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Home Blog Author Interview: Frances Palmer
October 12th 2020

Author Interview: Frances Palmer

Written by
Floret

I first met Frances Palmer in 2015 when she came to our farm to attend one of our in-person workshops. We formed a strong connection and have stayed in touch over the years. I’m in love with her pottery and her photography, and deeply inspired by how she’s grown a very intentional business centered around creativity and staying true to what works for her. Frances also loves flowers, especially dahlias, and has an amazing cutting garden she keeps for inspiration and subject matter for her photos. I asked her to share some of the lessons and experiences that led to her gorgeous new book, Life in the Studio: Inspiration and Lessons on Creativity, with Floret readers.


Erin: Thank you so much for taking time to share your story with Floret readers. For those not familiar with your work, can you share an overview of your story?

Frances: I’ve been a potter for over 30 years and did not begin until I turned 30, though I’ve made art since I was young and originally aspired to be a printmaker. When we moved out to Weston, Connecticut, with a newborn daughter, and I felt completely overwhelmed, I signed up for a throwing class at a nearby art guild. I knew immediately that pottery was my métier, and it combined all the things that I love to do. I am fascinated by the process from start to finish. My work is primarily functional, formed on the pottery wheel and thrown in mainly three clay bodies: white earthenware, terracotta, and high-fire translucent porcelain. In the early years, I worked in the house while our three children were growing up. Now, I have a barn next to the house and spend most of my time there. There are two gardens next to the studio where the flowers are grown for my photography.

Erin: Your career began in arts administration, but you left that behind decades ago and have worked in the creative arena yourself ever since. Your new book, Life in the Studio, is such a rich record of your path and also your day-to-day process. Is the book a project you’ve wanted to do for a long time?

Frances: My literary agent urged me for a long time to do a book, but I felt that I wasn’t ready or clear about what I wished to say. Then, Artisan Books asked me to write about my studio philosophies in order to inspire others. In general, I prefer my art to speak for itself, so it was challenging to put down on the page principles that I have held since the start of my career. Most of the time, because I am in the studio alone, my strategies live in my head and go no farther than family and friends. Some essays were easier to articulate than others, but I wrote for two years to explain my creative path, and it has been a worthwhile experience.

Erin: So many of our readers are yearning to express their creativity and might be waiting for certain things to fall into place first. But in the introduction to your book, you talk about unpredictability, and also about how following artistic dreams doesn’t mean you have to completely change your everyday life. Can you talk more about balancing creative intentions with unpredictability and less-than-ideal circumstances?

Frances: I was trying to say that even if one can’t afford to give up a means of support in order to fully follow a creative desire, small steps can be taken, allowing space to start. A table in a room, a special chair, a wheel at a communal pottery. One or two hours a week. It doesn’t have to be an all-or-nothing proposition, and gradually, the balance will start to shift. It takes time and patience, and sometimes one’s in the middle of change before it is acknowledged. Mostly, just keep at whatever inspires you, and even a little is a movement forward. Just knowing that you are allowing yourself that creative time makes a huge difference.

Erin: Your book has an entire section devoted to dahlias: their history, your favorite varieties, and how you care for the tubers and plants throughout the year for a season of blooms. Clearly you’ve been bitten by the dahlia bug! Can you say more about what these blooms, and gardening in general, mean to your work and your inspiration?

Frances: I’ve been growing dahlias now for over 26 years. I first spied them in a book and was immediately obsessed. When I began, they were out of fashion, and gardening friends were dismissive of my enthusiasm. But I was and still am captivated by their exuberance, color, and form. I love that dahlias bloom from late summer through to frost and get better and more eccentric as the season moves on. I am also fascinated by their provenance and how they are bred. Heirloom dahlias have a lot to say about the culture of their time, depending on origin. I am an art historian by education. I love to study the history of plants, as well as ceramics, and how the two intertwine in my craft. It is not just about planting a flower in the garden. I do a tremendous amount of research on all the flower types that I select.

Erin: You cover so many themes that have come up in your years of creative practice, including believing in your intuition about whether a potential commission is a good fit or not. Can you share more about learning to trust your gut?

Frances: I give each project complete attention and only send out work that is my best effort. At the start of my business, I accepted all opportunities, even if the job was something that did not really align with my design aesthetic. Over time, I realized that, if possible, it was most important to only undertake collaborations that I could be enthusiastic about. Fortunately, I’ve had only a few requests that I’ve turned down, but it is important to ask yourself a few questions before moving forward. If you listen to yourself, that is the best guide, as instinctively, you know if something is right for you. It is when you don’t listen that things can go awry.

Erin: You also write about how you initially bought ads to get word out about your pottery but eventually found that photography—which you have taken time to learn yourself—was the best tool. Would you recommend that other creatives learn to photograph their own work as a way of telling their story?  

Frances: Yes, I think that it is important for an artist to learn photography for a number of reasons. Photos keep a record of your work, showing evolution. No one will see your art the way that you do, so hiring a photographer can be expensive and unsatisfactory. At the end of the day, you will know best how to interpret your ideas and give the best expression. In the age of social media, it is important to be able to capture a spontaneous moment, and if you always have a camera or phone with you, this is easily accomplished. In these times, many digital and print magazines request you to supply your own high-resolution photos because they are unable to send a photographer. It is crucial to know how to provide these, which increases your visibility editorially. Finally, taking photos trains your eye to see things that are happening visually around you. Once your consciousness is raised, it is exciting to find new ways to capture the world.

Erin: I was really struck by the part of the book where you talk about your creative community, about how you wanted your daughter to be around artistic, accomplished women—and about how she has so many “other mothers” she can rely on. You write, “As much as I love my family, there is no substitute for having another woman to talk to about anxieties, fears, triumphs, tribulations, and the day-to-day job of being female.” I love this! Can you share more?

Frances: While there is much to admire in the accomplishments of famous women, I am most inspired by the women I know personally and witness their courage in facing the challenges of daily life. As mentioned, I work alone, so my friendships are tremendously important. Everyone needs empathy and support, yet also truthfulness. Having my women friends to talk to makes all the difference. But it is not a one-way street—I am glad to hear their thoughts equally, and we talk about politics, gardens, making things with our hands, children, and on and on. If we all lived in a communal village and sat around while we worked, that would be wonderful. But as that is not the current mode of things, get-togethers and conversation are gifts and highly cherished.

Erin: Who are some of the artists or people working in other arenas who are inspiring you now?

Frances: I am reading the biography of Ruth Asawa (Everything She Touched: The Life of Ruth Asawa, by Marilyn Chase), a Japanese-American artist (1926-2013) who as a teenager lived in the Japanese internment camps during World War II. She had an indomitable spirit in spite of this terrible hardship and went on to be an incredible artist of elegant wire mesh sculptures, as well as a community activist in the San Francisco school system during the 1960s. The USPS has just released a stamp collection of her sculptures. I recently finished reading a book by Isabella Tree called Wilding, about returning her family’s land that had been farmed for over a century back to the natural landscape. As a result, all sorts of plants, insects, and animals that were on the verge of extinction reappeared and flourished. Tree describes how interwoven and integral each aspect of nature is to the other and how this needs to be preserved for the health of the earth.

Erin: What are some of the projects you’re currently working on that you’re most excited about, and what are you dreaming of doing next?

Frances: I am very excited about the release of my book, as it will be the culmination of two years of writing and photographing. I also am having a photography exhibition at Wave Hill, a wonderful public garden on the Hudson River in the Bronx, New York. My photos are in Wave Hill House September 12th through to December 31st. Additionally, my wood-fired pots are part of an installation at the Eliot Noyes House in New Canaan. I am looking forward to making and firing new pots in my wood kiln that I had built last year near my studio. Creating the glazes for this is fascinating, and then to see how the ash from the wood transforms the pots is magical. It takes time and focus, and I love moving my work in this direction.

Erin: Thank you so much, Frances, for taking the time to share your story with Floret readers. I continue to be inspired by your work, and I know so many of our readers will learn from what you’ve shared. 

To celebrate the release of Frances’s new book, Life in the Studio: Inspiration and Lessons on Creativity, we’re giving away 5 copies. Winners will also receive Frances’s beautiful new 750-piece dahlia puzzle. For a chance to win, simply post a comment below. In your comment, tell us what inspires you most about Frances and her work. Winners will be announced on Friday, October 23rd.

A big congratulations to our winners: Victoria Summers, Melinda, Christina, Olivia Josephine and Angie Choly!

Please note: If your comment doesn’t show up right away, sit tight; we have a spam filter that requires we approve comments before they are published.

Learn more and connect with Frances Palmer.

Book: https://amzn.to/2F8pxFS

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/francespalmer/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/francespalmer

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Frances-Palmer-Pottery

Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/francespalmer/

Website: https://www.francespalmerpottery.com/

686 Comments

  1. Corrie Woods on

    Thank you both so much! I have just savored every word and every image of “Life in the Studio” Too, I have a stunning new Frances Palmer vase that will be filled with flowers from my garden by day’s end. Erin, I appreciate your introduction to yet another wildly creative wonderful woman!

    Reply
  2. Ruth Adams on

    I love the vibrant colours and movement within Frances Palmer’s still life photographs. Her images have both an exuberance and serenity about them.

    Reply
  3. Amy on

    Oh I so want to grow Dahlias next year! This book looks gorgeous!

    Reply
  4. Cecile Stewart- Hamilton on

    Thank you lady’s for sharing your stories , I continue to be inspired by you and others like you , continue to live a life filled with beauty.

    Reply
  5. Karena K. on

    I love her encouragement that pursuing creativity can be done gradually; If it’s something you love, the balance will naturally start to shift. I also love what she said about surrounding yourself with lots of artistic, accomplished women.

    Reply
  6. Susan Farrell on

    I love her eye for beauty and color in her flowers. The arrangements are breathtaking. Her pottery is amazing and so very creative. Her statement about listening to your intuition so things don’t go awry is so spot on. I am studying to be a health coach at this time and she is inspirational. I am going to buy her book to learn more about this amazing woman and her story. Thank you Erin for this wonderful interview.

    Reply
  7. Samantha on

    Those colors! The shapes! So inspiring! But most of all I find it inspiring that she followed her creative path in life. Looking forward to reading her book.

    Reply
  8. Kimberly Greidanus on

    The beauty in your talent is what is so inspiring for each of us!! The fact that you started to pursue this in your 30’s, shows us as well that it doesn’t matter what age we are to start a new hobby and bring it to life…you make exquisite pieces out of mud, that reminds me what The Lord has done and created from each of us, and you are doing similar art, Amen Bless your hands and each piece you form!!!

    Reply
  9. Dianne Gilbert on

    Her pottery is whimsical, fun, functional, and one of a kind. Her flower arrangements are lush, colorful and seasonal. She has a lovely eye for color and detail!

    Reply
  10. patty westridge on

    I.love how sge put my two favorite thing together photography and flower i would’ve to learn more and get inspiration from books

    Reply
  11. Lisa S. on

    Start where you are – keep at it – stay inspired (surround myself with inspiring people, images, and thoughts) – realize any movement as progress. Simple and true and I often lose sight of these truths.

    Reply
  12. Martha Ferguson on

    To make time for creative pursuits no matter how crazy your life may be.

    Reply
  13. Angie Clark on

    Thank you so much for your words. You are truly inspiring.

    Reply
  14. Suzanne Ketterman on

    Every Friday, on his way home from work, my husband brings me flowers. He has been doing this since before we were married. I have a very modest collection of vases. Most of them once held a more celebratory bouquet such as flowers I received for a birthday or anniversary. Seeing the photographs of the Frances’ beautiful work, I immediately began to fantasize about which vases I would choose for my “husband flowers”. I take loving care of my flowers all week, giving them fresh water and trimming the stems several times so they will last as long as possible. Fresh flowers in a pretty vase make a home look and feel loved and cared for. There are times when the flowers last so long that I will have several vases going at one time. These are the times when I realize a gal can never have too many vases! Thank you for sharing Frances’ story.

    Reply
  15. Gwen Hess on

    So intriguing as I also work in my studio, alone. I so enjoy and become deeply indulged in the silence and the inspiration I find within those walls. It was wonderful to read about creating inspiration outside the studio, becoming your own marketer, extending yourself into community and just creating a life you love. Thank you for the peek inside the world of Frances Palmer. I look forward to reading her book.

    Reply
  16. Margaret Naku on

    Many thanks for this insightful interview with Frances Palmer. .The interview questions generated responses that revealed so many dimensions of her artistic process, her gardening ,her photography , her business and her personal relationships. I particularly enjoyed your question about the friendships in her life . This question generated her acknowledgement of how solitary art can be and how she manages that and treasures her personal relationships and views each as a gift!

    Reply
  17. Leah Travers on

    Her pottery hooked me first. I saw it in a Floret book and immediately looked to the resources to find out where it came from. What I found was not just a “source“, but a story of a creative, inspiring, talented woman. I love her unique shapes and recognize them immediately. I’ve wondered which comes first In her photos, the flowers accessible at the moment or the vase, because they always look like old friends that bring out the best in each other. I find her pieces very calming, no matter how bright and wild the flowers in them are. She creates so much beauty. And each piece is a an incredible work of art. So much for our eyes to feast on in each photograph. Thank you for sharing more of her story with us.

    Reply
  18. Heli Koskelainen on

    Love how she combines the three things that I love and make myself too: pottery, gardening and baking! Increasing the time spend on them little by little instrad of a drastick chsnge is wise and excactly what I strive to do.:)

    Reply
  19. Hollie McCune on

    What inspires me most about Frances is her creativity! Her work and what she does is an inspiration and fuels my passion and dreams to make my own flower and garden dreams come true!

    Reply
  20. Tara L. on

    What a beautiful interview! I love your passion and the hope you exude. I love flowers and art, and right now, I cling to those things. I am raising my 2 special needs teens as a single Mom, and I am hanging on by a thread. Thank you for what you do! I would love to read your book, and do a puzzle with my girls. I have a very small flower garden, and I just picked my last Dahlias. Flowers bring a peace to me, that keeps me going on the extra tough days. Bless

    Reply
  21. Leah Morrison on

    Honestly, I have started to wonder if I’m crazy for getting into flowers, painting, photography and just recently pottery. I think my husband is legitimately worried about me. Ha! None of it seemed to work together, other than that it’s creative and inspiring to my soul. And I love that my kids join in with on whatever I’m creating.
    I feel so affirmed by reading this interview and I’m eager to read your book! Haha! It’s inspiring to keep trusting my gut and following the creative journey. Thank you for sharing!

    Reply
  22. Katharine Le Busque on

    I love her dedication to her vision of how a piece, or the world, should look and her commitment to making it happen with her own hands.

    Reply
  23. Holly on

    Love the pictures and her story. It is inspirational when someone follows their dream outside of the traditional. Helps me keep dreaming BIG

    Reply
  24. Anna on

    How can someone be amazing at basically everything they try? It’s incredible! Almost beyond inspiring… to the point of ridiculousness. :) Thank you for sharing her work!

    Reply
  25. Danielle Keeton on

    Thank you so much for the wonderful interview. I love how she encourages everyone to learn photography.

    Reply
  26. Joanne Mulloy on

    Thank you, Erin, for bringing another artist into my view who inspires and adds to this collective of creative women. Even though it’s largely online, I feel a great connection with the flower, pottery, photography and entrepreneurship community that you are creating. It’s important always and especially during this awkward and disconnected time. I will definitely check out Frances on IG.

    Reply
  27. Polly Conner on

    I think the simplicity of her artwork is beautiful. It isn’t showy or loud….it compliments what ever it holds. Thank you for sharing this interview and this opportunity with us.

    Reply
  28. Lisa H on

    I so needed to hear her advice that it okay to start small and gradually grow into your creative work. I just recently started a collection of books to add beauty and inspiration into my life and it sounds like Frances’ book would be a welcome addition.

    Reply
  29. Sarah on

    I am inspired by her reminder of how nice it is to have a group of women friends- it made me set up a zoom call with 2 far flung pals. And the light in her photos is so cheerful and magical 🧚🏻‍♀️

    Reply
  30. Barb Schmidt on

    I love those photos and how she puts lots of different colors together. Her comments about being inspired by people she knows, and how she cherishes het connections, conversations and feedback with her friends was heart warming and inspirational to me.

    Reply
  31. Heidi on

    I love her use of vibrant colors and the wild au natural creations! Our daughter is getting married next August so I’m inspired by her arrangements as I’ll be growing most of the flowers in my garden!

    Reply
  32. Anni on

    What a fantastic blog post. Thank you for sharing Frances’s work. Frances’s pottery is very warm and earthy. Her flowers and photos are amazing. I love the way she incorporates all her passions into her life’s work. I love the way you both live your life with purpose, making evident all the nature’s creative bounty.💕

    Reply
  33. Shari Reusser on

    Her book has been on my Christmas list! Her inspiration of her love for flowers and making containers for them is like butter and bread, they just go together❤️❤️

    Reply
  34. Debra on

    Thank you Erin for a wonderful interview. Frances is so inspirational and her words of wisdom are encouraging–“just keep at whatever inspires you, and even a little is a movement forward. Just knowing that you are allowing yourself that creative time makes a huge difference.” Baby steps–that is where I am at right now. I have kept a BHG February 2016 article on Frances, “Force of Nature” for inspiration. I am so happy to see that she has now written a book and am looking forward to reading it.

    Reply
  35. Jeanne Karp Hohmann on

    The photography of the dahlias bring memories of my childhood of my Busia. She only spoke Polish but in the garden we could communicate through the flowers. The picture if her that I have is with her dahlias.

    Reply
  36. Linda McDonnell on

    You are both so inspirational, thank you for sharing your conversation with readers.

    Reply
  37. Judy on

    Her inspirations and how she incorporates her love of beautiful florals and pottery and makes natural elements so alive in pure forms. Simplicity has always been in style and How she incorporates nature into her pots is her superpower. Natural and seemingly so effortless. Frances is lovely!

    Reply
  38. Ruth Vogt on

    Frances, I love how when answering about how we can get started following our dreams to create that you reminded us “It doesn’t have to be an all-or-nothing proposition.” We can all find joy in following our passions and by using a small amount of time and space to create! Thanks for that reminder! You’re passion to create shows in your creations and in how you inspire others to now create for themselves.

    Reply
  39. Mary Kluz on

    I just love that flowers get to be their gorgeous, wobbly, strong, colorful, asymmetrical selves in Frances’s world. Just what I want for everybody.

    Reply
  40. Debi M. on

    Wow! What an interesting interview. I am most inspired by Frances’ advice about learning to photograph your work. That is such fabulous advice. She learned what she needed to do to exhibit her work in the best light – a fabulous picture full of the warmth of the beautiful flowers, fruit and vegetable. This brings life and softness to the pottery. It makes me look at art differently. Thank you Frances and Erin!

    Reply
  41. Susie on

    Thank you for sharing your creativity with the world, and for your inspiration and advice. This was a particularly valuable and meaningful reminder to me: ” just keep at whatever inspires you, and even a little is a movement forward.” Thank you again!

    Reply
  42. Vickie on

    Beautiful flowers and pottery! Inspiring! Can’t wait to read the book!

    Reply
  43. Sue Wendel on

    Frances’ work is inspirational to me because it isn’t something she’s done her whole life. While 30 years old isn’t “old” by any stretch, it speaks to me as I contemplate retirement in a few years. I look forward to taking on new forms of creativity and have always dreamed of a large flower garden. Cutting flowers always feels extravagant, imagine having enough to do just that! I’ll be purchasing her book as a gift for a special someone soon. Thank you for your deeply personal insights.

    Reply
  44. Lisa kolis on

    She is an inspiration to start something new! Anything you are passionate about.

    Reply
  45. Rachel W. on

    Frances Palmer is so inspiring. Her photography of her beautiful and at times playful pottery, combined with her images of her gardens and amazing dahlias (a personal favorite of mine) bring me joy.
    I loved reading the interview. Thanks, Frances and Erin.

    Reply
  46. KRISTY GUILLORY on

    I loved reading this interview and cannot wait to read her new book. The part where she talks about how artists should learn photography to document their work: “ At the end of the day, you will know best how to interpret your ideas and give the best expression. “
    My father was so creative, an artist and loved photography. He would take pictures of everything. One of his favorite things to do, was going on road trips throughout our home state of Louisiana to take photographs. He passed away from Alzheimer’s 2 years ago this month and I am so great full I have those photographs to look back on now!

    Reply
  47. Julia Melling on

    Very inspiring! I especially like this:

    “Frances: I was trying to say that even if one can’t afford to give up a means of support in order to fully follow a creative desire, small steps can be taken, allowing space to start. A table in a room, a special chair, a wheel at a communal pottery. One or two hours a week. It doesn’t have to be an all-or-nothing proposition, and gradually, the balance will start to shift. It takes time and patience, and sometimes one’s in the middle of change before it is acknowledged. Mostly, just keep at whatever inspires you, and even a little is a movement forward. Just knowing that you are allowing yourself that creative time makes a huge difference.”

    Exactly where I am right now.

    Reply
  48. Elizabeth T on

    I’m inspired by how much research and work Frances puts into her new projects, especially in an age where so many things feel rushed and haphazard. I just followed her accounts and am excited to see what she tackles next!

    Reply
  49. Dori on

    When I look at Francis’ work I literally feel like I can just take a deep relaxing breath! So peaceful and serene. Your flowers and her pottery, design and words are just so very calming and refreshing!

    Reply
  50. Kristi Osborne on

    The photographs are to die for. The subjects themselves are beautiful…. but if I was interviewing her I would ask how she intends to keep that crisp, white shirt WHITE while she is creating the pottery! Seriously, this looks like an inspiring, lovely book.

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  51. Rachel C on

    This is a beautiful conversation! I’m all for women supporting other women creatives. Love you both!

    Reply
  52. Kim S on

    Thank you for sharing the interview. I admire that Frances follows her passion. It must be great to make a living doing work that you love. The book looks amazing and I hope to get a copy!

    Reply
  53. Alexandra Blond on

    So inspiring! Ms. Palmer can do it all, it seems! She has intentionally created a life that focuses on creativity and connection to the earth. Her work is magnificent. Thanks so much for sharing this with your readers. Can’t wait to read the book. Dahlias are my favorite flower…there is a soothing rhythm to them, almost like looking at waves in the ocean. May we all prioritize our 1 hour a day of creativity!

    Reply
  54. LouAnn Schielke on

    I am amazed at the blend of multiple talents: growing dahlias, photography, and ceramics. Love how the dahlias were used in the ceramic pieces!

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  55. Rosalina on

    Would love this book. Your pottery is exactly what I love.

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  56. Elizabeth Scheller on

    I look forward to reading your book and I enjoyed reading the interview!

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  57. Tracie Levin on

    Such a beautiful interview. Pottery has always been a hobby/art I want to learn. She has inspired me to learn pottery and I would be so blessed to win a copy of her book.

    Reply
  58. Kat on

    I am deeply touched by the idea of changing your life gradually as you shift energy toward creative process. Not to mention the absolute feast for the eyes here!

