a beard. I will carry that with me.

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  922. Mads Merritt on

    I gotta say, I didn’t think I was gonna end up tearing up. But she was so sincere when mentioning that the ability to share those cuttings and forming those friendships was the greatest legacy. I e noticed that among those who have lived long, the connections are often the greatest gifts they treasure, and it is usually a by-product of their material passion.

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  923. Tim Yokules on

    As a history teacher, I appreciate the quest to learn from and preserve the past, and what Anne has done to keep the legacy of the ramblers alive is remarkable. We are beginning our rambler journey and this article and the first episode of Season 2 have provided a great overview of their beauty!

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  924. Cynthia Willey on

    One of the great things about Anne is her generosity with her roses. Sharing her knowledge and her beautiful roses with others is a great gift. Anyone who has her roses will carry her memory. Thanks Anne the worlds rose angel.

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  925. BekahL on

    Very inspired by her boat trip and that it’s never too late to try your hand at something new.

    Reply
  926. Sherry Wankowski on

    “Don’t be stingy. To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy.” I love this! She is 100% correct. I’ve met so many wonderful people through gardening and sharing what I have. Having a beautiful positive legacy is something she will leave behind someday. I hope I can too.

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  927. Heather on

    I love when she said that we can meet and exceed our goals if we prepare ourself over time. It takes hard work and consistent work, but we can get there 💜

    Reply
  928. Rocio Jimenes on

    “It is never too late to act on your goals and dreams.” “You can’t become a rocket scientist without a great deal of study, and neither can anyone else.” I’m at my 40s and I feel old to start my business, but after I saw her and reading the interview I felt motivated to keep going.

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  929. Amy C on

    This woman sailed alone, built her own house, and she continued to challenge herself with new technology like the website and blogging. She was tough as nails and I hope to be half the woman she was someday

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  930. Emily Hayes on

    My favorite part of the interview with Anne is when she says it’s never too late to start doing what you wanna do. She says her love of roses started when she was 60 which at the time she thought was old, but at the time of the interview that was 37 years ago, I just love the idea of going out of your way to pursue what you love no matter the age

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  931. Nancy Yorke on

    I enjoyed her comment about starting later to enjoy the roses and that she built the supports. We’re never too old to keep learning.

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  932. Lori Larue on

    I sat down with a cup of coffee in hand this morning and a link to this blog. I am seriously supposed to pin point what I find most inspiring? Hmm…not sure I can do it. Thank you so much for this interview. It’s going to be shared among my friends for it’s awe-inspring content. Ann was beautiful, inside and out. Look at that lovely woman. First, she brought up volunteering. Kudos to her! I volunteer on a board and for an organization that takes care of the elderly in my town (think Meals-on-Wheels, etc). We have people who have volunteered for 25-30 years for our organization. We would not be successful without them. Kudos to her for mentioning that, and kudos to her for saving fur-lives who couldn’t defend themselves! Who wouldn’t be inspired by “First, don’t let being a woman stop you from doing what is traditionally seen as a man’s job unless you really need a constant supply of testosterone to achieve your goal. Ask yourself if the activity requires big biceps and a beard.?” “Ask yourself if the activity requires big biceps and a beard! My god I love this woman! :-) She supported local businesses! My family has a local business. Farming. We grow vegetiables. We’ve been in business since my grandfather purchased the farm in Vermont in 1917! We would not be successful if it wasn’t for the locals supporting us! Who isn’t inspired by her starting something new at 60! Hello, how many people do we know that start throwing in the towel at 60? I love that she loves rambling roses and that she went to all lengths to find them and how she shared them with people. Ultimately, she found a beautiful way to connect with people. Anyway, perhaps the most inspiring part of the interview is the sum of her total makes for one awe- inspiring Ann, one that I won’t forget about. What a beautiful soul she was. Thank you for taking the time to interview her. Give-away winner, or not, I’m already a winner for having read this fine interview this AM. Thank you, Erin. How fortunate you crossed paths with her. Thanks for continuing to support her work. Sincerely, Lori

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  933. Elizabeth Powers on

    As I was watching Anne during the first episode of season 2, I was in awe of this gem of a woman that perhaps the world would never had known if it weren’t for you Erin. Her collection of rambling roses was impressive but her legacy was what really struck me in awe. I think the entire interview was a gift to humanity. Because it reminds us all that something such as gardening is worthy. We need more Annes in our world.

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  934. Jessica Luther on

    “ Ask yourself if the activity requires big biceps and a beard. If not, go ahead with your dreams and fight the prejudice where you find it. Look carefully for the same prejudice in yourself”. Her ability to break gender norms is inspiring! This is one of the lessons I strive to teach my children, including my son.

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  935. Angie Hossler on

    Anne’s determination showed me how independence is a strength. Understanding ourselves is important and we shouldn’t feel bad for wanting to understand who we are or take the time to figure out who we are. Her story is so inspiring, I want to do more of what I love verses what others think I love. This store is so fulfilling and rewarding. Thank you for sharing Anne’s story! I wish I could have met her to spend some time learning from her. What a wonderful women she must have been to sit and chat with.

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  936. Suzanne Agan on

    I was so inspired by how she began pursuing some of her dreams after turning 60. I just started some of mine at the age of 50 and that hit especially close to home :). – Suzanne

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  937. Nicole Swick on

    Of course, I love Anne’s sense of independence, but I especially love her thought on sharing: “To inspire and introduce people to the beauty of old roses and sending cuttings of roses into their home gardens, is an act of love … of friendship. This is the greatest legacy.” She is proof of goodness in this world.

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  938. Jenna on

    I love how she has continued her passion so late I’m her life. She’s an inspiration to never stop being curious.

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  939. Karen on

    What am inspiration! I’m bolstered by her assertion that your age does not dictate your ability to follow your passions. 💗

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  940. Amy Shearer on

    Go out, visit with friends, don’t isolate yourself. It seems so simple but it is so easy to get caught up in all the to dos that I forget to have fun!

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  941. Anna on

    Even rocket scientists have to work hard to become rocket scientists. Nothing comes easy if you want to be really good at it and make a career out of it. What an inspiring lady.

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  942. Carolyn Sherring on

    Wow, what an inspiration Anne is. At nearly 50 her advice on growing older is exactly right and like she says, it’s never too late to have goals and dreams.

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  943. Aubrey Hopkins on

    She’s a woman I want to model my own life after. Not letting stereotypes get in the way or care that I come across as overly ambitious; she lived a very full life and left a very beautiful legacy!

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  944. Alyson Morgan on

    her grit, compassion and determination. “ You can meet and exceed your goals if you prepare yourself over time.”

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  945. Suzi Ketterer on

    My favorite part of this interview was the very end when she encourages you to share the roses so more and more people can enjoy them. I had the most beautiful established roses at my first little home. I’ve recently expanded my garden at my current home to include more roses and lavender. In addition to my dahlia obsession thanks to your book. I love caring for and sharing flowers. So excited to get through this next season of Finding Floret!

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  946. Aleena on

    Anne has inspired me to plant many rambling roses around our property to add some old world charm!

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  947. Martha Long on

    Honestly, the entire interview is a beautiful inspiration, but I was particularly impressed by her comments on not letting age be a deterrent in pursuing your dreams. Such a rich, vibrant life she has lived. I also love the way her roses have brought so many people together. I’m saving this interview to reread often. Thank you!

