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Home Blog DAY 4 // Growing Guide Giveaway!
December 22nd 2014

DAY 4 // Growing Guide Giveaway!

Written by
Floret

plaidbridal
Today is Day Four of the “Five Days of Giveaways” party to celebrate the launch of Floret’s new online Shop. Yesterday we raffled off one of the new dahlia tuber collections and the lucky winner is: Shannon K!

For the last few months, the team and I have been working behind the scenes to pull together a small collection of resources crafted especially for farmer-florists and home gardeners.

Ever since I began this wild and wonderful flower farming adventure, I’ve taken thousands of pages of notes, conducted dozens and dozens of flower variety trials and filled well over sixty notebooks with my observations. Many of those details including harvest reports, lists of best varieties to grow, field trial notes and personal preferences on hundreds of varieties of cut flowers have been shared here and through the 30+ Growing For Market articles I’ve written over the years.

As part of the new resource collection for farmer-florists and cut-flower gardeners, I’ve updated and expanded all of my best growing advice from past posts and articles and added tons of new gorgeous photographs and combined it all into convenient downloadable documents. No need for endless web searching and scrolling–you can simply save these PDF’s to your hard drive or print and take with you into the garden.

Today I’m excited to give away a selection from this new collection of growing guides.

howtodahliafinal
howtosweetpeafinal

These booklets are chock full of gorgeous photography plus practical, easy-to-follow growing advice and expert tips on growing long-stemmed beauties.

Here’s a preview of what we’ve put together so far:

GROW GREAT DAHLIAS:  Our farm is perhaps best known for our high intensity, small scale dahlia production.  In this beautifully detailed 14 page booklet, I share the secrets to growing these beautiful, bountiful blooms.

GROW GREAT SWEET PEAS: Handfuls of these highly fragrant blooms are what launched Floret in 2008 and got me started down this wonderful flower-filled road. This 11 page booklet includes an expanded list of my favorite varieties, tips for field and high tunnel production, plus my secrets to growing super long-stemmed sweet peas.

FANTASTIC FOLIAGE AND FILLERS:  Unusual foliage and fragrant fillers are the backbone of any great bouquet.  By adding texture, fragrance and unexpected elements, the right foliage or filler can highlight your focal flowers and take an arrangement to a whole new dimension.  This expanded and updated list of favorites includes detailed descriptions on over 30 varieties and spans 16 pages.

 

UPDATE:  This Giveaway is now closed.  Free condensed versions of our Growing Guides are now available in our RESOURCES section.

169 Comments

  1. caroline radice on

    I agree with other people about feverfew and lisianthus. Also I’d love to hear your opinions about what flowers are better to direct sow in the field and what are better to transplant as starts.

    Reply
  2. Joanne Halter on

    Would love to read information on starting and growing vines, feverfew and lisianthus.

    Reply
  3. Virginia on

    Hi again, Erin. I know that your experience with taking care of the soil through composting and cover crops help to produce beautiful healthy flowers. But when you do get the odd pest, what techniques/remedies do you use? Also, I may have missed in earlier postings, but how close do you plant your dahlia tubers? And I’d still love to know about sourcing/growing those black-eyed white anemones! Thanks!!

    Reply
  4. Jennifer Dunlap on

    I am totally enamored these days with Astrantias, Eryngiums, Dalea, and Scabioas. Would love to hear of your favorites. I am also completely enamored by your dedication to your craft and passion for plants. We are so blessed to have you share your knowledge and experience. Grateful for the ability to grow and learn from you. Happy holidays to you and yours!

    Reply
  5. Wendy hills on

    I think I must have read every article you’ve ever written and I can honestly say it’s changed everything for me – flowers are in my heart thanks to you. But my head wants to understand more of the planning and business just like you teach in your workshops, can that ever be translated into a download? and I’m afraid there’s not much chance of me getting to you from the UK, unless of course you want to come over and run a workshop here? Please!!!!

    Reply
  6. Sophie on

    Your on-line growing guides have been my inspiration and my number one go-to trusted source for successful dahlia and sweet pea growing! Although my sweet peas were affected by a virus this year, my dahlias were the best ever. I’ve been following your guides on storage of the tubers and fingers crossed all will be well….

    Lovely giveaway! Thank you Erin! And a wonderful restful and peaceful festive season to you and yours.

    Reply
  7. Gail on

    Having only just recently found your blog I have become obsessed with Zinnia’s and Dahlia’s after seeing your beautiful pictures. I have turned over a few square metres by the chook shed to try growing a few flowers. I would love the Zinnia guide but maybe you could have a guest grower guides from a flower grower that you know that farms in a different climatic zone like say sub-tropical where the heat and the humidity play havoc with delicate blooms.