    Reply
  59. Julie Mardis on

    This looks like a fantastic book- a labor of love. Her photos are such an inspiration as I am a devoted photographer of flowers too. Love the comment that photography raises your awareness around you. So true really believe you see things in a different way.

    Reply
  60. Ashley on

    What inspires me most is that she really puts herself in her work. She trusts her gut and her vision when starting a project and pours her time and creativity to achieve her best work. It definitely shows in her pieces and photographs. It is really special that she creates and encourages a female community of support.

    Reply
  61. Lydia Baker on

    Thank you, Frances for such an inspiring interview! I loved reading about her realizing her passions a little bit later in life. It makes me feel that there is still hope for me to accomplish my dreams and do something that I love! I also loved reading about her community and the support that she gleans from them, as well as her hope for her children to do the same. As a new mom this is all I can hope for my children!

    Reply
  62. Elizabeth on

    All so very very beautiful, but could I please sit down for a generous slice of that cake, and tea in the exquisite tea mug!!
    I love how her photographs evoke Dutch/Flemish flower/still life paintings.
    So very very true about taking small steps, making the time and space to experience your creative impulse, even if only to be still with yourself. Slowly, but surely, the pleasure of creating things is returning to my life.
    Also true about friendships that support and endure. To know there are people, women, who “get” you and will allow your craziness into their brains.
    I shall have to read the book to learn about dahlias. I planted them in a front garden where I was renting way back in the 80s, and the groundskeeper pulled them all out! It was traumatic and since have only admired them from afar. Our cross street neighbour has a marvellous, tall, glorious, boisterous bunch every year, for which I am grateful.

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  63. Katie K. on

    This beautiful and inspirational interview was like smelling salts waking me with a gentle pinch. It was a gift to read.

    I recently discovered Ruth Asawa’s looped wire sculptures, which are intricately formed and shaped in a continuous surface. Frances’ words reminds me that our personal and collective stories are woven and interconnected, like Asawa’s sculptures, and that a new loop- patiently strengthened with courage, self-awareness, intuition, and inspiration- can change the direction of the perpetual shape. Thank you for this generous interview and delicate reminder.

    Reply
  64. Stephanie on

    I thought this quote was beautiful: “If you listen to yourself, that is the best guide, as instinctively, you know if something is right for you. It is when you don’t listen that things can go awry.” Many times we jump on opportunity even if it doesn’t necessarily feel right. Her work is gorgeous. I particularly love the blue and white pottery.

    Reply
  65. Andra on

    I’ve admired Frances’s work for so long now that I don’t remember how I found her. I keep coming back because I admire her conviction and Gesamtkunstwerk. It gives me confidence as a young designer and artist to see her body of work spread out and evolve.

    Reply
  66. Hannah Cain on

    Frances’ thoughts on giving yourself creative time really resonated with me. I would love to do flowers full time but still work in town. It is a lot to juggle but I find myself dedicating more time towards flower work and hopefully at some point can fully shift over into a full time career with flowers. It may be slow momentum but it’s momentum :) Her book looks like it has great wisdom and advice.

    Reply
  67. Ti on

    Intriguing that she studies the history behind her loves. There is something charming, yet connecting when we do so. I love that too!
    Thanks for sharing, both of you. … true inspirations!

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  68. MJ on

    Interpreting beauty, Thank you Frances for expanding the community with this interview

    Reply
  69. Maureen Hoone on

    I am inspired by her positivity. I feel doing anything creative has positive energy. It feeds our soul and consciousness. She is so inspiring in how she cane to where she is now. She work is stunning, her pottery, her flowers and her photography marry together in such a magical way. Thank you for introducing me to her brilliance. It made me stop what I was doing and go out into my garden, refreshed.

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  70. Krysia on

    A true ray of sunshine to help me face the day.

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  71. Zandria on

    I love unafraid she is to be herself and create what she envisions. To live your dream and make an income from it is a wonderful goal!

    Reply
  72. Mary Ann Setliff on

    What a gorgeous life Frances has created for herself and what a blessing she is to everyone that sees her work. Stunning pictures ! Can’t wait to read this book.

    Reply
  73. Sarah Marie B Cuddihee on

    I have been an urban gardener experimenting for 7 seasons in my city backyard. I found Floret last year and the world of flowers has truly bloomed during this time of dis-ease in 2020. My anxiety is quelled by a walk through my flowers, picking and arranging in my modest beginner arrangements. The growing and the caring for this season’s dahlias has, for me, been similar to the puzzles of being a new mom. Asking around, trial and error- but never wanting to make a mistake that will result in failure to bloom. Gardening is the only thing that can distract me from the pandemic and work stress. As I dread heading into the winter, learning about vessels and arrangements will be a bright spot- in addition to the planning of my new beds for Spring. I’ve just added Francis to my Instagram feed. Thank you Erin and Floret Team for continuing to share and direct us to beautiful people and things.

    Reply
  74. Jen Little on

    What a great inspiration to do what feeds your soul while celebrating the beauty around you – no matter what stage in life!

    Reply
  75. Rosanna K on

    I love how she collaborates on all of her work growing flowers, creating vessels, and photographing them together to create such beautiful display. I can’t wait to read the book.

    Reply
  76. Becca on

    I love Frances talking about the importance of family but also the women in her life who became family and help her navigate life and are strong influences and examples to her daughter. I love the community aspect of that thinking.

    Reply
  77. Norma Cook on

    Her arrangements are stunning. I appreciate that she spoke about starting small. She’s so inspiring.

    Reply
  78. Karen on

    I am inspired by the beauty she captures. Seeing the photos, sometimes I physically sigh and release tension and remember there is beauty in the world. And beauty not just for the sake of admiration, but more for healing and peace. Thank you both for sharing beauty with the world.

    Reply
  79. Jess O’Donnell on

    Small steps, and that it doesn’t have to be all. I used to be so black & white in my thinking….becoming a mother and balancing time nurturing my family and nurturing my Self has been a challenge (because of that thinking)….just taking steps to begin is an act of creativity and nurturing. And words I needed to hear.

    Reply
  80. Tyra on

    So many inspirational thoughts! I really love that she shared you can start small with adding creativity into your life. It doesn’t have to be all or nothing; make time for it.

    Reply
  81. Sharon S on

    How important it is to have great friends. It’s a good reminder. Love to read about other creative women..

    Reply
  82. Allison on

    I love the idea of creating a life where beauty like this is accessible every day!

    Reply
  83. Donna Garbe on

    So true – “keep at whatever inspires you, and even a little is a movement forward. ” Such a lovely and insightful interview!

    Reply
  84. Renee Templeton on

    Of course the pictures inspire me, but even more so are her words and thoughts around just getting started, even in small bits of time, even if you are not sure about it, just do something! Otherwise you will always be waiting for that right moment, or more free time, TODAY get going!

    Reply
  85. Rita on

    Today more than anything we need “something “ to fill our hearts and souls!
    Anything to keep the outside noise out of our lives!
    💜

    Reply
  86. Lil Giamanco on

    It’s a wonderful blessing to work at what you love Having someone so inspirational is a blessing as well!

    Reply
  87. Katie K on

    I was inspired by her creativity and her thought that you only need a small space that is yours to start and maybe only an hour or two!

    Reply
  88. Nancy on

    I feel inspired when reading this about an accomplished woman trying something later in life. Some of us have concerns and don’t go forward to do something that could eventually feed our souls. Best of everything to those that have that courage.

    Reply
  89. Brenda on

    I love how she talks about it does not have to be all or nothing and it is all about this gradual shift.

    Reply
  90. Lucy Martin on

    This looks so inspiring. I’ve always loved flowers and growing them, and recently have been intrigued about pottery.

    Reply
  91. Hass Sheila on

    I love how she encourages people to just start at any level and go from there.

    Reply
  92. Susan Kilpatrick on

    I was inspired by her comment that it doesn’t have to be all or nothing – about the importance of beginning. South beautiful work!

    Reply
  93. Jessie Gillingham on

    At 30 I have started a new career path in Floristry. Before this I worked in an office with better pay but less joy. I had to move back in with my parents while I feed this passion and get it off the ground. With the current pandemic situation it feels as though I’m in a state of Arrested Development and have vague but lingering doubts.

    Having said that, the work of Frances Palmer, and others like her, feeds my soul and encourages me to keep going. Her pottery and photography and teach me that your vision really can come through your fingertips and be shared with the world. While flowers may be silent, colour and placement may be loud and tell their story.

    Thank you for the interview! I look forward to reading the book as well.

    Reply
  94. Tanya on

    Small steps to creativity are words of wisdom and experience. Being a creative soul in a tech secular world this advice inspires me to keep motivated to pursue my passions.

    Reply
  95. Janet LaBranche on

    I love the rich colors and groupings of flowers and vegetables, so pleasing to the eye. Each photo, which look like a painting, is begging to be framed and shared. Simplicity and elegance blossomed together. Thank you!

    Reply
  96. Courtney Boyer on

    I love photography and want to become good at it. But I am not great with people. So for a long time, I didn’t really know what I wanted to photograph. But what has inspired me through this interview with Frances, is that I just need to try new things, create what I want to create, photograph it and then grow!

    Reply
  97. Kathleen Millard on

    What a beautiful combination of shape.s, colors and textures. These images speak across our senses. Bravo.

    Reply
  98. Lynda Byrnes on

    I love Frances’ intentionality in all she does, her cultivation of her important female relationships and am blown away by the beauty she creates with her hands and beautiful artist spirit! Thank you for sharing her with us, Erin!

    Reply
  99. Jill on

    My book is on order and I can’t wait for it’s release. Using flowers in my creativity is so important to me and of appears this book will be a marvelous way to dig deeper into my passions.

    Reply
  100. Kathy on

    Thank you for sharing this interview. I am challenged to just start being creative a little at a time and watch it progress from there.

    Reply
  101. Rhea Adkins on

    Wow! What an inspiration! I love her advice to start small… a table in the corner, a special chair… that is so doable for everyone of us! I also appreciate how she values friendships and the importance of investing in relationships. 💕🌸💕

    Reply
  102. Christina on

    I love this interview women supporting women in business and life it takes a village thank you

    Reply
  103. Simone on

    You guys inspired me to start flower arranging and follow into a more creative work, step by step. “Mostly, just keep at whatever inspires you, and even a little is a movement forward” 💚

    Reply
  104. Carol L Dean on

    I am moved by her introspection of creativity in all the different aspects of her life–from her garden, to pottery, to photography and the friendships in her life. She is incredibly inspiring, causing me to think about things in a deeper, more conscious way.

    Reply
  105. Lara on

    The comment “just keep at whatever inspires you, and even a little is a movement forward” because it can be so hard to balance the desire to be creative but also know you have to provide for your family in so many ways that take up most of your energy and time. But even those little steps, the little scraps of time spent doing something inspiring can on some days feel momentous

    Reply
  106. Nicole Laird on

    I love that from a scary time in her life she’s seized something creative to centre her and has developed her entire life around it. She sounds like an incredible woman and I’m sure all those who know her feel so lucky to know her. Her entire life ethos is what is inspiration and her words around not having to go “whole hog” speak volumes to me, just allowing some creativity into your soul is better than none.

    Reply
  107. Mandy on

    I love that she learnt another skill, (photography) that enhanced her pottery rather than relying on someone/ something else to sell it for her

    Reply
  108. Rebecca Burton on

    I love her wish that we were all living communally, supporting each other daily in artistic practice. I wonder if we might move towards more of that model, after feeling the ache of separation from people/community during these months.

    Reply
  109. Michelle Ward on

    The chain of inspiration is amazing. I have been lucky enough to come across an inspirational person, and they keep linking to more and more inspiring people. Thank you Erin for sharing her on you page!! Frances thank you for your honesty on so many levels of life. I’ve always been an artist of many forms but have never given myself credit for it. I have finally started to grow into the direction with both my art and spreading positivity to create myself a business. I love that you are able to say it’s okay to not accept opportunities that don’t quite fit in because I tend to be the yes man. And I love that you said you are most inspired by the personal women in your life that have to overcome challenges of daily life, because finding that balance really is difficult. With my new adventure the first people to support me were my closest of family and friends. To know they inspire me just as much as I have inspired them is really something I would not have realized if I hadn’t stepped out my comfort zone. Thanks ladies for empowering women!

    Reply
  110. Gail Wynne on

    Thank you for introducing me to her pottery a few years back. She is right in that good friend is an amazing gift to give yourself.

    Reply
  111. Sol on

    This was inspiering. The conections with her creativiti. It is so negletet and so non inporten this days. I an inspired ro take it back. Tank you❤️

    Reply
  112. Kelly Dafler on

    I love the beauty of her photography and the way she captures both her pots and the beauty of the flowers in them.
    I find her comment about how following your creativity doesn’t have to be all or nothing, but can be gradual, and you just need to start. and the balance in your life will shift. You can do it

    Reply
  113. Angie Choly on

    I will start this comment off by a direct quote of Frances Palmer’s – “I was trying to say that even if one can’t afford to give up a means of support in order to fully follow a creative desire, small steps can be taken, allowing space to start. “- When I read this the tears just started to flow. Her words are like a gentle nudge towards opening oneself to start. I feel like I have been so tightly wound up in my desire to want to monetize the things that I love that I have been unable to give myself the space to start and to let go and simply create again! Thank you so much for posting this interview, these are the very words I needed to hear and it has struck me to my core! Begin, begin, begin again.

    Peacefully

    Reply
  114. Robin Fortenberry on

    Her simplicity process, learning what she loves and growing those forms to speak out as their own force.

    Reply
  115. Anita White on

    The concept of allowing space to start something, with a reminder that it doesn’t have to be all or nothing feels freeing. There is so much room for possibility when thinking about a new endeavor in that way. Very inspiring!

    Reply
  116. Susan Reams on

    Her work is unique and glorious! We each should not imitate others but believe in our own talents, Frances Palmer has mastered this skill. As they say imitation is suicide. Love yourself!

    Reply
  117. Carri on

    This book sounds wonderful. I felt like I had to put my creativity on the back burner during pharmacy school. After school I became a mother and all of my efforts go into raising 3 beautiful children (especially with distance learning right now). The idea that I can allow a little room for creativity, that it’s not all or nothing, is so powerful! I am a new gardener and am obsessed with dahlias. I just finished my second season and can’t wait for next year! Plus we love puzzles at our house :)

    Reply
  118. Laura Woods on

    I love being introduced to inspiring women and lifting eachother up. As a mother of a young daughter her words resignated with me. Finding other inspiring women to uplift your daughter and allowing her to learn and grow through their teachings. Community is key, in a world that feels so diatant. I think this is more important now than ever.

    Reply
  119. Diana Crosswhite on

    I appreciate Erin for bringing such amazing women into our lives. That one comment from the book about the need to connect to other women represents how many of us feel. I am fortunate to have curated an amazing tribe. They were excited for me when I signed up for the Floret class and will be amazed when I share this book with them. Thank you for creating something to inspire more women.

    Reply
  120. Wendy Hampton on

    I love how she says that “sometimes one’s in the middle of a change before it’s acknowledged”… (sorry if I messed up the quote) but it actually brought tears to my eyes. Sometimes changes happen so incrementally that we miss that shift from who you used to be to who you are now. It has been that way for me with gardening. It is the one thing that has brought me the most peace since a health crisis 8 years ago and my gradual healing and slow regaining of energy, movement, and hope.

    Reply
  121. Cal Henderson on

    I’ve been in the tech industry my whole career and never thought I could be a creative. I love Frances’ comment in the interview that encourages me to take an hour here or there and sometimes the change will start before you realize it! What an empowering idea that I will definitely pursue! Would love to read more about Frances and her work – would like my 26 year old daughter to start her life with the tremendous freedom to express herself artistically. Thank you for the interview and sharing her book!

    Reply
  122. Krystn on

    Her clarity and intent shows through brilliantly, in her art and in her being.
    Thanks for opening my eyes to Frances!

    Reply
  123. Judith Toogood on

    What a delight to Meet Frances Palmer in print responding to such thoughtful questions. I responded to her start small advice as so many need to hear this. The important thing is to allow space in your day to create something that pleases you. I work as a therapist my clients are individuals that have been released from prison. This job provides equal parts admiration; celebrating accomplishment and also suffering when we fail. I have worked as a florist for most of my life and it is my fist love. Like many l needed stability so went back to school and grateful for my steady paycheck. With that I am grateful for the opportunity to create positive change in others lives and am dedicated to the cause. However my peak moments are when I am alone in my green house or at my design table working on a floral arrangement or plant project. These times create my pathway to being fully present for my clients. A while back I had a large floral job that was taking longer than expected so I told my new supervisor I needed to take a day off . He didn’t know me that well and was fascinated to hear about my “side hustle “ of all the things I know for sure I am certain of is that my County job IS my side hustle! I always say, I only work it to fuel my flower habit. I do understand the need for stable income but I hope others are inspired by your words and Floret’s “start small “inspiration to locate their own hold on the majestic power of a creative spirit. It can uphold and strengthen us when we are faced with the other obligations that take up the hours of our days.

    Reply
  124. Mary Barry-Magsamen on

    I love her comment about being creative is not something that has to be an all or nothing proposition. Im slowly allowing myself to spend more time being creative and while I’m a little impatient, her words give me hope & patience to go at the pace I can, until one day I may be able to dedicate all of my time and creative energy doing the things I love ❤️

    Reply
  125. Carrie on

    As someone with big dreams that seem far away, I feel like Francis’s comments about patience and starting small are needed daily reminders to myself. I look forward to spending more time reflecting on what that next small step may be for me personally. What an inspirational woman with such a lovely gift!

    Reply
  126. Barbara Reimer on

    So inspiring that she reached for something to help her feel better when she was at home with a newborn. Life doesn’t end with having children! It gives you a chance to find a way to be your authentic self!

    Reply
  127. Carole Bundy on

    So much creativity!! Beautiful pottery , beautiful flowers and capturing it all in amazing photography !! Frances is inspiring. I’m newly retired and itching to get out and dig in the dirt of my yard. I’m inspired to create more beauty with my flowers as I expand my gardens . My goal is to have something blooming in every season. It makes my heart happy to have flowers in the yard and in the house. Thanks for sharing your talents and life lessons with us.

    Reply
  128. Fidel Negrete on

    I am just blown away by the wise words that are spoken in this interview, as well as the eye candy photography. What stood out to me was the idea of trusting your gut, as I find myself in a similar situation in which my heart yearns to dive deeper into my gardening hobby and share my bounties with my small agricultural community in the California Central Valley.

    Reply
  129. Maryhchic on

    What moved me was what she said about her women friends and how important they are to her. She creates beautiful art.

    Reply
  130. Tammy Gibson on

    I love that she became an artist later in life.

    Reply
  131. Falyna on

    I feel like this is going to be akin to finding the golden ticket hidden in the chocolate bar, for an introduction to a wonderful, amazing, and truly inspirational world that will be a uplifting life changing experience!

    Reply
  132. Kathy Redman on

    Sometimes in life you read/see/hear a message that resonates so deeply it is profound without quite knowing why in the moment. What you know (if you are paying attention) is that it is important to stop and reflect on the chord that has been touched within you- Frances, I love your pottery- the form , the shapes, the materials – I can not fully understand why -yet- but it is important – you are important- the message is important- the book is luscious

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  133. Carly on

    I love her comments about prioritizing time for creative projects. Right now I am a mom of two very small toddlers and this past year I have completely fallen in love with gardening. I love having a creative project for myself. I do not have as much time as I would like to devote to it but I make it a priority. I also know that as time goes on I’ll have more time to spend on this creative endeavor. That motivates me to keep making gardening time a priority regardless of how much “progress” I make.

    Reply
  134. Ashley Wegner on

    I think it’s amazing that she combines so many different art forms in such a natural way that makes it feel homey. Since I’ve started my flower farming obsession, I too have looked for ways to incorporate my other crafts/skills into my flowers and into my farm. This way, I don’t get too tunnel-visioned and to remind me to stop and just be creative for the sake of creating art.

    Reply
  135. Lorna on

    The practice of any art form will help the practice of any other art form: the way she’s allowed flowers and ceramics to spill into each other in her daily life seems to embody this idea. Also, she seems to be singular in her approach to colour–and to form–in floral design which seems both effortless and aesthetically deliberate.

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  136. Ann Muth on

    I love that her pottery is functional, and that she advertises by taking her own photos of her works. The photography is equally as beautiful as the pottery.

    Reply
  137. Stephanie Hoover on

    I have been a fan of hers since I met her a flower class in Litchfield . I own two pieces of her pottery and they are loved and treasured ( and no doubt will be passed down to my daughter). It is so fun learning from your interview how important women friends are to Francis . Thank you for the wonderful interview

    Reply
  138. Evan on

    Working from home since March has really brought me back to my creative roots and seeing things differently – from redecorating my house to create a space I love, discovering plants, and preparing to dive into the joys of a cutting garden to have endless blooms to brighten my day and give a piece of joy to those I love. I always love reading stories of individuals finding creative outlets regardless of where they are at in their life, so that certainly stuck out the most to me – along with learning photography to capture your work (or, perhaps, your life!) through the lens to represent what it is in your own eyes. Whether I win or not, I’ll certainly have to pick up a copy of this book! And the puzzle looks like a perfect rainy day activity!

    Reply
  139. Sophie Olmsted on

    WOW! As a practicing potter and beginning farmer, I so appreciate all that Frances is noticing and reflecting back into our world. We need more people like her!!!

    Reply
  140. J. Davis on

    Her comment that creative endeavors don’t have to be an all or nothing proposition was a good reminder for me. We don’t have to wait for perfect conditions. Just get started!

    Reply
  141. Donna M on

    More often than not, we tend to lose ourselves for the sake of attention. Just like she said, in the beginning, she took anything that came her way. But eventually, it will reflect in your work because at the end of the day…passion is what fuels the fire and as they say, if you love what you do…you will never work another day in your life.

    Reply
  142. Kristin on

    I really appreciated how she talked about starting small with creative time and space. It made sense in terms of time, economics, energy, skill level…so many different things. We live in a time when we often expect instant gratification, and it’s good to hear that sometimes we will need to take things slowly.

    Reply
  143. Shu Jean on

    I’m inspired by Frances discovering pottery at the age of 30. It shows me that when you try something new in life, it could be your new calling.

    Reply
  144. Janice Benigno on

    Love what she says about women and needing each other!! Beautiful work and art. We should all remember that there all kinds of art in the world and we can each contribute to it. She is a lovely lady and artist and can’t wait to read her book for inspiration💗

    Reply
  145. Connie Koontz on

    I like the comment about taking photos to train your eyes to see things you might miss otherwise! And the vibrancy of colors is eye candy.

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  146. Kristin Yezza on

    I am also a relatively new mom and artist, so the fact that her early trajectory is similar to where I’m at now makes me feel very hopeful and is inspiring me to keep chipping away at all my creative dreams:)

    Reply
  147. Robin Montstream on

    I’m so inspired by the way Frances marries her pottery with flowers, fruits and vegetables. Her art energizes my creativity.

    Reply
  148. Brenda on

    “This doesn’t need to be an all or nothing adventure. Start where you are!” This is deeply encouraging…I can start today.