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  948. Jessica S. on

    Thank you for sharing Anne’s story. Her life was a great example to those coming after – explore, learn, do – all with a little sense of humour. A life lived to the end!

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  949. Sydney on

    “ Ask yourself if the activity requires big biceps and a beard. If not, go ahead with your dreams and fight the prejudice where you find it” Anne is an icon. What a wonderful read! She sounds like she was an absolute delight <3

    Reply
  950. Valarie A. Dunlevy on

    What an inspiration! How the world would be so different if we all practice what she thought and did!
    I especially loved this from her interview,
    “… you should try to know yourself, your talents, and limitations, but be careful to not underestimate what you are capable of doing.”
    Brings tears of joy and a happiness, and a fresh new light on my gardens and my passion for growing. I’m tuning 69 in Nov and my middle name is Anne! We are ALL connected in this life! Thanks so much for sharing this information❤️

    Reply
  951. Heather Brunelle on

    Her description of Voyage of Determination moved me as I am also an independent woman that has learned to build on my own.

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  952. Beth Hatcher on

    For sure, it’s the later in life advice that means a lot to me. Starting my flower farming journey at 56 years old sometimes seems a little crazy. It does keep me very active and I am also learning so much about it and myself every day! Anne is such a treasure!

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  953. Liz H on

    She says right at the beginning, “Life-long learning and growing keeps one engaged,” and those are words to live by.

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  954. Lindsey on

    This… “First, don’t let being a woman stop you from doing what is traditionally seen as a man’s job” was beyond inspiring. We often don’t realize the gender roles that are introduced to us as children and for women how limiting that can be. Even in society today. What an inspiration she is to women and girls everywhere even if they aren’t interested in flowers and gardening. To see what she has done over the last 30 years and her lifetime can move a person to do what they always wished they wanted to do but thought they couldn’t.

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  955. Debbie Kostolansky on

    What a n inspirational woman.! You’re never too old to find your passion in life.

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  956. Sarah Hennessey on

    This episode was incredibly inspiring and allowed me to think of old roses in a new light. I’m blown away by the many beautiful forms and colors shown, and how hard a few special people have worked to keep them going all these years. Thank you for sharing this dedication with others. I am inspired to continue learning about roses and eventually become a steward of these beautiful treasures too.

    Reply
  957. Clare Loxterkamp on

    I love the idea of pruning parties. Sharing the love of gardening with others continues to full my heart and keep me charging through the weeds.

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  958. Jen Seale on

    What an inspiring human! I loved the Voyage of Determination formula for achieving difficult goals. ❤️

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  959. Alexandra on

    I recently lost my father which was a big loss to me but it also forced me to learn some things about myself. Gardening was a therapy for me during and after that loss. Note that the warmer weather is here I am able to get back outside and in my gardens. I got a rose bush this year which reminds me of my father and growing up. Gardening is my favorite hobby and being able to watch my garden grow gives me great pleasure and thoughtfulness in life when things aren’t going great or I need a better outlook

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  960. Mary on

    I was so inspired that she started when she was 60 and her response to doing something late in life…. I’m so intrigued about roses now and wondering how/where I can put them in my garden.

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  961. Sue on

    What an inspiration! A great reminder that age is just a number and it’s never too late to start something new!

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  962. Kelley Mansfield on

    I love that she started at 60 and I love her explaination of how to achieve a goal. Very smart and strong lady.

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  963. Amy G. on

    Oh my gosh. That she didn’t even start her rose journey until 60. You’re never too old for new adventures!! Keep living life!! ❤️

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  964. Teanne Teeft on

    Anne inspires me to be curious and reminds me that it is never “too late” to learn. Thank you for sharing her story and making it known!

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  965. Dawn M on

    After spending the day helping my garden idol Eleanor Tickner(83) tend to her four acre peony garden I found myself crying with relief knowing someone else especially you Erin and your team has the same overwhelming sense of responsibility to keep her legacy going. Although she now has to move around her beloved garden now in full bloom in a scooter she shares that same sense care for her 2500 babies that Anne did. Both you and Anne have added fuel to my fire to keep trying to find a way to save the farm or acquire the plants. Learning hands on in the garden from my elders, starting with my Grandmom and Dad has been is my greatest blessing♥️

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  966. AMY DENDY on

    I find her zest for life inspiring and the fact that she continued enjoying her hobbies and passions until the end!

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  967. Susan Travalena on

    It was sweet to hear that it is never too late for goals and dreams. ♥️ An extremely intelligent person.

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  968. Susan on

    At 58, I loved what she said about beginning at 60! It’s never too late and I hope I continue start new things too!!

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  969. Kristin on

    I found roses and gardening late-ish in life, as a way to deal with my divorce. It’s been the most rewarding journey and I love how she says it’s never too late to follow your dreams.

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  970. Hattie Wiebicke on

    Just her ultimate love of roses. I was fortunate enough to be raised partially by my grandmother and great grandmother. And when I think of them, it’s always roses that come to mind, especially my great grandmother. She had the greenest thumb and could make anything grow. Before she passed, we took cuttings of her favorite roses, and I still have many of them growing to this day.

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  971. Kristin L. on

    I love that her perspective was that inviting people into your garden and sharing roses was the most important thing. That is encouraging and inspiring.

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  972. Stacy Fitzgibbon on

    Starting her dream at 60! I’ve been putting plans into place to retire a little early so I can start farming. I’ve had plenty of moments of doubt around how successful an aging body can be at starting a manual labor job so later in life. Anne is now my inspiration and my new mantra “Be like Anne!”

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  973. Megan Z on

    I was inspired by her age when she started. It’s so impressive to have someone in their senior years still have so much life to live. It makes me have hope that while I may not have done much now, it can never be too late.

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  974. Lori on

    Lovely interview, beautiful soul. Love that she says (and shows!) it’s never too late to chase your dreams!!! What an amazing woman – I’m so inspired by her life – thank you!! 🤍

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  975. Laura Fenby on

    What an encouragement to live life to the full. It doesn’t matter how old is, she never considers herself too old to keep trying new things and expanding her knowledge and business.

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  976. Michelle on

    I loved when she said it was never too late to follow your dreams. It’s a good reminder to get up and go and follow things that make you happy.

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  977. Kathy Stewart on

    She goes through life with the same curiosity, determination, and generosity no matter what the task at hand or dream to fulfill is. The originally “you can do it” spirit.

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  978. Dani Boss on

    I love her take on “later in life”. So many successful people got started when they were older… gives me hope as I embark on our flower farm journey at the ripe age of 39!

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  979. Ann Alexander on

    Like everyone here, I was inspired by the whole article, but as a “young” woman of 62 with BIG dreams, her perspective on following your dreams no matter your age was especially inspiring. I’ve loved roses ever since I can remember and as an artist, I continue to be enamored and challenged with capturing their beauty in my artwork.

    And in our yard, there is a spruce tree that has passed on that I have been dreaming of becoming a trellis for my first rambling rose. I wonder which one I should choose…

    Affectionately,
    Another Ann (without an “e”)

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  980. Maureen G on

    At 69 I own and operate my own flower farm which I started 9 years ago. I was inspired by my mother who grew antique roses in a garden near her antique shop in Western Maine. Every year at Mother’s Day my father would take her to a specialty antique rose nursery and buy her a couple of new antique roses. I took cuttings of those original old roses here with me to my farm in 2014.