    Reply
  8. shurry on

    I stumbled upon your blog, by viewing instagram. Gorgeous blooms! Inspirational photos! I wish I could visit the farm. Seems like a happy, magical place. Congratulations!
    I am eager to read more and indulge on these beautiful photos. (Especially, during this cold, snowy winter in Upper Peninsula Michigan).
    Those dahlias are amazing!

    Reply
  9. Laetitia de chez Florėsie on

    I’d love to discover your guides which seems just gorgeous and get te best of my cutting garden in France! And in the future, please tell us more about anemones. Happy Christmas and all the best from Champagne!

    Reply
  10. Sarah B on

    Great read. Would love to read more about ranunculus!

    Reply
  11. Susan on

    A guide on growing roses would be wonderful!

    Reply
  12. Jackson Mahaney on

    I agree with the comments about hoop houses and preparations, or perhaps tips on space planning and how to over-winter special flowers. We specialize in peonies but annuals – that’s a whole new world! Celosia has lots of varieties…maybe tips on that. :-)

    Reply
  13. Violet Maddox on

    I’d like to know about Peonies & any type of Wildflowers. Also a booklet maybe about best advice on how to get into flower farming & working with florals in general :).

    Reply
  14. Marina on

    Hi I’m a beginning grower and would love to have a book like that to learn from! I am especially interested in growing chocolate cosmos if you have any notes about those!

    Thanks :)

    Reply
  15. Laura on

    I would love a guide on vines! Jasmine, clematis, passion… Any vines!

    Reply
  16. Barb Stefanyshyn-Cote on

    Although this prize would be a wonderful gift – all I want for Christmas is the chance for you and I to meet! It’s on my bucket list.
    May 2015 allow you to continue your inspirational work!

    Reply
  17. Jamie sammons on

    Would love to learn about different peonies and dahlia varieties. I would also love a list of all different kinda of foilage used for cuts. I love finding new textures and colors to incorporate in design.

    Reply
  18. Jamie sammons on

    I would love to learn more about growing different peony and dahlia varieties. I’d also love to have a list of every different possible foliage that can be used for cuts. Love finding new colors and textures that I never thought about using before!

    Reply
  19. Diane Miller on

    Perfect. Just what I need as I start to plan for next springs inaugural cutting garden! Cheers Diane

    Reply
  20. Yvonne Rose on

    Im interested in the Fragrant Roses as a cut flower for design,also they can be used in all kinds of Herbal Delights as well! Thank You for the inspiration you give to all who know that Flower Farming is truly a Passion.Thank You for this fun Give Away!

    Reply
  21. Jessie on

    This was my first year growing Dahlias in Virginia and I’m amazed at how well they did. Thanks for the inspiration and the incredibly useful technical info!
    I would love to learn about your favorite fragrant cut flower varieties for bouquets and arrangements.

    Reply
  22. Amy F on

    Will be starting to grow flowers next year and this info will be so helpful. Would love more info on the season extension practices you use!

    Reply
  23. sophie Kurylowicz on

    I just searched your blog the other day to check what the right height to pinch out my Zinnias was (I’m in Australia!). I love your growing guides and tips on preferred growing varieties. That stuff on fillers is fantastic, more growing guides for bulbs (Ranunculus and anemones) and because of where I live I’m into anything that’s heat tolerant! celosia, cosmos, sunflowers!

    Reply
  24. Delisa P on

    All of your flowers are devine. I would enjoy the flower guide on your dreamy dahlias. I would also like to see one on peonies and ranunculus. Thank you for being such an inspiration!

    Reply
  25. Sandra d on

    I think there needs to be a Pacific Northwest “best of” guide. You obviously have an eye for what is beautiful. What is easiest to grow in this climate?

    Reply
  26. Abby Lee on

    Hmm…sunflowers, ranculus, anemones, delphiniums, growing in a high tunnel guide…

    Reply
  27. Sadhvi on

    I would love to read anything you write. I have surrounded our house with the flowers I love. For all the seasons, which is something that I also had to learn.
    So what would I like to hear you write about?
    Like I said, anything!

    Reply
  28. Kristy on

    I totally vote for poppies. Yours are so beautiful and mine are hit and miss with probably 1 in 10 seeds making it to flowers.

    Next would be ranunculus, I can’t get those to grow in NC

    Reply
  29. Carolyn Camp on

    I would really like to see a guide on how to grow roses organically if possible. Any suggestions for alternatives to the pesticides and fungicides needed to grow a healthy and productive bush would be appreciated.