    Reply
  149. Liz V on

    I love her comment about having other strong women in your life that you can turn to for friendship and conversation, and act as part of your family. I cherish my friendships with other women for the same reason because there’s nothing better than a girl gang to amp you up and feed your passions in life. It’s inspiring to hear her story of how she’s come this far and to have the tenacity to chase your dreams little by little.

    Reply
  150. susan corrieri on

    As a middle-aged woman newly passionate about dahlias, gardening and art, I’m so moved by this work and look forward to reading the book. Thank you for bringing her art to us.

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  151. Laura Hayman on

    The organic shape always draws me in to the story.

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  152. Carole Eben on

    I love to see Frances’ work and the inspiration she gives on the creative side in each of us. I am in awe of her creative talent to combine both her pottery and photography in such beautiful pictures. I am going to get my camera out and take some pictures of my gardens and flowers. Thanks for the inspiration!

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  153. Mandy Baker on

    I am a ceramic tile artist who has recently been bitten by the dahlia bug. What great inspiration she presents in her photographs. The composition of the different color flowers with her pottery were wonderful, I’m look forward to seeing more in her book. Her sharing of her inspirations from other women helps inspire me to want to keep trying new things. Thanks for the introduction to a wonderful artist.

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  154. Korinne M Umbaugh on

    Frances acknowledges the practicality of today’s world and the role of the working woman, we often can not give up our primary profession despite the pulling of our creative interests and abilities. She encourages individuals not to lose touch with their artistic abilities and interests and cites easy ways to do this. Her artistic products (vases/vessels) offers a lasting vehicle that can be a focal point in establishing floral design skills at any level. Her art continuously allows us to practice our creativeness while offering an object of lasting beauty.

    Reply
  155. Stephanie on

    I was struck by her comment that she wrote for two years and it was “a worthwhile experience.” As if in giving so much to us, her readers, she had gained also.

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  156. Mary Glidden on

    oh to create what you love and then share creativity love with others. Her pottery is stunning . I really enjoyed this post. It is so inspiring getting a peek into others lives and how they were able to live their love.

    Reply
  157. Janna on

    It is amazing to me that she can say so succinctly what many of us need to hear, “2 hours spent being creative is moving forward”. I can do that!

    Reply
  158. Lynn Martell on

    Well said, thanks for sharing a new artisan staying true and doing what she loves. Pleasure to read article and I’m excited about France’s new book.

    Reply
  159. Christina Smithberg on

    Stunning! Color in abundance! Contrast, texture, touchable, shapes, and a touch from God!
    Thank you. I am motivated to create floral images through silk fibers, paint, dye. Yeah!!

    Reply
  160. Olivia Josephine on

    Since I read this interview a few days ago, it has really made and impact for me. I am an artist in my early 30s, and about to start on my own flower farming journey next spring. Getting to read about women who have found their creative calling like Frances (and Erin!) whose lives are surrounded with beauty that they have created with their hands is pretty profound. It rubs off on you when you see people who have recklessly allowed themselves to do something that they are meant to, and it works out wonderfully. I can’t wait to read more in her book!
    Also great advice to take little steps and to carve out time and space for creativity. Already, I was inspired to rearrange a few spaces in my house to create a painting studio downstairs this weekend: it’s going to be awesome. Thanks for the uplifting vibes, was a pleasure to read this article ;-)

    Reply
  161. Marsha on

    Wow beautiful flowers and pottery. One of my weaknesses is being a perfectionist. I love the imperfections in the fruits, flowers, pottery…even the old withered furniture. Thank you for sharing the beauty in these faults.

    Reply
  162. Delia on

    Great interview and a reminder that creativity is not an all or nothing pursuit. I had dreams of having a strawbale studio out back to pursue textile arts and other artistic endeavors but for now I am happy to be able to focus my efforts on flowers, preserving food, and maybe this winter, sketching once a week. Baby steps, right?

    Reply
  163. Mel B on

    I’m inspired by all of this interview but what really stuck with me was when she said “it doesn’t have to be an all-or-nothing proposition, and gradually, the balance will start to shift.” After having two children under the age of 4 I found that my needs, wants and passions were all put on the back burner so I could meld into this new image/label of being a Mom. Letting go of ‘who I am’ essentially has not been working for me. This year I have done a ton of soul searching and working on more self care and taking care of my needs. It has not been easy but slowly but surely I am getting little pieces of myself back together. Don’t get me wrong, I love my children and the life we have, but I have learned that Mom’s can’t forget who they are just because they are “filling Mom shoes now”. Long story short, her saying just chip at it a little bit at a time and setting that time aside to allow yourself to be creative, your life (essentially) will become more balanced. For me this year my biggest struggle was trying to balance everything in our lives while trying to fulfill my needs. This is a great reminder! :)

    Reply
  164. Mary Brown on

    So lovely to see the graceful ceramics with the beautiful blooms. Your variety of styles and textures is inspiring. Love how you use botanicals in your work!! and love how your work adds beauty and grace to everyday life!! THank you!

    Reply
  165. Suzanne Tom on

    Love her starting advice, small steps and you won’t even notice that the change is upon you!! Such diversity of creative mediums being done well also resonates and means that one doesn’t have to focus only on one area to the best, but that multiple callings can be explored. Amazing and inspirational!

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  166. Mary on

    I love now that my children are older and I now found what I want to do with my life! It’s so inspiring to know if I start small it can still be successful and its never to late. I dont need a big farm my back yard can work just fine! Well here we go thanks for the inspiration.

    Reply
  167. Nova on

    I’m very inspired by Frances’s approach to creativity as well as her female friendships. She appears to combine a studied approach with intuition to her art and the outcome is beautiful! Thank you for sharing this interview with us.

    Reply
  168. Heidi Cox on

    Wow, gorgeous pottery and beautiful descriptions. I love that she didn’t start her pottery until she was 30, and how she thrives in community with other women and sharing their experiences. How inspiring!

    Reply
  169. Janli Weston on

    I was most inspired by Frances’s comments: It doesn’t have to be an all-or-nothing proposition; It takes time and patience; Mostly, just keep at whatever inspires you, and even a little is a movement forward; Just knowing that you are allowing yourself that creative time makes a huge difference.
    Thank you for sharing her encouragement.

    Reply
  170. Melissa Eagleton on

    Both the photography and the pottery are so beautiful and inspiring! I am in the process of developing my flower gardens and plan to put in more bulbs this fall to allow for more cuttings next year. I will be following Frances on Instagram as of today for more inspiration!! Thank you for sharing this lovely interview!

    Reply
  171. Karen on

    Thank you for sharing your story of how being opened to creativity can expand ones horizons. It’s a message we all need to hear- one action pursued begets others that form a foundation for living. I read it twice to take it all in.

    Reply
  172. Maggie Ross on

    She has the balls to just throw herself into what she loves.
    …you don’t have to completely change your lifestyle and lose your means of support…little changes…midway through the change before you realize it…just keep moving forward

    I needed to hear this.
    I need to read her book❤️

    Reply
  173. Monica Strimbei on

    The entire entierview is very inspiring. Everything that she said is only fair. I was happy to read that she started her potterry business in her 30’s and that her advice to aspiring artists is to start slow, with small steps. That is very true. I am also amazed that she does everything by herself: pots and vases, gardening the flowers for the photos that she takes herself. It’s incredible!

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  174. Katie S on

    I am most inspired by her pottery. Fun post!!

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  175. Mary Dunn on

    Creativity comes from such a deep personal place -that when someone can shine that light for others, they are truly sharing something wonderful. An inspiring interview and the photographs are bold and beautiful!

    Reply
  176. Barbara on

    I love the reminder of not waiting until everything is perfect before starting. And her flower gardens leading to her barn!

    Reply
  177. Kathleen on

    I had read an article about Francis , her pottery and her love for dahlias a few years ago and just fell in love with her and her creative work. I was thrilled to see this interview, in which she had words of encouragement and inspiration to not give up and keep working at what one loves to create. And I love her suggestion of finding time, even if it is just a couple of hours to work at one’s creative venture. I so agree it is good to have friends to support and to have feedback with each other, as she also stated . Thank you for sharing this interview, it was truly inspiring!

    Reply
  178. Pagyn Harding on

    Frances’ idea of “starting small” really spoke to me. Her advice about learning to photograph your gardens, flower arrangements echoed what I’ve tried to do more of this summer. Her pottery and flower arrangements were lovely to look at. My son loves dahlias and every year we’ve learned more about this flower. Just looking at Frances dahlia arrangements was inspiring, got my own creative juices flowing. Thanks for sharing this interview.

    Reply
  179. Tina on

    I see gardening itself as creating art, and find it fascinating how she has combined these two art forms of gardening and pottery with photography – a third one! to create a 4th; her book. Magic.

    Reply
  180. Anna Zajac on

    I love the simplicity of the design. In this case, less really is more simply stated.

    Reply
  181. Cheryl Feeney on

    Your interview with Frances Palmer was a shot in the arm! A couple of important take-aways, for me: “listen to yourself” and “no one will see your art the way you do.” I struggle with being confident in my work, to explore and put myself ‘out there’… to make art the way I see it, and not what others may want.

    On a lighter note, I’m especially encouraged that Ms. Palmer’s garden is not meticulously manicured and that objects in her photographs are not without blemishes! She captures reality… life is not perfectly-perfect. Thank you for sharing her photography of two things I love dearly: pottery and flowers. The interview was a joy to read!

    Reply
  182. Kathie on

    I’ve always tried to live by the quote “The purpose of life is a life of purpose.” It’s so easy to be pulled in all different directions when one is trying to do that, however. The time given to creative projects can quickly disappear to give room to something that seems more important at the time. This year I will look ahead to possibilities in my garden, rather than with disappointment or regret . Thank you, Frances, for reminding us how central creativity is to our wholeness. Your photographs are inspiring, the pottery is so beautiful and organic, and your floral arrangements are stunning! I can’t wait to read your book!

    Reply
  183. Barbara on

    I loved seeing what you do with flowers and photography! I have a collection of flower photographs that inspire me to create art quilts. Thank you for encouraging us to begin slowly and take time each day for some form of creativity. Your pottery and photographs are lovely…

    Reply
  184. Claudia Jacobson on

    I am so inspired to encourage my son to get back into pottery after seeing Frances Palmer’s work. He gave it up for a other love, working for Fish and Game in Alaska. Thanks so much for sharing this interview and photos.

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  185. Linda Hancock on

    This looks like a beautiful book! In the interview, I loved that Francis talked about being true to herself, and taking on mostly commissions that she can be enthusiastic about, that bring her satisfaction. Thanks for the insights.

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  186. Kim on

    Inspired by the sections on photography and friends.

    Reply
  187. Tara Marineau on

    I loved this interview. It really made me want to read the book. Beautiful pictures and topics I love. I too would love some mentor relationships in my daughters life. Great inspiration.

    Reply
  188. Carol on

    I love the light in the photography. I study the photos trying to learn how to direct and control the light.

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  189. Cindy on

    Wow! Beautiful inspiring work! Love the vessels and arrangements.

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  190. J. on

    Ms. Palmer certainly has a talent for creating beautiful still life arrangements. Her pottery takes her artistry to an even higher level.

    Reply
  191. Jessica on

    Just keep at whatever inspires you-
    Yes ! This is wonderful , plus that cutting garden – loss for words , I absolutely love pottery , sculpture is probably my favorite art so all of its mediums inspire me , but hers is perfection
    I love that she’s learned photography to capture what she has created . Loved this interview …

    Reply
  192. Diane Walker on

    I love Frances’ photography, gardening and pottery and how they flow into each other: a circle of art and inspiration.

    Reply
  193. Marie Roberts on

    The combination of Frances’ amazing pottery and beautiful flowers are absolutely stunning.

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  194. Jane Miller on

    Wow, what a beautiful aesthetic! It is a joy to see such a gift being put to such use!

    Reply
  195. Deb Pattee on

    There was a lot that I loved about the interview. I love the idea of baby steps. She said to start with just a few hours a week. I can do that. I love the idea of a support group. As important as blood family is, there is also another kind of family. Amen. I love that she connects pictures with her writing. There are different learning styles and she meets the different needs of her readers! It was very inspiring and certainly makes me want to get her book. It also makes me want to try different things. I am newly retired and believe that it is not too late for me to do some “creative” things! Art has never been my strength but this interview helped me believe that I could actually do what she is doing! Ha. It would be at a different level, but I can do it – gardening, photography and even pottery. What a thought!

    Reply
  196. Haylee on

    I was inspired by her words to “start small” when you have a creative desire. I also think it’s inspiring that she creates her own subjects (her flowers and pottery) and also captures them through photography. Thanks for sharing this interview!

    Reply
  197. Ellen Lagasse on

    I love how Frances has stayed true to herself with learning photography, recognizing that she creates what she loves and others will love it. She has captured the spirit of creativity with clay and flowers. Thank you for sharing her story. She has now a new fan on IG.

    Reply
  198. Lucy Jessop on

    I think it’s her versatility, her creativeness in many areas of her life.

    Reply
  199. Jodi on

    “It doesn’t have to be an all or nothing proposition, and gradually the balance will begin to shift.” That right there made me realize a few things about myself and that was a big take away for me. Thanks for sharing! I’d love to gift this book to a friend but buying one also for myself!

    Reply
  200. Janet Kramka on

    So many great take-aways from this article, but in particular the simple statement about taking small steps & allowing space to start was so encouraging. Thank you for these interviews!

    Reply
  201. Amy Claborn on

    I’m new here, but love the gorgeous flowers and pottery! Would love to win!

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  202. Erica Saran on

    That she works alone but still puts tremendous value on her female friendships. I aspire to have this in my life.

    Reply
  203. Christina on

    What an inspiring woman- I loved hearing what Frances is reading and how important it is to foster friendship with other women.

    Reply
  204. Sally G Douglas on

    For Frances. By sharing the joy you have found in growing flowers, arranging them in your own containers and photographing them so artistically, your have given to all of us a lasting gift!! Thank you!!

    Reply
  205. Tammy Ryan on

    Frances inspires me to further explore my creativity and that hopefully no matter your age, it’s never too late to try something new! Thank you for the introduction to her Erin!!

    Reply
  206. Amy Jones on

    I am also a potter and a gardener (Floret Online Workshop 2018 alum-life changing!). I can’t remember when I first discovered Francis’ work, but I know the first time I saw it I was instantly struck not only by its beauty, but by its singularity. Her pieces are so recognizably hers. I had never seen personality expressed through pottery like that, but once I had it changed the way I looked at my work. She has been such an inspiration, as an artist who makes beautiful, functional objects, but also as someone who lives a life of art. Thank you for your interview. I hope she is able to read these comments, I have always dreamed of telling her how much she has meant to me.

    And to you as well, Erin. Farming can be a lonely business, and being a part of the Floret learning community makes this daunting (but thrilling) endeavor much more possible. You have made yourself a mentor for so many people. That’s no small thing and you bare it with such grace (and help from more amazing people, I realize), but you are the fulcrum. I ask myself on a daily basis, WWED?
    Thank you all for the inspiration!❤️

    Reply
  207. L on

    The fact that her work as an artist flourished after her vocation as a woman, wife, and mother had been established is most inspirational.

    Reply
  208. Keryenna Brown on

    Wonderful interview with some excellent questions! I find myself struggling to give my creativity priority sometimes and experience imposter syndrome. I loved hearing her tips to just take small steps and dedicate a little bit of space. Taking my own photos might also help me to appreciate my work instead of criticizing it.
    Excellent!
    Thank you!

    Reply
  209. Tracy Anderson on

    I have been a fan of Frances Palmer for over 20 years. I love the organic yet whimsical nature of her work and can’t wait to read more about her journey as an artist.

    Reply
  210. Anne Richardson on

    The vivid colours and use of nstural light is indpiring and the vases compliment her arrangements beautifully. A great story!

    Reply
  211. Sue Gray on

    I’m almost 68, still working at a job that requires skill, but is not truly a passion. Frances has inspired me to look with fresh eyes at what I could do to begin to let my creative ideas flourish. I am not too old to dream new dreams. Frances and Erin, you both inspire me! Thank you

    Reply
  212. Adriana on

    Colors, shapes, light, gloss, shades, the fact that flowers look like they are growing directly from her pottery. Magical connection. Every single part of her art is an inspiration for me. We are so lucky that we can see what she sees through her photography.

    Reply
  213. Natalie Petrov on

    I loved reading all of Frances replies to your questions. Taking small steps and listening to yourself really struck a cord with me. I found all the pictures beautiful and her pottery amazing!

    Reply
  214. Susan Watters on

    A wonderful interview and introduction to Frances Palmer. I wish I could fly to the East Coast to see her exhibition! Being a lifelong photographer and gardener I feel we could be good friends!
    Overall very inspiring post!
    Thank you!

    Reply
  215. Samina on

    What an inspiration.All her work , pottery, photography is beautiful.l have always wanted to learn pottery and paint flowers and I am hopeful now that I can too.thankyou for sharing her interview.

    Reply
  216. Kim E on

    I just started taking ceramics lessons and I just turned 30 a week ago! Maybe I’ll learn to make beautiful pottery one day? And since I love love love dahlias, maybe I’ll get the opportunity to grow them one day, researching all the varieties like Frances! Not sure if I can take as lovely photos, but at least I can try to get better. Also going to start reading that book about Ruth Asawa – as a native San Franciscan, I love her as well!

    Reply
  217. Louise on

    I am so inspired by Frances’s story. I hope at a recently retired 70, that I can begin on a creative path.
    I have registered for Floret 2021, but would also love to have the book. The photography is wonderful.

    Reply
  218. Debbie Glasco on

    Her creative vision is amazing and inspiring. Flowers. Pottery. And photography. A winning trifecta! Thank you for sharing the interview!

    Reply
  219. Brooke James on

    I am inspired by the fact that Frances values connection with other women even as her creative work is solo. Her pottery is absolutely stunning and the fact that she also grows flowers to display in her vessels is remarkable!

    Reply
  220. Kelly H on

    Frances’ grasp of composition and her sophistication with contrasting textures/ colors / materials / sheens is exceptional and certainly inspiring. It’s exciting to see how she has curated these wildly varied elements while making them appear to be so naturally arranged. It seems that her compositions take from principles that classical painters use to create depth and drama but by using real life objects, the result is a richness and boldness that has a super natural vibrancy. I don’t mean to be overly dramatic here but sitting with these images is refreshing and frankly life-giving. 🤍

    Thank you for this interview, I was not aware of her work prior to the Floret IG stories, so I was excited to see this blog post. While I’m here, I’d like to say that Floret is such an icon for what is good in the world and on the internet. It’s always inspiring to see people using their voices to lift others up, particurly when it seems to come from a place of pure joy and humility. So thank you all for being a light on the web 🤍

    Reply
  221. Lisa Herman on

    Frances is inspiring because she does what she loves and is passionate about it. The textures and colors are beautiful in her photographs.

    Reply
  222. Joyce Moloney on

    Beautiful thoughtful colour and pottery.
    Relate to the dahlia obsession
    Very inspirational lady

    Reply
  223. Joan on

    I love that Francis found her passion while she had small children and continued to work at it while her kids grew up. It is so easy to lose yourself when you have children and are constantly taking care of others. She inspires me to make time for my passion.

    Reply
  224. Kate Bode on

    The photography looks like classical oil paintings which make my heart beat softly….

    Reply
  225. Tammy M on

    Everything, because she is not afraid to be vulnerable to put herself out there in a real way, creative, open, beautiful. Her pottery is so amazing and maybe one day I can invest in one or two! I’d love it all, but we will have to see. I have her book on my Christmas list but wouldn’t it be fun for me to win a copy?!!!!! I can add it with your books!!!! another inspiration of mine!

    Reply
  226. Polly on

    Thank you for sharing, lovely photos and interview. I am looking forward to seeing the book. To me, Frances’ pieces look like feet for the flowers.

    Reply
  227. Carmen M. Liffengren on

    I just love watching people live the creative life. I love pottery and filling it with fresh flowers. I find inspiration everywhere. As a knitter myself, I find color and pattern inspiration everywhere and seeing creative people only makes me pursue creativity more!

    Reply
  228. Paula Koffsky on

    I am a big fan of Frances’ magnificent photos of her beautiful pottery and garden flowers. I am a painter and I have a vegetable garden. I found that I love to arrange and photograph my harvests; I am simply amazed by the natural beauty. Frances’ eye for color, texture, scale and composition are a huge inspiration for me. I received a generation of dahlia tubers from a friend who’s father kept the tubers for 20 years. “Ben’s tubers” are going strong after 5 seasons in my garden. I have definitely caught the dahlia bug!

    Reply
  229. Trish on

    Thank for sharing Frances’ art. As a potter who hasn’t been able to touch clay for a few, I enjoy learning about other clay artists. Her work is lovely.

    Reply
  230. Janet Leone on

    Wow. I must say this interview caught my attention. Though new to growing dahlias (though not new to to gardening) and new to throwing pottery, my dream is to eventually create my own vases and vessels for my fabulous dahlias. I also take lots of photos of anything and everything ( my flowers, greenhouse happenings, even my chickens and honeybees!) and like to share the photos with family and friends. Thank You for the great interview, it was a reminder to never stop learning, growing, creating and sharing.

    Reply
  231. Sarah Austin on

    I find this woman fascinating! Her outlook on incorporating her joy of flowers with her other talents, pottery and photography, are truly inspiring. I felt my heart sing as she described the importance of other woman in her life as well as her daughters. I have always loved art but was discouraged as a child. However, I persevered and little by little at 61 I am enjoying myself through my multiple mediums – sewing, hooking, and making things with natures supplies. I come from a long list of gardeners and this summer I enjoyed my gardening more than ever and I am looking forward to next years expanded gardens! Thank you, Erin for your smile and exuberance which shines thru your videos.

    Reply
  232. Helen Nisbet on

    Some of Frances’ words really struck a chord with me. The image in my mind regarding moving forward now is that it needn’t be like jumping off a cliff, we can climb down the cliff- gingerly.

    Reply
  233. Dottie Bell on

    Absolutely gorgeous photography and her beautiful pottery speaks for itself.
    Great interview!

    Reply
  234. Bridget on

    Wow thank you for sharing this wonderful comversation. I am inspired by the way in which Frances says to persevere, even a little at a time as often you are already on the way to changing. I also love that she has pulled together all of her loves into her work, the pottery, the garden and the photography. Frances has inspired me to up my photography skills for sure. Thanks again Erin for sharing x

    Reply
  235. Glenda Leary on

    I love the creativity and beauty of your work. I also love how you made extraordinary pieces to compliment the dahlias you grew, and then incorporated photography to show off your talents. You’re definitely an inspiration to me. What a Fantastic interview!!!

    Reply
  236. Michelle Motley on

    What inspired me the most; France’s ongoing commitment to developing her skill, style and craft over time. Her investment of time and energy is evident in her glorious pictures and artwork. Erin, thank you so much for sharing the artist’s work on your blog. Very inspirational.

    Reply
  237. Nancy Slusser on

    I thoroughly enjoyed the interview with Frances. The point that resonated most with me was her appreciation of other women. The acknowledgment we need empathy, support and truthfulness in our lives. I loved how important Frances felt this was for her daughter to know and spend time with talented women.