    Ann’s story inspired me because she started one of her journeys at the age of 60 and never gave up on being curious. Curious about the world around her and she was not apologetic about starting new projects kate in life. That’s inspiring!

    I have purchased from Rogue Valley Roses and really love their selections. ❤️

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  981. Aaron Haddock on

    I love that at she was motivated to create her own website, a new thing for her, that late in her career where she is already a published author. Very motivational.

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  982. Laura James on

    Anne’s passion and love of doing something she loves. As with anything in life worth passing down to others, if they see the passion and excitement that it gives us, perhaps others will treasure it as much as we do. Growing Rambling Roses 🌹 is an art just as quilting or canning. . These things have to be preserved an passed down through the generations. So thank you for saving such beauty.
    I just turned 59 so 60 is just around the corner. I too love roses and well anything with gardening! She made me think about my life’s passion an to pursue them as she did. All the while enjoying the loved ones around me an sharing my passion for everything ❤️ what a beautiful soul !

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  983. Marlee Hakes on

    I love her drive to do what she loves even it it seems too lofty of a goal.

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  984. Nicole on

    Her sense of adventure and building houses! I would love to read A voyage of determination…What an inspiration!

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  985. Logan Stoltman on

    What a full life indeed. I was inspired most by how Anne never stopped learning and growing. What a beautiful testimony of a life & labor of love.

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  986. Margo Quiriconi on

    I felt so touched in reading this interview. What commitment she has and how generous in sharing her love, friendship and knowledge.

    Reply
  987. Lisa Mittleman on

    I just turned 60. I appreciated Anne’s comment that given her age of 97, 60 wasn’t that late in life to begin her rose garden! I’m now an empty nester and really have the time to garden! Plus, my middle name is Rose (passed on from my Grandma), so I have always had a real appreciation for roses!!

    Reply
  988. bridget comeaux on

    I love her attitude that you can do anything with preparation and study. I copied that and put it in the fridge so I and my kids can see it a lot. Someday hopefully it will sink in and root.

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  989. Colleen on

    I love this story! What inspired me the most is her commitment to life-long learning. There are always knew things to be learning, even when you think there couldn’t possibly be anything knew to know, especially at the age of 97 and the life that Anne lived. I also love that she tries to support local. I would love to read some of her books!

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  990. Vasoula Kyrkos on

    Her encouragement to chase your dreams. She lived through a time when it wasn’t easy for women to do what they wanted and not afforded certain opportunities. But she made her own. It’s not too late to do what you want is something we all need to hear. Dream big, find your passion and do them. And don’t let fear, age, or lack of big biceps stop you. Find your “wall jack” and move forward.

    Reply
  991. Erica Robertson on

    This quote really hit home with me. As a Firefighter/paramedic i was met with more prejudice than help. I fought through so much to reach where i am today and i do my best to help the people around me not have the same problems i did.
    “ don’t let being a woman stop you from doing what is traditionally seen as a man’s job unless you really need a constant supply of testosterone to achieve your goal. Ask yourself if the activity requires big biceps and a beard. If not, go ahead with your dreams and fight the prejudice where you find it.”

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  992. Karolina on

    Wow, thank you for sharing Anne with us, she is a true inspiration! I love that she found her passion for roses at 60 and has been able to do so much, it makes me feel like there is still so much out there to discover and learn and that, like Anne, I could do it all!

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  993. Sarah C on

    It’s never too late to start something new! I am so inspired by this!

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  994. Jessica Nichols on

    I love her desire to act on love, friendship, and legacy with the gift of cuttings. What a beautiful thing to share and treasure.

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  995. Dawn Sherrill on

    Such a well lived and full life. I love the fact that she never let being a woman hold her back. So resilient. Since I’m in my early sixties and looking for a new career, this interview was so inspiring…..all of it. I’m going to forward and share with friends my age. Thanks for sharing this. Now out to look at MY roses. :)

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  996. Megan Hover on

    I loved her emphasis on community and that she has pruning parties! Life and knowledge are so much richer when shared

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  997. Morgan Larson on

    My favorite part of the interview was that she developed this passion for roses when she was in her 60s. You don’t need to find your passions early in life to have a full life.

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  998. Lois on

    I love the inspiration that she provides as a woman and a human being. What a treasure and I am envious of all those that she has mentored and shared with.

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  999. Erin Ardoin on

    Her generosity is inspiring. Sharing k her knowledge and her roses. It’s so lovely. And if course, your willingness to share that legacy too.

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  1000. AmyRose on

    I love her passion and drive. What a beautiful legacy.

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  1001. Jill on

    She was always determined, from the age of 3 or 4/to her passing, she pushed forward and followed her dreams. Such a woman that I and many women should learn about.

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  1002. Sarah Swan on

    Wow, what an inspiring woman! I loved reading about her life and all of the different careers she had. Her formula for achieving a difficult goal was very inspiring. I tend to have big dreams but feel like some are way out of reach.
    I love that she wanted to start a website and blog in her later years! That task seems daunting, even to someone who has grown up with computers, but how much more of an undertaking when that was not your way of learning growing up.
    I love that you were able to record all of this rich history in her story. One of my favorite things to do at get together was always to sit with my grandparents and my great grandmother and hear the stories of their lives. We have a lot of it written down as well.
    This is a treasure ☺️

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  1003. Sarah Thurman on

    I love how she challenges what should be considered late in life, and our preconceived timelines for new pursuits.

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  1004. Jasmin McGraw on

    Anne is so very inspiring, fight the prejudice and go ahead with your dreams is jumping out at me. She’s incredible.

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  1005. Katie Thrush on

    I loved how tenacious Anne is. I loved this quote “First, don’t let being a woman stop you from doing what is traditionally seen as a man’s job unless you really need a constant supply of testosterone to achieve your goal. Ask yourself if the activity requires big biceps and a beard. If not, go ahead with your dreams and fight the prejudice where you find it.”

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  1006. Marci on

    I loved reading about Anne, what an inspiration, but I loved it even more getting to watch it last night on season 2! She is truly amazing. Would love to read her books.

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  1007. Lee Ann S on

    I have always feared “getting old.” And by that I don’t mean the physical part of aging, but the fear that discovery, reinvention and opportunity only reside in youth. Anne’s story shows that fear to be misplaced. <3

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  1008. Greta on

    “I pursued many dreams after I turned 60…” and “Commit yourself to lifelong learning and skill development”

    That part of the interview is so inspiring that age doesn’t matter and you shouldn’t hold yourself back! I’m starting a garden in my 40’s and wished it was something I began years ago but this interview gives such a different perspective! This is extremely inspiring and motivating! Thank you for sharing her with us!

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  1009. Marybeth Kou on

    I appreciated what Anne said about what’s most important – sharing you garden with other people. That is my dream, to make a beautiful place for people to enjoy and rest in, whether that is my own private garden or somehow something open to the public. I’ve always dreamed of inviting people into my garden and sending them away with flowers or cuttings.

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  1010. Janet on

    I think it’s pretty amazing that she didn’t start growing roses until 60, and it’s now what she’s become most known for. Definitely an interesting and inspirational lady.

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  1011. Dede Warren on

    I’ll be 60 next year and am completely inspired by Anne’s indomitable spirit! Last year I joined my local rose society, as well as the American Rose Society, and this year I’m applying the Master Gardeners program as soon as applications are available. Anne has so successfully shown us all, it’s never to late to be who you might have been! Neither age nor gender should stand in our way.
    Bravo to Anne, and to Erin who shares her indomitable spirit! You inspire us all to do more, and to reach our full potential.