    Reply
  30. Shelley on

    Congrats on your new online store!! I would love more information in the future about growing anemones & ranunculus. Love the photography on your blog & website!!

    Reply
  31. Evangeline M on

    I want to know how you do everything—but I think I going to go with mums. They are one of the flowers you don’t hear much about that I would love to grow successfully. Or flowering kale.

    Reply
  32. Rachel on

    I would love some tips on growing anemones and ranunculus! I’ve never tried them but I’d love to give them a shot!

    Reply
  33. Brooke on

    I just started my first cut garden in my backyard this this last fall. I was super inspired by your humble start! I would be growing here in here in Arizona ☀️ And would love to know a couple of varieties that would do well here! I hope to turn my flower journey into something amazing. I want to show my kids {6yr, 4yr, &2yrs old} the value of hard work. Planting a seed and nurturing it and ending up with something more beautiful than even hoped for!

    Reply
  34. Taylor on

    Thanks for sharing your knowledge! I’d love to see one on lisanthus as well…!

    Reply
  35. Audra on

    I would love to hear about when you start all the different varieties of flowers and fillers you grow, whether they’ll do well growing on outside or in a greenhouse, along with information about how long you grow them on before planting outside or potting up! I also am interested to hear more about succession planting and how to grow larkspurs, dephiniums, and stock. Thanks!!

    Reply
  36. Norma on

    Do you know how to grow lilacs? My husband loves them but I haven’t been successful with growing enough for cutting AND leaving on the bush.

    Reply
  37. Bobby Bowen on

    Hello floret flower farm! I’d love a few plant varieties covered by manuals. Foxgloves and delphiniums for starters – how on earth do yours get so tall? Also lisianthus from start to finish, and shrubs that provide berries with a decent vase life. Thank you for this opportunity!

    Bobby

    Reply
  38. Cindy K on

    While Sweet Peas are my favorite flowers, growing them myself is quite a challenge. I’d love a guide for growing poppies!

    Reply
  39. Lindsey H on

    Ranunculus. Love that flower, but it didn’t come up well for me with the other bulbs :-/ I’m curious about your tips for long – stemmed dahlias (some of ours were so short!) But I want to read up on foliage and fillers too!

    Reply
  40. Catrinel Wright on

    Hello Erin, greetings from the UK! Just to say your blog is always a source of inspiration and a very good pick-me up at the end of a hard day, so please keep writing :)

    I would like a growing guide on ranunculus and anemones, and another on best roses for cutting.

    Somebody mentioned a growing guide for tulips: I could help with that, as I am in my 11th year of growing tulips for cutting, keep trying new varieties most years, and keep notes of what has been successful and what was less so.

    Reply
  41. Katie on

    This is awesome! How about info on when to start seeds for succession planting and when to order bulbs.

    Reply
  42. Laura Timmerman on

    I love your growing guides! So thorough, clearly written, and full of information. I’d like to to see one about growing roses for cut flowers, especially scented ones.

    Reply
  43. Eric on

    I would like to see a manual on aromatic herbs and small fruited shrubs best for fillers – for instance, not all basil are alike and the longevity of berried shrubs are variable when cut. Thank you for yor work on the blog!

    Reply
  44. Marcella Giovanni on

    Oh, wow! This is amazing news :) I could use the growing guides for future reference because my dream is to have a flower farm like you. You’re really inspiring.
    I would love to see Ranunculus and Lilies in the guide, or even any other flowers you grew.

    Reply
  45. Jillian Arquette Gallagher on

    Erin, I would love to see a growing guide on scabiosas, and bulbs; specifically tulips. My generous bee keeping berry loving father swayed me to make the leap into the garden…all 18 acres of it. I’m working and dreaming my way towards being a flower farmer, so any edition would be a help!

    Reply
  46. marianne on

    Well first I am thankful for these offered guides and hope they apply to our zone 8 (no peonies and tulips for us :( ). I just ordered all the guides and bulbs (except the sold out zinnias-would love this) so I don’t need to win. However, will chime in for future guides of scabiosas, heirloom chrysanthemum, ranunculus and berries. Thank you, Erin!

    Reply
  47. Sarah Carrier on

    I haven’t entered the other giveaways… have been waiting with my fingers crossed for this one! The greatest gift is a little bit of wisdom from your experience. I would love info on Peony growing and info on flower storage (I know that is not a growing guide) but general tips of flower storage would be great. Thanks for all that you do and offer your readers. Love visiting you here.