    Reply
  238. Sharon Germany on

    Her creativity is inspiring. I love how she composes photographs

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  239. Patricia Wolfe on

    As a newer dahlia lover and a gardener that takes photos almost every day of my garden I loved Frances’s beautiful styling and color palate of the backgrounds, the flowers and her amazing pottery. I love her strength as a woman and the knowledge of needing a community of close women friends to thrive. I hope I win her wonderful book!

    Reply
  240. Laurie Pangborn on

    Her photos are so beautiful! I love creative pursuits as hobbies but have always wanted to jump into photography to document my sewing, gardening, cooking and crafting projects. This article is nudging me just jump into that realm. Thank you for this great interview!

    Reply
  241. Wilma Knight on

    I enjoyed hearing about Frances as a young mother and how she persevered with her art. She is very inspiring to myself now that I have retired. I have taken many art workshops since before having our children, during their young years and up to the present. Between my gardens and painting – encaustic, watercolour, acrylic – my list goes on – I am hoping to expand that knowledge even more. Thank you, Erin, not just for your inspiration in your flower farm, but also for informing us of other artists such as Frances.

    Reply
  242. Zoe on

    I heard Frances interviewed and she spoke about the craving to understand the essence of things….such as one can observe growing a flower. So grateful that she shared her story and her inspiration for her life and work. Awe inspiring.

    Reply
  243. Carmelina Villani on

    I love the creativity shown in every piece that Frances makes. Her flower garden is an inspiration to me, one of my goals for next year is to start a cutting garden. I’d really like to try dahlias.

    Reply
  244. Jackie Wilkinson on

    Her words are an inspiration to read. I love art and have a daughter who is an artist one who is a musician and baker. I am finding my art in growing flowers. Maybe my daughters and I can start a company with an artist, a Baker and a flower farmer Mom.

    Reply
  245. Alvin on

    This is amazing! The world needs more people like you ☺

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  246. mary fuson on

    What an inspiration. Follow your dreams. I LOVE the pottery!

    Reply
  247. Keely McMullin on

    As a working mom of a preschooler & infant, I’m in some serious need of carving out some time to tap into my creative side. Returning to the cathartic practice of throwing clay may be just the outlet i’ve been looking for, so thank you for the motivation!

    Reply
  248. Brooke on

    Here work is so inspiring! I can imagine it must be difficult to talk/write about such abstract topics such as life in the studio, but she in an amazing communicator. Plus its so fun how she combines so many of her passions from pottery to gardening!

    Reply
  249. Kathleen Scanlon on

    I am struck by the beauty of her photography and the use of her pottery to display and evoke emotions. I admire artists who are able to connect their art to reality and in doing so enlarge the beauty of the presentations.
    I went to the online Wave Hill exhibit of her work and was struck by the vibrancy and beauty of the photographs.

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  250. Robin Habing on

    I loved hearing that it takes time to learn something you love. For ADD people, it feels good to hear! Thank you for sharing your story with us!

    Reply
  251. Julie Romero on

    I feel that I need to read her book, I signed up for the floret workshop…with just a huge internal something that told me I needed to do so, not a clear path or direction exactly. I have in the past created all manner of things while grown beautiful roses and orchids and swaths of marigolds and just generally surrounded myself with flowers, but I have felt lost in recent years (since we moved to the PNW nearly 7 years ago) like I am off my path and just not finding my way back and my roses and things here barely bloom and my creativity has all but disappeared. It feels like the workshop and now this book might be what I need to find my way again.

    Reply
  252. Jill Wittig on

    I love that Frances works with different clays so she gets to be completely fancy and completely rustic.

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  253. Liz H on

    What an inspiring interview! I love how she talks about why she does her own professional photography, and the importance of dynamic, real-life relationships. And of course Frances does beautiful work!

    Reply
  254. Tori on

    Her. Pottery. Is. Stunning. And I love that she grew dahlias when dahlias weren’t popular. 😍

    Reply
  255. Victoria Carver on

    I think her photography is truly inspiring and her encouragement of establishing a community of women to support each other. Her book looks stunning.

    Reply
  256. Christy Ellwanger on

    I love Frances’ intentionality and purpose driven creativity. Her sense of exploration and drive to keep learning are inspiring. I love how she weaves different crafts together and challenges herself and others to get outside the box. She takes creative risks yet knows when to say no. I am so excited to read more and learn how to generate more creativity in my life. Thank you Erin for sharing Frances with us!!!

    Reply
  257. Stephanie Everitt-Kirkbride-Kirkbride on

    Inspiration is the perfect medicine; it ignites something in us that is hopeful and dynamic. I am struck by her eye for color and the moment—both in capturing a small moment to observe and more importantly, to delight in. I love when creatives teach about living instead of what they do, then people are free to take the idea in and create in their own way. I look forward to learning more about Frances. Thanks so much for sharing this portrait!

    Reply
  258. Laura ‘Iowa’ Lee on

    Beauty, inspiration, and peaceful are all things I experienced while reading this interview. There is so much ugliness in the world, at the present time, that Frances’s book shall be a welcome reprieve. ❤️

    Reply
  259. Susan on

    I am impressed that her book focuses on finding how to express ones creativity, as I believe we all share the need to create, and her advice to start small, “even an hour”. Often we don’t do because we’re so afraid of not knowing what happens next. An old quote says, “Well begun is half done!”

    Reply
  260. Beth Preuss on

    Wow! Thank you for sharing Frances’ inspiring story. As one whose balance has slowly shifted from raising a large family to raising and designing cut flowers, I appreciate her perspective and encouragement. It is indeed a journey! I am especially grateful for her encouragement to pursue photography (my winter project) as I have found that inexperience to be a hindrance to showing people what our studio is capable of creating. Loved being inspired by amazing, creative women. Thanks to you both!

    Reply
  261. Jacqueline Lunt on

    “I was trying to say that even if one can’t afford to give up a means of support in order to fully follow a creative desire, small steps can be taken, allowing space to start. A table in a room, a special chair, a wheel at a communal pottery. One or two hours a week. It doesn’t have to be an all-or-nothing proposition, and gradually, the balance will start to shift.”

    I feel myself in that place right now, Where my world is shifting. It’s comforting that the small actions I’m doing may add up one day to a life more in line with my desires.

    Reply
  262. Amye on

    How does one take their passion, make it their profession, and circle it with community? For me, those three aspects of life can feel so distant from one another, and Frances is an inspiration and a wonderful example of how it’s possible to intertwine those parts of life. It gives me hope!

    Reply
  263. Melinda Brayton on

    Frances has found such a rewarding way to combine her artistic skills by integrating her love of plants, ceramics, and photography. To pass this knowledge to her daughters is empowering. My own daughters are asking me the same questions I asked my grandmother as I leaned over her shoulder to watch her plant seeds and raise beautiful flowers, fruits, and vegetables. I hope my daughters find the joy I have found in my own little patch of beauty over the past 35 years. I am certain that Frances will continue to inspire others with her creativity and commitment.

    Reply
  264. Gina Hamilton on

    What caught my attention right off was the age she began. It’s inspiring to see that no matter what age you are, it’s never too late to pursue your passion. I’m 55 and started a Flower Farm this year do her story gives me hope❤️

    Reply
  265. Rhonda on

    …absolutely lovely…

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  266. Debbie on

    Her passion is what strikes me, just like yours Erin at Floret!
    I’ve been into art my whole life- attending every art class they had at my high school and working in different media’s throughout my lifetime. I just would like to finally figure out where my talent is the most rewarding and where I should anchor my focus (I enjoy so many avenues of art), so I can be as passionate and as successful as you two!

    Reply
  267. Colleen on

    I am inspired by Frances Palmer’s encouragement to start small! I am not in a financial position to “quit my day Job” but I’ve got all the passion, a starter cut flower garden, a small collection of vases & tools, and my first set of blooming dahlia tubers! I, too, was bitten by the dahlia bug and I love how versatile they seem in design. Frances shows them off so beautifully in the article above, I want to read more!!!

    Reply
  268. Michaela Majoun on

    Thank you for an insightful interview, great questions! I recently discovered Frances Palmer on Instagram through photographs of flower arrangements so luscious and imaginative that I had to learn more about her. Then I saw her pottery, each piece a gem. What I most admire about Frances is mastery, how her deep pursuit of process expresses her aesthetic in so many areas. The results are both earthy and sublime.

    Reply
  269. Jessica Scholl on

    Frances seems to be a modern day Renaissance woman! She has become known for so many different means of creative expression: pottery, floral arranging, photography and now writing. This is inspiring to me as someone who has always loved growing flowers, I began to arrange them this past summer. I am an elementary art teacher, so I am constantly seeing creative expression of my kiddos (school and my own) but don’t often have time to pursue my creative interests as I would like. Patience is what I took away from the interview. If I keep slowly growing as an artist and put in the time, I have confidence that one day it will be a journey I find fulfilling. Thank you Frances, I can’t wait to read tour book (a couple pages at a time!)

    Reply
  270. Linda Garcia on

    What doesn’t inspire? I love the cut garden flowers. And have always wanted to learn how to throw pottery. Now that my husband had passed and my children are grown, I can finally take the class at our local community college. Also I’ve never grown dahlias, but I was so inspired by Laura of Garden Answer who introduced me to Floret Flowers, who has now introduced me to Frances Palmer. I can’t wait to plant some come next season. Imagine throwing my own bowls and vases to display my dahlias in. Thank you for the inspiration.

    Reply
  271. Olivia on

    I recognize in her work how art and creativity can enrich our lives and be a balm to our anxieties. I had heard another interview in which Frances addressed how her loneliness and isolation was alleviate by a class in pottery. And of course I am inspired by her bold and heartfelt decisions about how she sells and markets her work. Hoping that we all find ways to connect heart and hand like she does.

    Reply
  272. Grace on

    I do a bit of pottery and have done a floristry certificate but am still firmly in the hobby side of things. Also starting to learn about gardening now we have a house, this book sounds like it would be very inspiring

    Reply
  273. Leah on

    How lovely and inspiring! I love all the beautiful photos!

    Reply
  274. Heather Williams on

    I’m inspired by the fact it all grew organically and this chapter blossomed later in life for her. I love that she blends several of her talents, which at first seem to support her pottery, but then when you read what she has in the works, she actually has a photography exhibit as well, so her talents really do stand on their own as well. I’m always inspired by her floral arrangements as well as her pottery and her photography skills!

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  275. Heidi Meadows on

    The reminder to carve out and set aside a time for creativity – even if just an hour or two for now – is encouraging and inspirational.

    Reply
  276. Maureen Wheeler on

    Great interview! So much of what Francis said resonated for me – learning to photograph your own work, following your gut in determining what endeavors to take on, and cultivating and honoring female friendships feel widely applicable. I also really loved her description of Wilding and put it on my reading list right next to her book!

    Reply
  277. Margarita Legaspi on

    Frances has such a gift! Her passion is so evident in the lovingly arranged bouquets matched with pottery she has created with her own hands. This passion is something I aspire to.

    Reply
  278. Thea on

    I’ve admired Frances Palmer’s work for several years and discovered her from a beautiful magazine layout of her pottery. The dahlia in her pottery photos are amazing. Hard to take my eyes off them. Thanks for the interview!

    Reply
  279. Emily Joseph on

    Her use of color is transcendent. Each image has a mood and it’s arranged completely around the gorgeous flowers and foliage she has grown, all within a stunning visual backdrop. She has effortlessly balanced the modern with the timeless.

    Reply
  280. Rachel Bush on

    I am inspired by her color theme! In all of her works she is using the complementary colors of orange and blue. From the terra-cotta clay she uses, she is able to get rich orange pieces. And from the white earthenware and high fire porcelain she creates these beautiful white pieces that can then glazed blue. All of her designs that are shown in the photos above center around the two colors and her flowers enhance the theme beautifully. And I think this dedication she has definitely shines through when she talked about taking on projects that really spoke to her! Overall, I just really admire her devotion to consistency in a sometimes chaotic world.

    Reply
  281. Adrienne Hegedus on

    I didn’t know of her work until you mentioned her in a recent social media post.
    What inspires me is her self sufficiency without separation from the world. She can do it all, but values her connection with friends and others who inspire her. It seems like a great way to never be bored.

    Reply
  282. Lisa van den Brink on

    I find her confidence to follow her passion very inspiring! So gifted! Thank you for the opportunity to win this fabulous book!

    Reply
  283. Lisa Edelhuber on

    From the first photo I saw of her beautiful bouquets in her carefully crafted pottery, I was hooked! Frances style reminds me of famous paintings from a bygone era. Simply magnificent in every way.💖

    Reply
  284. Katharina Lowther on

    I’m inspired by her ability to trust her intuition and follow her artistic passion. I like the comment about the importance of photography and the way it allows one to see the subject with fresh eyes. I also had no idea dahlias were considered passé 26 years ago!

    Reply
  285. Amanda on

    I found hope in that she started her beautiful journey with small children and for me, that light at the end of the tunnel is everything.

    Reply
  286. Jessica Kagele on

    I absolutely love that she creates, creates creates-from a place of work she is truly excited about. Also-her forms in the vases-those forms and structures are inspiring all on their own. :)

    Reply
  287. Morgan Graham on

    I love that she incorporates her own photography into her business. A brilliant way to cut cost and to see another view. Love this idea! I dabbled in photography 10 years ago so this is a great reminder to refresh my talents to work for me! Thank you!!!

    Reply
  288. Anna Mara on

    Her vases are such a piece of art and her gorgeous pottery inspired me to become a florist 17 years ago, she has and always will be such an inspiring artist. What a gift!

    Reply
  289. Patricia Forst on

    She has the best of all worlds, solitude to write and create pottery, a garden of flowers and more, photography to document the filled and staged vases, and family and friends to support and encourage. I love the idea of a traditional wood fired kiln, although I doubt I still have the stamina to feed and monitor such a great undertaking! The photography was stunning. The variety of vases and floral arrangements breathtaking. I believe she has inspired me.

    Reply
  290. Elaine Qualter on

    It’s so nice to hear from down-to-earth artists like Frances. Her journey is relatable and her artwork is inspiring. Thank you for bringing such a beautiful soul to my attention. Even if I don’t win her lovely book, I’ll be sure to check it out from our local library!

    Reply
  291. Chris Goodall on

    Frances pottery work and photography of her flowers mimics my feelings when I see your posts. They make me smile with the beauty of it all. It’s lovely learning about women following their dreams.

    Reply
  292. Heather L Kleiner on

    I agree that having a circle of women to open yourself to and receive from is essential. What encouraged me in her interview was to just take the first baby step in the direction and it will grow.

    Reply
  293. HOLLY HAUPT on

    I’m inspired by her lovely pots and vases and of course the flowers she grows and how she puts them together so unique ly I love how she is so authentic! So individual doing what she loves. So nice to see people in their element doing what they love! A true artist in every sense of the word! And my favorite flower is the dahlia. I’ve caught the bug. I planted 45 dahlias this year! Gave away 15 and will divide and trade and get more varieties this next year! So inspired by Frances.

    Reply
  294. Kristin Pyatt on

    It’s so inspiring to see how it all connects together. I particularly like how she praises just committing to something small are steps in the right direction.

    Reply
  295. Lindsey Mesa on

    I love that she is self-reliant, trusts her point of view and is capable of making what she wants happen.

    Reply
  296. Susan Smith on

    Great interview. Being introduced to people like Frances (and Erin) makes me want to get out of bed every morning. I can’t wait for her book to arrive; it looks amazing. I ordered it as soon as Erin told me about it on Instagram But I would love to send a copy of the book to my daughter Who is an amazing florist.

    Reply
  297. Betsy Maloney on

    I am most inspired by her career pathway, and how seemingly every experience “before hand” impacted her creative choices now days. Can’t wait to read the book!.

    Reply
  298. Jan Warren on

    It is amazing that she does pottery and grows dahalias. I love it when she said when dahalias weren’t popular she didn’t care she loved them so she grew them anyhow. This is one smart woman

    Reply
  299. Joanne Mulloy on

    I love that Erin introduces me to artists that are inspired by flowers. These are great questions which activate my own creativity. I love discovering artists and watching the beauty they bring to ours told. Does Frances really wear pearls when she’s at the wheel?

    Reply
  300. Joeleen Davis on

    Honestly, what is so inspiring for me is that Frances started this journey when she was 30. She started with a love of pottery and look where it lead. She took the chance and didn’t let anyway stop her. Her work is absolutely beautiful, stunning actually ❤️

    Reply
  301. Ruth Gonzalez on

    At first I didn’t realize that Frances was a pitter because her floral arrangements were so incredible, notjust the arrangement but the lighting and more. I was delighted to later learn that she makes the beautiful vases we see in her pictures. Very inspiring person!

    Reply
  302. Ellen Ryan on

    I admire in particular Frances Palmer’s long but focused road to achieving her desired level of creativity snd artistic control and trusting herself to know how her time and energies should be spent. I’m in the midst of refocusing my life’s work towards creative practice and it’s inspiring to see how small steps, when guided by a bigger vision, can further this transformation. I want to know more of her insights! Thanks for this interview.

    Reply
  303. Pamela Cass on

    I admire Frances for following her passion and her love of flowers! Her book sounds like it is full of inspiration and creativity, flowers, and photography… things that I truly love! For me… I love growing flowers, photographing flowers an making eco dyed paper!

    Reply
  304. Mara Myers on

    I love the intentionality that goes into her work. She uses her vases as vessels to best display the natural beauty of flowers.

    Reply
  305. Pamela on

    I love how elegant her vases are.

    Reply
  306. Fran Freimarck on

    I first learned about Frances Palmer in Melanie Falick’s book Making a Life. I’m so pleased to know she has created a book of her own. Since dahlias and pottery are both big parts of my life I know I’ll find it inspiring.

    Reply
  307. Lucy Randall on

    Being a young college student just starting my journey into floriculture, I am most inspired by her direction. I love when Frances explained how she evolved from taking on every project she could to narrowing down to things she “could be enthusiastic about.” I love how she knows exactly what she wants. She has a clear vision and runs with it and it is very inspiring.

    Reply
  308. Erin Tepe on

    If flowers were friends I’d pick Frances! And Erin!

    Reply
  309. Julie on

    I love that she points out that you don’t need to wait until everything has fallen into place in order to be creative. Also, her photos are gorgeous!

    Reply
  310. Lara Fabrycki on

    I hope this beautiful book inspires my potter friend to start creating lovely vessels for my fabulous flowers!🥰

    Reply
  311. Angela bollerud on

    Amazing artistry and an amazing story. Thank you for sharing!!

    Reply
  312. Marla C. on

    I like where she imparts that we all “ need sympathy, support yet truthfulness”….. that’s what good friends are for. Accountability and compassion is what we all need to survive. Women friends can deliver that for us.

    Reply
  313. Linda on

    As an artist and gardener, I can relate to everything Frances says in her interview. Artists are often on a path of discovery. One creative endeavor leads to another, and each experience informs the other. This is evident in Frances’ work. Finding time in our busy lives to create can be challenging. Frances inspires me to take small steps toward carving out creative time. I also love her comment about the importance of having women friendships. How lucky someone must feel to be part of her creative circle of friends!

    Reply
  314. Kim Goff on

    I appreciate the contrast between her ceramics and the flowers Frances photographs in them. This is especially true for her white vases which are often full of color and light from her dahlias, tulips, and other familiar blooms.

    Reply
  315. Jeannie Slone on

    I, too, am in love with dahlias. I’m inspired by Frances’ beautiful dahlia garden and the way her flowers in her lovely pottery are a work of art.

    Reply
  316. Anna VanDemark on

    I find it fascinating the way Frances has woven together her love of creating pottery, growing flowers and photography. Her gorgeous photography serves as a creative culmination of her pursuits. Such talent and inspiration, I can’t wait to read her book!

    Reply
  317. Michelle Kiebala on

    I love all of the different vase styles, and her flower gardens look amazing!

    Reply
  318. Christina on

    I love that she doesn’t have to travel far to find beauty and inspiration for her outlets…….it’s in the garden right outside her door. It makes me realize I need to look right in front of me and stop thinking everywhere else is where I should be.

    Reply
  319. Nancy Schwartz on

    I am inspired by her commitment to walk her craft through seasons and years to get to where she is today. I love the value she places on relationship and I am encouraged by her nudge to just start where you are and the balance will shift over time.

    Reply
  320. Tina on

    I love her spirit and how she tranforms as needed to continue to evolve in her creativity…from mom to potter to gardener to photographer to writer!

    Reply
  321. Esther Benedict on

    As a 30yr old who is longing to pursue a creative venture, but can’t afford to give up my current means of support to do so, Frances’ words are so encouraging and inspiring. She reminds me that not only is it never too late, but that pursuing a dream doesn’t always require big changes. She found a way to take a first small step, and I so want to do that too I don’t need to turn my life upside down in order to start doing what I love; I just need to make a little room.

    Reply
  322. Melissa Jackson on

    I love the photography..the flowers are photographed so beautifully. Really inspiring to see her work.

    Reply
  323. Shelley Robillard on

    Such beautiful and inspiring work. I was struck by the comment about it doesn’t have to be all or nothing. That it’s okay to start slowly, a little at a time, see what develops. I feel like I’ve been set on a journey the last few months, and I’m not sure quite yet where it will take me. It is nice to have permission to delve in little by little. Perhaps this method will clarify somethings for me, and doesn’t seem quite as scary. Gorgeous gorgeous work. Thanks for sharing.

    Reply
  324. Kristina Kwacz on

    That even small steps in one’s creative process yield progress!

    Reply
  325. Colleen K on

    What inspires me about Frances…..her innate craft and beautiful compositions. It was a visual delight to read her post. What a great pleasure it would be to read and experience her book. Thank you Floret and Frances for sharing!!!!

    Reply
  326. Skweak Henneman on

    The interview was so insightful. Such creativity and beauty she brings to this world. Thank you

    Reply
  327. Robin on

    She is clearly someone who loves to learn. I’m inspired by her attentivemess to what she loved as she discovered it – pottery, dahlias, photography.

    Reply
  328. Lexi on

    I am most inspired by Frances because she leads from her creativity. She has found a life that is gentle on the earth, expresses her soul and pours toward common wellness. I too want this for my life. I take inspiration from women who have been at it for as long as Frances has as a reminder for me to keep going, getting to know my creative voice, expression and my unique gifts.

    Reply
  329. Tricia Torrens-Burton on

    What an inspiring article! I love the advice to start small. Also love the insight on relationships with other women. Will draw on this as I prepare for retirement (aka career change).

    Reply
  330. Greta Colombo on

    Which came first, the Flower or the Vase?
    Frances work is so inspiring for many reasons, it talks to me about Sensibility, Heritage, Uniqueness. It’s so refreshing to see art craft that brakes the rules of standard with such airiness…. I feel that the aiming that led her taking a Floret’s class might be reciprocate. As a grower, I see her work as part of a necessary dialogue and at the same time as a call: who wouldn’t want to grow blooms able to worthily fill those pieces of art?
    If Floret has been the starting point for many florists to start growing their own flowers, I wonder how many growers might be gently pushed by this book in getting their hands dirty with a different kind of material…

    Reply
  331. Laura Giles on

    I love where she talks about spending time with other women and the importance of being able to be yourself and to be vulnerable and transparent.