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  1012. Cristina on

    Very inspiring. Her determination stood out to me.

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  1013. jodi weaver on

    i loved the continued drive to not sit down and stop. The live to the last minute attitude.

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  1014. Dana Strouse on

    I love her advice on sharing “ However, inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy. ”. Her story and advice Reminds me of my favorite book, Miss Rumphius.

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  1015. Brooke on

    I love her passion for growing. I’m inspired by the idea of volunteer work parties as I add roses to my cut flower farm. It’s been hard to figure out where to let interested people help, but now I think roses will be a good flower to consider bringing people in for. And then we can have tea by the roses when they’re in bloom at some point.

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  1016. Melanie Self on

    I am 61 years old! My name is Melanie Anne. Anne with an “e”. I am retiring from a very rewarding career of serving families. We have 6 acres of beautiful rolling hills in North Carolina. We are hosts via Airbnb to a sweet little 1970 PlayMor glamper. Bath house going in soon. A greenhouse and gardens are in the plans. But I am 61. Starting just now? My heart leaps for joy today! If Anne can do it, then I can too. The years await MY opportunity create a beautiful southern garden space to share with others. Or perhaps a rose garden! How I have longed for the inspiration to just do it. Thank you for valuing Anne’s life, telling her story and her faithful work. Thank you Anne not only for sharing but for inspiring in me the courage to do what I love just because it brings my soul great joy!!

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  1017. Sarah on

    So inspiring! Thank you for helping her message be heard.

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  1018. Crystal Bailey on

    The part that inspired me and tugged at my heartstrings was, “Max and I used to have people over all the time to enjoy the property, and many friendships as lovely as the roses developed.” I absolutely love that so much!

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  1019. Sarah McCutcheon on

    “It’s never too late to act on your goals and dreams”

    I found growing just a few years ago at 37. I turn 40 this year and we just bought a 4.5 acre property here in Michigan and I feel like I have to rush to get it all going. Hearing her journey and that she was still going at 97 is a great reminder that you do still have time if you live your life to the fullest.

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  1020. Sara Hewitt on

    I love that she used her gardens to meet new friends and let others enjoy them. She brought so much joy to people’s lives simply by sharing her roses and cultivated friendships with many by doing so – the beauty of connecting.

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  1021. Rachael Faber on

    I was awestruck to hear she built hoses after 60. Not just owning a company with workers that did the heavy lifting, but getting in there and doing the physical work herself! It was so encouraging to hear her love of roses didn’t start until she was 60. I’ve often felt I waited too long at 50 to get started with flower farming so this was especially touching. Thank you for sharing her story! I look forward to being able to read each one of her books and would love to one day see her beautiful rose garden!

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  1022. Keressa on

    What a woman! Her determination and her formula for doing anything is inspiring ❤️

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  1023. Tracey Wykes on

    Wow, what an awesome lady. She certainly lived a full and enriched life. I’m inspired by her advice to keep learning and act on your dreams, no matter what age you are. Strong motivation for me to carry on with my flower filled dream life!

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  1024. Michelle Kurtz on

    Anne like Erin is an inspiration to all of us who love flowers. As a budding flower farmer I’m always happy to learn anything I can. I love all of the information about roses as I’m just getting started with them.

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  1025. Juliet Turner on

    “..be careful to not underestimate what you are capable of doing”, she wanted to build a house and she did and she also did not consider age as a barrier to chasing her dreams. Such a rich and full life so well lived.

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  1026. Stephanie Liska on

    Gosh, there is so much to be inspired by in this interview. What an amazing woman! I think the part that moved me the most is seeing that is can be okay not living in one silo. She lived such a full life with so many interests. That is how I live my life but I’ve received a lot of feedback over the years that I have too many dreams or I dream too big. She had lots of desires and she went after them all. Roses, DIY, sailing, and the one that made me shed a tear, spaying and neutering animals. I started a local project of spaying and neutering cats in 2019. I’ve been able to help over 170 cats get fixed and vetted all on my own. In addition to being a full time engineer and hobby farmer. I was really moved that she had so many different interests and she went after them. I hope that when I’m older, I’ll look back and think, damn I had as full of a life as Anne. That would be incredible.

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  1027. Hannah Guilford on

    “ First, don’t let being a woman stop you from doing what is traditionally seen as a man’s job unless you really need a constant supply of testosterone to achieve your goal. ” yes, Anne! I myself am a general contractor and hobby flower farmer, with a passion for many florals including roses. There’s something about the sweet wild scent and unruly nature of rambling and old roses that draws me in. Maybe it’s because, like Anne, I’m a tough and big personality and we connect with things that grow in their own direction. I’ve placed and order for some more roses in her honor, and I’m excited to see them come to life, and to share their cuttings with friends.

    Reply
  1028. Gary Bailey on

    After 20 years in the military, I have found myself in her shoes with my wife. At 50 years old and not as spring chicken as I was, I am collecting hybrid tea, ramblers, drift, climbers. We both are facing medical issues, but Anne’s story was like looking in a mirror.

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  1029. Natalie on

    I am inspired by the keeping forgotten beauty alive for a bit longer.

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  1030. Leona on

    Keeping moving with pain is an issue. My love for flowers and spring weather is encouraging

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  1031. Kelsy Webber on

    I read this interview when Floret first released and has stayed with me ever since. I’ve been greatly impacted by this quote- “If not, go ahead with your dreams and fight the prejudice where you find it. Look carefully for the same prejudice in yourself. It could be lurking there without you realizing it and could cause you to not believe in yourself and to restrict you from following a difficult goal.”

    I know I’ve had this prejudice against myself in me, despite having a perfect example in my grandmother who was an engineer turned single farmer all while raising 6 boys. She owned her own computer parts store for decades. She broke every mold I knew of. I’m shifting my life to do the same. This year I am learning to skateboard and loving it!

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  1032. Jennifer Barr on

    I am inspired by her encouragement to organize and/or participate in volunteer efforts. I used to be so much better at that!

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  1033. Bernadette Ducasse on

    As a lady who is up around 2am everyday (just am) I like that Anne stated “My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.” We may be two peas in a pod!

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  1034. Gabrielle Heller on

    I am in my last year of my 30’s. I feel like my fun years are over. I love how she felt that starting roses in her 60’s made her realize it was a 3rd of her life. I still have a lot of life to go. And let’s hope all of them are filled with flowers! Thank you!

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  1035. Amy on

    I loved the thought of you are never too old to start something new.

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  1036. Min K on

    I watched the episode 1 of Growing Floret season 2 and it would be an understatement to say that I have been inspired by the story and all of the work that team Floret has been envisioned for! I love both old and new roses and I do believe that spreading the love of the historic roses among home gardeners is definitely helpful in an attempt to preserve them from going to extinction! It would be amazing if I can receive Anne’s books as I love growing historic climbing and rambling roses and I have just started this season! Looking forward to more years with historic roses. Thank you for all you do!

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  1037. Susan Davis on

    I love the part about sharing about the roses and making new friendships.

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  1038. Ruth on

    Generosity! Share, give, spread. Ahhh the beauty and just giving it freely to everyone around you. A lesson I need.

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  1039. lisa on

    I liked the idea of knowing yourself; your talents/limits. I also enjoyed the comments regarding age and to keep moving.