    Reply
  48. Mercedes Ivener on

    Thank you for publishing the wealth of information you have painstakingly gathered. You are helping to bring back flower farming to our country! I would love the one on foliage and fillers as I want to grow these items in my backyard garden for use in the flower shop I am opening this coming year. Foliage doesn’t ship very well and transportation is costly for those large bundles so I want to grow my own supply! I would like to see you do a guide on 1) vines to use in arrangements and 2) post harvest care and conditioning for flowers and foliage.

    Reply
  49. Erica on

    Ranunculus and anemones!

    Reply
  50. Wendy C on

    I would like to see a detailed guide on growing Celosia flowers. Thanks!

    Reply
  51. Ashley C. on

    I’d like to see some tips on Icelandic poppies!

    Reply
  52. Roxanne McCoy on

    An in-depth grower’s guide on snapdragons would be very welcome. Erin, everything that you do is wonderful and so I am hoping that you will take this suggestion as just a helpful hint to take you one step closer to excellence. I believe that you often interchange the terms cultivar and variety for the word species. When you are talking about the whole group of dahlias or sweet peas or zinnias, you are talking about a species or sometimes even a genus. Then the cultivars are all those incredible cultivated varieties within the species.

    Reply
  53. Malin Berg on

    How nice! Good job! I would love to reda one about fragrant roses! Or Hydrangeas!! Thank you

    Reply
  54. Nicole on

    I could use growing guides on all the beautiful flowers you grow @Floret! Yes please! At the moment I need one about english roses the most, since I’ve planted them they are struggling with diseases and aphids..
    And I am keen to start with ranunculus and icelandic poppies but don’t know how without a polytunnel..

    Reply
  55. Amber Dickson on

    I am just starting to do some research on flower farming, in anticipation of having a place to grow my own product someday! I would love tips for small-scale potted flowers, for those of us with limited growing capabilities.

    Reply
  56. Suzi on

    I agree also biannuals, lisianthus, poppies and ranunculus please.

    Reply
  57. Kristen C. on

    This is wonderful! I would love to see tips on growing perennial greens, shrubs, and vines used in centerpieces and in bouquet work.

    Reply
  58. Wanda Fox on

    Hello Erin & Co.
    I have admired you from afar for years it seems! Time to really get my flower world rocking. I would love to learn how to grown8 ft tall delphiniums. That is one of my favorite pictures of you lost in a beautiful jungle of blue delphiniums! Wanda

    Reply
  59. Jane Stratton on

    Would love to know more about unusual fillers!

    Reply
  60. Sarah on

    I would love some tips on starting out; how to know your soil is ready and your space is good, what to plant when. Super excited to see all you come out with!

    Reply
  61. melissa s on

    I’d love to see a guide on the cute nasturtiums I see in your bouquets! :)

    Reply
  62. Amber on

    I’m very interested in growing a wide variety of sunflowers – an acre or so. I’d like suggestions on which companion flowers and greenery to plant. Also, I’d like to plant flowers in and around our upcoming apple orchard. I’d like to know which varieties would do well in that environment.
    I’m not sure if your guide is an exact match for these questions, but I’ve also always loved the idea of a cutting garden so I can send friends home with bouquets.

    Reply
  63. Kim on

    I’d love to see you expand on what you’ve written about biennials, especially campanula, digitalis, and dianthus. Do you have any new favorites, or have you changed your mind about some of the varieties you used to grow? Thanks!

    Reply
  64. Brittney Adams on

    I would love to learn more about English Garden Roses! I believe I have a great space for them, but I’m just not sure. For some reason the intimidate me!

    Reply
  65. Ozzie on

    Delphiniums! That’s what I would love to learn to grow.

    Reply
  66. Krista on

    I would love some tips for lisanthus! Such a magnificent, finicky flower. Also, can never have too much info on non toxic rose farming;)

    Reply
  67. Karen M on

    Chrysanthemums! Thank you.

    Reply
  68. Phoebe of Thistle Flower Farm on

    I’ll add my vote in with the many others who would much appreciate more resources about growing ranunculus, anemone, lisianthus, and icelandic poppies.
    Also your post harvest handling practices for different types of flowers, specifically your thoughts on straight water or preservatives. And, if there are any crops you use for cover cropping that you also are able to harvest cuts from. Thank you for sharing so much useful information on your blog, and I hope that your holiday week is tremendously peaceful. oh! And any tips you have for cutting and handling fruiting branches for arranging (blackberries, apples, pears etc.)

    Reply
  69. olen on

    Just bought 5 acres-ready to make some moves! I’m extremely interested in the dahaila tuber world. Propagation, irrigation, greenhouse building. Thanks.