    Reply
  332. Joy Bomar on

    I’m so interested in the fact that she grows the flowers, makes the pottery, takes the photographs herself.

    Reply
  333. Kathy on

    Frances’ success at perusing a creative life style and following her passions is what is most inspiring to me!

    Reply
  334. R P on

    I love the wide variety within her work!

    Reply
  335. Sara Anderson on

    Having spent my work life using the left side of my brain, I want to be more creative. I love that Frances doesn’t just grow flowers or just make pottery, or just do photography. She sees the flower journey from start to finish. I want to be like Frances and learn to do all 3 crafts. I’m 62. It’s never too late.

    Reply
  336. Michelle J on

    Well everything! It’s hard to narrow it down. If I had to pick it would be that she seems so grounded and as a professional artist myself (for over 30 years) I still find that to be quite difficult. I will look forward to reading this book (and recommending it to our local library)

    Reply
  337. Chelsey on

    I have always been drawn to bowls and vases. I began collecting them as a teenager and have amassed a fairly ridiculous collection within the context of my small apartment. My love for these items have led me slowly down a winding path toward flowers and flower farming. An enthusiastic gardener, I strangely never considered flowers a thing I could cultivate on my own. Yet, as a painter, I have always found the inimitable curve of a petal absolutely enthralling. Having discovered Floret, I am convinced that this is my calling – growing flowers, putting them in beautiful containers, and painting them in an effort to share beauty as I see it. I am so beyond thrilled by the opportunity to get my hands on Frances Palmer’s new book, which appears to celebrate a combination of all the things in my life which bring me the most joy. Thank you for such a beautiful article. I can feel the Big Magic inspiration creeping over me already!

    Reply
  338. Rhonda on

    Being at peace with yourself and your process 💜 THAT is what feeds her creativity and she is open to following that path.

    Reply
  339. Nicole on

    I love where Frances talks about her daughter and her creative community, I think that’s absolutely beautiful and I feel the same about raising my kids.
    I feel like I’m a creative person stuck in a non creative persons body, Things I can’t do and make myself I absolutely love to buy from people who have a passion like this, it brings me joy too look at it and know it was made with so much love. Just like the dahlias my neighbour gifts me from his garden, they bring me so much joy.

    Reply
  340. MWG on

    Enjoyed this interview especially how her views have been enriched by others: friends and artists of all types. Became aware of Frances Palmer through reading Floret’s blog. Her pottery is enchanting.

    Reply
  341. Dorinda on

    I thoroughly enjoyed getting to know more about Frances and learning about her inspiration and journey. I love to see the connections that happen when you start working toward a dream. You read the right thing or meet the right person or develop another skill in the process. Nothing is wasted even if it doesn’t always look like you think it should. Here’s to the women that live and work to enrich their lives and the lives of others when there’s no spotlight to be found.

    Reply
  342. Whitney on

    Love this and am excited to read Frances’ book!. As a mom of littles I am always finding it difficult to incorporate creative exercises into the week. But, I’m now inspired to make some new habits and carve a little time out for these endeavors!

    Reply
  343. Becca Smith on

    Thank you both for sharing so much of your practices! The work that Frances creates inspires me to be more intentional in my own practice. So much of the work she creates is so people’s and has clear thought behind it without complication.

    Reply
  344. Annette Z on

    I love that she started when she had her hands full with a young child. It’s not an easy time to tackle anything extra L, but it’s a reminder to always seek out things that inspire you.

    Reply
  345. Rachel H on

    I love that Frances combines timeless, handmade pieces that can be passed down through generations with ephemeral blooms. Every week her pottery and flowers tell a different story! I love to imagine all the seasons and special moments those arrangements have witnessed.

    Reply
  346. Melanie Helton on

    I read Penny Anderson’s post and can very much relate. I recently turned 60 and even though I can’t imagine losing a child, I, too, have been working through many emotions. Thoughts of aging, purpose, dreams and life in general have been swirling around in my head. I feel as though I need to explore a dream that right now feels out of reach, but with the guidance of Floret and people like Frances…I believe that it is possible. I’ve never grown a dahlia, but have pre-ordered Erin’s book and will be riding on the Dahlia bus this upcoming spring! Thanks for sharing your inspirations and beauty!

    Reply
  347. Bronwen Heinrich on

    Frances, through her tactile art form, uses her hands to create beauty, showing the importance of friendships and drawing human beings together…this is inspiration.

    Reply
  348. Alissa Elrod on

    I love that Frances is true to herself and art that inspires her. As a young artist I constantly need to align myself to this and not get swept into anything that pays or seems exciting.

    Reply
  349. Shay on

    I enjoy seeing how her work is a cyclical process- from planting flowers, making a vase for the flowers, responding to the flowers by accommodating and complimenting their unique personalities into her clay work, putting them together to create a photograph that looks like an inspired painting… and then putting them into a book to enjoy them over and over!

    Reply
  350. Joy Bice on

    I love the way Frances encourages the idea of doing what you can when you can but dedicating time and space for it. Her work is gorgeous!

    Reply
  351. Cindie Alwood on

    My very close friend didn’t start doing pottery until she was in her 30’s and needed a creative outlet. I see her in so much of what Frances had to say and will be sending this book to her. I, too, restarted doing creative work after a long career and just signed up for the 2021 flower growing class. This interview has inspired me in ways I have yet to discover but something clicked in my brain while reading it and I can’t wait to see how it manifests. Thank you Frances for sharing your story and thank you Erin for writing the blog. I think you have no idea how many of us felt a lifeline in the story.

    Reply
  352. Colene Finney on

    I particularly like her way of photographing her work as a way to promote it. Beautiful still life feeling to the photos. Inspirational in many ways.

    Reply
  353. Karla Chambers on

    Wow, what an inspiration…I loved the entire interview. I’m in my 60s & truly wish I was younger as I would totally develop a cutting garden & dahlias would top the list along with nasturtium (to feed my love of cooking of course too). I am working towards new plantings in my flower beds & so I read & watch videos a lot from Floret & other gardeners. Her pottery story is awesome. Thank you!

    Reply
  354. Erin Quinn on

    Such simplicity and beauty, flowers in a vase. It’s my favorite way to lift my spirits and remind me to be thankful for the natural beauty around me. I also collect pottery and vases are one item I’m always drawn to. Thank you for the inspiration!

    Reply
  355. Diane Zerbonia on

    Beautiful. I would love to read this book, and see the beautiful photography of her glorious dahlias and gorgeous pottery. And then I would love to share it with my sister who is very artistic and just built a studio in her home to finally get back to her talent. For the last 20 years she’s been working and taking care of her family. It’s her time now and I’m sure this book will give her many insights. Thank you for sharing this artist with us Erin.

    Reply
  356. Kristina Taylor on

    I love how you photography captures the beauty of the flowers. It makes me want to take more pictures of my flowers to have as not only a record, but as inspiration for more artistic realms. I am also loving how you use your intuition as opportunities arise. So often we forget to listen to our inner voice to lead us and that is how I like to live. Thank you for being so inspiring and your artistic talent is truly beautiful. I need to tap my inner artistic talent more often!

    Reply
  357. Kaleigh Thompson on

    Frances seems like such a gem. I resonate with her so much in the sense that I am almost 30 myself and hope and pray to start my own business out of my home doing things that make me happy with plants and flowers and maybe even take up pottery one day soon!! I feel such satisfaction in my work field of horticulture, but dream of entrepreneurship and being endlessly creative. Frances has amazing talent with pottery and the fact she started it around my age makes me feel more comfortable about adopting a new skill. I am the type of person where I feel like I put everything into one task/activity at a time to get bored shortly after and find something new to dedicate myself to; however I feel that if I had the land I needed with the tools and ideas, there’s no doubt I would make it happen. Trying to at the moment out of a room in my house, to start up a plant/homemade goods website — it’s so nice to see that more and more people are delving into their creativity. We need more people like Frances!💕 she is such an inspiration, I’m sure her book is fantastic —

    Love and all the support!

    Reply
  358. Yelena Churchill on

    I love how she creates vases with great shapes for arranging flowers. I find that often potters create a beautiful vase but you could only fit one or two flowers in it! Her book looks very inspiring and I can’t wait to read it!

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  359. Brooke on

    He work is so beautiful and her story is so inspiring!

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  360. Rosalina on

    Such beautiful work. Looks old and new at the same time. She so inspires us regarding creativity and not being afraid to follow what we love. Is her pottery available for purchase, if so where?

    Reply
  361. Janet Vanderveen on

    Thank you for this interview. Frances is to be admired for sharing what she has learned to enrich the lives of other creatives. As a woman I agree cultivating a supportive network is important as is listening to your gut and determining whether a project suits you and deserves your energy. Bravo!

    Reply
  362. Erin M on

    I’m inspired by her style, it’s so interesting to see how the creator of a vase decides to fill it with flowers, the process of all those steps being combined.

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  363. Sandy on

    I enjoyed reading the question and comments. The book and photography is beautiful. Congratulations!

    Reply
  364. Tatyana Gronback on

    Frances’s ability to trust herself, her own vision and stay on course that is hers is truly inspiring. I struggled with self doubt at times because my vision differs from others and want to see what I make not only make others happy but make me feel good as well. I think this book will be helpful in finding ways to achieve that confidence. I also love the part where she talks about relationships and friendships. I feel we might be similar in that.

    Reply
  365. Stephanie Marsh on

    I love the small part of Frances’s story given here and I am now excited to read her book. Thank you Erin for sharing the stories of people that continue to intrigue and inspire us. I love France’s bravery in finding her passion a little later, although still young, and sticking with it, even in baby steps. So many of us are finding our passions later in life and have no choice but to take the learning and growing process slow and easy. I am always more inspired by others’ successes when their story is similar to my own.

    Reply
  366. Terri Lowdon on

    Beautiful article & photos! I would love a copy of this book!💜

    Reply
  367. Rene on

    As a 70+ creative, this lovely exchange between two artists reminded me again of how important it is to listen to your intuitive self. You can step out and be courageous with
    a “no” that allows space for a better “yes”! The book is beautiful. Thanks for the possibility of it landing on my doorstep!

    Reply
  368. Mary Yang on

    What an inspiring story. Frances work is absolutely stunning. I love how she incorporates her garden into her work – pop of color makes a world of a difference. Thank you for the inspiration!

    Reply
  369. Cristy Elzinga on

    This was one of my favorite interviews! I love her point of view on following your instinct and learning photography to help you see the things around you differently while tracking your own progress!

    Reply
  370. Peggy Dlugos on

    What I admire about Frances is how she has tended many “gardens” throughout her life.

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  371. Jeanne Heald on

    I love how Frances includes so many different aspects of art in her life. I also appreciate that she wanted her daughter around to learn and appreciate it as well.

    Reply
  372. Emily Harness on

    I’m inspired by the way Frances communicates her passions and dreams, while still showing the balance of day to day life and how it’s okay to have a slow approach to things, but still chase the dream! I’m turning 30 and wildly excited about what this next year brings me after the Floret Workshop and new season pops through.

    Reply
  373. Alisa Howard on

    Loved the interview. Can’t wait to read Frances’s book. I’ve always loved pottery and intrigued by the process. I’ve done photography as a hobby for many years. Recently retired and hope to spend more time perfecting my hobby.

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  374. Lu Anne Feazle on

    Very inspiring! Frances photography speaks to my spirit. I have been cresting art for 40 plus years and florals have always been an inspiration. Thats what attracted me to Floret. I yearn to spend my retirement with a beautiful garden that I can create from. Oh, what joy that would be!

    Reply
  375. Holly Porter on

    I am inspired by the simplicity of Frances’ work and the way she has let creativity permeate her life! Doing so I believe brings true happiness and it is obvious that she finds true joy through her work, and shares it with others.

    Reply
  376. Taylor Ehle on

    What a beautiful story. Inspiration carried me throughout the interview, as there was plenty to marvel at. The clay works created by Ms. Palmer are enchanting on their own, but the way that she marries them with flowers and captures images that provoke such feelings of beauty is truly a skill. I cannot wait to create my next arrangement and photograph them with newfound confidence, while I take into account Ms. Palmer’s lesson that, “At the end of the day, you will know best how to interpret your ideas and give the best expression.” 💛

    Reply
  377. Jacqueline Roytman on

    Reading Frances’s words ( I’m paraphrasing ) that even if you can’t afford to give up a means of support in order to fully follow your creative desire, taking small steps and allowing the space to start is important. The balance will start to shift. It takes time and patience. Just knowing that you are allowing yourself that creative time makes a huge difference. Her words truly resonated with me. I have following and reading Erin’s books and mini workshops for the last season, with hopes to join the Floret workshop next October… love all of the connections being made, with gratitude

    Reply
  378. Chelsea on

    I love that Frances has found a way to marry her passions – gardening, pottery, and photography. How inspiring to see that being passionate in one area doesn’t exclude you from having other passions and interests. The book looks absolutely beautiful!

    Reply
  379. Theresa on

    I am inspired by how authentic and true Frances has stayed to her style and vision.

    Reply
  380. Bri Ladd on

    I love the symmetry between Frances’ forms and nature/botanicals. Absolutely stunning work (and book!).

    Reply
  381. Allyson on

    It’s so inspiring to see the different ways these flowers and colors can be arranged with other objects!

    Reply
  382. Suzy on

    My grandmother was a potter and shares a similar story to Frances. I feel it’s so important to get the message out that even when life is busy, kids are young, you can still be creative and do something for yourself that brings joy.

    Reply
  383. Melissa Reid on

    Yes to photography, yes to pottery, yes to community, yes to moving forward in creative life in manageable mouthfuls, yes to all of it! As a (former) potter, I am so impressed at the combination of terracotta, earthenware, and porcelain in the same studio! And I admire the dedication of wood firing. So much to appreciate here. I am inspired!!

    Reply
  384. Patricia Griffin on

    What a lovely, inspirational interview! Such a treat! I so look forward to reading about her journey. Thank you for sharing this!

    Reply
  385. April Guilbault on

    I just love that Frances’ work is such a perfect blend between elegance and earthiness. I think that’s a wonderful way to walk through life, being open to a full range of expressions. Her words about her friend community and how she values, supports, and is supported by her fellow women is a perfect reminder of what (hopefully) surrounds us in our every day. P.s.-I’ve also, in the past few years, become completely, totally and utterly smitten with dahlias! Swoon…

    Reply
  386. Elizabeth on

    Beautiful story. I’m especially inspired by her diligence and honesty – that it took two years to write the book, even though a lot of people make it seem like it’s easy or simple to do, and that she puts so much research into all of her selections and varieties. It certainly pays off!

    Reply
  387. Jennifer on

    Wow, very inspiring! I love that she’s multi-talented. Being able to create the art and then also capture it on camera is amazing!

    Reply
  388. Amy Vande Voort on

    Loved reading this! I’m anxious to read the book and to have my 18 year old daughter-artist read it as well!

    Reply
  389. Terry Tobey on

    Frances does truly beautiful work. I am inspired by how she continually kept at what made her happy and how she allowed it to morph over time into new directions. Often I feel that what I want to do is too much, too overwhelming, if taken as a whole. I continually struggle with that all or nothing mindset. I will think of Frances as I try to remind myself that just keeping at it, even just a little bit, is still movement forward towards what I truly want to accomplish! Thank you for the lovely, and inspiring article :-)

    Reply
  390. Penny Anderson on

    Next week I turn 60 and while I have always been drawn to gardens and flowers, I was never in a situation where I could follow that dream – until a couple of years ago after my daughter passed away. To work through my many emotions I began a small flower garden. Each year it has grown and each year I have learned more and my heart has once again begun to feel sweet peace and joy.
    A few weeks ago I discovered Floret! Oh, what fun it has been to look forward to next year. As I read through the interview and your guest began speaking of beginning’s I thought back on that first year of the small memory garden and then to now and how much it has grown. She is so right. We just need to begin by opening the door or and sticking our foot in the door. That is what I’m planning on doing with my Floret beginnings – you see I to have been bitten by the dahlia bug… And I can’t wait to get her new book, I have a feeling it will be a bedtime favorite of mine for a long time to come.
    Thank you to both of you!!

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  391. Tammy Jencik on

    I love that she addressed the all or nothing trap we set for ourselves. Many of us need to be reminded to take those micro steps to our goals. They help us learn and grow and help us discover if we are on the right path. I was inspired by the importance of a community of artists.

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  392. Rachel Hardy on

    Wow this interview was very fun to read and helpful! I’ve been needing a boost and this was it! I love how the lighting in her photographs seems to almost move! Thanks for this!

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  393. Yelena Beliaev on

    A beautiful woman surrounded by nature and hand-made beauties. There is no jot of deception in this image. So I believe everything what she talks and does. I’m always inspired by such optimistic life stories. They make my day and even my life. They make me smile and plan new project. There I find answers on many questions that worry me. This interview has encouraged me in some thoughts – don’t undertake commissions which are boring even you need money, learn photography as the best tool to express your ideas and yourself. And of course, what Frances talks about creative community can’t leave me indifferent. To grow professionally and personally, a person has to be around like-minded people. Thank Frances and Erin for this amazing meeting.

    Reply
  394. Veda Renee on

    What a visual oasis!!! Beautiful photography, pottery , and flowers!!! Such talent and inspiration!!
    This book looks incredible and my creative soul craves it. 🥰
    Thanks for introducing us to Francis and her incredible work! 😘🌸💕

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  395. Lorna Burley on

    What an inspiration Frances Palmer is from discussing the importance of community, especially among the women whom surround her, to her commitment to her pottery and constantly improving and finding new methods as creating glaze from ash. Like you, Erin, Frances is a true teacher willing to share what she has learned. Thank you for this treasured share! I’ve written down the books she mentions. They look like great winter reads!
    Fondly, Lorna Burley

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  396. Travis Jones on

    Thanks for sharing! What great inspiration on how to turn a hobby into a craft into a creative life. Can’t wait to learn more from the book.

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  397. LINDA SIMPSON on

    This is an inspiring interview….it is so nice to see women aspire to their dreams and show others that dreams are possible. Erin you both do this for the rest of us. Thank you

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  398. Danielle Cormier on

    Erin, what part wasn’t inspiring would be an easier to answer. I admire people like Frances Palmer who know their true calling like pottery was for Frances. Creativity has always been my passion however, I am still discovering where my true passion lies. I believe you are never too old to discover and learn and that is what I am dedicated to at this point in my life and I am enjoying every moment in the process. Frances story reinforces that thinking as she was 30 when she started pottery and she then went on to photography and flower garden. I started my first flower garden this year at age 57 and I plan to have one every year from now on as the flowers either dried or pressed are used in my art. I do tend to be an all-or-nothing gal, so I have to be careful and take time to also cultivate more friendships and community. As Frances points out “Everyone needs empathy and support, yet also truthfulness.” The part that truly resonated with me is that she continues to read and discovers new inspiration in others in the process. Thank you Erin to introduce us to Frances inspiring story. I have shared her story to my sister artist and will also follow her on instagram.

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  399. Ronda Spaulding on

    This is my first introduction to Frances, and I am so inspired by her! I love to hear how people have discovered their creative talents and how they have fit their life around them. Thank you for the introduction! I’ll be following her for more inspiration

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  400. Susan Gordon on

    A lovely interview! Our daughter is a potter in Washington, D.C. creating beautiful function pottery and teaching. This year with the pandemic she has expanded her creativity in their garden on the farm in Virginia. I am excited to purchase this book as gift for her! Thank you for introducing Frances Palmer to me.

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  401. Anne Gassner on

    First of all, thank you Erin for providing information and wonderful out reach programs to inspire people like me. I learned about you through Chip and Joanna Gaines.

    Now as for Francis, her intertwining of her two loves, pottery making and flowers, is a beautiful thing to read about. I planted a wildflower garden for the first time this year and I dream of making a greenhouse out of vintage windows. So the fact she has her very own barn where she gets to do the thing she loves is encouraging to hear.

    I am a math teacher and sometimes I feel like my life lacks creativity. So it is wonderful to hear about all the different ways you can carve out time for creativity and beauty into one’s life.

    Thank you, yet again, for a fabulous read and helping me to see that I need to find more time in my life for flowers and the things that I love.

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  402. isabellagarden on

    I love that Frances combines her passions: pottery, gardening, and photography. And that her pots have an organic, whimsical feel.

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  403. Irén Bartók on

    A beautiful interview. The entire thing was inspiring! Thank you for sharing. It was a joy to hear how Ms. Palmer embraces and values the woman in her life and how she encourages her daughter to seek out female mentors and confidants. And the thought of having communal villages where we DID sit together and work…or create art! Well, that just sounds sublime❤️ Why can’t that be more pervasive?! Hmmm…

    In January my father passed away and I’ve just realized that he left behind a potters wheel we bought him many years ago. Said he’d always wanted one but then never did use it. I don’t know why. Sorry now I didn’t ask him. Now Ms. Palmer has me thinking I should give it a whirl!!! I’ll let you know how it goes☺️

    I’m looking forward to reading her book and also learning about the two woman that are inspiring her at the moment. So lovely how her art is infused with her passion for flowers. Sigh…💕

    Thanks, again. Love all of your interviews 💮 Wishing you all the very best from Alberta, Canada🏵️

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  404. Susan Bonasera on

    As I lay in bed recovering from a heart procedure and wondering how my life energies have been altered, reading this interview has given me new hope. I look forward to sharing her philosophy with my very over worked daughter and retired from work friends . Thankyou both for sharing your life and passions. I am inspired to keep trying.

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  405. Evelyn Weed on

    I read this article without any prelude to Frances or her art. I have come away with that happy feeling of peeking into the life of someone who has found a lovely balance of creativity and life, that is not only inspiring but infectious. I will just take a point or two and apply it to my own life and look forward to the future.

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  406. Deidra on

    Frances embodies all the virtuousness of raw feminine power. Her truthfulness, originality, and roots in art history appreciation resonates in her art. Whether that be cultivating a researched dahlia garden, throwing traditional vessels for modern women, or capturing them with a lense, mimicking the flowery abundance of great renaissance paintings. Her vision of art in the ordinary is so functional, ritualistic, beautiful, and enigmatic. Every word I’ve associated with all the great woman of my life. To maintain such beauty within can only be manifested outside
    ones surroundings. I create watercolors of flowers I’ve grown
    which has been my regiment of self-care and actualization, documenting my growth. I do not have children but to hear about Frances ultimate creation of life and how intentional she is by raising her daughter in an environment of strong, expressive woman is not only a rare world but one that takes careful cultivation which blooms into unprecedented abundance. That is inspirational. Thank you Erin & Frances for this collaboration of two creative minds.