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  1040. Krystal on

    It’s never too late to pursue a passion, dream, or new adventure! Got to keep in moving! Thank you for sharing this.

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  1041. Robert Tainsh on

    The part of Anne’s interview that inspired me the most is when she said, “My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.” I am divorced, live alone, and my children live in far away states. I love when a neighbor stops to admire my plantings and asks questions about each of the plants. It keeps me engaged and makes me feel like I still have value in spite of my advancing years and solitude.

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  1042. Bri on

    Her perseverance to do what she loves and keep chasing dreams. Empowered women!

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  1043. Amber on

    The power of sharing touched me.

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  1044. Sophia on

    I’m inspired by her passion and dedication!

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  1045. Cyndi Treiber on

    I absolutely loved this interview and Anne’s inspiring and tough personality. What really hit home for me was the following: “If not, go ahead with your dreams and fight the prejudice where you find it. Look carefully for the same prejudice in yourself. It could be lurking there without you realizing it and could cause you to not believe in yourself and to restrict you from following a difficult goal.” Encouraging people to f I get prejudice is one thing. Encouraging people to engage in self-examination with the same fervor is something we all should be aspiring to on a much more grand scale!!

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  1046. Christina on

    I have fond memories of pushing the thorns off of my grandmothers rose bushes prior to picking a rose. I share your passion of passing on flowers with neighbors and friends.

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  1047. Alexandra Mudry on

    Her formula… especially the part about knowing yourself and talents/limitations – but not letting yourself conclude that you aren’t capable because you might not be the best at something to start. Just knowing that it’s worth trying and not having a fixed mindset… clearly it led to such a long and rich life!

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  1048. Leslie Wasik on

    I am beyond inspired by Anne’s story! Thank you so much for this work you’ve done to preserve her legacy. I think what gets me the most is the remembrance of what an intellect she was. She was so driven! Once she got something in her mind, there was no stopping her, and the work that she did was so very important. I feel a distant kinship with this sort of spirit, and it is wildly motivating to me to read this story. It gives me hope that the work that we are doing on our small farm in Western New York will make a difference and leave a lasting positive effect once we’re gone.

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  1049. Rebecca Yan on

    I am inspired to “go ahead with my dreams!” 🌸😄

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  1050. Stacey Diehl on

    Anne was very giving & welcoming and I would like to imitate that.

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  1051. Jayme on

    She’s so inspiring! Not getting into roses until 60 years old; and all the amazing things she’s accomplished! It’s reminding me that you’re never too old to start something. Here at 31, almost 32 I feel like my life is over. That I’ll never get to be flower farmer/vegetable gardener. This interview put a little pep back into my dream!

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  1052. Cassaundra Cornell-MacKenzie on

    Her advise to “keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development” is a very important message.
    I find myself feeling isolated at times due to working from home, then operating our farm and raising a toddler. In college and before kids, I was always out and about – she reminds me to always keep moving for the benefit of yourself, not just of others.

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  1053. Ashley Laabs on

    I am inspired by Anne’s late start and frequent turnovers. Such a diverse life! I believe I will live similarly, as I’ve changed careers frequently and only recently came to gardening.

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  1054. Melissa M on

    Anne’s generosity giving roses away over the years inspires me – what a wonderful thing to do in the spirit of gardening community! I look forward to sharing my plants this year.

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  1055. Ady Cope on

    Anne’s advice: “to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development” is very inspirational to me.
    I find myself isolating myself in my garden lately, even though deep down I’m wanting to share and enjoy the beauty, that I’ve worked so hard at growing, with others. Her words are the reminder and nudge that I so often desperately need. My flowers and garden make me so happy and I should share the beauty with others more often so they may feel that same excitement and happiness too.

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  1056. Kris Reed on

    What an amazing person Anne was – I’m so happy to got to know her just a little through this lovely series! I especially appreciate her oh-so-practical approach to tackling life’s problems. Thank you!

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  1057. Delphine Bienvenu on

    Magnifique! Thank you for that tender and sweet story. Salutations from up north, in the cold Quebec province of Canada.

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  1058. Sheree Sieg on

    Truly amazing and inspiring . Thank you so much for sharing

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  1059. Fiona Lovely on

    Loved this series on Anne! Thank you for sharing Team Floret! 🌹

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  1060. Carrie on

    Thank you so much for sharing some of her vast knowledge! She sounds like a very special person that touched many lives not only with regards to roses but to her philosophy of life!! Thanks to you Erin for telling us about a wonderful person!

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  1061. Julia Burnett on

    While Anne’s comments from her book A Voyage of Determination inspired me to share this interview with my high school students, the idea of simply sharing a rose clipping touched my heart today. Sharing is at the center of spreading joy to others in our lives. Thank you for this reminder.

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  1062. Laura Hale on

    What a courageous and generous woman! I loved the part where she emphasized live long learning, but appreciated the humble way she has incorporated generosity throughout her life. Thank you for this article Erin. Please know you have the same gifts: courage and generosity!

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  1063. Jeannette Bull Robison on

    Anne’s comments on age and ability spoke to me. I was rooted in Texas – and loved the state and my family (still do!) At age 40, my husband, sons and I moved to Pennsylvania. What a beautiful state, and so many gardens! I got a fresh perspective on what was “out there” and what I could do. While still in my original career as an art director, I set my sights on working in education. Our next step, when the boys were grown, was an opportunity to move to South Carolina – another adventure, at our age! When jobs proved to be scarce for me, I decided to go back to school, and study horticulture. What a fresh, new perspective for my artistic foundations! Now, approaching 67, I am a landscape designer, combining my lifelong love of plants with my other love, art. Just because some opportunities are past you, does not mean that there are so many more ahead! Keep your eyes – and your heart – open to the possibilities.

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  1064. Mia Cahal on

    What a beautiful and full life! It’s is so inspiring to see what she accomplished later in life. I’m in my late 20s but have already felt the doors is possibility closing around me as I age. Ann’s story reminded me that dreams are possible no matter when you begin. The important thing is moving forward and taking steps to achieve your dreams. Wow! So grateful for her life and that you have shared her with this community!

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  1065. Beth Ann on

    Wow! I love the wisdom she shares. Quite frankly what has inspired me most about what she said was the simplicity of what she said about each thing. I over think everything and she was so simple and made everything sound so easy if you just remember to take things one step at a time. Let things fall into place and enjoy the ride. ❤️

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  1066. Karen on

    What a moving interview! I found the part where she said although she was 60 when her passion for roses began, it has been longer than the careers of many. (the big biceps bit was also very funny!) Thank you for sharing this Erin. x

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  1067. Eric on

    Thank you so much for sharing this interview and providing more information about Anne’s book. Her zeal for a life full of learning and betterment is so, so inspiring—especially now during this never-ending, inescapable pandemic.

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  1068. Helen Andrews on

    This is an amazing story, interview with an inspirational] gardener, person! At 85, I so admire her determination and
    desire to do, whatever it takes! Bravo Ann, I will be planting roses among the trees on Vashon Island, and, a very proper lawyer friend of my husband once asked me, with a blushing face, “where did you get those biceps?” To which I answered, “ lifting babies!” It helps to keep working!! Cheers, Helen

    Reply
  1069. Toni on

    I loved the interview. Her love for life in general was my favorite part. I also loved that she built a house and used a jack to raise the walls. Nothing would stop her! What a great story and a great life!