    Reply
  70. Charlotte on

    I’ve just had the chance to start on my dream of creating my very own cut flower garden. Some beautiful and very knowledgeable advice would be perfect. I would love to also know more about how to grow peonies and anemones.

    Reply
  71. Angela on

    This is wonderful!

    Reply
  72. Kristen M on

    I second and third and fourth the anemones and ranunculus! All the info. you’ve provided on your blog before has been so insightful. Thanks!

    Reply
  73. Evelyn L on

    I would love it if you would share any tips on three spring beauties – anemone, ranunculus and poppies. Here, in Zone 6 on the east coast, I have added them to my low tunnels. It is my second year growing them. Last year was good, but I would love even better. Your work is inspirational, from growing to designing to all the ways in which you share. Thank you! Congratulations on all your accomplishments, can’t wait to follow your next visions. Enjoy them… all!
    Best

    Reply
  74. erin on

    would love to know more about how to grow peonies, lilacs, hydrangeas and roses.

    Reply
  75. Kris P on

    I’ve appreciated the cultural advice you’ve made available on-line and I have no doubt that your growing guides are fabulous. I’d love to see a growing guide dealing with sunflowers.

    Reply
  76. Katie on

    I’m so excited about these growing guides! This year I plan on turning my back garden into a flower haven. It has been sorely unloved and I’ve reached my wits end waiting for my landlord to put some work into it, so I’ve decided to do it myself.

    I’d love to see growing guides on anemones, ranunculus, poppies and peonies. I’d also love to see a growing guide on growing in small spaces and how to use every square inch.

    Reply
  77. Karen Cherry on

    I have enjoyed all the inspiring info you have shared from the first photos I drooled over on flickr. I would love more info about those Mums you gave us a peek at last fall. How do you grow them? Are you trying any other perennials or shrubs?

    Reply
  78. Sarah Ervin on

    I would love to see guides on peonies, heirloom roses and if you plant them, hellebores. :) Cant wait to read what you have available now!

    Reply
  79. Sally on

    I would love information on wild flowers for a pollinators bouquet!

    Reply
  80. Shari D on

    Future articles: peonies, anemones, companion plantings.

    I grew great sweet peas in my back yard last season after reading your article. :)

    Reply
  81. Caroline on

    Thanks so much for this! I would love a guide on using herbs and other edibles in arrangements, for added interest. Or tips on how condition and use more delicate flowers and foliage. There’s so much diverse inspiration online, but learning what can actually be used in wearables v. bouquets v. centerpieces is quite daunting…

    Reply
  82. Tammy Howard on

    I would love information on growing and propagating cold hardy roses (We are in zone 4) and propagating different shrubs for filler. Propagation in general would be a great topic! Thanks for the inspiration Erin! Have a great holiday.

    Reply
  83. aubrey on

    a field guide for growing in the mountains? i’m at 2500 ft, amidst the pines, and would love to successfully flower farm up here!

    Reply
  84. Laurie Parkison on

    What a gorgeous growing guide! I would love to learn more about growing your amazing Icelandic poppies! So beautiful!

    Reply
  85. Rose Martinson on

    Well,… Since I have purchased all of the collections just a day ago.. I really need the study guide so that I will succeed…… I can’t wait.,,,,,, my Christmas gift to me from me…… Thank you so much for your collection,… I feel that I have won the drawing at so many levels …..
    Poppies will be my next challenge …… The mystery of these sweet flowers were inspired to me due to the London exhibit symbolizing the 100th anniversary of WWI …. Ceramic poppies????? Or not,…. I want them and a guide to go with them….. Love every thing you do

    Reply
  86. Julia on

    Boy, I would just love it if you covered how to grow cut flowers in less than perfect conditions. We live in Ellensburg, WA, and have drought conditions and a lot of wind! I have successfully grown marigolds, peonies, goldenrod, zinnias, sweet peas, celosia, and many other old fashioned varieties. But a few are simply impossible. Plants have to be super hardy here!

    Reply
  87. VillageKid on

    Oh bless you for compiling these!! Totally ‘soul’ candy for those of us working to get better at our growing flower skills!!

    Let me add my votes for:

    Roses, tulips, anemones, ranunculus, mums, celosia, as many filler plants/foliage as you can think of!!

    Also anytime you want to do ‘vase care’ for such toughies as lilacs, poppies, the different vines like clematis.

    Look forward to see what all you come up with.