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  407. Deidra Moore on

    Frances embodies all the virtuousness of raw feminine power. Her truthfulness, originality, and roots in art history appreciation resonates through her art. Whether that be cultivating a well researched dahlia garden, throwing traditional vessels for the modern woman, or capturing it with a lense mimicking the flowery abundance of great renaissance paintings. Her vision of art in the ordinary is so functional, ritualistic, beautiful, and enigmatic. Every word I’ve associated with all the great woman of my life. To maintain such beauty within can only be manifested outside ones surroundings. To raise a young girl in this environment around a tribe of strong creative woman is a world that takes careful cultivation but blooms in unprecedented abundance. Thank you Erin & Frances

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  408. Sandra Perez on

    I am simply wowed by the photographs! The detail clarity, color saturation, gorgeous compositions… I want to jump in! A mother, potter, gardener, photographer, and now a writer…a beautifully, creative life expressed in its fullest! I am looking forward to reading and seeing this book 💚

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  409. Patti McPheeters on

    I think what inspires me about Frances is her encouragement to be creative in less than ideal circumstances, to make moves toward setting aside a bit of time to spend doing creative endeavors that give us joy.

    Reply
  410. Betsy Mcsorley on

    I am inspired by Frances Palmer for the way she is constantly learning and doing new things such as the wood kiln where she will be firing new pots and creating glazes to use with the wood fire. Would very much love to read her book, it would be wonderful to be a winner. Thank you.

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  411. Leah Meyring on

    I’m finding myself wanting to be more creative these days. Frances’ combination of pottery, flowers and photography is so inspirational! I’d also like to share with my sister, who is so creative herself. I think she’d really love Frances’ work.

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  412. Dru on

    There are many things to adore about this book, but I so appreciate her sharing how her friendships are very important to her because her life’s work/passion is a solo practice and we must remember to nurture all of ourselves.

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  413. Emma Rooney on

    So inspiring! I’ve always loved pottery, and the photographs are a great reminder of how pottery brings a flower arrangement to life. I can’t wait to read the book.

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  414. Sharon Gentges on

    What an inspiration! I love the way she leaves a few petals on the table in a photo. You can almost imagine that she just stepped out of the photo for a moment (which she probably did!)

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  415. Stephen on

    “Just knowing that you are allowing yourself that creative time makes a huge difference”

    Great insight. Thanks for the encouragement

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  416. Geneviève Thiboutot on

    Merci beaucoup!!
    Elle est inspirante par la profondeur de l’amour qu’elle porte à sa passion!

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  417. Carolyn Kelly on

    Thank you for this interview. It is my first intoduction to Frances Palmer other than your references to your collection of her pottery. Her photos, artwork, flowers, pottery so beautiful! I love how she speaks of motherhood and how woman need each other to talk, listen and share life.

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  418. Hollie Marron on

    I am inspired by your encouragement to start however small, to set aside a creative space and time to manifest the beauty we want in our lives!

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  419. Beth Lilley on

    I love the arrangements and can’t wait to use them as inspiration for the Friends of Arts and Flowers displays in the Detroit Art Museum once we are able to get back into the museum.

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  420. Rebecca Treat on

    Oh. My. Gosh! What a celebration these photographs are! And what an inspiration this life is!

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  421. Patricia Ridgeway on

    I love how she says being creative and branching out can be gradual that it doesn’t have to be all or none. Very inspiring for those of us who are reaching for our dreams but yet still have to stay grounded To present while trying. Beautiful pictures. Thank you for sharing.

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  422. Barb webley on

    Inspiring and beautiful . She has such a great eye for form and colour .

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  423. Marianne Mersereau on

    I am inspired by Frances’ encouragement that one can start small and gradually add momentum toward achieving one’s creative desires.

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  424. [email protected] on

    Her use of real flowers to create plaster molds to use for sprigging flowers onto her pots is very clever. No wonder the flowers look so casual and natural.

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  425. Tiff H on

    Her philosophy around building community is extremely inspirational. I love how devoted she is to learning, sharing and passing it down to a future generation. What a lovely article!

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  426. Courtney Garbee on

    Thanks for sharing Janet’s inspiring and beautiful work. I’m a mother of two small girls and working physician who spends every spare moment escaping into the corners of my yard to garden. I dream of the day when I too will be able to grow more flowers and create pottery. I am inspired by Janet’s advice to add in the time to create little by little. This is simple advice, yet profoundly wise.

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  427. An Olmscheid on

    I love when she mentions keeping at what inspires you. It doesn’t have to be all or nothing. Flowers & photography are at the top of what makes me happy and I also enjoyed pottery for a few years…this all inspires me to keep doing what brings me joy!

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  428. Stephanie de Fiori on

    Thank you for introducing me to Frances and her work! I’m searching to find my creative outlet and she offered many useful tips. Also, her photography is stunning and I love her pottery. I’ve never had much luck growing dahlias but she has inspired me to do the research and try again. I can’t wait to read the book. Thank you again for this wonderful interview.

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  429. Mollie Moseley on

    Such inspiring thoughts- whilst many of us are not able to live in a creative community of like minded makers for either geographical, political or financial reasons, Frances is an inspiration and a pragmatic practitioner. Start with a favourite chair with (or without) a favourite view , a piece of paper to map your thoughts in pictures or words and it is surprising where it takes you….. even if only to escape for 10 minutes (or hopefully more).
    I’m not sure how familiar you are with the British artist Grayson Perry in the States (he rocks btw!!) but in a recent interview he advised “Make a little nest for you feelings about being alive, nurture them that they may fledge and fly” – a good mantra to live by in such dark days x

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  430. Shawn on

    As a fellow potter I was very inspired. I also plant a cutting garden every year and she is inspiring me to photograph my arrangements and garden. There is always more to learn and do

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  431. Shari Howard on

    I am 70 years old and it is always rewarding to see the creativity and passions of other women. The combination of gardening, photography and pottery is such a natural form of art. Thank you for sharing this interview.

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  432. Kelly on

    I’m inspired by France’s comment about starting small, not to feel like it needs to be all or nothing. I struggle with that, and her suggestions hit the mark for someone like me who is so busy with work and family, that it’s hard to imagine carving out space for oneself. Thank you, I think I can make a small step in filling up my creative side.

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  433. Mia on

    So inspiring! I caught a glimpse of myself in her words. I love the baby step direction of working toward our authentic selves and the many ways creativity oozes through the cracks; flower gardens, pottery, photography and more. For the past 2 years I’ve been growing flowers in my back alley for the parents walking their young children and pushing strollers or pulling wagons. I created a space for them to connect with nature with flowers they can pick. The first year I also grew large pumpkins, personal sized water melons and cantaloupes along with flowers they could pick. Since then I’ve met Charlotte and her 17 month old daughter who I’ve shared kale, tomatoes and raspberries from my front yarden. It’s such a pleasure to share the creativity of nature through my gardens while building relationships with the neighborhood. I also found photography opens up another aspect of seeing from another perspective; flowers, berries, produce and people. I look forward to reading her book.

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  434. Colleen on

    Inspiring words and exquisite photos! They encourage me as I begin my flower farm journey at the age of 59. Francis’ words: “just keep at what inspires you and even a little is a movement forward”, is something I will take with me today as I start planting dahlia tubers in my first field bed. I’ve been a gardener for a long time but it’s always been a hobby and the way to surround myself with beauty when other aspects of my life were unlovely, but this new venture seems to be the right path for me. “If you listen to yourself, that is the best guide, as instinctively, you know if something is right for you”, are words that really resonate with me as only in the past six months have I really paid attention to my intuition and started taking small steps to turn my dream into reality. Thank you for sharing this inspiring interview.

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  435. Nancy on

    Her photos are stunning. I am inspired by her desire to research flowers and ceramics and how self assured she is. Her book is bound to be full of wisdom and inspiration!

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  436. Christl Michele on

    Oh, my! I’m so inspired by Frances and her work, particularly because I’ve attained a “vintage” age, and am just now slowly learning how to honor and nurture my own intrinsic artistic nature. I love her sharing that small steps toward a goal are valuable, as my “all or nothing” mentality can keep me from just starting on something. Thank you for sharing her work!

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  437. Sandy Carr on

    What absolutely yummy pottery, flowers and photography. Everything she creates loves every other thing she creates!

    Thank you Erin for sharing Frances and her beautiful life.

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  438. Linda C Bennett on

    Thank you both for sharing. It is an inspiration to know that others share the same pull toward combining the creation of pottery and the beauty of nature together as a whole. Both are creations that intertwine uniqueness and beauty. I have recently restarted a past journey where I am plan on doing the same.

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  439. Madelyn on

    I am so inspired by this! I myself struggle with being able to balance my creative needs and desires with the day to day bustle sometimes feeling that it’s impossible to do so. I have many creative outlets and I don’t feel that I should have to my limit myself to just one. I am slowly finding my way like she mentions creating a natural balance between both. Love your work Frances and Erin I love your as well. Two amazingly inspiring women.

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  440. Katherine Loughlin on

    I love how her pots have such a flow and grace to them, plus her bouquets are so gorgeous. She has so much to share. I’m glad she wrote a book. Can’t wait to immerse myself in it!

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  441. Diane on

    What impressed me was making sure her daughter was introduced to creative women as mentors. It truly takes a village. The flowers are exquisite. The energy in all dynamic.

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  442. Ellen on

    I love that Frances takes the time to really understand the flowers she plants – that is what I love about planting! I am inspired by how she gradually went toward what brought her the most joy. It calms me to know that it doesn’t have to happen all at once. A career change can start with finding some spare time a little but every week.

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  443. Niloufar Ameli on

    When looking at Frances’ career, I love that creativity is not confined to one area, and that it is celebrated wherever it presents itself. Seems rather freeing and inspiring. Why limit oneself?

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  444. Deborah on

    I’m so inspired by Frances’ idea to “allow space to start” a creative life. This is such a lovely and encouraging interview. Filled with so much beauty.

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  445. Stefanie C on

    After losing my job as a corporate interior designer in the crash of 2008 and changing careers to a much less creative sector, I’ve been looking to add something creative to my days (either just for myself or for my friends and community). To me, Frances’ determination to be creative in her daily life is so inspiring.

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  446. Linda Linenfelser on

    I am inspired by Francis talking about how important women’s friendship is in her creative life.

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  447. Joy Collazzi on

    Thank you. I thoroughly enjoyed your interview, and introducing me to Francis Palmer. She’s incredibly talented and her photographs are breathtaking. I too enjoy all forms of art, creativity, and nature. Right now I’ve had to hone my interest for the winter to photography and drawing. Growing flowers is still a dream, though not yet possible. It’s inspiring to realize: “that eventually we can reach our goals despite adversities that come along, and that it takes time to “weed” out all the extra stuff to get to what we are best at doing. And to focus on doing the work we enjoy and love, little by little as time and life allows, and at some point we do it more and more. It’s a constant rebalancing throughout life.” There’s some kind of instinct inside that knows this and grows impatient. However, must say, it’s good to hear and read about women who have kept persistent, knowing they have something beautiful to contribute in life and to others. That each individual can find and develop their own talent(s) throughout life, and in time. Thank you both for this wonderful reminder.

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  448. Elizabeth Stutzman on

    I love how many of Frances‘s skills are being presented in that book: gardening, research, pottery, floral arrangement, photography, wisdom, mothering, writing… it sounds like a fascinating and personal book. Several of the photos look like old baroque paintings. It is absolutely stunning! I am inspired to see the ways she has made space for her creativity. It has been one of my biggest challenges since getting out of school. There is always the thought that it will happen someday, and there are small projects here and there. She must already be inspiring quite a few people if she was invited to write a book about what she does. Thank you for sharing!

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  449. Barbara Page on

    I had no previous knowledge of Frances Palmer. Your interview was interesting and intriguing. Thank you. I am drawn to her use of color in her photography. It is thought provoking and very joyful. And her words on her photography have motivated me to look a bit more crtically at my photographs and hopefully, possibly, raise them to a new level. (And lets be clear, I am a novice and a photographer for fun, and I find joy in it.) Thank you so much. A wonderful read on a lovely Tuesday afternoon break from work.

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  450. Susie on

    The strength of a woman artist, mother, friend, as Ms. Palmer rings true to me. Inspired, I shall go collect objects of beauty from my own home, gather flowers from my vast gardens, set up a vignette and start taking photos! With gratitude, thank you Erin for sharing this with us. “Just Do It!”

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  451. Carolyn on

    I love the idea about a routine that allows for a lot of time and space to inspire and nurture your creativity – instead of waiting for it to show up. After reading a little about Frances, I feel like she has found a good balance between getting things done and letting creative ideas rise up and develop. This will be a book in my “inspiration” stack, for sure.

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  452. Chelsea on

    What a wonderful interview; thank you! I first discovered Frances Palmer’s pottery a few weeks ago through a post of yours on Instagram Erin. Her work is incredible, and I would love to learn more about her studio practices as a beginner potter and dahlia grower myself. Thank you for introducing us to her work and to this new book!

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  453. Mary Tenoever on

    Thanks for posting this interview. One of the things that struck me was when Frances said that her conversations and coming together with her women friends was a “gift.” I totally feel that way about my friends. It is such a treasure!

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  454. esse on

    creating is unpredictable, make time for it, even a little, and it will happen
    this speaks to me and gives me courage

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  455. Peggy L. Paden on

    I am a Potter as well. I started in my mid fifties, but I find that art has always found a way to express itself in many mediums in me. I really connected with the wonderful interview you posted of Frances and her evolving, dare I say “budding” body of work. I love the comment of having strong accomplished women being around her daughter. I have two young granddaughters that I just moved to be closer to last year. That bit if advice is going to stay with me for awhile…

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  456. Elizabeth on

    Thank you for sharing this interview. I started out reading it because of the love for dahlias, however, I appreciated Frances thoughts on the varied topics discussed in the interview. One comment in particular resonated with me, she stated: “I am most inspired by the women I know personally and witness their courage in facing the challenges of daily life.”. A good reminder to look close to home and friends for inspiration, rather than the fads or fashions in the media.

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  457. Laura on

    Frances inspires us to be creative even if we have careers, families, lives that preclude us from plunging 100 percent into what we would love to be doing IF we had the time. That’s the take home message I received; get started. Do something that inspires you. Don’t wait for “ some day”.

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  458. Janet Lee on

    Thank you for interviewing her! I recently discovered and learned about her work and I am excited to read more about her work and the studio practice.
    I love how her pottery making brought other creative activities like gardening and photography into her artistic practice. I feel inspired and want to make my life more filled with creativity! Thank you again!

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  459. Kristin Johnsen on

    Wow – thanks for sharing some of the photos from this gorgeous book! It ticks a lot of boxes for me – my mother taught me about enjoying flowers and other unusual items to use in arrangements, and unusual vessels in which to arrange them, and my grandfather was a great grower of Dahlias in Whatcom County while I was growing up – Frances’ comment about dahlias not being mainstream and old fashioned when she started growing them resonated with me!!! I think of my grandpa often now during dahlia season since they’ve gotten to be “in”! I also really enjoy her use of vegetables and flowers together in her vignettes – reminds me to be more creative as I put arrangements together. This book looks amazing – thanks for introducing us to it!

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  460. Amy Clements on

    Where to start! The pottery is gorgeous, the flowers are amazing and the photographs take my breath away. Thank you

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  461. Melissa on

    Frances work inspires me to look at things differently. I’m new to the dahlia world and love her use of these spectacular flowers .
    I recently hired a garden designer and hope to create something special.

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  462. Rebekah on

    I love this. So beautiful and inspiring.

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  463. Robin on

    To be an accomplished artist and photographer takes not only creativity and talent but also courage to expose that very creativity to the world and open yourself to both accolades and criticism. Frances possesses not only great talent but also the courage to set forth her vision and trust her “gut”. Simply her work is outstanding. Kudos to her! I so enjoyed this interview and photography. Thank you for sharing it.

    Best,
    Robin

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  464. Julie on

    I love the femininity expressed through the vases, flowers, and food in her photos. Bright colors of blooms poking out of beautiful and creative pottery. Splashes of sunlight coming through windows….a cake dusted with powdered sugar perfectly….most of all how inviting her photos are….Frances pulls the viewer in…and makes you want to sit next to a warm fire and hot drink and be inspired.

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  465. Jodie Morrison on

    Artistry in all forms is such an inspiration to the world. Needed now more than ever. I also do pottery and have a small flower farm! Daily I aspire to create as freely and colourful as Ms Palmer and the team at Floret. Inspiration is individual and comes from source, heart and universe. Thank you for this lovely insight.

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  466. Ashley Laabs on

    She can convey the way beauty and creating can help regenerate us and our relationships! Wondeful to hear the part about learning photography ourselves, as I had an artist friend tell me something similar eons ago. Art needs community and we as a community need art. She brings it all together blissfully!

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  467. Maggie on

    Frances and her work are both an inspiration and a comfort in this strange Covid time. Her art, and her new book, are a testament to the magic that happens when we listen to, nurture and act on our creativity.

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  468. Ruth on

    I am inspired by how France’s photography grew out of her love of pottery and flowers. I keep telling myself I shouldn’t take on a whole new art, photography, when I’m already involved in gardening, fiber arts and watercolor but reading her interview and seeing her gorgeous photographs have inspired me to continue expanding myself in that direction.

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  469. Shannon L Haff on

    Very inspiring article…made my day! I love what she says about allowing your creative desire space to start. I would love to sit and visit with you both!

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  470. Sue Helms on

    A lovely interview, so inspiring. The colors in the photos are so rich and bring the scenes to life. Thanks Erin for providing us with thoughtful people willing to share a bit of their story, with us. How sweet that you remain friends also.

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  471. Anne Fowler on

    Beauty. Making beautiful objects and illustrations with natural elements is a gift to be desired. As my Mother’s daughter, I love flowers and all things pretty. She and my Dad taught me to find beauty in everything and to be a careful observer so as not to fail to see and seek beautiful things to adorn my life. I yearn to grow a cutting garden, and maybe that will happen one day. Fresh flowers all over the house would make me so very happy. I hope I am leaving behind a few gifts by example to this world. God created such beauty and amazement!

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  472. Jennifer on

    I adore how Frances combines her study and art of pottery with a passion for flowers, all married together in photography! What an inspiration! Thank you for sharing this wonderful woman (and book) with us!

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  473. Veronika Sh on

    I am just obsessed with dalias in general and would enjoy looking at pictures of them during cold winter time :) my house always has a vase with flowers no matter what time of the year it is . Flowers bring me happiness and make my days brighter. Her book seems so inspirational, something I would enjoy reading and get inspired :)

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  474. Donna Levitt on

    Beautiful photography and combination of my passions – pottery and growing flowers!

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  475. Amber Allen on

    Look forward to reading such an inspiring book.

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  476. Kathy on

    Pottery while in pearls and a white shirt, no apron. Master of her craft! I love her pottery, but the fact that she has also grow to be a true gardener, writer, photographer, artist, and stayed true to herself is wonderful. Her style evolves, she hasn’t just done one style for decades over she has grown and evolved. Thought provoking and just gorgeous!

    Reply
  477. Loren Jones on

    I was so delighted to read your article about such an inspirational artist. I especially love the way she combines her sculpture and flowers. I only dream of having such a beautiful life. I may take a pottery class once covid is over. Thank you for sharing such a treasure.

    Reply
  478. Bridgid on

    This is so beautiful! My creative pursuits feel in tune with one another but I tend to get caught up in thinking I need to focus on just one. Reading this was a lovely reminder that creativity doesn’t live in isolation. It exists in the studio, at the table, in the garden, and sitting with a good friend. Beautiful interview! Thank you for introducing me to Frances’ work!

    Reply
  479. Crystal on

    Her intuition and listening to herself <3

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  480. Prisilla Cope on

    Love how her interests are intertwined and her openness to experimenting.

    Reply
  481. Judy Bozec on

    I love that the photography highlights the uniqueness of her pottery as well as the floral arrangements! Both are equally beautiful and inspiring!
    Thank you for sharing

    Reply
  482. Ashley Ross on

    I absolutely love her story and aspire to lead a life similar to this. About a year ago I left a corporate accounting position, for an entry level floral designer job, and haven’t looked back since. I am striving to get back my creative side that I lost after college in a whirlwind of work, paying off loans, etc. I hope to make creativity a regular part of my life that I can always go to to explore, draw, paint, watercolor, hand letter and more. My next dream is to take a pottery throwing class!!

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  483. Audrey on

    I love how Frances uses the culmination of her talents in pottery, photography, and gardening to collectively support her creative business! I love how she creates in a way that makes her happy first!

    Reply
  484. Laura on

    Since I was very young picking flowers and finding the perfect vase to display my arrangements in has always brought me joy and let my artistic side come out. Seeing Frances work inspires me to continue being creative and look at creating in different ways.

    Reply
  485. Debbie on

    Life, friendship, creativity, inspiration, beauty, gardens, flowers, new skills, my favorite -peony, women.
    We all need a best friend to hear our good and our bad, someone to laugh with and to listen to help us be our best selves. Thank you for reminding me how special the women in my life are to me.

    Reply
  486. Karsta on

    I absolutely love her story and the evolution of her creative path. What a beautiful book for the world to see. I’m also a potter and gardener, with a strong desire to become a more robust flower grower. I love to create arrangements and lately I’ve been researching the style and size of vases that allow for gorgeous whimsical bouquets. It almost feels like magic to see this interview today, as this book looks like it connects all of my passions. Thank you for this wonderful interview, Erin and Frances.

    Reply
  487. Jena Piccolo on

    Frances, thank you for this advice about expressing creativity. My hobby of growing and arranging flowers, that I hope to turn into a business one day, can be overwhelming (but also very exciting!) and your words are comforting. Thank you sharing this story, Erin!

    Reply
  488. Charleen Kepner on

    Beautiful! Those photos were incredible. And the reminder that being creative doesn’t have to be all or nothing!

    Reply
  489. Cindy Morgan on

    I am envious of those who have “the touch” artistically & find it a passion in their lives. It is obvious Frances has that touch. Her pottery is beautiful. Her photographs of her arrangements show passion & artistry as well. I believe her book will speak volumes of creative inspiration to women.
    While I do not have an artistic bone in my body, I do find my passion in flowers. I have a newfound love of dahlias. I planted many varieties this spring & have had a bountiful success. They are works of art. Learning from Erin’s workshop I now know how to dig them, divide & store. In my obsession, I have ordered several more varieties for next Spring. I am eager to see my success in dividing my tubers to enjoy even more blooms next year.
    Many thanks to Erin @ Floret Flowers for all the interaction, videos, and instruction! You, too, are an inspiration & artist!! I have purchased both your books & am waiting eagerly for your third due out in March!!

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  490. Sylvia McGrade on

    Ms. Palmer’s artistry is remarkable. I really had no idea what to expect when I clicked the link to her interview. I was fascinated by her subtitle, “Inspiration and Lessons On Creativity” because I’m newly retired and seeking where creativity can lead me with this amazing gift of time. As I read the questions and responses, I found it remarkable how Palmer has flowed from one artistic form to another: printing to pottery to gardening to flower arranging to photography and how each has benefited the other. Her pottery is gorgeous (I am especially in awe of the blue and white pieces) and the flower arrangements are fabulous! Thank you for sharing this piece with your Floret Fans.