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  1070. Stephanie on

    I started my adulthood as a performing artist and dedicated my life to it. However, over the years, it broke me down a bit and I realized there was so much else out there I wanted to try but couldn’t due to fear of missing out on an opportunity. I finally decided to start listening to my heart and in my forties finally met my insanely supportive husband, and I’m pregnant with the baby I thought I’d never be able to have. Marrying my husband resulted in a move out of big cities and here in rural Pennsylvania, I found gardening. A passion I never knew I’d had buried inside me (and had been trying to assert itself through tiny herb gardens on window sills for decades). I began apprenticing at a local flower farm last year while in my head thinking I wish I’d found this when I was younger. But late bloomers are my favorite, and reading this interview was a fresh reminder that there is no such thing as too late if you love something. Thank you for this interview.

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  1071. kayla on

    my favorite part of the interview was when she was talking about how your gender doesn’t matter as long as the job doesn’t require a beard or big biceps, only for her to double back later and say that the biceps don’t really matter either a what a lovely person and a wonderful interview :)

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  1072. Janet Biernacki on

    I think it’s her building of her home and then building more. But it’s the attitude mainly of how we can do things. “Even rocket scientist had to study “

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  1073. Daniela Schimpf on

    I really enjoyed this interview because it wasn’t only about roses. It was a journey into my inner self , knowing to be strong if it needs to be,like she as a sailor & open up to show kindness on the other hand like she shares her knowledge & garden .Actually the rose reflex her life as a rose is : tough ,thorny,beautiful, cheerful. The most fun part was the “ bicep & beard” part .
    Thanks so much !

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  1074. Brooke on

    The most inspiring part of this interview was the part where she mentioned using a jack hammer. I’m a single woman with a large garden and having the right tool because I don’t have biceps is so crucial. A fair amount of people think I’m crazy, but I get results so it is worth it.

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  1075. Jamison Williams on

    Thank you so much for a wonderful interview. I love roses and want to learn more! Anne is truly inspiring and my favorite take away is that you’re never too old to begin your dreams!

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  1076. Autry Cataldo on

    I planted my first David Austin roses last year. I can’t wait to see what they do this summer.
    I’d love to learn more about roses, and Anne’s love of them is inspiring!

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  1077. Geoff Rigney on

    Really enjoyed the entire series. The interview with Anne is incredible. We are blessed to meet such souls on our journeys through life. They offer so much inspiration. I’m a sailor too so I ordered Voyage of Determination. I can’t wait to read it and share it with my daughter Anna. I’m looking forward to looking over her website and other books as well as well. 60 is the new 30. I should know; I’m almost there myself. Tracey and I just beginning our new journey at Homer’s Bay Art & Garden, a flower farm plus more. Keep the inspiration coming Erin. We’re watching and reading. We appreciate you.

    Geoff Rigney

    Reply
  1078. Joanna Z-Wynne on

    Thank you for sharing this inspiring and moving story of this amazing woman. Truly a life well lived

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  1079. Deb on

    Oh my, what a lovely read. I will keep this post as I will try to make it my inspiration to get my rose garden growing stronger. I have just recently, the last 2 years, started to enjoy roses in my garden. My husband keeps on telling me to slow down, I’m the same age as Anne was when she took her sailing trip. I just keep telling him that keeping busy in my gardens is what is keep me young(er). Love your site BTW.

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  1080. Armik on

    Such a lovely way to wrap up the series with this interview. Ann’s advice to stay out of bed is what I need to remind myself these days. Meeting with friends and family and sharing your expertise and not being stingy is such a great way to live one’s life.
    At the age of 34 I struggle with changing my career completely, thinking that it is too late, but this interview with Ann reminded me that it is never to late to chase your dreams. Thank you.

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  1081. Rachel on

    These lines brought tears to my eyes.

    “I remember when I turned 60. I thought 60 was so old. That was almost 37 years ago, well over one-third of my lifetime so far. At almost 97 years old, it doesn’t seem that my passion for roses started all that late in life. It’s been over 30 years since I began this journey—longer than the careers of many. I pursued many dreams after turning 60…My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.”

    At 46 with a chronic auto-immune condition that includes small fiber neuropathy pain throughout my entire body, I sometimes feel like I live in a 97 year old body and tend to isolate myself. This reminds me that I have a full life to live and possibly more years ahead of me than behind me. I could literally be reborn tomorrow and have another 51 years of incredible living…..thank you Erin and Anne.

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  1082. Ramona Anderson on

    Lovely thanks for sharing. I love the part about giving away the roses.

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  1083. Marina Dillingham on

    Anne’s advice on staying young by remaining active is what touched me the most. My mom is turning 79 in a couple of weeks and no one believes her when she says her age because, like Anne, she never stops moving, learning and seeking out new experiences. After a long career as a high school teacher and administrator, two masters degrees, 4 children, etc., she reinvented herself as a painter after retiring from education and she now travels the world showing her art. Like Anne, my mom is an inspiration and living proof that age is just a number. Like heirloom roses, Anne and my mother have only grown wiser and stronger with age.

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  1084. Teri on

    Thank you. I love that she was young at heart and was never too old for a new adventures

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  1085. Clarice Hampel on

    I am impressed learning that she co-founded NOAH and had a deep respect for animals. And how nice that Anne liked to share her plants with others. Spread the beauty and enjoyment of her collection. Thank you for sharing Anne with us.

    Reply
  1086. Heather Cease on

    Thank you for sharing your interview with Anne here- for honoring her legacy. The part of her interview that most inspired me is how she looked for ways to overcome obstacles. She didn’t let difficulties stop her. Incredible!

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  1087. Kristi on

    What an honor to have shared this time with her, Erin. Memories you will cherish always. Thank you for bringing her encouraging words to us, so we can also be blessed and inspired to muster up the determination we need to reach our life goals! I’m so glad you do what you do, how else would we have learned about this marvelous woman!!

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  1088. Heather Cease on

    Thank you for sharing your interview with Anne here- for honoring her legacy. The part of her interview that most inspired me is how she looked for ways to overcome obstacles. She didn’t let difficulties stop her.

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  1089. Heidi Roycroft on

    There are many motivational speakers who haven’t lived the message the way she has. She is an elder to listen to. I will get her books because I’d like to hear more of her voice. I liked when she said there are ways to overcome obstacles with work and tools! Thanks for bringing her to us Erin.

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  1090. Margaret on

    Wonderful interview and so true in her words – be strong, love what you do, be curious, keep learning, and SHARE. No limits. Go for it, but be smart. Love it. Thank you!

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  1091. Wendy Vanwagoner on

    Her comments about it never being too old to pursue something new really encouraged me. I started a new business when I turned 50, and now three years later I think about starting more new businesses or pursuits in a wide variety all the time!

    Loved this series! Thanks so much for sharing it.

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  1092. Mel Smith on

    I am sitting here writing this in my bed – procrastinating going to bed early so that I can be up early for my desk job. Something stirred in me just now and for some reason I feel like crying. So often we are taught that life is simply school, career, family if you are lucky, retirement, and that’s that. But look at the life that Anne was able to live outside of that structure. There is so much beauty and life to find, cherish, seek. Although I do not know her outside of the words she shared here, this quick glimpse into her life has moved me. Why should I compare my life to the progress of the life next to me? In a world full of roses, Anne is a rambler rose.