    Victoria

    Reply
  88. Sarah P on

    A guide on lisianthus and/or chrysanthemums would be great…. Perhaps also you could add mum cuttings to your store in the spring, if you have stock plants…..?? :-)

    Reply
  89. Linda Q on

    Wow, I so wish I had these guides when I first started growing cut flowers 2 years ago! I have been gardening all of my adult life-perennials, flowering shrubs, annuals & trees- but nothing prepared me for all of the details involved in germinating, growing, cutting & making bouquets for market! It is not like you can go to a garden center and just buy the plants and stick them in the ground -YOU have to grow everything yourself from seed. The guides you have done so far look great and are definitely on my wish list. I would like to see future guides on flowers that make the focal flowers pop that would include propagation details and tips. Blue flowers like ageratum, salvia gruppenblau, and blue statice. White flowers like daisies, ammi, and feverfew. Also a booklet on the plants you call ‘air’ such as gomphrena & craspedia. I haven’t tried growing lilies yet but one on those would also be helpful!

    Reply
  90. Anne Anderson on

    I would like to learn more about Hydrangeas. I just planted some new ones last season and I have so much to learn. So many variaties! They are beautiful fresh and dried!

    Reply
  91. Elissa on

    Your selection of growing sources, tips, advice is priceless! Assistance in growing foxglove, chocolate cosmos, and astilbe would be delightful!

    Reply
  92. Lorna on

    Would love to see a guide for delphiniums, anemones, and ranunculus. Really, all the flowers. :)

    Reply
  93. Kirsten on

    Oh geez, that’s a tough one! Maybe wildflowers like poppies, cosmos, and bachelor buttons. In particular I have a hard time keeping poppies from dying once cut. There must be a trick!

    Reply
  94. Jordyn on

    I would love a growing guide on Peonies!

    Reply
  95. Virginia on

    Your how-to grow guides to date have been priceless. So much knowledge! Would also love to see something on anemones and ranunculus as mentioned by Kelly above. And where or where can the black-eyed white anemones be found??

    Reply
  96. Laurie Anne on

    WOW !!! I would really like to look at some Alliums and Ranunculus! ;) Thanks from Montreal !

    Reply
  97. Kathleen Citron on

    Your flowers are amazing!

    Will the Dahlias you are selling (tubers) grow in North Carolina (zone 7)?

    Reply
  98. Jane on

    Ranunculus, and forget-me-nots. Digitalis, and delphiniums! Thanks!

    Reply
  99. cristina on

    this sounds like a wealth of information- that I would love to have! I would love to know more about growing foxgloves,delphiniums, and peonies

    Reply
  100. Barbara on

    I have read and re-read your flower focus articles many times, both on your blog and on Growing for Market, such useful information. Thank you so much for sharing your talent and knowledge! I would love a guide to heirloom chrysanthemums, more on celosias, and a hoop house guide.

    Reply
  101. Marta on

    I am soooo excited about these growing guides ! I have been reading every word on your site since I stumbled upon it from an image I found of you with an armful of Cafe au Lait Dahlias slung over your shoulder :)))) I don’t believe that was any coincidence at all – You are my flower muse and I thank you for your inspiration and your spirit of generosity in giving back – I would be grateful for any future guide, but, specifically one on bulbs of all kinds ! Thank you , thank you, thank you!

    Reply
  102. Jenn Henry on

    Feverfew please!!! I saw an insta pic you posted over the summer with buckets of varieties! Then Icelandic poppies and Ranuncs! Thanks Erin!

    Reply
  103. Beth S on

    I would love to read your guide to dahlias! It would also be awesome to have guides for lisianthus, celosia, bulbs, and woodies. There’s so much to learn about!

    Reply
  104. Amy S. on

    Great choices for the first four guides! I will likely buy all of them. In the future I would love to see some on ranunculus and anemones, spring bulbs like tulips and narcissus, and one on planning and growing for mixed market bunches.

    Reply
  105. Kathy on

    I would love to hear how you build hop houses. And where you get all your energy. thanks, kathy

    Reply
  106. Mara on

    Would love a guide on seed starting indoors, what one would need, when to plant out, etc.
    Also, I’d love to see some posts/a guide on your many thousands of fall bulbs, how you order, when you plant, how you plant, what goes in the hoop house vs out etc.

    Reply
  107. Kelly G. on

    You’re such and inspiration! Starting my own little flower farm this year, and would love to learn more about anemone and vines particularly clematis.

    Reply
  108. Emily Carey on

    I would love a growing guide! I would love to learn more on Bells of Ireland or astilbe.

    Reply
  109. Lisa on

    Love to know about growing interesting foliage. I’m in the PNW as well and would love know your tricks for that pesky liquid sunshine we have so much of. I also love to see something on growing Ranunculus. Love them but have a hard time growing them. Just a small gardener but would love to be able to grow enough to use in my designs. Beautiful site!