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  491. Debbie Pearce on

    What a renaissance woman! Frances has so many artistic talents that it inspires one to seek a talent in new arena. Her pottery uses tactile senses while her photography uses the visual. And growing flowers to satisfy her own interest is so grounding. Then in her “creative hours” she writes a book.
    Thanks, Erin, for the interview!

    Reply
  492. Carolyn Teeter on

    I love to create and recently have set aside my painting for developing garden structures and raise my great nephew. Frances’s encouragement to keep doing the things you love even in small spaces of time and to develop your photograph skills all of which I’ve done in spurts is an encouragement to keep going. My Covid-19 projects were building a shed and trellis’s, learning to propagate interesting shrubs and grow Dahlias more intentionally and like Other artists hopefully will get time to paint them. I was hoping to take one of your classes Erin just at the time they went online. My husband grew up river on the upper Skagit so we often get a chance to drive through the area and maybe even do a little Plein air painting. This fall a local Dahlia grower had hip surgery so I occasionally had a chance to help her out a bit. I learned so much and am taking your suggestions from your previous books to take notes for my dream gardens. I’ve so much to learn so books are a great way to keep dreams alive

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  493. Rachel Hibma on

    I love the way she talked about the importance of taking small little steps every day, even if we can’t make a career out of it at the moment! That inspires me to keep going with my creative pursuits of poetry and floral arrangement. 💜

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  494. Susan Jacoli on

    Your dahlia bug just bit me! I’ve always want dahlias in my garden, so I’m now inspired to try. Your pottery is organic and would set beautifully on any table. Brava!

    Reply
  495. Robin Langsdorf on

    I have enjoyed following Frances on Instagram for some time and am delighted by this interview. I share her passion for dahlias and photography and love her ceramic work. She is a beautiful inspiration!

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  496. Jill den Hertog on

    Delightful interview with a woman who has expressed perfectly the wonderful way women can & do support each other. At the same time she quietly encourages and supports individual creativity & expression. Thank you for introducing me to her this way. Jill

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  497. Diane on

    I love that there are so many facets to inspire and excite everyone, regardless of where their creativity or passion lies with flowers.

    Reply
  498. Jamie Greeman on

    Frances’ work reminds me that there is still so much beauty in this world to be shared, enjoyed, and savored.

    Reply
  499. Kari Winter on

    What a great interview! I have been in love with Frances’ pottery for years & dream of one day owning a piece. I think I first saw her exquisite white vases on a Floret blog many moons ago.
    How inspiring to hear Francis talk, in her new book, about not waiting until all the stars align before exploring one’s creative path ~ just start, however small. I, too, highly value my female friendships. And like Frances, have gotten the Dahlia bug!

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  500. Melinda on

    I love that Frances embraces and encourages the “do what you can” mentality in making space for creative work! The idea of jumping whole hog into a new creative pursuit is terrifying for someone like me (what if I’m no good? What if I waste all that time and money and I don’t really like it?) but a little bit at a time is attainable and decidedly not-so-scary.

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  501. Rebecca Davis on

    I appreciated Frances’s comment regarding time for creative pursuits: “It doesn’t have to be an all-or-nothing proposition…” Use whatever free time you have, and over time “the balance will start to shift.” Yes!

    Reply
  502. Sharon West on

    Frances Palmer’s sensitivity and reverence for her clay art and floral materials are quietly shown in her beautiful photography! Thank you for sharing.

    Reply
  503. Barbara Hagedorn on

    Thanks for posting this interview! I found her evolution inspiring and also want to follow up on her sources of inspiration. The photos are lovely, so vibrant!

    Reply
  504. Jennifer Conklin on

    The advice of starting art making right away instead of waiting for the “perfect” moment. Wonderful and inspiring!

    Reply
  505. Beckie Dorothy on

    I love what Frances said about having other women in your life to share your good times with, cry with and celebrate with.

    Reply
  506. Mithra Ballesteros on

    I’ve been following Frances’s career for some time. She’s a testament to the idea that life is long! That there is time! Frances proves that we really can hit our stride in the second half of our lives, when perhaps society wants us to shut up and play bridge. So those who are impatient for success, or who are worried about balancing creative work with perhaps more mundane responsibilities need to take a moment and consider this woman’s impressive body of work. And how she continues to send out tendrils of curiosity. What a fine way to cultivate a life!

    Reply
  507. Sarah F. on

    This book is definitely on my wish list. What most inspires me is that she encourages people to follow their dreams even if they have setbacks to fully live their dreams at the moment. Also, that little steps on that pathway are really big steps to accomplishing those dreams. The flowers and pottery are also phenomenal. Thank you for sharing this interview and the opportunity to win a copy.

    Reply
  508. Ally B. on

    I love the way she incorporates so many different kinds of creative work into what she does—gardening, pottery, photography!

    Reply
  509. Heather on

    I am inspired by Frances’ sense of design–the colors and fluid and harmonious lines in her pieces!

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  510. Nan on

    Wow, so inspiring! I love her pottery and her photography too. Thank you for introducing her to us.

    Reply
  511. Pamela Burke on

    This is truly inspirational. What a blessed life to excel in many art forms and have them mesh so perfectly
    Thank you so much

    Reply
  512. Livingmypnwlifestyle on

    Very inspiring to see hands turn materials from the earth into artistic displays with endless possibilities to be re arranged a many different ways for different seasons. I learned to throw clay at age 9 and took professional classes – a skill I still love to this day. I also have the most amazing memories of planting dahlia with my late Grandma. My love for all flowers comes from childhood memories of being in the Garden with my Grandma. This book combines two of my favorite artistic mediums all into one.

    Reply
  513. Lori Montalbano on

    Frances’ photography of her work captures textures and colors in the flowers that silently shout their beauty. The arrangements are classic, yet informal and her pottery is showcased in each beautifully crafted scene. Invigorating and soothing all at once. Super-inspiring. A feast for the eyes!

    Reply
  514. Teresa Moore on

    Years have honed her skills in pottery, photography, and gardening. She is a becon that your talents can all come together. Her life is layered with inspiration, as is yours. Thank you for your blog..

    Reply
  515. Campbell Scott on

    Her work is beautiful and I would love to share her work with my aunt who went from “my New Years resolution is to take a pottery class”… for literally 10 or so years in a row. She finally signed up for one, fell even more in love, and now has her own little potters shed in her house…

    I love the idea that you could already be in the middle of the change when you realize it.

    Reply
  516. Terri Hallman on

    I admire any kind of arranging — but I particularly like the way hers are not necessarily “perfect” … some petals, leaves or fruit on the table … and how the arrangement seems to flow out of the vessel it’s in!

    Reply
  517. Marilyn on

    What I love about Frances Palmer’s vases is that they hold the flowers so beautifully because she knows flowers so well.
    Frances has long been an inspiration to me and I feel lucky to live with several of her vases.
    The vases also look lovely empty, resting in the kitchen cupboard with a glass door.

    Reply
  518. Jodi Kennedy on

    I love the bright color pallet Frances employs with her garden blooms! Really gorgeous. And of course, the vessels are fantastic.

    Reply
  519. Jaime Stone on

    Thank you for this inspiring conversation between 2 inspiring women. Just what I needed ❤

    Reply
  520. Hayley Bartasawicz on

    I love Frances’s ability to use texture, colour, and simple shapes to create beautiful pieces of art. I am inspired by her dedication to her art and appreciate her words, especially as someone who has bouts of doubt about whether my art is good enough or worth pursuing.

    Reply
  521. Jaclyn C on

    I am inspired by Frances’s journey. She mentions finding her creative niche when she was 30 and the transformation of working in her house to having a whole barn space and two gardens devoted to her art. I believe a creative outlet is what my life is missing and look forward to the time in my life when I have the means to follow in her footsteps. I am inspired by both Frances and Floret alike in this aspect. Thank you for all you do and for sharing your story!

    Reply
  522. Jennifer Stewart on

    Wow! Frances Palmer is so committed to honing her craft. It didn’t happen overnight and 30 years later she is still learning new techniques with her wood fired kiln. I appreciate that she wants to encourage us to learn photography better to capture the spirit of our own art! Can’t wait to read this book- it looks beautiful!

    Reply
  523. Angela Darrah on

    I’m inspired by Frances’ enthusiasm for her new wood kiln and the opportunity to learn it presents. Her excitement is a reminder that even when you are a master at your craft there is always room for growth and creative exploration.

    Reply
  524. Penny Warner on

    She inspires me to pursue my creative side. I would really love to have her book!

    Reply
  525. Jt Covelli on

    As a gardener and collector of vessels for arranging flowers, I’m drawn to Ms. Palmer’s elegant style. Nature brings gentle imperfections and the asymmetry in some of her pieces feels right at home with flowers. I love the statement each piece makes in simplicity. I’m looking forward to the book so much.

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  526. Nicole on

    I love that Frances started pottery at 30 despite being artistic her whole life, that’s inspiring! We’re never to old to follow a passion. I love too that she combines her pottery with flowers and photography!!! Everything about this interview was inspiring, thank you for sharing a piece of yourself with us Frances and for introducing her to us Erin ♥️

    Reply
  527. Sally on

    Beautiful, gorgeous garden and pottery!
    Such beauty is an inspiration!

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  528. Mary Jo Allen on

    I love that although not a spring chicken any more, Frances is still learning and exploring her craft. Her love of life and her ability to create beauty inspire me. I am a retired professional photographer who also loves dahlias and creating artistic expressions of them through photographs.

    Reply
  529. Sarah on

    Frances comment about needing other women in our lives is so good! I love her work and she seems like a very interesting woman and wise woman as well.

    Reply
  530. Barbara Bujold-Martinez on

    Francis Palmer’s comment about claiming even a little space, a little time in one’s life to devote to creative processes rang true for me. In my early 60’s, I started throwing pots with 3 siblings at a nearby art center, enjoying this new way of connecting with family as we experienced the decline in our parent’s health. I was working full-time then, and those Tuesday evenings were precious. Our mother was happy to know that although we couldn’t visit her those evenings, she knew where we all were, and that we were together. She proudly displayed the beginner pots we created.

    Now that I approach the age of 70, I work at my old job occasionally, and pottery has grown in my life to include working in a group of potters with a wood-fired kiln. One of these friends gifted me 3 dahlia tubers 2 springs ago. As we slip into Fall here in Minnesota, I love how the dahlias distract me from the changes in weather that lie ahead, and keep me rooted in the beauty of each remaining warm day when another dahlia blossom may begin to unfold.

    While I am well aware that not all are in a position to retire from work, or take classes towards discovering a passion, I believe all have the ability to claim a piece of time to start a creative process, and with persistence, see it grow.

    The excerpts from Francis’ book are definitely inspiring!

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  531. susan on

    Thank you for this interview! Frances life and work is so encouraging. I love that she is still learning by reading the work of others. All creative interests tie together and influence each other. As a potter she took the Floret class to learn about growing a garden of flowers for her pottery and photography. Beautiful!

    Reply
  532. Ava Brock on

    I am inspired by Frances’ connection of art, nature and gardening. Cultivating beauty in the world is my passion. The suggestion to capture our creations with beautiful well staged photography, considering background and integration of more than floral pieces is exciting. It reminds me of the work of Kaffe Fassett, who I adore. Thank you for sharing this Erin.

    Reply
  533. Mary Ann Hartigan on

    Love the feel of freedom and ease in her pottery and floral arrangements; particularly the hand painted pieces in indigo blue on white!

    Reply
  534. Becca Fox on

    I love the simplicity of Frances’s photography, pottery, and arrangements. One tulip, in bud, placed in a striking porcelain vase is so incredibly eye catching and says so much more than a large, highly detailed flower arrangement. She is proof that you don’t need much (materials, money, etc) to create beauty- just hard work, good lighting, and bits from the garden.

    Reply
  535. Sally Morris on

    Erin you are always introducing me to new people and ideas. I am excited to meet Frances and the beauty of her work! The winter months are coming and it will be such a delight to have this inspiring book. I love her photography and the way she adds objects to echo colors in the arrangement. It takes it to another level of enjoyment!

    Reply
  536. Sandy Eilbes on

    I would love to meet Frances. Her pottery, photography and flowers are inspiring. Love that she shared her story with you. And that you shared it with your readers.
    You are very interesting and followed your dreams also.
    Thank you

    Reply
  537. Sissel Byington on

    How very inspiring! Thank you for introducing Frances. I’m looking forward to learning more about her and her process. Her pottery is exquisite. I also have spent a lot of time learning photography, and have recently been captivated by dahlias. I completely agree that learning photography trains you to see the world differently; you learn to spot “moments” and truly see the world’s light and love around us all the time.

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  538. Lee Seeger on

    Frances is a true Renaissance woman. She has managed to engage with multiple art forms (writing, photography, gardening, flower arranging, pottery) with ease. I love that she recognizes the value of studying other women artists. Ruth Asawa has been an influence in my life for many years. Her magical wire sculptures and her ability to rise above adversity has been inspiring for me. Now I have a new source of inspiration: Frances Palmer.

    Reply
  539. Bria Arauz on

    I’m so inspired by Frances recognizing her creativity and artistic talents all along, but knowing and trusting once she found her niche; showing a strong sense of self and patience.

    Reply
  540. Charlene Kagele on

    This is an inspiration for every artist! Her pictures tell so much of her story, amazing work
    and color…. Thank you for introducing her to all of us!

    Reply
  541. Annemarie on

    This interview with Frances’s was a reminder to me to follow my creative journey in whatever capacity I can and where it can feel overwhelming to get from A to Z with my vision, that in the movement forward the balance will shift naturally. I also am inspired by Frances where in a world were so many sacrafice their authenticity to be seen she stays true to her creative center.

    Reply
  542. Eileen Sproule on

    I especially was drawn to her commitment to nurturing her friendships. In a world that continues to isolate us emotionally and now physically too its even more important to cultivate and grow the friends who bring such balance and health to our lives. What’s the fun of being creative if you have no one to admire and celebrate with you? ☺️ Thanks for introducing us to Frances! She seems like a gem.

    Reply
  543. Robin O’Quinn on

    As I move into the later stages of my life, I’m 57 now, I feel an urgency to emphasize authenticity in all of its myriad forms. Frances is so obviously integrative; taking the focused visions she engages in her studio to everything she does in the rest of her life, from her photography to her conversations with friends and her hopes and dreams for her daughter. She reminds us that a life of purpose and beauty are always within our grasp if we come to each moment with the truths we glean from living in our own visions. Than you Frances.

    Reply
  544. Jeani ONeill on

    Frances’s dahlias are beautiful and the pottery is the jewel that encases them. Thanks for sharing.

    Reply
  545. Christine Lyon on

    I too have enjoyed making beautiful things with my hands from pottery bowls and woven baskets to knit socks. I have struggled for years with the idea of how to combine these artistic interests with my flowers and still paying the bills. Frances has found the glue that seems to hold it all together! I’m inspired and looking forward to seeing her book and would love to sit and chat one day!

    Reply
  546. Mary Calcasola on

    Passion for nature, and passion to release our spirit into the creative process is such a gift, we all have the ability to reach this goal, and it’s people like Frances and you Erin and the floret team that inspires me and many more to follow our passion every day, thank you! My spirit is flying 🦋

    Reply
  547. Jo on

    Thanks for this interview with Ms Palmer. As a painter who loves dahlias and pottery I am fascinated by her approach to creativity. I was reminded of a community college pottery night class I took the first year out of college. I was set on a career teaching and had no time to pursue a hobby, yet I delighted in building slab forms that, once fired, were useful and functional objects. She mentioned starting small, an hour a week. Maybe, 60 years later, I might try again.

    Reply
  548. Anyaa on

    I love that her heart leads in everything she does. I can’t help but smile and feel inspired by her work and the way she shares it through her photography. She makes love tangible.

    Reply
  549. brenda kodama on

    Her desire to always strive for excellence is quite inspiring. I love the table that is so beautifully set with fresh flowers and delightful goodies to eat. Thanks!

    Reply
  550. Melinda on

    I enjoyed the fallen petals in Frances’s photographs!
    It reminds us that every phase of life is beautiful and worthy of appreciation. Thank you.

    Reply
  551. SARAH on

    Frances’ words are so grounding. As I read through your interview with her, and as a creative, I am eager to read and experience her book, and be captivated by her version of creativity. My hope is that it will add to my own creative journey. Lastly, I am most excited to share this creative book with my daughter. My wish is for her to be touched by Frances’ Life in the Studio and add this experience to her own life as a creative.

    Reply
  552. C Duffy Lehrer on

    I love her vessel shapes and colors and how she has stayed true to her design. I also luv that she desires the female connection of strong women for her daughter. Life is about connection. Flowers are the purest gift of connection for one to another.

    Reply
  553. Nancy Haase on

    I absolutely love how her pottery works so well with the flowers – an extension of the arrangements! I have just started planting dahlias and am now hooked especially after seeing her creations! Thank you for sharing such a motivating artist 🥰

    Reply
  554. Sherry on

    Love that she has the beauty and grace of a light that shines on all of us that want to do more in the creative area. The colors and vase creations are magical and has bright my day

    Reply
  555. Olivia K on

    To see creativity portrayed in so many different aspects of one’s life is so reassuring. Artists often get portrayed as a single entity – potter, painter, pianist. But the truth is that creativity seeps into every aspect of our lives if we encourage it. With two small children and a full-time job in the middle of a pandemic, I rarely have time to stop and create something from whole cloth. Paying attention to small tasks in the garden and cooking dinner and carefully adding color to an online calendar help me keep the creative spark alive. Thank you for introducing Frances and her book to a larger community!

    Reply
  556. Chris Allen on

    Frances Palmers narrative dialogue so inspired me; my heart leaped within. A dream confirmed, small beginnings will lead to great things. Her passion for Ceramics, growing heirloom Dahlias and the Art of photography; blended and intertwined beautifully.

    Reply
  557. Heather Brunelle on

    Frances Palmer inspires to enrich oneself and others through creativity and beauty. Her story provides a vision for me as I embark on a path toward a more creative life.

    Reply
  558. Sarah VanOeveren on

    Frances’ words are so ground. As I read through your interview with her, and as a creative, I am eager to read and experience her book, and be captivated by her version of creativity. My hope is that it will add to my own creative journey. Lastly, I am most excited to share this creative book with my daughter. My wish is for her to be touched by Frances’ Life in the Studio and add this experience to her own life as a creative.

    Reply
  559. Mignon Fulton on

    I am inspired by Frances’ creative community and how her daughter has “other mothers” to go to for support and knowledge. I too have a tribe of wonderful women friends. This past summer my daughter interned with 2 of them at their architecture firm. To see her being mentored by influential and strong women was a proud moment for me.

    Reply
  560. Susan Rode on

    I am both inspired and relieved to read about France’s story and creative process. Her journey so resonates with me when she speaks about the creativity that moved through her and eventually found expression in her daily life. I can relate to the emotions of uncertainty, not be ready, finding time..and still being moved forward by the creative muse that lives inside one… Woman all over the world continue to create amazing expressions of artistic vision in their lives no matter what the circumstances…I find it both humbling and incredible exciting to be apart of that movement .
    Learning from other women’s stories who have forged their own paths in life to express their creativity and authenticity in their lives is also something that moves me in my own life. At 70, I am grateful for women like yourself, and Frances , who have built their dreams step by step to a creative life. Through many stories in my own life journey, it has been creativity that has freed me and given me solace during turbulent times. It is creative life that continues give meaning to so many women. It is a gift to have both you share your own journeys Thank you

    Reply
  561. Hunter S on

    I have tears streaming down my face… I hadn’t realized how much I needed to hear your story. Giving guidance, courage to follow my own dreams. Your photographs are a salve to my soul, thank you!

    Reply
  562. Mona on

    What magnificent pottery and floral designs. I continue to get inspiration to start floral gardening as a senior. I started clearing space in my yard for cutting flowers. Thank you Floret and Ms. Palmer.

    Reply
  563. Erin Geoffroy on

    Such beautiful pottery and such a beautiful cutting garden. I love the use of flowers to set off and showcase another line of work-pottery. It’s inspiring to see all the beauty flowers bring to life! Excited to read Frances’s new book!

    Reply
  564. Sarah M. French on

    I believe it is about finding courage, sharing and feeling a support. It is wonderful to hear her path and see her work!
    It gives me encouragement to step out and begin something new!!
    Thank you.

    Reply
  565. Jessica T. on

    What a beautiful and inspiring post! The photographs are gorgeous— I love the white porcelain with blue glaze and a single tulip! I am so encouraged by the idea of taking small steps to incorporate creativity in my life. As the mom of a bright and active 2 year old daughter, I also want her to have a community of creative and skilled women to look up to. Thank you for this post, I gives me much food for thought and—hopefully—action!

    Reply
  566. Carol Walker on

    The interview with Erin and Frances was inspiring. Too often I worry how to get started, how to please people in an order. I gleaned this: We learn from our mistakes. Jump in. Don’t be afraid of the unknown. Start slow and be patient with yourself and the process. Frances sounds like a wonderful mentor I would love to meet!

    Reply
  567. Keli on

    I love how she is using art to inspire her daughter and create community.

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  568. Alicia Condon on

    Frances’ beautiful use of color, light and form always inspire me!

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  569. Mimi Hildebrandt on

    I love her vases, the flowers she chooses, but mostly the messiness of the finished photograph.

    Reply
  570. Elizabeth Gerszewski on

    Wow! What a beautiful way to express creativity! I think the fact that Frances feels so at home with multiple forms of creativity is the most inspiring thing of all. So often I feel the pressure to focus myself into one form of creativity or another that I forget the beauty and freedom in pursuing many passions and how they all intersect. She uses ceramics, photography, and gardening to inspire the work she does in each other. I love that!

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  571. Robin on

    I’m inspired by her use of color. Everything is gorgeous.

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  572. Ingrid on

    What a beautiful story! I garden as therapy—-and also started pottery when I had tiny children. I love how her principals can be applied to all different artistic endeavours!!

    Reply
  573. Peggy on

    Thanks for introducing me to Frances Palmer! I loved to learn about her study the history of plants. (as well as ceramics) And her through research the flowers she uses. I love to know the history of things too. Also their symbolism and uses in the past and in different cultures, etc.

    Reply
  574. Lela on

    Thank You for sharing Frances Palmer’s interview. Her pottery is beautiful and the combination with the flowers are stunning! I look forward to holding her book in my hands one day with a cup of tea.

    Reply
  575. pam seaberg on

    Such an inspiration. I love how she pressed the flowers into the clay.

    Reply
  576. Angela on

    The pieces that Frances creates are heirlooms, each seemingly containing a story passed on to the new owner. As she said, it is her photography which gives each piece a life of its own. These still lifes are breathtaking. Her ability to represent and share story in these modes is fascinating and inspirational.

    Reply
  577. Lisa on

    I love that her work, creativity are two of my loves, flowers and beautiful pottery. I adore vases, always on the look out for appropriate ones. She’s designing with idea, focus on arranging and displaying flowers. So inspiring to see how she’s carved out a life of work around her loves and creativity. What a blest life!! Thank you for bringing her work and book to our attention. Thank you for sharing so many of her books with your following, kind and gracious of you!