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  1093. Jenn Goonan @Cheers_to_Flowers on

    Her words will be taped on my fridge, “My advice is to keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up to date with current events, be open to new ideas, and commit yourself to life-long learning and skill development.”

    Thank you so much for sharing this series, so beautifully written and inspiring!

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  1094. Sheryl Jump on

    What an inspiring woman full of great knowledge! I find her advice to be practical, don’t let being a woman stop you, know yourself, learn what you need to accomplish a goal. I might be interested in some climbing roses or ramblers for my back yard. Inspiring that she kept her body and mind fit and interested in life.

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  1095. Tina Pender on

    I was so inspired by her tenacity! I love that she found a way to accomplish her goals despite prejudice, even prejudice hiding in her own mind. That’s such great advice! I think she truly understood the concept of sowing and reaping. She sowed generously and reaped a legacy!

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  1096. Marilyn Holliday on

    Erin, thank you for sharing your interview with Anne.
    I would have never known about her and her life. I love how she planted the roses in the trees. That she was always learning and sharing her roses. She is another Pioneering Spirited women that we have as part of out heritage. Thank you so much for this. I have enjoyed it so much.

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  1097. Mary on

    I was drawn in by your questions and so looked forward to Anne’s answers. One word instantly came to mind while reading the interview: Fortitude. Anne had it and you were so, so lucky to be a part of her life story and experience her friendship. Well done!

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  1098. Lana Duvall on

    What an amazing interview! It’s inspiring that her passion with roses started when she was 60 and she cultivated that passion for 37 years. Many people would not start a new hobby or interest at that age, but she did and it enriched her life and many others. I love that she pursued her goals throughout her life. 💕

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  1099. Laura Wall on

    The words that resonated most were these: “inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy.” Sharing in the experience of a garden is what matters most to me from those who’ve guided me to those who I have also been able to share with and inspire. Thank you for sharing Anne’s story!

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  1100. Terrie Kilroy on

    What a lovely interview. Before reading the interview, I was disheartened that she had spent many years laboring to build beautiful gardens and amass a collection of prized roses. Only for the gardens to become overgrown, in need of care that she could no longer provide. I wondered what words of wisdom she could share with us. Then she reminisced about she and Max having friends over and told of how they were able to share the beauty of the gardens. How, in years past, she’s given many cuttings to younger friends and now they’ve grown into the “old” roses. In her words one can feel the joy of sharing the beauty of those gardens. It is comforting to know that in giving cuttings to others, she was able to share the roses’ beauty far more reaching than her own gardens. A sense of continuity, in that her hard work will not be lost because she is gone. Thank you for sharing this.

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  1101. Marlee Hakes on

    What a sweet interview. I would have loved to have sat and talked with her about her adventures. Her books looks inspiring! I love how she pursued her goals and dreams all throughout her life, not letting life circumstances or age keep her from it. If we could all have such beautiful attitudes!

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  1102. Gunner Rozploch on

    What inspired me most about the interview with Anne was that its never too late to pursue your goals and dreams. Even though she was 60 when she got started she still pursued her passion for roses and started her incredible collection despite feeling like she had a later start.

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  1103. Britany Lunderg on

    I loved and I am inspired by how generous Anne was with her knowledge– to write books, to open her garden, to share her time with you and now all of us. It was a beautiful reminder that one is never to expert to support even the most novice (thinking of myself in this case at the beginning of her gardening journey).

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  1104. susie marglin on

    Most of us womenfolk know we can grow something. Wether babies, if that’s our bodies choice, or at least geraniums from the local Home Depot. Now renting equipment to raise a wall we just constructed or learning to cross the Pacific ocean with the guidance of a sextant and the stars takes an unusual belief in self. I don’t like committed exercise or sweat but at 70 I ran my first half marathon. Too bad I spent so many years not thinking I could do that. Anne showed over and over how belief in oneself never should stop. Amazing how the fragile beauty of roses and the joy of watching them ramble over fences and up trees was her final delight.

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  1105. Simone Osthoff on

    Anne is certainly a remarkable example of what it means to live a full and meaningful life. I particularly enjoyed her first advice “don’t let being a woman stop you…” emphasizing that gender limits can obstruct one’s aspirations from both within and without. And above all, her love for learning is palpable and generous. Thank you!

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  1106. Kathy Fiero on

    Your posts whether on dahlias or cut flowers, and now roses are always so inspiring. What I greatly appreciate is your effort to honor the past while moving forward on your own journey.
    “Meeting” Anne Belovich through your interview and documentation of her garden was so enjoyable, thank you! This year I hope to add some roses to my garden to join my dahlias and cutting garden flowers. Thank you for the nursery suggestions.

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  1107. Elizabeth Burke on

    I am most inspired by Anne’s message that you can achieve your dreams regardless of age or gender. Just focus on your goal and do the work necessary for success! As a parent and second career retired teacher, that has been and will always be a very important message to pass on to our children.

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  1108. Rebecca Craythorn on

    As someone who works in a male dominated industry (construction), I found Anne’s reminder not to let gender be a barrier really struck a cord with me. Ironically, being an avid backyard gardener, I have found it largely to be a space dominated by women! I find myself echoed in parts of Anne’s voice in the duality of being able to perform ‘male’ roles but also having a great love of the more nurturing ‘female’ space of the garden. She sounds like an amazing lady Erin, and I am glad you have shared her words with us. It reminds me, yet again, to slow down and take the time to get to know the people behind the plants, and the stories they have to share. Can’t wait to see how your collection progresses!

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  1109. Jill on

    I loved her advice to share with others and to give freely, and to build community events around your garden. Especially in recent times, it’s so nice to have these types of opportunities to connect with our neighbors!

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  1110. Sharon Weaver on

    I was inspired by how later in life she started her passion for roses. I am turning 59 soon and have never had a lot of success with my roses. I am now ready to be determined and succeed! Also the fact that she was a woman never held her back from achieving her dreams. She was a very wise woman that reminded me of my grandmother who was a working farm wife who succeeded in her dream of becoming a painter ❤️. You were very privileged to know this great lady

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  1111. Wendy Chase on

    I’ll be 60 in a year, and her interview was so encouraging! I went back to school in my late 40’s and there are still more things I want to do. Sometimes I feel like I’ve missed the chance, and it’s so good to hear stories like hers. I adore roses and although I live about 125 miles south of the Arctic Circle, I have some! Rosa Rugosa Hansas are very hardy and they have a lovely fragrance. The biggest problem I’ve had with them is moose think they are pretty tasty in the wintertime. I dream of the garden I’ll have when we retire and move to the Lower 48.

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  1112. Gretchen Heard on

    Just when I think I’m done and ready to retire, my daughter asks me to help with her new passion; growing flowers. Anne’s story is a reminder to me and many other 60 something’s that we have a lot left to offer. It keeps us young working outdoors and oh, the flowers. Loved the series of articles. Thanks, Floret.

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  1113. Michelle Taylor on

    I am 54 and I feel as if I have spent my life being a mother and have forgotten who I am and what I wanted to be. It is scary to realize a part of your life is changing and coming to an end. Not that you ever stop being a parent but you get to focus on your needs and wants again. I have felt lost and out of direction. Two years ago I meet and became friends with a lovely woman Phillis May who is 97. She has become a great inspiration to me. Her life philosophy is very much like Anne’s stay open to new things get up and out of bed everyday and enjoy as much time out in nature as you can. Never stop learning, challenge yourself as much as you can and be thankful for what you can do rather than frustrated with what you can’t. These sentiments have meant so much to me and truly have changed my outlook. How fortunate you are to have met and spent time with such an inspiring person as Anne. Thank you for continuing to sharing your journey /story with us.