    Reply
  110. Tonya on

    For whatever reason, I absolutely stink at fall and winter sowing. Me and hardy annuals seem to have a love/hate relationship.

    Reply
  111. Pressly on

    I am taking the plunge this year to grow dahlias here in NC! And I would love to learn more about growing anemone as I’m trying those out for the first time too!

    Reply
  112. Serah Pesce on

    I second the anemones and ranunculus! Thank you for sharing you experiences, expertise, and breathtaking photos! What inspiration!!

    Reply
  113. Stephanie Leonard on

    Would really like to up my sweetpea game so I’ve got my eyes on that one. I would love to see a growing guide for ranunculus and anemones in the future. Hints and tips on how to acquire hoop house supplies and maybe some basic thoughts on that subject would be helpful too! Love your site, I’ve learned so much already.

    Reply
  114. Jillian M on

    Poppies! Poppies! and Poppies! …… Its the dainty ones that can be the most intimidating. Being only 24 years old and practically having no money to peruse this dream I need all the resources that are available to me & knowledge is power!! Ranunculus and Anemones would be amazing too….. if the guide can come with a pop out low tunnel!…… Ah, I’ll keep dreaming…because I KNOW all of this will be in my future. When there is heart and passion it WILL happen!! Thank you Erin for all of your inspiration on the reg!

    Reply
  115. Erin Walsh on

    Garden roses growing guide..Or general guidelines for planning a field/row. Everything thus far has been helpful/informative thanks Erin

    Reply
  116. tanglebloomvt on

    Loving the idea of these growing guides! I would like to see guides on delphinium and lisianthus. Thank you for sharing your knowledge with us.

    Reply
  117. Katie B. on

    Just starting our journey in creating a flower farm, so I’d love to read about any and all types of plants. And post harvest handling. Thanks!

    Reply
  118. Jacqui on

    I would love to learn more about lisianthus, ranunculus. Thanks for all you’ve done so far!

    Reply
  119. Shannon on

    I could use some guidance growing everything, but would love to have specific guides on anemones, hydrangeas, and zinnias. Thank you!

    Shannon Brown

    Reply
  120. Deanna on

    I’d love a guide on lisianthus. Also ranunculus. A post-harvest handling guide for a variety of flowers would also be wonderful.

    Reply
  121. Janet on

    Zinnias are one of my favorites. They always look so vibrant and colorful in every garden!

    Reply
  122. Natalie on

    I would love one on anything, but a guide on starting out and planning would be nice!

    Reply
  123. Martha on

    I don’t recall seeing delphiniums in your bouquets, but their seeding requirements can be fussy, so a growing guide would be great to see. Also I do see a lot of roses and/or lisianthus in your arrangements, so that would be a wonderful addition. Happy Solstice!

    Reply
  124. Sas on

    Spring bulbs!!!

    Reply
  125. Karen on

    Your articles in Growing for Market have provided much momentum for our farm’s floral endeavors and it’s nice to see you creating ongoing resources dedicated to specific crops. Have you thought much about a guide to perennials (esp. woodies?), including tips for best ways to establish permanent beds with effective weed barriers and irrigation? . . . . much on my mind these days.

    Reply
  126. Angela on

    I would love to get a detailed chart on post harvest handling for the flowers you grow. Which ones need to sit in the cool garage vs go right into the cooler. Which flowers do you scald the ends? Are there ones that don’t go in the cooler at all? etc etc etc!

    Reply
  127. Mary Jo on

    I would love to see a future growing guide on woodies & shrubs. I’d also like to see one on grasses and grains, though perhaps you’ve already included those in the foliage and fillers guide.

    Reply
  128. redbrickbuilding on

    I’d like to see a growing guide for winter-blooming flowers!

    Reply
  129. Katie Phillips on

    Celosias! I loved all the varieties in your test batch last year, the sheer number of colors was breathtaking. And amaranths… Love Lies Bleedings etc.

    Reply
  130. Cheryl Buras on

    Love the inspiration you have given! Just continue your journey of bliss and rewarding work…..
    Thank You!

    Reply
  131. Toni Carie on

    Oh my goodness! I would so love to use the guide in starting my gardens off this year. It’s so hard knowing where to start….

    Reply
  132. Marla C. on

    How about one on the”early birds”. -ranunculus and anemones? Maybe an article on composting/ prepping your soil for different varieties ?…..

    Reply
  133. Yelena Shumakova on

    I would love the dahlia growing guide! (Sweet pea fighting for first here!)