    Reply
  578. Suzanne Gilbride on

    What an inspiring lady
    Just from your interview you would love to meet her and walk through her garden and studio
    There are so many inspiring people in the world that’s what needs to be on the news at night!!

    Reply
  579. Kathryn Smay on

    Love her passion and drive to do what she loves!

    Reply
  580. Dawn-Marie on

    Oh my goodness, I am blown away by the richness of the colors in her photographs! They remind me of still life paintings by the ‘old masters’.

    Reply
  581. Judy Anderson on

    Beautiful composition of form, texture and color in her photographs. Her pottery is really lovely. That first photo of the variously colored pottery is particularly spectacular.

    Reply
  582. Sheri Newman on

    I love what she said about her women friendships, that we need empathy and support but also truthfulness. I agree that we have to have a group that has permission to speak into our lives to keep us on track. How she blended her love of pottery, photography and flowers is fantastic. I am reminded that we must follow our dreams, no matter what age! 💕

    Reply
  583. Oishanu Dutta on

    I know people will notice the flowers first or even the beautifully smiling Frances first but the first thing that caught my eyes was her eye for pottery!

    It’s really a great idea to know how to do pottery because then you can create vases like you want and each one will be a little different and unique. I love her compositions 💚

    Reply
  584. Barbara Roloff on

    Frances really speaks to me. I appreciate the interview and love her story. I feel like there is this natural progression burning inside of me to do art, photography and grow more beautiful flowers. I am trying to create space in a small intentional way, but work gets in the way. I’m excited for a new chapter in life as I quickly approach my mid-50s. I would love to win a copy of your book, but if not I will definitely buy it. What a treasure.

    Reply
  585. Beth McLellan on

    Just reading the blog this morning is inspiring me! I have started taking photos of my flowers this year and I love the process and am almost always amazed at the final product. This is my first year growing cut flowers. Floret farm and their shared knowledge has given me tools and inspiration to grow amazing plants this year. Flowers are so inspiring to photograph. Creating the bouquets is like 3-D painting and then I get to photograph them working with light and backgrounds. All very soul-satisfying. I love reading about and observing others who create with plants and photos.
    My Instagram is mclellan.beth

    Reply
  586. Jillian Froebe on

    Referencing the experiencing of wilding when plants, insects, and animals that were on the verge of extinction reappear and flourish, I imagine Frances’ creative guidance as a parallel to that as aspects of self that have been dormant emerge in artistic expressions.

    Reply
  587. Alissa M. Kuzmich on

    As a mom of three young kids, I love the encouragement to keep at whatever inspires you, even small bits at a time. Art and gardening feeds my creative needs, but it is definitely in small bits right now. Her pottery, garden, and photography are stunning!

    Reply
  588. Jenny on

    It can be done ! If you follow your heart . Breathtaking work .; thank you for sharing . 💕

    Reply
  589. Rebecca Kitzmiller on

    Frances Palmer is committed to her art but is humble enough to seek truthfulness in friendship. Her work is beautiful and transcends time.

    Reply
  590. Leith on

    As a person who lives with ADD, I have many interests and potential paths, Frances’ work is beautiful; no doubt, but her path is what’s inspiring to me! She has many interests and has found a way to marry them in a cohesive way…I am looking for the same kind of marriage as creativity tugs at my soul daily and I try to prioritize how to spend my resources. Frances is an inspiration and guide; thank you :)

    Reply
  591. Raelene Rands on

    I love what Frances says about going with your gut when creating. Sometimes I will have a pile of leftovers after doing a bunch of bouquets for the stand. I will often have this gut feeling to use them to see what I can create. This usually pushes me to create something I originally never intended but yet it looks quite the opposite and its like it was always meant to be. I also appreciate what Frances says about doing your photos to capture your art the way you see it. For years I felt like a dreamer that would shift from one grand idea to another. Now that I have flowers in my life (yes I have grand dreams about flowers) I have a creative outlet. I’m way more settled or grounded when I’m able to create. This is how God made me and it’s taken time to realize that I’m a creative soul.

    Reply
  592. Barbara on

    So much talent, discipline, and common sense in one woman — and she continues to evolve, and to inspire even herself!

    Reply
  593. Kristi M. on

    Oh my goodness, this is so beautiful!
    With everything happening in the world we could all use more beauty and inspiration in our lives and this books pours out creativity that is truly lovely.

    Reply
  594. Janea on

    I appreciate her comment about reaching out to other women. She mentioned if we worked in a communal place we would all sit around and visit while we worked. I know that isn’t possible right now physically for many. Personally I have a standing Zoom meeting every Wednesday night from 6-8 for my friends to come and go as they can. We collectively work on our art together and enjoy being a part of each other’s life. We also have some of their kids and husbands that join in and they started to draw, paint, or make origami (one husband) as we worked in our projects. Many of us are creating cards and pictures to go to the nursing home residents and their care staff and to encourage them right now. Looking forward to when we can responsibly do it in person again.

    Reply
  595. Lynda Walker on

    I love her stunning creativity of pairing her love of flowers with her pottery. She nailed the importance of friends and other entranpeuners in her life. She is inspiring.

    Reply
  596. Marie Deforge on

    France’s dedication is inspiring. I love her suggestion about artists of all kinds learning to photograph their own work, as no one can convey it’s essence quite like the artist themselves.

    Reply
  597. Jessica on

    I love how she takes every day things and makes them beautiful. It makes me think every day is beautiful.

    Reply
  598. Katie on

    What a beautiful life story. I’m so encouraged by her reminder that taking even small amounts of time to discover and learn can be the launching place of so much more. I absolutely love her pottery and the way she uses her photographs to show their beauty along with gorgeous flowers.

    Reply
  599. Leslie Chan on

    I love her intention- like when she says she researches before choosing what she will plant. I like her individuality- like when she says she grew dahlias when they weren’t popular. I love that she wasn’t afraid to start something new in her 30s. Frances makes beautiful work.

    Reply
  600. Linda Ames on

    It is comforting to know that my journey is not a random as it appears. I always wanted to paint and begin by photographing flowers. Now my love is arranging flowers. Thanks you Erin for introducing Frances’s story. Creativity like love never ends.

    Reply
  601. Katy Lockhart on

    TWO of my icons have joined forces! I am a thrilled! I am a potter and an avid flower lover (recovered wedding florist here) and have been following both Erin and Frances for years. Isn’t it great when we inspire each other?
    I can identify with Frances speaking about “easing” into a creative life. A lot of times I can be hard on myself if I’m not spending enough time being creative, or only making pottery items that pay the bills. Cheers! I’d love to read the book! IG @fireflystudiospottery

    Reply
  602. Nancy Wiese on

    Reading about Frances and her creativity was a gift of grace this early morning. The beauty and feeling of joy transmitted by her passion and practice give inspiration to us all. I admire and appreciate her wonderful way of sharing her Art and true love.
    Thank you!

    Reply
  603. Kathy Settles on

    I would love to own a copy of Frances’ book as I am currently shifting my time and energy into more creative pursuits professionally, specifically with flowers, and would love to learn from her insights on trusting your creative process. I’m inspired by her use of color and form in her arrangements and how she sets us her photographs.

    Reply
  604. Diane on

    i’m inspired how Frances makes beautiful pottery and still has time to keep a wonderful cutting garden. Over the last couple of years i’ve discovered that dahlias are also one of my favorite flowers! I love how beautiful they look when everything else in the garden has just about ended for the season.

    Reply
  605. Lucinda LaFayette on

    I love that she suggests spending time with other creative women. I believe that helps to feed your own creativity.

    Reply
  606. Tiffany Hope on

    Very few artists have the courage to document and pull back the veil on the journey of their creativity. I would love a window into the heart of that journey, as it seems it would translate into so many types of media. The blend of creativity with pottery, flowers and womanhood is a call to my heart open the pages of this book and be inspired.

    Reply
  607. Laurie Dunston on

    I appreciate how Frances suggests getting started; being creative in your life and allowing the creativity to grow. Her photos as beautiful As her pottery. Beautiful art form!

    Reply
  608. Sandra Lee on

    What an inspiration of combining her love of pottery and flowers together…both are my favorites! I look forward to reading her book.

    Reply
  609. Susan Camp on

    The juxtaposition of color, texture, materials and light in the photographs is inspiring me. I love to design arrangements to give to someone who needs some peace in their life with items from my garden and items scavenged from nearby woods. Viewing these arrangements in their vessels is opening up a new way for me to loosen up and arrange. I’d love to see more.

    Reply
  610. Linda Kriss on

    Beautiful work. I just added her book to my Christmas list. Not only to have, but to give.

    Reply
  611. Penny Simmons on

    Oh, how inspired I am to continue to construct this convoluted path on which I find myself! At 53 I’d just completed a nursing degree right before Covid it, so have delayed the job hunt. In the meantime my sister, who just lost her job, and I are being tempted once again to try to flesh out and document the creative journeys each of us has longed to indulge for so long! Reading Erin’s and Frances’ stories is encouragement that a creative and soul-satisfying life of the creation of beauty is not only within reach of reality, but essential! Thanks, ladies, for the inspiration! Looking forward to pouring through your books over this winter!

    Reply
  612. Denise Kamo on

    Wow…great interview. Frances Palmer has distilled out the ingredients that make for a fulfilling life. She has integrated each of those ingredients into a lifestyle that fits in all that she has learned to do. Then she SHARES how to do this with her readers. Very inspiring!

    Reply
  613. Philipia Bates Renouf on

    I am inspired by Frances Palmer’s eye for beauty! Her photography is graphic and stunning. And her pottery!, I am coveting it now. Would love to read her book and learn from her years of trial and error of crafting her pottery.

    Reply
  614. Julie Bargman on

    She is constantly learning; about her art and herself and avenues to improve both.

    Reply
  615. Pauline on

    Thank you for this interview. I did not know the work of Frances and now you made me so curious! The book looks so yammie😁

    Reply
  616. Kathy on

    I love looking at her flower arrangements for new ideas. I can think of several friends for whom this book could be the perfect gift.

    Reply
  617. Bernadette Varner on

    Her photography is simply breathtaking, her work unique, and for me, part of the title of the book itself, inspires me the most, “inspiration and lessons on creativity”. We can all do with a little inspiration!

    Reply
  618. Berandette Varner on

    For me, part of the title of the book itself, inspires me the most, “inspiration and lessons on creativity”. We can all do with a little inspiration!

    Reply
  619. Janice Cox on

    Beautiful! Work & Thoughts. Thank you for sharing.

    Reply
  620. Nicola Burgess on

    I love her comment that it’s important for an artist to learn photography as no one will see your work like you do. True light bulb moment for me. Thank you x

    Reply
  621. Chanda on

    I love the focus to life this brings.

    Reply
  622. Kathy Jackdon on

    The unity of pottery making, flower-growing, and photography in Frances’ art. And her finding the balance for herself of working alone and intimate friendship.

    Reply
  623. Jane on

    Most inspiring to me was her affirmation that you can start by just doing your art a few hours a week. The transformation takes time, but it will happen organically.

    Reply
  624. Ingrid on

    A simple block of wood changed the focus from the beautiful dahlias to your artwork. Inspiration and so exciting to see! Thank you

    Reply
  625. Madelynn Powers on

    Sometimes you come across a persons story at exactly the right time. I’m a mother of 2 under 2, a potter and work full time in tech. I had a conversation with my husband last week about my dreams of living between my studio and the outdoors. He told me.to put it out in the universe and see what happens. I would love to hear more from Francis about patience, making room for creativity and the importance of community. Not to mention her stunning photography!

    I’m constantly inspired by Floret. One of the stories from your 12 scholarship winners has been a recent inspiration. Thank you for having thoughtful emails and meaningful content. ♥️

    Reply
  626. Emily on

    Frances’s photography is not only purely captivating in and of itself but the details tell such a beautiful story of her work and dreams. After reading your terrific interview with Frances, I am inspired by her dedication to her craft over the many years and how it has led her down other avenues — photography, gardening, writing. *A* dream does not mean one dream, it can take you to so many different places if you let it.

    Reply
  627. Mary Anich on

    Loved her comments of her need for women in her community.

    Reply
  628. Elizabeth Marchese on

    What an thoughtful interview with a peek of Frances’ insight and inspiration. Her book is definitely going on my must have list!

    Reply
  629. Jean Heestand on

    Besides her stunning pottery & photography, Frances gives us a great gift by her example of being a lifelong learner who listens to her heart & draws inspiration from those around her.

    Reply
  630. Jasmine on

    Love Frances’s thoughts on getting started in creative practices, setting a small amount of time each week rather than waiting until all the stars align. Her white earthenware is beautiful!!

    Reply
  631. Kady Dalrymple on

    I love her exuberance and passion for her craft and nature! It’s palpable, authentic and inspiring. Her advice comes from wisdom and experience. Thank you for this interview. I will make my way to Wave Hill to see her exhibit!

    Reply
  632. Tamara on

    As a 64 year old woman who has been an avid, yet distracted garden aficionado for 30, Frances inspires me to do more! I’m impressed with the richness of her color coordination, and the fullness of her subjectivity. I’m looking forward to reading, and giving, her book!

    Reply
  633. Jo Bailey on

    I am wholly inspired by Frances’ quiet confidence and conviction. Two very rare and wonderful qualities.

    Reply
  634. Marianne Radke on

    Frances’s articulation of the importance of other women’s voices in our and our children’s lives really stuck out to me. Also, the fact that she found her true medium of expression, pottery, at a later stage in her life is inspiring. I think that we come to think of our youth as our formative years, and neglect to honor our later years with recognition of their potential for creative evolution. A beautiful artist with an incredible repertoire of skills and advice for all.

    Reply
  635. Paula Bolash on

    I love when people build on everything they have known in their life and continue to build on it.
    As someone who is not an artist and have built on my knowledge of homeopathy,nutrition, midwifery etc.,I am inspired to turn my hand at a creative endeavor , as my daughter leaves on her own life adventures, starting with Floret’s course and now see how photography can be a nice complement as well.
    I am excited to see what the next 20 years can bring!

    Reply
  636. Katie on

    Frances is a true original. I’m inspired by the authenticity of her work and sense of self. She’s giving the word timeless and beautiful art. Truly enjoyed reading her interview this morning, while I mole over how I will show up in the world!

    Reply
  637. Pat Preib on

    Thank you for sharing this wonderful woman’s wisdom!

    Reply
  638. Alyssa on

    Her work is so beautiful. I am inspired most by how she combines skills – pottery, photography, and growing flowers – all coming together to make something unique and stunning.

    Reply
  639. Trish Podlasek on

    Immediately, I’m inspired by your conversation with Frances. It touches on similar aspects of my own life. I’m a graphic designer, watercolor artist and developing photographer. I am learning to capture my work the way that I want it to be viewed. “No one will see your art the way that you do” so true!

    Reply
  640. Morgan on

    It was so inspiring to hear she didn’t discover her interest in pottery until she was 30. So often we feel pressured to discover our purpose and find ourselves discouraged when we feel like we’re behind or not making any progress. It’s nice to be reminded that everything happens in its own time and that we should trust the process.

    Reply
  641. Lorilyn Wiering on

    Thank you for this interview. I am so inspired by how she has fully claimed her own life: her creativity, her way of seeing, her instincts. The life flowing through her is what we are made for, and I am inspired to keep following my own life’s energy.

    Reply
  642. AnnaMay Wilson on

    I love the calm I feel when viewing her art, enhanced by the kind of person she seems to be as reflected in her thoughtful answers. Great questions, Erin!

    Reply
  643. Annie on

    I like her recommendation on be in harmony our values « If you listen to yourself, that is the best guide, as instinctively, you know if something is right for you. It is when you don’t listen that things can go awry. » I also like her photography of her work.

    Reply
  644. Monica on

    SO many things inspire here! I love that she didn’t come to pottery until the age of 30. As someone who is attempting to shift careers at 41, hearing stories like this is really helpful and appreciated. Also, she appears to have truly found great success in following what she loves and in surrounding herself with beauty. Congrats to you, Frances!

    Reply
  645. Liv on

    What inspires me most… Hard to say! Her work is superb. I am absolutely inspired by her career shift, and her willingness to share her creative journey with the rest of us. I am that much more motivated to pursue my passion for growing now! Thank you for the great read. Can’t wait to get my hands on her book!

    Reply
  646. Kimberly Manning on

    Beautiful work! I’m inspired by how she found pottery and dove right in. It’s so important to be self aware and pursue what makes our hearts sing.

    Reply
  647. Donna Deal on

    I am looking forward to reading this book! It sounds like a gift of inspiration to follow your heart. The advice to start small with what draws you, and allow it to grow over time, is such kindness. And I agree about learning photography! It’s on my list. Can’t wait to read more.

    Reply
  648. Stephanie Pavlovich on

    I love the way her vases inspire arrangements. I feel I just can’t wait to start arranging when looking at one of her pieces.

    Reply
  649. Betty Carroll Fuller on

    I also an artist, a drawer and a painter living on Cape Cod, I create fairly large contemporary pieces. I also have worked creating floral pieces for weddings, etc.on a small scale to supplement my income. Her work is lovely and I especially love that the photos use flowers.

    Reply
  650. Karen Eldridge on

    Wow! Thank you so much for introducing me to this beautiful, creative woman and her work both on the pottery wheel and the garden. I can see by her photos that you are kindred spirits! What inspires me most is her encouragement to start wherever you are and see what might develop over time. I resolve to do just that with my own, currently small, creative hobbies.

    Reply
  651. E. TWETEN on

    France’s placement of 2 very beautiful objects together, is so smart, intentional and very gorgeous! It’s melding the best of both creative worlds, both of which begin with dirt. I love it, what an inspiration!

    Reply
  652. Laurette on

    What gorgeous arrangements! The pottery is fabulous, too. Thank you, Floret, for sharing so many talented women through your blog.

    Reply
  653. audrey norberg on

    Oh WOW! Yum yum yum! I just want more!Such beautiful shapes and colors and texture.I so wish I could wander around your lovely spot in this world.Thank you for sharing!

    Reply
  654. Teresa Milam on

    Francis’ photographs are incredible! They satisfy my love of floral art and of realism. While her pottery may be her medium, the arrangement of bouquets and photography of them are her talent! I’d love to learn about her creative process from her book. Thanks Erin, for introducing us to such an inspiring artist, and for all else that you do.

    Reply
  655. Jess on

    I would love to own one of her vases! As far as inspiration, I love the contrast of the bright beautiful flowers against the neutral white vessels. Gorgeous work.

    Reply
  656. Lee Ernst on

    I love Frances’s suggestion of starting by working a few hours a week as a way to get started.

    Reply
  657. Judy Marti on

    I love the photography, documentation of her work and her creativity!

    Reply
  658. Tracy Bauman on

    I love the layers that are involved in Frances’s work. As an artist myself I fully appreciate and understand that need to create. I love the idea and importance of being able to beautifully document your own work. What I found really interesting is I just read A Life Handmade a children’s book about Ruth Asawa to the children I teach. Although it did not talk about her encampment, it did talk about her life as an artist and the importance of creativity! I love the garden pottery, and photographic layers of artwork that France’s creates though a holistic approach, creating a more natural and relational approach to her artwork.

    Reply
  659. Karen on

    Wow! What a great interview with Frances Palmer. I cannot wait to read her book. I’m already inspired :)

    Reply
  660. Gaye McNair on

    These are beautiful and Frances sounds lovely! I’m surprised at how much I am loving all her white textured pieces. That makes me want to lean toward that clean look as the background to the color of flowers. And how wonderful to hear her speak from experience on remaining creative through the different seasons of a woman’s life!

    Reply
  661. Victoria Summers on

    Frances Palmer is a true inspiration to me. Her photographs and creative spirit has inspired me and I look forward to purchasing her book. At a time when many of us feel captive at home working , I like how Frances said all of us can be creative. It’s not all or nothing when it comes to art . Her spirit gave me the courage to set aside a small table and chair on my porch to do my drawing, painting and flower arranging. And Frances gave me permission to work as little or as much as I want and not feel guilty to spend some time on fostering My creativity .

    Reply
  662. Jiff Blansfield on

    I’ve reached a point in my life where there is a steady longing for a stronger alignment between my exterior working life and the promptings and values of my interior life. The fostering of such an alignment is fed through inspiration provided by women, like Frances, who lead lives devoted to creative expression. They function as North Star on this uncharted and intuitive path.

    Reply
  663. Jess on

    I am now inspired to pull out my camera and and photograph what I find beautiful around me! The colors and textures gave me such a boost as I started my day today…

    Reply
  664. Vera Foronda on

    Thank you for this inspiring interview with a true creative! I admire the advice to allow space to present itself even when unable to give up a means of support and “gradually, the balance will start to shift.” Frances is an amazing artist expressed in so many ways that can only come when inner truth is allowed to come to the surface.

    Reply
  665. Amy Maloney on

    Francis’s words on trusting your instincts are so true. In the world of social media and all of the information out there, so many people fail to trust their gut and create art (any form of art-visual, tactile, etc.) from their own mind and experience.
    I can’t wait to read the book and also recommend to my artistic (and curious) friends.
    Thank you for sharing this Erin.

    Reply
  666. Terri Shaver on

    Frances definitely has an eye for arranging flowers and creating the most beautiful still life settings! I’d love to win her book!!

    Reply
  667. Nathalie on

    Love your work. Can’t wait to get the book.

    Reply
  668. Sharon Hoskins on

    Thank you for highlighting a talented female artist. Frances Palmer’s work is clean and beautiful. I love that she encourages everyone to catalogue their work with pictures. I also love how she talks about how important at it is to have female friends. Please keep introducing me to more great and talented women!

    Reply
  669. Cathleen Smith on

    I love Frances’ obsession with Dahlias. I too fell in love with them many years ago in the mountains of North Carolina and have only recently begun to try to grow my own. I also appreciate her perspective on photography, which she has definitely mastered! Her photos are just beautiful! Frances seems to have found her inner child and cultivated a business that works for them both. I can’t wait to read her book!

    Reply
  670. Stacie Butler on

    Her work is exquisite! I love the variety of colors and styles. They make me want to keep a gorgeous flower arrangement on my table all the time!

    Reply
  671. Lorie on

    So much that we accomplish in life is a step by step process. As an older woman, I am inspired by Frances’ perspective about the best is yet to come and that we are never too old to pursue our creative dreams. Her photographs and pottery suggested to me a feeling of just being on the verge of harvest. Full flowers, rich colors, ripe fruits-the beautiful culmination of her creative work.

    Reply
  672. mb on

    So much beauty here! I can tell there is a ton of wisdom and inspiration in her book. I’m in awe of these photo! Also I really love book recommendations, so now I have 3 new ones on my list, including Frances’s!

    Reply
  673. Jodi A. on

    My favorite quote from Frances in this interview is: “ If you listen to yourself, that is the best guide, as instinctively, you know if something is right for you. It is when you don’t listen that things can go awry.” Frances inspires me to be still and listen to my inner voice when making tough decisions. Sometimes those decisions may not make sense to others, but in my heart of hearts I know I have to do what is best for myself. And by being my best I can give my best to others around me. Thanks Erin once again for sharing your platform to showcase another amazing woman!

    Reply

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