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  1114. Rose Valencia on

    What an inspirational interview! “I remember when I turned 60. I thought 60 was so old” these words made me smile and warmed my heart. I will turn 60 next May. And next May I will graduate with a degree in Landscape Design. Covid opened the door for online learning in a field that otherwise is not obtainable online. I bought the books, I passed the classes (only one left) and I will take my passion of gardens as far as my life allows. Thank you for sharing Anne with us. Can’t wait to read some of her books and her blog.

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  1115. Anna White on

    Such a beautiful interview. I love her fearlessness and courage. Had to reach for the tissues..

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  1116. Barbara Lindberg on

    I so enjoyed the other three postings of this story that I couldn’t wait to read this one. I will buy one of her books for sure. I loved how she talked about not letting being a woman stop you from pursuing goals that are non-traditional. I’d love to know more about the Victorian homes she built! She was so incredibly diverse in her experiences. I’m certain that it’d be fascinating to sit and talk with her. I wish I had met her but I’m very grateful Erin that you’ve shared the friendship that you had with her with us. I do feel like I know her after reading the stories.

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  1117. Jo Moore on

    Clearly Anne embraced a positive outlook and curated a life of challenge and personal growth. Possessing an evolved aesthetic often manifests by surrounding oneself with the most beautiful elements of nature. The reverence and honor this amazing woman bestowed upon her beloved roses will live in perpetuity in gardens of friends and in America’s Rose Garden. I can only imagine how many lives Anne has touched and inspired with her many talents and passions.

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  1118. Leslie Trecha on

    I’m getting close to retirement and I’m a little nervous about staying engaged after having a long career with a full schedule. I love Anne’s advice to “keep moving, stay out of bed, go out to lunch and visit with friends and family (don’t isolate yourself), read and stay up-to-date with current events, be open to new ideas and commit yourself to lifelong learning and skill development.” What a perfect call to action! I’m going to keep this quote and use it as a guide.

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  1119. Jan Crane on

    I loved her story. She is an inspiration to people to never stop learning…whether it is about flowers, building or current events.
    I’ve just begun to grow roses in the last few years and I’m 64. I hope I live to 97 to enjoy them in their full glory!

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  1120. Wendy Keiser on

    Anne said in an interview she had a done a few years ago “for as you know well enough, rose gardens seldom outlive their owners for long”. Her legacy will live on, not only with Chambersville Heritage Rose Garden but now with Floret Farms.

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  1121. Chloe kirsch on

    I just sobbed reading this. Her love of life is what is so moving to me. She obviously loved roses just as much. I like when she says ” don’t be stingy” . The generosity from the floret team and from people like Anne are what drove my mom and I into flower farming. I want to give give give so her saying not to be stingy hit me right in the heart. ❤❤

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  1122. Polly Vollmar-Heywood on

    As a person who has worked with elders most of my career, and the last 20 years creating handicapped accessible garden beds for elders in care settings, I love that you are commemorating Annes life in this way! My favorite part of this interview is her 3-step advice on how to approach your Big Picture, or life goals. It’s basically to ‘do it’. Don’t lie in bed dreaming about how great it could be, if only. Study, try, and try again until you’re capable of reaching that star!
    Thank you so much for sharing your relationship with this amazing woman!

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  1123. Linda Hovgaard on

    “Keep roses watered, fertilized and in places with lots of sunshine!” Advice that applies to people as well. However, there were so many other things in her interview that inspired me deeply as well. “Inviting people to your garden and sharing is perhaps most important.” I love her advice to keep moving and commit to life-long learning and skill development. I am inspired and driven by her “3 main parts” for achieving any difficult goal. I heartedly agree that supporting local, small business owners as much as possible is vital. And last but certainly not least, I love the fact that she pursued many dreams after turning 60, including her passion for roses. What an admirable, strong, inspiring, beautiful woman! Thank you Erin for sharing her legacy with us!

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  1124. Jackie on

    Each summer, I lived with my grandparents who also both lived a long life full of love and adventure. My lust for gardening began while helping them with the gardens that surrounded their cottage in the woods. I watched and helped them prune and fuss over their little plot of paradise. We lived each summer there along a creek and they taught not only their grandchildren, my sisters and I, but also neighboring and visiting children how to swim. Ann reminds me of these two fine examples. Never slow down and give to your community and friends, human and furry, and indeed the world. She led by example. Her care for others and future generations is remarkable and I recognize your contribution to her legacy by sharing her story and giving to the floral community. What an opportunity you are given to honor this wise crone’s legacy.
    Thank you,

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  1125. Lori-Anne on

    Profound words from a life well-lived. Anne’s guidance and knowledge of roses, encompasses great life endeavors and achievements. The life advice “go ahead with your dreams and fight prejudice where you find it. Look carefully for the same prejudice in yourself. It could be lurking there without you realizing it and could cause you to not believe in yourself and to restrict you from following a difficult goal.” is motivational and inspiring. I would definitely enjoy reading and learning from Anne’s library. She has left a legacy of gardening roses and living a long, full life.
    Thank you for sharing her story and interview 🌹💕

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  1126. Cristen Atkins on

    Nearing the middle part of my life (almost 50) and still not know what I want to do with my life (except for my 2 daughters Katy and my dog Dolly ), Ann inspired me when she said:

    At almost 97 years old, it doesn’t seem that my passion for roses started all that late in life. It’s been over 30 years since I began this journey—longer than the careers of many. I pursued many dreams after turning 60,

    “At almost 97 years old, it doesn’t seem that my passion for roses started all that late in life. It’s been over 30 years since I began this journey—longer than the careers of many. I pursued many dreams after turning 60…”

    So, hopefully there is still something out there for me to find…seeing that lol Ann didn’t figure it out till she was 60 makes me think I still have a chance not to waste my life and make my parents proud of me (even in their passing).

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  1127. Josh H on

    I loved this part: “inviting people into your gardens and sharing is perhaps most important. Don’t be stingy.” It’s definitely what I have tried to do with my own garden. Almost everyone that comes by leaves with at least one new plant and it makes my heart so full to share the beauty God has blessed me with.
    Amazing interview with an incredible lady!

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  1128. Kim Pike on

    Her background is so interesting and inspiring. I would have loved to just sit and listen to her talk about her life. What an amazing experience she has had.

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  1129. Megan Daline on

    I, too, am a rose lover and Anne is my new idol. I just turned 70 and I find her to be so inspiring. My favorite is that she wrote her books in her 90s! I also love the way she figured out how to accomplish difficult goals.

    Thank you for sharing this interview.

    Best, Megan

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  1130. karen lindsay on

    I love how her zest for life and the great outdoors started at the ripe old age of 3 or 4. How she would ‘run away’ down to the beach to frolic in the sand. And
    how her mother would come barreling after her, screaming, to drag her back to the garden surrounded by THE fence. Such a feisty little thing. It’s no wonder she lived to 97! Her life came full circle ~ she started in a garden filled with beautiful flowers (though she didn’t know it at the time), and ended surrounded by her own lovely paradise. May she rest in peace.

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  1131. Samantha on

    What an amazing interview! I feel so inspired. Thanks for sharing

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  1132. Iza Iseri on

    Thank you for this lovely int