    I would love to see a guide on peonies or ranunculus. For a to do, I would love to see a field preparation guide.

    Thanks so much!

    Reply
  134. Helen on

    Would appreciate an overview of new and emergent green/sustainable growing/handling practices and/or new products and their pros and cons (e.g. alternatives to common floral preservatives, oasis, mixed plantings/beneficial insects).

    Reply
  135. Roz Smith on

    You have been my inspiration. Growing cut flowers has long been an ambition of mine, and I am fulfilling my dream now, in my “tiny” 3 acres here in Royal Berkshire, England. I would love some help on how to grow roses for picking. How to avoid weather damage and pest damage, and perhaps a bit about pruning?

    Reply
  136. Penmerry on

    I always swoon over your fields of dahlias… so I would choose that! And I’d love to see one on Lisianthus in the future!

    Reply
  137. Kelly on

    Growing guides for anemones and ranunculus!!!

    Reply
  138. Johanna M Morris on

    I have been following your blog for a few years now and I am so inspired and encouraged to keep growing these beauties. I would love more information on selling at market and how to make beautiful arrangements . I also would be interested in a guide on the soil, hoophouse, greenhouse and seasonal guide on which flowers grow together :) thank you for being such an inspiration.

    Reply
  139. Jane Smith on

    Whoops, forgot future growing guides: how about field grown vs. hoop house? And low tunnels and fabric cloth use while you’re at it.

    Reply
  140. Jane Smith on

    Just the thing for a ‘budding’ flower farmer. Thank you so much for all of your help..via blog posts and the website. Happy Holidays!

    Reply
  141. Amanda Brown on

    Congratulations on this new big step in your flower farming! Living on the East Coast with harsh winters means I have trouble with Ranunculus, Anemones and types of zone 6 bulbs that I can’t overwinter.

    Reply
  142. Elisa on

    2015 is the year I will be realizing my 5-year long dream of a small flower farm, and I will definitely be looking to your fantastic growing guides in the process! The climate here in western Norway is probably a bit harsher than yours in winter, but I will learn to cope with that. I would love to see a growing guide for hardy roses that will do well in the field and also perform in a vase. I would be thrilled to win any of your growing guides, but I think I would choose foliage and fillers first as I think it would be super useful to me as I am setting off on this journey.

    Reply
  143. Cole Harris on

    I would love your thoughts on field and wild grown roses.

    Reply
  144. Rachel Dyson on

    Thank you for sharing your time, knowledge, ups and downs with us. I am interested to growing more roses so any time saving care tips would be most welcome. All the best to you in 2015!!

    Reply
  145. Ivette Selen on

    Would love to have a guide on how to keep my plants more healthy/natural control of diseases. For flowers a guide on how to grow snapdragons.
    I used your guide for sweet peas this year and the flowerstems were a lot longer than last year.
    This was the proof for me that I can grow my own cutflowers (with a bit of help :-).

    Reply
  146. Rose Mossong on

    Hello from NZ! I would love to know what are the best Wildflowers to sow for picking and using in bouquets and tBle arrangements. Thankyou.

    Reply
  147. Andrea Vallee on

    I would enjoy information about succession planting, a plan for enjoying cut flowers nearly year round here in the Samish Valley. Thank you!

    Reply
  148. Carol on

    So much inspiration. Whatever you choose to guide me through next, I will be happy!

    Reply
  149. Sabrina Brown on

    I would love to have the growing guide on sweet peas. If would love to see a guide on growing container gardens.

    Thank you!
    Sabrina

    Reply
  150. Hannah Roberts on

    Hi there, I would love to win these booklets and other areas I’d like covered are shrubs/ perennials for foliage.

    Reply
  151. janis Harris on

    Awesome Erin! I would love to have any of those! Tulip varieties would be a great resource too.

    Reply
  152. linda on

    First day of Winter but also my lst days of planning for my teeny tiny flowers for my teeny tiny flower bouquets. Interested in any small, fairy like flowers to make tussie mussies wrapped in vintage linens….

    Reply
  153. Holly Talbot Shiach on

    Hi Erin, oooh that looks fantastic! Id like you to cover foxgloves. Thanks for your hard work and inspiration!

    Reply
  154. Janet Czarnecki on

    I love your new online shop! I would love to see a guide for delphiniums and one for nursery practices for starting teeny tiny flower seeds!

    Reply
  155. Margaret Thorson on

    I would love to pick your brain for what you know about growing flowers. I’ve been doing it for 25 years and there is still so much to learn. One of the best things about this business.

    Reply

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